Photo by Melody

Recipes: Eq's lust list of recipes wanted

Communities > Forums > Recipes
bookmark
Forum: RecipesReplies: 122, Views: 730
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
12:21 AM

Post #4180129

Sort of continued from here-
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/787799/

Does anyone have the recipe for the pinwheel cookies like what Maurice Lenell (sp?)sells? I have a recipe for pinwheel cookies but it doesn't quite taste the same.

And what about a recipe for basic old animal cracker cookies? I have an old antique mold just for making animal crackers. Would love to try it out someday.

There was a recipe my grandmother made and she called it thumbprint cookies. She used to put a dab of home made jelly or jam in the middle and I think it had some sort of nuts in the recipe. Does this sound familiar to anyone?

Now I’m going to go back through notes and try to round up the names of recipes I’ve been meaning to find.
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

November 11, 2007
12:24 AM

Post #4180140

When my Mom made the thumbprint cookies, she just used a basic sugar cookie recipe---there is also this one that is tasty
http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Jam-Thumbprints/Detail.aspx
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2007
12:31 AM

Post #4180164

Sneaking this one in. Very unique cookie recipes on this page:

http://www.bakingdelights.com/2007/08/27/the-50-best-cookie-recipes-on-the-internet/

WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2007
12:31 AM

Post #4180166

Trying something here, hope it works:

Click on image to see recipe for
CHOCOLATE PINWHEELS



This message was edited Nov 10, 2007 6:34 PM

Thumbnail by WUVIE
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
12:44 AM

Post #4180232

Hey threegardeners, I think you hit that one on the head. I looked at that recipe and it's got walnuts in it. That's what I remembered. Thank you.

Hey Big W, That worked! What did you do, take a photo of your recipe book? Way to go!

Hmmm, I feel like a kid in a candy shop since I started this thread.

Would love to find these recipes-
-canned venison
-rosehip jelly (with instructions)
-spanakopita
-eggplant parmesan (very thinly sliced and could have been dipped in an egg batter of some sort before it was layered into the baking dish)
-Linguini with white clam sauce
-shrimp in lobster sauce (typical Chinese food style)
-crabmeat rangoon
-shrimp toast
-some sort of Asian devilled crab with cream cheese seved on a fan shell
-egg drop soup

Still looking for more but must make pit stop at Big W's last website!
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
12:47 AM

Post #4180248

Moving this over here- [quote] [QUOTE]And what about a recipe for basic old animal cracker cookies? I have an old antique mold just for making animal crackers. Would love to try it out someday.[/QUOTE]

Found a recipe, but thought it was odd to have included oats.

Not sure how old the recipe is, but it is printed, not copied,
so it has not been altered:

1 cup butter
2/3 cup sugar
1 egg
1 tsp almond extract
1/2 tsp salt
2 1/2 cups sifted, all-purpose flour
1 cup Quaker or Mother's oats (quick or old fashioned, uncooked)

Beat butter until creamy, beat in sugar gradually. Blend in egg,
almond extract and salt. Gradually add flour, mix thoroughly. Stir
in oats. Chill dough thoroughly.

Roll out on lightly floured surface to 1/8" thick. Cut out with floured cutters.
Place on greased sheets, bake at 350° 8 to 10 minutes.

When cool, decorate as desired. [/quote]

And yes, the quaker oats does seem sort of strange. I don't recall tasting any oats in the animal cracker cookies from the the little red boxes with the string handle.
Joan
Belfield, ND
(Zone 4a)



November 11, 2007
12:50 AM

Post #4180267

I've got the canned venision recipe.

Canned Venison

Cut meat into cubes and try to remove as much fat as possible. Chill the meat and pack loosely in jars, leaving 1" headspace. Add 1/2 tsp canning salt and 1 beef bullion cube to each jar.

Process in pressure canner:
Pints: 10# pressure for 75 minutes
Quarts 10# pressure for 90 minutes.

We really like it this way and the bullion takes away the wild taste.

I'll be watching to see if anyone has a recipe for shrimp toast. I LOVE shrimp toast, but haven't had much luck making it on my own.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2007
12:54 AM

Post #4180279

Found a site with several mentioning this was the
best Spanakopita recipe they have ever found:

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Spanakopita-II/Reviews.aspx?Page=2
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
12:54 AM

Post #4180281

http://nookandpantry.blogspot.com/2007/06/green-tea-cheesecake-white-chocolate.html

What is matcha? I'm not going to go running to Viv any more. I have no idea what matcha is and no sense wasting time trying to figure out what it is if somebody already knows. I don't think I've even seen the word before.
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
12:56 AM

Post #4180291

oops, typing while you guys were typing. Thank you Joan, I'll save that. Off to pick a spanakopita recipe now!
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

November 11, 2007
12:56 AM

Post #4180294

matcha
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matcha
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
1:14 AM

Post #4180346

Can you pulverize green tea and use that as a substitute?
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

November 11, 2007
1:20 AM

Post #4180370

You'd think so----
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
1:31 AM

Post #4180411

That's what I'm thinking.

I typed out Big W's Chocolate Pinwheel cookie recipe for anyone else who needs it-

Chocolate Pinwheels

Ingredients

½ C butter
1 C sugar
1/3 C packed brown sugar
1 egg
1-1/2 tsp vanilla
2 C all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
Pinch salt

Filling
2 C (12 oz) semi sweet chocolate chips
2 Tblsp butter
¼ tsp vanilla
Pinch salt

Instructions

In a mixing bowl, cream butter and sugars. Add egg and vanilla until light and fluffy. Combine dry ingredients; beat into creamed mixture. Divide dough in half; place each half between two sheets of waxed paper. Roll into 12” x 10” rectangles. Chill until almost firm, about 30 minutes. In a saucepan over low heat, melt chips and butter. Add vanilla and salt; mix well. Spread over dough. Carefully roll up each rectangle into a tight jelly roll; wrap in waved paper. Chill for 2 hours or until firm. Cut into 1/9” slices with a sharp knife’ place on greased or parchment-lined baking sheets. Bake at 350° for 7 – 10 minutes or untillightly browned. Cool on wire racks.

Yield about 9 dozen.

Back to poking around at her site!
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
1:43 AM

Post #4180449

This spanakopita recipe but go to the site to get the helpful tips from those who made tried the recipe.

Spanakopita II

INGREDIENTS
•1/2 cup vegetable oil
•2 large onions, chopped
•2 (10 ounce) packages frozen chopped spinach - thawed, drained and squeezed dry
•2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
•2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
•2 (4 ounce) packages feta cheese, crumbled
•4 eggs, lightly beaten
•salt and pepper to taste
•1 1/2 (16 ounce) packages phyllo dough
•3/4 pound butter, melted

DIRECTIONS
1.Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
2.Heat vegetable oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Slowly cook and stir onions until softened. Mix in spinach, dill and flour. Cook approximately 10 minutes, or until most of the moisture has been absorbed. Remove from heat. Mix in feta cheese, eggs, salt and pepper.
3.Lay phyllo dough flat and brush with butter. Place a small amount of spinach mixture onto each piece of dough. Fold phyllo into triangles around the mixture. Brush with butter.
4.Place filled phyllo dough triangles on a large baking sheet. Bake in the preheated oven 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until golden brown.

Some of the tips that I found helpful were-

[quote] I wanted to make larger triangles to have as a nice main course with a side salad. Took a little getting used to on rolling them up but let me give you my advice...I took 4 to 5 sheets stacked on top of each other. I buttered the top layer then placed about 1/2 cup of the mixture onto one end and just started folding it till it kinda made a triange...each time I folded it over, I place a tiny amount of butter on top, then buttered the top of the completed triangle. I also rolled them to make a rectangle and that worked out well too. It made about 12 of them! Either way you roll em, they are yummy yummmy!!!!!...PS...to get all the water out of the spinich, take a bunch of paper towels and place the spinich into it and squeeze the heck out of it. Make sure you're over the sink when you do it and be careful if the spinich is hot! [/quote]

[quote] Delicious spanakopita, be sure to use good quality feta to get that sharp 'bite' these should have. I did add a little garlic and a bit of fresh lemon juice to the mixture. I am giving this only 4 stars, not for the taste but for the directions. If one hasn't worked with phyllo, they would need more specific directions. Be sure to keep it covered with a damp cloth and only expose the sheets you are currently working with to the air. Otherwise they dry out and are impossible to fold, cracking and splitting. There are plenty of tips on the box and don't forget to allow for defrosting time! I also feel that the baking time is off. The trianles that I baked fresh were done in about 20", nice golden brown with bubbly filling. I also froze some and those took closer to 45" to be done. I doubled the recipe and took a platter to a baby shower and everyone enjoyed them. [/quote]

[quote] Delicious spanakopita, be sure to use good quality feta to get that sharp 'bite' these should have. I did add a little garlic and a bit of fresh lemon juice to the mixture. I am giving this only 4 stars, not for the taste but for the directions. If one hasn't worked with phyllo, they would need more specific directions. Be sure to keep it covered with a damp cloth and only expose the sheets you are currently working with to the air. Otherwise they dry out and are impossible to fold, cracking and splitting. There are plenty of tips on the box and don't forget to allow for defrosting time! I also feel that the baking time is off. The trianles that I baked fresh were done in about 20", nice golden brown with bubbly filling. I also froze some and those took closer to 45" to be done. I doubled the recipe and took a platter to a baby shower and everyone enjoyed them. [/quote]

[quote] Sep. 10, 2006
This may be the tastiest spanikopita I've ever had. The mixture was a little wet for using just one phyllo sheet per triangle. Next time I might use 2 sheets per triangle. The only modifications: I added 2 minced cloves of garlic to the mix, and 2 tbsp of chopped basil alongside with the dill. Simply amazing.
[/quote]

I'm adding those tips just in case somebody else is saving this to their hard drive too.

Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
1:50 AM

Post #4180477

I found another animal crackers recipe and it too has oats in it but no egg-

Animal Crackers Recipe
Ingredients:
1/2 cup instant oatmeal, ground up fine
3/4 cup flour
2 teaspoons honey
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup butter
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
4 tablespoons of buttermilk

You can use a mortar and pestle or a blender to grind up the oatmeal. Put the oatmeal in a large bowl. Add the honey, salt, flour and baking soda. Mix well. Cut in the butter with 2 butter knives. Add the buttermilk. Mix this together with a wooden spoon. Separate into 2 pieces. Get a rollingpin and roll the
dough out till is is very thin. Cut out the shapes with animal shaped cookie cutters. Place on a baking sheet and bake at 375 degrees F for 10-12 minutes.
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
1:57 AM

Post #4180498

Found another one for animal crackers. In looking at these, I think these are actual cracker recipes as opposed to a cookie recipe to plop in a mold. What do you think?

Animal crackers, and cocoa to drink,
That, is the finest of suppers, I think;
When I'm grown up and can have what I please,
I think I shall always insist upon these. Christopher Morley (1917)

3/4 cup (94 g) whole wheat flour
1/4 cup (35 g) cornmeal
1/4 cup (30 g) grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons (30 ml) dehydrated vegetable flakes
1 teaspoon (5 ml) baking powder
1/4 teaspoon (1.25 ml) salt (optional)
4 tablespoons (60 ml) cold reduced-fat margarine
1/4 cup (59 ml) skim milk
dash cayenne pepper (optional)

1. In a bowl, combine flour, cornmeal, Parmesan cheese, dehydrated vegetable flakes, baking powder, and salt (if using).
2. Using a pastry blender or two knives, cut margarine into flour mixture until it resembles fine crumbs. Make a well in the center and stir in the milk to form a stiff dough. Gather the dough into a ball and chill, wrapped in plastic wrap, for 15 minutes.
3. Preheat oven to 375°F (190° C). Roll out dough on a lightly floured work surface to 1/8-inch (1/2 cm) thickness. Cut out with small cookie cutters into animal shapes. Transfer cut out crackers to a nonstick cookie sheet. Prick surface with tines of a fork.
4. Bake 4 to 5 minutes, until crackers are lightly browned on the bottom. Using a wide spatula, turn cracker over and bake for another 3 to 5 minutes, until browned on the bottom. Cool on a wire rack.
5. Store in an airtight container.
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

November 11, 2007
2:02 AM

Post #4180512

These are actual cracker recipes---that one sounds good, Mom used to make them when we were young and money was tight.
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
2:05 AM

Post #4180523

Oh great, I think I just found it-
http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/new_york_city/entry/barnums_animal_crackers/

The earliest mention of animal crackers we have in print is this recipe from 1883:

Animals or Menagerie
1 bbl flour, 40 lbs sugar, 16 lard, 12 oz soda, 8 ozs ammonia, 6 3/4 gals milk."
---Secrets of the Bakers and Confectioners' Trade, J. D. Hounihan [self-published:Staunton VA] April 1. 1883 (p. 96)
[NOTE: this is professional cooking text. It does not offer any instructions regarding the shaping of these cookies. The author offers this interesting preface note on p. 89: "The following recipes are from threee of the best workmen in the business. One of them is at New York, another at Philadelphia and the third at Cambridge, Mass. They are all employed in the best bakeries in their respective localities, and I have their sworn affidavit that they are the recipes they are now working with, and the best known to them...I am not at liberty to give the names of the parties I have the recipes from, for reasons best known to myself and the parties"]

There we go- "1 bbl flour, 40 lbs sugar, 16 lard, 12 oz soda, 8 ozs ammonia, 6 3/4 gals milk."

Mustn't forget that ammonia listed above???


This might be a good possibility-
http://www.foodchannel.com/2005/05/recipe_search.html
[quote] Recipe Search

Concerned reader Nancy Parker asked Foodchannel.com, "I am looking for a recipe for a cookie just like the Barnum (Bailey) Circus Animal crackers. I want to make a cracker-like cookie...sturdy and a bit sweet..so I can make my own animal crackers at home. I can't seem to find one. Where should I look? I have already Googled it...the recipe was awful! If you know where I could look...I would be very appreciative!" [/quote]


1/2 cup sugar
2 egg whites
Pinch salt
1/4 cup melted margarine
1/4 cup flour
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter or spray a baking sheet. In a mixing bowl, stir the sugar into the egg whites; add the salt. When the sugar is fully dissolved, add the margarine, flour and vanilla and beat with a mixer til smooth. Drop the batter, 1 teaspoonful at a time onto the prepared baking sheet, spacing them 2- inches apart. Bake for 5 minutes, or til edges are browned. The cookies are warm enough right out of the oven that you can form them into shapes and draw designs in them with a toothpick.
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
2:07 AM

Post #4180529

Oops, typing when you were typing. I picked up this mold at a garage sale along with a bunch of cooking gadgets and gizmoes. It's all animals. It's really pretty. It has all the shapes of the animals that were in the original box of Barnum's Animal Crackers. I should go take a photo of my mold. It's really neat.
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

November 11, 2007
2:16 AM

Post #4180560

please, take a picture.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 11, 2007
2:28 AM

Post #4180603

bunch of Christmas cookies here:


http://www.northpole.com/Kitchen/Cookbook/
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
2:31 AM

Post #4180621

More than you ever wanted to know about Ammonium carbonate (a byproduct of hartshorn, a substance extracted from deer antlers [harts horn]. Hartshorn is most commonly referenced in old cookbooks in jelly recipes. It was also known a source for ammonia, which could be used as a leavener)-
http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodcookies.html

Took me a while but I figured it out- animal bisquits not animal crackers or animal cookies. These were originally imported to us from UK in those little boxes to hang on our Christmas trees as decorations... hence the little string handle.

225 g (8 oz) Be-Ro Self Raising Flour
100 g (4 oz) caster sugar
100 g (4 oz) butter or margarine
½ lemon, grated rind and juice
1 medium egg, beaten
DonnaB
Vancleave, MS
(Zone 8b)

November 11, 2007
2:35 AM

Post #4180648

Equil the best Pinwheel cookies I make are from Refrigerator Cookie dough. You can make any kind you want by dividing up a batch of dough. I also pack dough in a loaf pan since can't roll out dough anymore. Just make it in layers pressing into pan real good. dump out when chilled and slice down the middle lengthwise. Slice cookies about 1/4" thick

Refrigerator Cookie Dough

2 1/2 c. all-purpose flower
1 1/2 c. gran. sugar
1 c. butter softened
1 1/2 tsp. dbl acting baking powder
1 tsp. vanilla

at slow speed beat all ingredients until just mixed. At medium speed beat 3 minutes. Shape dough into rolls about 1 1/2" in diameter. Wrap in wax paper and chill 4 hours to 1 week. Slice 1/4" thick and place 1" apart on cookie sheet. Bake 375 for 8 minutes or until lightly browned. Immediately remove cookies to cooling rack.

Citrus Pinwheels

1 batch refrigerator cookie dough divided in half

mix 1/2 tsp lemon extract and 1/2 tsp yellow food color in half of dough

mix 1/2 to 1 tsp orange extract and 1/2 tsp yellow food coloring and 10 or more drops red food coloring to get desired orange color.

roll out each dough seperately between wax paper sprinkled with powdered sugar to about a size of 12" x 16". Remove top layers of wax paper from both and invert together. (I find it is much easier if you chill each layer before inverting together.)
remove top piece of wax paper and roll doughs up together from long side. Chill until firm and slice 1/4" thick and place 1" apart on cookie sheet. Bake 350 12 to 15 minutes until just lightly browned. Remove cookies to cooling rack immediately.

Neapolitan Cookies

1 batch refrigerator dough divided in 3 parts

to 1 part of dough add about 1/2 to 1 tsp strawberry flavoring and enough red food color to make it red

to another part add 1/2 tsp almond extract and some finely ground almonds or walnuts. leave dough white

to last part of dough add 1 square of melted unsweetened chocolate.

place either strawberry or chocolate dough in bottom loaf pan and press to fill bottom of pan evenly. Next layer the almond dough on top and then last layer on top of it. It is easier to remove from pan if you line it with wax paper. Chill several hours. Remove from pan and slice down the length. Cut cookies 1/4" thick placing 1" apart on cookie sheet. Bake 350 for 10 to 14 minutes or until lightly browned.

I also do this one in chocolate and mint with finely chopped nuts in the chocolate part. Since you will be dividing the dough in 1/2 instead of 3 parts use 1 1/2 squares of unsweetened chocolate

With this dough you can do anything or flavors you want. It is one of our most favorites. Your imagination is your only limit with this dough





This message was edited Nov 10, 2007 8:39 PM
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
2:45 AM

Post #4180704

Sorry, still had my nose in google when you all were posting.

TwinLakesChef- WUVIE beat you to that Northpole site in the thread we came from. Great site. Great minds must think alike.

DonnaB- goodie! Another one for me to try! I remember my grandmother rolled hers in red sprinkles before she baked them. The sprinkles were only around the edge. Looked just like the Maurice Lenell cookies.

threegardeners- here ya go! I only paid a couple dollars for it. I'll need to know how to clean it up properly as well as how to season it before I use it. It doesn't look all that old now that I have it in my hands but it sure has been laying around for a long time.

Thumbnail by Equilibrium
Click the image for an enlarged view.

threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

November 11, 2007
2:48 AM

Post #4180716

Wow---what a find!!
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 11, 2007
2:48 AM

Post #4180720

I second . . what a find! What is the material it is made of?
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
3:01 AM

Post #4180763

I'm not a metal person. Best guess is cast iron based on the weight of it and I must admit I was curious myself so I licked it before I took the photo and it tasted just like cast iron dutch ovens we have.

I also bought a really old corn bread whateverthosethings are called deals. The corn mold is in the shape of 5 or 6 corns but I don't believe it is made out of cast iron. It's much larger and much blacker than this mold and not nearly as heavy. Don't ask me to take a picture of that as I have no idea where I put it after I took everything out of all my kitchen cabinets and reorganized while deep cleaning about a month ago. It's here, somewhere. Haven't a clue where.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 11, 2007
3:32 AM

Post #4180841

Ok oil it well and it will do good.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2007
3:46 AM

Post #4180881

Ooh, love all these recipes, and that animal mold, very neat!

Did you by chance surf Ebay to see if a similar pan with more
details was featured? Very interesting pan and recipes.

I'll be quoting Mr. Morley often. ;-)
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
4:53 AM

Post #4181122

Looking for these recipes-
-rosehip jelly (with instructions)
-eggplant parmesan (very thinly sliced and could have been dipped in an egg batter of some sort before it was layered into the baking dish)
-Linguini with white clam sauce
-Ratatouille

I am told these sites are good for Chinese recipes-
http://www.chinatownconnection.com/chinese_recipes.htm
http://www.mit.edu:8001/people/wchuang/cooking/Chinese_n_Japanese.html
She said there was a good crispy duck recipe here-
http://www.asianonlinerecipes.com/online_recipes/china/china.php
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
4:57 AM

Post #4181130

Oops again. I let that last post sit while I was doing something else. I didn't check eBay. Haven't been there in a while and I already have the animal cracker mold. I don't want to sell it. I sort of like it.

Yes, the Morley quote was cute. That's why I left it in. I like little things inserted like that.

I still need to sit down and dig out that list I had started of recipes I wanted. Maybe tomorrow.
Maxine
Western, WI
(Zone 4a)

November 11, 2007
4:37 PM

Post #4182043

Lauren, do you have the old Betty Crocker cookbook from the early 50'th?
The thumb print cookie that you requested is in there. Have made them since I was married in 54. My Betty Crocker cookbook was a wedding gift and our 2 girls were so used to it, had to find them each one by crusing auctions and garage sales.
Let me know if you don't and I will post it for you.

Maxine
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2007
4:49 PM

Post #4182076

Hi Eq,

No, I'm sorry, I meant checking Ebay to see if there is a similar
mold. Sometimes those selling the same information may provide
a company name or other bits of research. If so, one can further
research the company and may come up with recipes, dates, etc.

I'm just a stickler for information and love to research. :-)

KM
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
5:31 PM

Post #4182196

No Maxine, mine's from 1978 but it's my staple. It's got a recipe for Thumbprint cookies in it that I used a few years ago. See if it matches yours please-

Thumbprint cookies
1/4 C packed brown sugar
1/4 C shortening
1/4 C margarine
1 egg, separated
1/2 tsp vanilla
1 C all purpose flour
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 C finely chopped nuts
Jelly

Heat oven to 350... blah blah blah.

When I tried this recipe, it didn't taste right for some reason. Maybe it was because I used store bought jellies and jams but something was not right.

That book does have a good spritz recipe though.

Since you're here ;), canihaveyourjellyrecipepleaseprettyplease. I'll need directions too. Better yet, wanna come stay with me and teach me how to do things right? My husband can take yours out and they can go and do guy things.

No WUVIE, nothing like it on eBay. Just checked. Also tried to check outside of eBay for the original or reproductions and came up empty handed. This is about the closest I could come and it's not even cast iron and they didn't include a recipe. I'm pretty sure I hit the recipe on the head once I figured out the history of Barnum's Animals. It's a bisquit not a cracker or a cookie.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/landing.jsp?go=DetailDefault&id=5809

That site is kinda neat.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2007
6:11 PM

Post #4182282

Ah, a bisquit indeed. Love all these recipes and sites you are sharing,
many thanks!

Found the thumbprint cookie recipe in my file this morning:



Thumbnail by WUVIE
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
6:40 PM

Post #4182377

Hey! Where's the basic dough recipe found on page 75? Check yours out and see how it compares to what I used please. Just curious why mine didn't taste all that great. Or at least to me they didn't taste the way I remembered when I was little.
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
6:55 PM

Post #4182419

I found what appears to be two decent Ratatouille recipes-

First recipe-
INGREDIENTS:

2 medium eggplant, peeled and diced
2 medium zucchini, diced
2 large bell peppers, diced
2 yellow onions, peeled and diced
4 carrots, peeled and chopped
6 cloves of garlic chopped
1 cup sun dried tomatoes
¼ cup of olive oil for sautéing
1 cup of stock
3 sprigs of fresh basil

Place eggplant cubes in a large bowl of salted water. Let set for about 15 minutes. Drain water and squeeze water out of eggplant pieces, being careful so they retain their shape.

Heat a large saucepan or Dutch oven on medium-high heat and add olive oil. Sautee eggplant, zucchini, bell peppers, onions and carrots until nice and caramelized (about 7-10 minutes), stirring occasionally. Throw in the garlic, stir and cook for about 3 minutes or until garlic begins to soften. Add broth and sun dried tomatoes, reduce heat to low, scrape the bottom of the pan and reduce liquid until vegetables are nice and stewed (about 15-20 minutes). Season to taste with salt and pepper and serve topped with fresh basil.

Serves 4 with leftovers – and you WANT leftovers as this dish tastes better and better the longer it sits.

Second recipe-

2 bay leaves
2 tsp garlic powder
Fresh black pepper to taste
1/4 cup canola oil
1 medium eggplant
1 large onion
2 medium green peppers
2 yellow squash
2 medium zucchini
2 medium tomatoes
1-1/4 cup canned tomato sauce

Peel eggplant, zucchini and yellow squash in "stripes" leaving half of the skin on the vegetable. Cut eggplant into chunks (cubes) and place in a bowl of cold water for 10 minutes. Then drain. Cut tomatoes, green peppers, zucchini and yellow squash into chunks and chop onion into smaller pieces. Heat oil in medium skillet. Saute chopped onions for a few minutes, then add remaining vegetables, bay leaf, garlic, salt and pepper. Saute mixture for at least five minutes over medium heat. Add small can of tomato sauce and stir occasionally for another 15 minutes. Serve warm.

While I was at the site that had that second ratatouille recipe, I also found two more that look good that I know we like here at home-

Spinach Pasta Primavera

2 tsp romano cheese
1 Tbsp fresh basil
1/4 cup chopped asparagus spears
2-1/2 oz frozen peas and carrots
1/4 cup raw, yellow squash
1/4 cup raw zucchini
1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes
1/2 cup cooked spinach egg noodles
2-2/3 oz fat free vegetable broth
1 tsp butter light, salted
2 oz fat free ricotta cheese

Cook spinach egg noodles and set aside
1. Heat a pot of water to boiling
2. In a blender, combine ricotta cheese, vegetable broth and butter, mix until pureed
3. Pour in a large soup pan and set on low heat just to keep mixture warm
4. If water is boiling, add asparagus, zucchini, squash and peas and carrots
5. Cook vegetables for 2-3 minutes, drain, then pour vegetables in pan with puree mixture
6. Add cooked pasta, sun dried tomatoes, basil and romano cheese. Ready to serve

And-

Squash Medley

2 tsp olive oil
2 oz can sliced mushrooms, drained
1 medium onion
2 medium zucchini squash
1 medium tomato

Wash zucchini squash and trim both ends. Slice squash cross-wise into thin slices and reserve. Wash tomato and cut into small wedges and reserve, separately. Peel outer layer of onion and thinly slice into rings. Over medium-high, heat oil in a medium skillet and add onion slices and cook until they are tender. Add squash slices, cover and cook for an additional 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add tomato wedges and sliced mushrooms to skillet and continue to cook mixture covered for an additional 5 minutes. Transfer vegetables to a serving bowl.

I can now cross Ratatouille off my lust list as both of those look good.

WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2007
6:58 PM

Post #4182443

Oh my gosh, do I feel like a bimbo. LOL

Coming right up, dear lady! :-)

BASIC DOUGH RECIPE

1/2 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla
2 1/4 cups all purpose flour

Beat butter and shortening 30 seconds on medium
speed. Add sugar, powder and salt. Beat until combined,
beat in egg and vanilla last. Beat in as much of the flour
as you can with the mixer, using a wooden spoon by hand
to mix in the rest if needed.

Refrigerate dough for up to three days or freeze up to one month.



This message was edited Nov 11, 2007 1:08 PM
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
7:00 PM

Post #4182453

Looks pretty much the same as mine. Think the butter v. margarine could have made that big of a difference in taste? We normally use butter around here not margarine anyway but around the holidays, we buy margarine for the people who won't use butter.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2007
7:00 PM

Post #4182454

SPICE DOODLES

Using basic dough recipe:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=4182443

Mix 2 Tbl sugar and 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice in a bowl.
Roll dough into 1" balls, roll in sugar mixture to coat. Place
balls 2" apart on ungreased cookie sheet, bake 10-11 minutes at 375°.

Makes about 40.

Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
7:03 PM

Post #4182459

I've never heard of spice doodle cookies before. Cool!
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2007
7:07 PM

Post #4182469

Eq, just my humble opinion, butter instead of margarine makes
all the difference. I do understand the health concerns, but as long
as one only indulges now and then, I think butter is better. ;-)

BRANDIED CRANBERRY DROPS

Using basic dough recipe:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=4182443

...and the following:

1/2 cup dried cranberries, chopped or whole
1 Tbl brandy or orange juice
2 Tbl finely chopped candied ginger
Brandy Icing

Heat oven to 375°. Combine cranberries and brandy or orange juice.
If you already have the basic dough ready, simply add the mixture and
the ginger to the dough, mix well.

Drop by teaspoon onto ungreased sheet 2" apart. Bake 8-10 minutes.
When cool, drizzle with Brandy Icing. Makes about 30.

BRANDY ICING

Stir together 1 1/2 cups sifted powdered sugar, 2 Tbl brandy or milk
(Brandy makes a fabulous flavored drop!) and 1/4 tsp. vanilla. Add more
brandy or milk until of drizzling consistency. If preparing in advance, you
can freeze the cookies without the icing, then thaw & drizzle on day of
serving.



TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 11, 2007
8:37 PM

Post #4182735

CLAMS AND SPAGHETTI
Serves 4

¼ cup butter
2 to 4 cloves garlic, minced (depends on your preferences and size of garlic)
½ cup fresh chopped parsley
½ tsp. Salt
2 7 ½ ozs. Minced clams and juice
¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 lb. Fine spaghetti or linguini, cooked

Saute garlic in butter, add parsley and clam juice, BUT DO NOT ADD CLAMS.
Cook for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add salt, clams and cheese. Stir clam mixture into hot cooked and drained spaghetti.

This is my best friends recipe who is an accomplished chef; however I do believe I embellish on this recipe; just haven't found my version yet.
Equilibrium

November 11, 2007
9:23 PM

Post #4182885

I prefer butter anyway. Actually; all of us do so unless a recipe calls for it or unless we're having family or friends over who prefer margarine, I only buy butter.

Oh wonderful! Thank you TwinLakesChef! I can scratch off Linguini with white clam sauce! Please let me know if you come up with your notes.

I have been potting plants on and off all day and never did go rooting around for other recipes I wanted but here's what I'm down to right now-
-rosehip jelly (with instructions)
-eggplant parmesan (very thinly sliced and could have been dipped in an egg batter of some sort before it was layered into the baking dish)
-some sort of Asian devilled crab with cream cheese served on a fan shell
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 11, 2007
10:41 PM

Post #4183143


here is the basic recipe for Eggplant Parmesan, I usually slice them thinner than this, probably only 1/4 to 1/3 inch and depending on whether we are working on lower carbs, I have browned them with only an egg wash and no breading. (Not as much crust to absorb oil, and then become soggy also.) I only fix about half this much and sometimes used a prepared marinara.

Parmigiana di Melanzane

2 medium-sized eggplants -- washed and cut into
1/2 inch (1 cm) slices
1/2 cup bread crumbs -- (125 ml)
1 tsp dried oregano -- (5 ml)
1/2 cup all-purpose flour -- (125 ml)
2 eggs -- well beaten
6 Tbs olive oil -- (90 ml)
3 cups marinara sauce (see below) -- (750 ml)
8 oz mozzarella cheese -- (250 g) thinly
sliced
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
Marinara Sauce
4 Tbs olive oil -- (60 ml)
3 cloves garlic -- finely chopped
16 sprigs fresh parsley (leaves only) -- chopped
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
4 cups plum tomatoes -- (1 L) drained and
coarsely chopped
1 Tb dried oregano -- (15 ml)
6 anchovy fillets (optional)
2 Tbs tomato paste -- (30 ml)

Sprinkle the eggplant slices lightly with salt and place on paper
towels for 30 minutes to drain. Mix bread crumbs and oregano on a
plate. Dry the eggplant slices, dust with flour, dip in beaten eggs,
and cover with bread crumb mixture. Heat the olive oil in a skillet
over medium heat and saute the eggplant slices until medium brown,
about 5 minutes per side. Place a thin coating of marinara sauce in
the bottom of a baking pan large enough to hold the eggplant in a
single layer. Arrange the eggplant slices on the sauce. Place a
slice of mozzarella on top of each eggplant slice and sprinkle with
the Parmesan. Cover with the remaining marinara sauce. Bake in a
325F (165C) oven for 20 to 25 minutes. Serves 6 to 8.



Marinara Sauce
4 Tbs (60 ml) olive oil
3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
16 sprigs of fresh parsley (leaves only), chopped
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
4 cups (1 L) plum tomatoes, drained and coarsely chopped
1 Tbs (15 ml) dried oregano
6 anchovy fillets (optional)
2 Tbs (30 ml) tomato paste


TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 11, 2007
11:29 PM

Post #4183315

deviled crab with cream cheese I can come up with but what is a fan shell?
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

November 11, 2007
11:30 PM

Post #4183320

Isn't that when they serve it in a real scallop half shell or something?
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 11, 2007
11:32 PM

Post #4183335

Blend Together:
1 8 oz pkg. Softened Cream Cheese
1/3 cup Mayonnaise
1 tsp. Prepared mustard w/ horseradish or more to your taste
1 ½ T. dried minced onion
½ tsp. Seasoned salt

Fold in:
1 T. chopped parsley
dash of garlic powder
1 6 oz pkg. Wakefield King Crab Meat, thawed and separated into small chunks

Serve with raw veggies
Serve Hot or Cold
Makes 1 ¾ cup


(Old Wakefield Crab recipe) Wakefield is no longer around.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 12, 2007
12:00 AM

Post #4183471

If one were about to serve, maybe a fan shell could be
made with a timbale iron?

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 12, 2007
12:10 AM

Post #4183500

This is from my Betty Crocker cookbook, dated 1954. I've used this for years. Last year, I filled them with a dab of Nutella and raspberry jam. Mmmm.

Thumbnail by meezersfive
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Joan
Belfield, ND
(Zone 4a)



November 12, 2007
12:27 AM

Post #4183567

Hey Lauren, on your newly updated list above, you forgot the shrimp toast! :=)

Or did I miss where someone posted a recipe? I'll go back and look again.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 12, 2007
12:56 AM

Post #4183676

Butter is better for flavor, but cookies spread more while baking if you use butter. I use half shortening/half butter, even though it galls me to do so. Not for everything though, these are fine with butter, but peanut butter cookies, snickerdoodles, and other drop cookies need the shortening to keep them compact. Adding more flour just makes them dry and icky.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 12, 2007
12:59 AM

Post #4183690

Meezers, on the note of cookies spreading, do you (or anyone
reading, please) have any suggestions for a recipe best for cutouts?

It is always disappointing to cut out cookies with fine detail only to
find the finished product looks like a parade blimp.

KM

;-)
Joan
Belfield, ND
(Zone 4a)



November 12, 2007
1:08 AM

Post #4183738

I make cut-out cookies for nearly every holiday for the people at work because they love my recipe. Which reminds me, I haven't made them the fall leaf cookies yet this year. :)

Cut Out Sugar Cookies

2 cups powdered sugar
1 cup butter
1 tsp. vanilla
2 eggs
1 cup shortening
2 tsp cream of tartar
1/2 tsp salt
4 cups flour

Mix all together, divide into the approximate amount for one roll out and form them into balls. Wrap in plastic wrap and chill for at least an hour. Roll out each ball 1/8 inch thickness on a liberally floured surface. Cut into shapes and carefully transfer to ungreased baking sheet. Bake 350 degrees for 8-11 minutes, depending on how hot your oven runs.

I frost them using a powdered sugar, white vanilla, butter, cream frosting. I make a big batch of frosting and divide it into smaller bowls and color them in different colors, depending on the holiday. (Sorry, I don't have a recipe for the frosting, I just dump everything together and add enough cream to make it frosting consistency.) The frosting sets up enough so you can stack the cookies a couple layers thick, but not so much that it's hard as a rock when trying to bite it. Sometimes I use different flavorings other than vanilla too, but we all like vanilla the best. However, I've kept the white vanilla in and added a drop or two of peppermint for Christmas cookies.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 12, 2007
1:27 AM

Post #4183831

Shrimp toast. Is this what you were looking for?

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Daddys-Shrimp-Toast/Detail.aspx
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 12, 2007
1:33 AM

Post #4183857

Rosehip Jelly. This sound right?

www.recipelink.com/mf/20/653
Joan
Belfield, ND
(Zone 4a)



November 12, 2007
1:34 AM

Post #4183863

Thanks Pepper! It's not quite the same as I've had, but it might turn out to be better. I'm printing the recipe now and I'll make it soon. I have a can of crabmeat that I'll use, and I think I may have shrimp in the freezer, unless one of the kids has been here recently *shopping*. If not, I might even try these tomorrow.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 12, 2007
1:36 AM

Post #4183868

No problem!! I'm not doing anything I love looking up recipes.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 12, 2007
1:56 AM

Post #4183934

Joan, you're a doll, thank you!
Equilibrium

November 12, 2007
2:01 AM

Post #4183947

Whoa, I go to divide and pot up a few more plants an lookie what kind of goodies are waiting for me!

Looks as if I can cross two more off my list! Yay! Thank you Edens_Gardeners, thank you TwinLakesChef, thank you JoanJ, thank you Meezerssix (couldn't resist), and thank you pepper23!

Yes threegardeners, it was served in a real scallop half shell. Really looked pretty.

Couple questions first for TLChef- I am pretty sure I saw piemento (could have been red pepper) in that deviled crabmeat type deal as well as finely minced carrots and broccoli. If I take a picture of it in the shell this coming week and take a picture of it smushed out on my plated do you think that would help? Also too, we were talking about it and we're all pretty sure it had shredded cheddar cheese mixed in and then on top.

pepper- I have never canned before in my life. I couldn't tell you if that's the right rose hips jelly recipe or not. I noticed there were three different rose hip jelly recipes at that site. Matter of fact, I don't think there is a right one or a wrong one out there because people have different taste buds. Have you ever made jelly before? If you have, I'm jealous. One of those things I always wanted to learn how to do before my Grandmothers, Aunts, and my Mom passed away who all knew how to can and make preserves.

Hey Joan, really sorry... so many threads and I lost track of which one you were in. Here is the shrimp toast my girlfriend found for me hot off the press as of last night-
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=4181501

Say whaaaaaaaaat, does everybody but me have the good Betty Crocker cook book from 1954? I feel so deprived.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 12, 2007
2:04 AM

Post #4183957

Now you have me wanting to look up the dates on our BC books.

Hubby managed to get away with a very old copy of "The Joy of Cooking"
in his divorce. :-)
Equilibrium

November 12, 2007
2:44 AM

Post #4184057

Don't have The Joy of Cooking. I do have quite a few really neat cookbooks that I inherited when my oldest brother passed away. So many that I'm overwhelmed actually and I keep them for sentimental reasons. I've flipped through many of them but keep reverting back to my Betty Crocker.
Equilibrium

November 12, 2007
5:12 AM

Post #4184411

Does this recipe look as good as any for Sourdough Bread-

Sourdough Bread

Dough
3/4 cup (6 ounces) warm water (95-105° F)
3/4 teaspoon (0.1 ounce) fresh yeast
1 1/2 cups (10.5 ounces) Sourdough Starter
1 1/2 cups (7.3 ounces) all-purpose flour
1 1/4 cups (6 ounces) whole wheat flour
1 tablespoon (0.5 ounce) salt

For the Sourdough Bread, combine the warm water and fresh yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer. Stir to dissolve the yeast fully. Add the Sourdough Starter, flours and salt. (NOTE: If refrigerated, bring Sourdough Starter to room temperature before using.) Mix on low speed until the dough is fully developed. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl. Roll the dough into a smooth ball and place in a medium mixing bowl lightly brushed with olive oil. Cover and refrigerate for 16 hours. Remove the bowl from the refrigerator and ferment at room temperature for 6 hours.

Divide the dough into 2 equal pieces and form into loaves. Places the loaves on the counter or in a proofing basket and cover with a warm, damp cloth. Proof the loaves at room temperature for 2 hours. Preheat the oven to 400° F. Continue proofing the loaves at room temperature for 1 hour.

Score the loaves with a sharp knife, spray with water and bake for 30 to 40 minutes, or until the crusts are a deep golden brown and the middle of the loaves is 190-200°.

Remove the bread from the oven and place on a cooling rack for 30 minutes. If the bread was baked in loaf pans, remove the bread from the pans before cooling.

Note: For more intense sour flavor, extend the refrigeration time of the dough an additional 6 to 8 hours.

For the starter, a friend suggested this and he said it was easy-
[quote] Making sourdough starter is easy. Here's how I do it.

I choose a damp, overcast day, not rainy but perhaps foggy or misty.
This serves three purposes: the lack of sun and dampness keeps the
culture medium (flour and water) from drying out; insect activity is
greatly diminished during that type of weather, so there is much less
likelihood that an insect will land in the mixture; the damp air seems
to carry the yeast spores and lactobacillus bacteria better, and the
spore and bacteria laden mist settles into the medium.

I mix a little flour and water to make a pancake batter consistency, and
place a dish or bowl of that outside in the damp air for a few hours
(2-6 hours).

Then I bring the dish inside, cover it with a cloth or loose lid so that
it can "breathe," and watch what happens over the next 10 days or so.

Two things can happen: 1) some pretty white or green or yellow or pink
mold will grow on the surface of the mixture, in which case it can be
thrown out; 2) Naturally occurring environmental yeast spores and
lactobacillus bacteria (which is what gives sourdough its tart taste)
will grow in the mixture, and their coexistence supports both but
inhibits the growth of any other kind of mold or other microorganisms.
At that point you have a healthy sourdough culture.

The culture will become bubbly and active. Add a little more flour and
water every few days as the culture needs to have more food. If you
don't plan to use the growing culture soon, or if there is a lot of time
between uses, you can put it in the refrigerator where it will really
slow down (although it's still growing and reproducing) and you won't
have to feed it as often.

When you want to make sourdough bread, use a cup or two of the starter,
but make sure you always save some so you can add more flour and water
to it, to grow more culture for the next batch of sourdough bread. [/quote]
Equilibrium

November 12, 2007
6:14 AM

Post #4184480

Just remembered a stuffed trout recipe would be nice. I've had that a few times with a sauce that was rather tasty.
Maxine
Western, WI
(Zone 4a)

November 12, 2007
11:26 AM

Post #4184654

Equil: Heres your recipe. very good!

1/2 cup soft shortening [half butter] I used all butter
1/4 cup brown sugar [packed]
1 egg yolk
1/2 tsp. vanilla
Mix above ingredients thoroughly

1 cup sifted gold medal flour[ what else would you use?]
1/4 tsp. salt
Sift together and stir in.

Roll into 1" balls. Dip in slightly beaten egg whites. Roll in finely chopped nuts [3/4 cup]
place about 1" apart on ungreased baking sheet and press thumb into center of each.
Bake until set. Cool--Place in thumbprints a bit of chopped candied fruit, or sparkling jelly
or tinted confectioners sugar icing.
Temp. 375
Time bake 10 to 12 minutes [watch closely as they burn real easy]
amount about 2 doz. 1 1/2" cookies

Very trust worthy recipe and yummy!!

Maxine
Maxine
Western, WI
(Zone 4a)

November 12, 2007
11:32 AM

Post #4184658

Wouldn't want you too feel deprived Lauren, so I will start looking for you a 1954 Betty Crocker cook book. Mine is getting so beat up from using all these yrs.

Meesers: your's looks 100% better than mine. Must have been those kids using it.
Rule at our house was, if you baked them you could eat as much as you wanted, but their had to be on a plate for the following meal for everyone to enjoy.
Never had a problem with kids wanting to bake. Our boys can cook and bake as well as the girls.

Maxine
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 12, 2007
12:01 PM

Post #4184693

A couple choices for Stuffed Trout that sound good.

http://allrecipes.com/Search/Recipes.aspx?WithTerm=stuffed+trout

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 12, 2007
12:55 PM

Post #4184784

This isn't my original copy. Youngest absconded with the '55 edition, food stains,missing pages and scribbles included. I found this copy in a second hand shop that had a bookcase full of old cookbooks. It's not quite the same, there's no index at the beginning of each section, and you have to hunt for the cookie, or whatever you are looking up. Recipes are still all the same though. I have about 40 cookbooks but this is old faithful and I use it often.

There's an early edition available...
http://product.half.ebay.com/Betty-Crockers-Picture-Cookbook_W0QQtgZinfoQQprZ1578940
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 12, 2007
12:58 PM

Post #4184795

OK, I must have been brain dead:

"some sort of Asian devilled crab with cream cheese seved on a fan shell"

I misread originally and gave you a dip recipe; if it is "deviled' we've got to have some cracker crumbs and eggs in there; think of crab cakes only made more liquid, looser so they can't be formed into a cake so you have to put the mixture into a shell or individual baking dishes and bake.

Do you have a picture of the dish; where did you taste it? a restaurant?
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 12, 2007
1:07 PM

Post #4184822

Oh, yes. And DO take a picture; we'll figure it out.
Equilibrium

November 12, 2007
1:20 PM

Post #4184859

Hey Pepper, thank you. I found a few more-

1 cup yellow cornmeal
4 (8-oz) trout fillets such as lake (preferably) or rainbow trout
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/4 lb baby spinach, any coarse stems discarded
1/2 stick (1/4 cup) unsalted butter
1/4 cup pine nuts, toasted

Put cornmeal on a large plate. Lightly pat fish with paper towels and season with salt and pepper, then coat fillet well with cornmeal.
Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large heavy skillet over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then sauté one third of spinach, stirring constantly, until slightly wilted but still bright green, 15 to 30 seconds. Transfer cooked spinach to a bowl. Sauté remaining spinach with remaining oil in same manner. Season with salt.

Wipe skillet with a paper towel, then heat 2 tablespoons butter over moderate heat until foam subsides. Increase heat to moderately high and sauté two fillets, skin sides down first, turning once, until golden brown and just cooked through, about 4 minutes (do not clean skillet). Repeat with remaining butter and fillets, then reserve browned butter in skillet.

Divide spinach among plates and top with pine nuts and fish, then drizzle fish with browned butter.

Cooks' note:
• Toast pine nuts in a shallow baking pan in a 350°F oven until golden, 5 to 10 minutes.

And another-

Mushroom-Rice Stuffed Trout

1/3 cup [80 mL] sweet butter
2 onions, chopped
3/4 cup [190 mL] long grain rice
1 1/2 cups [375 mL] fish stock or chicken broth
1 pound [454 g] mushrooms, minced
3 tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
3 tablespoons [45 mL] freshly chopped parsley
2 tablespoons [30 mL] lemon juice
Salt and pepper

Into a casserole, melt half of sweet butter; cook onions until translucent.
Well mix in rice, until all grains are well coated with butter mixture. Pour in fish stock or chicken broth; bring to a boil. Cover casserole; lower heat and simmer slowly for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, into a frypan, melt remaining sweet butter; cook mushrooms until all liquid has evaporated. Mix in chopped tomatoes; cook for 5 minutes more. Mix parsley/mushroom mixture into rice mixture. Sprinkle with lemon juice; salt and pepper, to taste. Leave to cool.

And this trout stuffed trout

1/2 tablespoon salt
1/2 tablespoon white pepper
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/4 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
1/2 large white onion, pureed
1/3 stalk celery, pureed
1/2 lb melted unsalted butter
2 cups breadcrumbs
1 lb cooked skinned and flaked trout

Cook the 1 pound of trout, remove the skin and lightly flake the meat with a fork.
Don't mush it up. Combine all ingrediants, mix lightly until the bread crumbs absorb all of the moisture. This makes your stuffing. Place enough of the stuffing into a the whole trout to fill it, but still allow it to be closed. This recipe made enough stuffing for about five 12 ounce trout. Bake, at about 350 convection or 400 conventional until the internal temp is 160 degrees.

Hey Maxine, If you do find one I'll pay for it. Makes sense to teach boys to cook just as you would girls. Same deal goes with teaching them how to do the laundry. Our boys all know how to cook the basics and they're just now learning how to do their own laundry.

Hey meezers, I'd like one from the 50's when I was born. Preferably the one that you are all using.

Hey TLChef, on Wednesdays we go to a restaurant where they serve King Crab Legs. It's a seafood restaurant but most of the staff are Chinese and so are the cooks. I did ask them for the recipe and they tried but their English is not so good. I figured if I couldn't figure it out myself, I'd just ask them to write it out in Chinese and I'd have my girlfriend translate it to English the next time I see her. Yes, I can get pictures this Wednesday. Never thought to photograph my plate but what the heck!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 12, 2007
2:19 PM

Post #4185074

There are several 50's edition on that link, and additional ones on the bottom of the page, on Ebay.
Equilibrium

November 12, 2007
2:50 PM

Post #4185189

Maxine! Don't buy one for me. I just found out eBay and Amazon have them and a seller on Amazon has one that looks just like this that could be added to my current order for Behavior-modifying Chemicals for Insect Management and Windborne Pests and Diseases (ya I know, my reading material isn't exactly like everybody else's) -
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=11104&item=120180983308

If that is what your 1954 editions look like, I could have my own copy within a week. He's got it and would be more than happy to ship it to me with the other two books.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 12, 2007
4:01 PM

Post #4185427

Yup that's it. I don't think they changed the cover design, until maybe the 60's. That's a pretty good price considering the condition. I saw some others on half.com that ran a bit more but were in better shape. Mine seemed hardly used at all, but the pages are very yellow. That's a tradeoff for no food stains.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 12, 2007
4:36 PM

Post #4185542

OK; this is where I would start-this has NOT been tested; let's see your picture the next time you go to the restaurant. A lot of your decisions will be based on what "Asian" flavors you detect that YOU like. I didn't add it into the recipe but a small amount of Asian Fish sauce would give it more character; just don't go overboard with it; you want it present but should not be able to detect its distinct flavor.

Equilibrium's Asian Deviled Crab

2 tablespoons onion, chopped
2 tablespoons celery, very finely minced
1/4 cup diced red bell pepper or jarred roasted peppers
3 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons flour
1 dash lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
3/4 cup milk
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 dash cayenne (definitely Asian)
salt and white pepper (drop the salt if you add in Asian Fish Sauce)
1 egg, beaten
1/4 cup bread crumbs
1 pound jumbo lump crab meat

To make it more Asian stir in fresh chopped cilantro or basil; You could add a little sesame oil to the initial 3 T butter.
2 tablespoons parsley, minced

Panko bread crumbs (Asian; crispier than regular) mixed with fresh shaved or shredded Parmesian Cheese; you could mix cheese into the main igredients if you wished; if you mix it with the bread crumbs I would bake at a lower temperature so the cheese does not get rubbery.

Sauté the onion, celery and diced red bell pepper in butter until they are translucent. Blend in flour and stir on low heat until flour has a chance to cook a little. The mixture will be a little foamy. Add milk and stir with a wire whisk. Add the lemon juice and all seasonings.

Beat the egg in a bowl with 1/4 cup milk.
Stir in a little of the hot sauce to the egg and milk mixture; then add the mixture to the sauce in the pot. Add the crab meat and parsley. Reheat, stirring to blend well.

Spoon into greased shells or ramekins and top with Panko crumbs or finely crushed cracker crumbs if you don't have Panko available.

Bake in a 350-degree oven for 15 to 20 minutes or until browned or 325-degree oven for 30-45 minutes

Won't be near a store in a while but next time I go will pick up the ingredients to test this; there are always adjustments to be made.

Now you know the thought process I go through when I attempt at designing a new recipe.




Edited to add that some grated ginger might be good in this also.


This message was edited Nov 12, 2007 2:55 PM
Equilibrium

November 12, 2007
4:59 PM

Post #4185590

I'll get some photos. No way could I come up with anything like what you just did above and your recipe may very well end up tasting better than the one I want. I do know that they said they used Philadelphia Cream Cheese in their recipe. That much I could understand.

Meezers, I'll let him know to ship the book to me. I'm not paying anything for it. He's just tossing it in to get rid of it because he likes to stick to scientific publications. Oh happy day!
Maxine
Western, WI
(Zone 4a)

November 12, 2007
5:04 PM

Post #4185602

Will take a picture of what mine looks like later. That is not my cook book cover.

Maxine

Just got back from the dentist again. Had a molar tooth pulled 10 days ago and ended up with a dry socket which they said didn't happen on the upper jaw. Well, guess what??
Started with a root canal and crown, but the original dentist cracked one of the roots, so everything had to come out. Price of tooth, too dang much!! over $2000.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 12, 2007
5:29 PM

Post #4185667

Ow Ow Ow I feel your pain, done the whole nine yards. Now I have uppers from Monkey Wards, and nothing hurts. I wish I had all the money I've put into my mouth.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 12, 2007
5:32 PM

Post #4185676

Meezers,

Don't mean to be nosy, but are you saying you bought
dentures from Montgomery Ward?

:-) KM

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 12, 2007
5:33 PM

Post #4185682

LOL, just kidding, got them from my dentist...but I bet if they had them someone would order them!!
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 12, 2007
5:36 PM

Post #4185688

Oh, phew! LOL. I was really feeling bad for you, I couldn't
imagine department store toofers. ;-)

One of these days, I swear I'm going to find a denturist able
to make teeth for ladies. In our area, you get a basic mouth of
teeth that look like they are square, belonging to an old man.

Reminds me of the commercial for Dymo labelers. LOL

(Sorry to get off track re: Recipes)

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 12, 2007
5:41 PM

Post #4185703

Yeah, I'm due for an upgrade, and I think I'm going with the new female dentist in the office where I go. I think mine look squarish too.
Equilibrium

November 12, 2007
6:15 PM

Post #4185768

Gosh Maxine, really sorry about your dry socket. You be careful now and don't let any temperatures go unreported to your doctor. I hope they have you on antibiotic.

(sigh) They said mine were in too good of condition to go with dentures. I just keep thinking of all the money I spend in my mouth and want to puke. I'd much prefer to just have them all ripped out right about now. I'm convinced I'd save a ton of money in the longrun.
MaVieRose
High Desert, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 12, 2007
7:20 PM

Post #4185920

Crab Rangoon
http://www.starportfoods.com/crab_rangoons.htm , http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Crab-Rangoon-I/Detail.aspx , http://www.absoluterecipes.com/seafood/crab-rangoon.html

Shrimps in Lobster Sauce http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Shrimp-with-Lobster-Sauce/Detail.aspx , http://www.cyber-kitchen.com/recipes/Shrimp_Lobster_Sauce.htm , http://www.dvo.com/recipe_pages/chinese/Shrimp_with_Lobster_Sauce.html , http://www.recipezaar.com/181825

Egg Drop Soup
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_drop_soup , http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,1977,FOOD_9936_25560,00.html , http://www.billybear4kids.com/NoSalt-LowSalt/recipe-egg-drop.html

egg drop soup is so simple and easy: check measurement on posted links: when i cook, i never measure, which is why so difficult to share recipes.
heat water or any stock of choice.
in a bowl, beat egg.
when water or stock begins to boil. lower stove fire to low.
stir the stock and prepare to slowly drip the beaten egg. serve warm
sprinkle with chives or green onions prior to serving.

some people like egg drop soup thick: make a slurry of 1 tbsp water to 1 tbsp cornstarch. mix well till cornstarch dissolve. . add to hot soup. will thicken naturally. Enjoy!
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 12, 2007
8:55 PM

Post #4186207

Another thought for your deviled crab:
However, it wouldn't have the consistency that the other recipe would have. I still vote for the first one.
When you tasted it, did it have a creamy consistency or more like a dip (mayo . . cream cheesy)?

1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil
1/2 medium red bell pepper, seeded, chopped (about 1/2 cup)

1 cup mayonnaise or maybe could be 1/2 c mayo & 1/2 c cream cheese
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese (about 1 1/2 ounces)
1/4 cup thinly sliced green onions
1 Tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 tsp minced jalapenos ( vary to your taste)
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
8 ounces fresh crabmeat, drained, picked over
1/3 cup slivered almonds (about 1 3/4 ounces)

Preheat oven to 3 75 F. Heat 1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil in medium nonstick
skillet over medium-high heat. Add chopped red bell pepper and saute until light brown, about 3 minutes. Transfer pepper to large bowl.
Add mayonnaise, Parmesan, green onions, Worcestershire sauce, jalapeno, lemon juice and celery salt to bell pepper. Stir to combine. Gently mix in crabmeat. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer mix to shells or ramekins. Spread evenly. Sprinkle with almonds or fine cracker crumbs. Bake until top is light golden brown and bubbly, about 30 minutes. Serve warm.
Maxine
Western, WI
(Zone 4a)

November 12, 2007
10:41 PM

Post #4186472

This is a pic. of my beat up Betty Crocker cookbook. Wouldn't trade it for anything.

Maxine

Thumbnail by Maxine
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gloria125
Greensboro, AL

November 12, 2007
10:53 PM

Post #4186503

Cleaning cast iron pots and pans. Especially found one's from the flea market.

Run through the self- cleaning cycle of your oven. Season with crisco.
Rub all over the pot, then leave it in the oven while you cook something on low. Or, overnight with a pilot light.

Never eat Crisco, but its good for seasoning pots and pans.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 12, 2007
11:29 PM

Post #4186628

good tip
Equilibrium

November 12, 2007
11:35 PM

Post #4186652

Hey Maxine, I think I just got the 1950 one. The cover of the cookbook being sent to me does not look like yours. The one from 1950 has got to be better than the one I have.

Say whaaaaaaaaaaaaaat? I can't eat Crisco? Tell me it ain't so!

TLChef, I couldn't take it anymore. I drove to the restaurant and asked them for one to photograph. They took me in back. We're talking nobody speaks English back there. I have photographs for you. Our normal waitress told me that the cook said he put shrimp in it today but last week he put chicken in it and sometimes he puts crab in it. He also said no broccoli last week but broccoli today and sometimes he puts carrots in it. He held up two containers. One looked like some sort of a restaurant sized mayonnaise and the other one looked like a restaurant sized Philadelphia creamed cheese. I take it both of those go in the recipe. I looked very close at the filling and I don't think the red thing is piemento any more, I'm thinking it's bell pepper.

Here's the first photo-

Thumbnail by Equilibrium
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Equilibrium

November 12, 2007
11:36 PM

Post #4186655

Here's a macro image of the filling in the shell-

Thumbnail by Equilibrium
Click the image for an enlarged view.

TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 13, 2007
7:35 AM

Post #4187934

I am leaning toward my second recipe but why don't you try both. It looks more oily, like a dip rather than creamy, like my first recipe. I really would consider having them write it out in Chinese and have your friend translate it.
Equilibrium

November 13, 2007
12:51 PM

Post #4188216

I got to looking at both of your recipes and the first one strikes me as something that might go really well on smalle pieces of toast as an appetizer. The second recipe looked to me to be something that would be really great as a filling for stuffed mushrooms. I'm leaning toward the first recipe right now for an appetizer for Thanksgiving dinner.

Question for you, how do you come up with recipes? I have a girlfriend who used to sit down at a piano and the music would come to her and then she'd play it and write it down later. Do recipes just appear to you and then you write them down later> I could never create a recipe or music.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

November 13, 2007
1:39 PM

Post #4188332

Equilibrium: I don't know about other people, but I have sort of an inventory of "tastes" in my head. When stomach says "lunchtime", I sort through the list. As you go along and make a choice, others are automatically eliminated. For example, recently I was given a recipe for Brocolli Salad, (from Sharran). As you are chopping the broccoli, the next item comes into your mind > red onions. Well, I don't have any red onions. How about red grapes. The dressing is supposed to be ranch dressing. Well I don't have any ranch dressing, so how about a mix of sour cream and Smart Promise Omega Three mayonaise. And what for crunch? The recipe says, bacon bits. Well, I don't have any, and besides Im vegetarian. But I do have Betty Crocker Imitation [Soy] bits. Well. That wasn't the recipe I was given. But it tastes pretty good. But now Im thinking, what about walnuts? What about smoked pumpkin seeds? What about croutons? What about some finely chopped dried pineapple?

So that's how it goes for me. In fact, everytime I don't have something that is SUPPOSED to go in a recipe, you take it off in a new direction.

... Rhapsody in Broccoli.

gloria

Equilibrium

November 13, 2007
2:34 PM

Post #4188529

I totally lack in the creativity department but admire people who have that gift.

For me, cooking is a lot like my potting mixes. The potting mix for Tacca is very different than the potting medium for Nepenthes alata which differs from the potting mediums for other Neps and the potting medium for Paphiopedilum Norita Hasegawa Hybrid which differs from the medium I use for other Paphs and I have lists and lists of precise potting mixes right on down to the species/cultivar. I'm pretty anal about my plant mixes just like I'm anal about my recipes. I don't normally wing it by substituting and that's probably because I'm not comfortable deviating from what has worked for me or in this situation... tasted good to me. (sigh) I'm just not adventuresome and definitely lacking in the creativity department.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

November 13, 2007
2:39 PM

Post #4188546

Its just so hard to believe. I doubt that a non-adventurous person would even be growing those plants!
Maxine
Western, WI
(Zone 4a)

November 13, 2007
3:18 PM

Post #4188685

Equil, please translate to words I can understand on what you are growing.
Don't think I lost out on brains when they were handing them out??

Maxine
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 13, 2007
4:31 PM

Post #4188893

Designing new recipes is a bit difficult because there are so many already out there to use as a starting point and then alter to your preferences-why reinvent the wheel? A recipe is just a starting place.

Starting from scratch is a different sort of thing . . . my own original recipes were designed mostly out of need . . . I have an inspiration of what I want the end product to be like and can't find a recipe that meets the need.

Or in doing a bridal luncheon I decide I want to do the salad more unusual . . . a tomato is the vase . . now what to put in the arrangement . . . enoki mushrooms, chives (like spikes in a flower arrangement) mixed greens poked in like fern filler, an edible flower or two. That being said, a real knock-out dressing to make it worth it. Want it pretty but if the flavors are not there, then it loses.

texture, flavors that work, eye appeal, come to mind. The more you experiment, the better you get at it. (and my poor DH is the recipient of the trial and errors). They have to have his stamp of approval.



TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 13, 2007
4:36 PM

Post #4188905

LOL guess I can get very anal about cooking. I once spent several weeks experimenting with cabbage rolls until I came up with my favorite concoction.

In fact when someone mentioned putting some saurkraut right into the meat mixture here on Dave's I had to go out and get the ingredients and try it.

The most unusual thing I did with the cabbage rolls was to cook a tomato mixture on top of the stove with a lot of fresh grated ginger in it; a litttle brown sugar, a little vinegar, some flour to make it very thick. Pour over the cabbage rolls and bake; when done there is a nice thick gingery sauce that we love.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

November 13, 2007
4:37 PM

Post #4188907

TwinLakes: I think you have just described the artistry of food.

For me, Im more concerned that my food is healthy than beautiful. But if it is not beautiful also, it can soon get boring. So if you cook to meet only one criterion, you are missing a major part of the action.

Thanks for that perspective.

gloria
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

November 13, 2007
4:40 PM

Post #4188921

Is there are recipe for those cabbage rolls? i never did get those, or the grape leaves right.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 13, 2007
4:55 PM

Post #4188979

LOL Maxine.

In brief, Eq is saying that some recipes call for salt, some don't.

;-)
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

November 13, 2007
5:12 PM

Post #4189044

Gloria, there is a recipe for those cabbage rolls. It is on one of the Comfort Foods threads here in recipes.

WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 13, 2007
5:33 PM

Post #4189108

When I lived in California, I made eggrolls all the time, and
this thread reminded me of how much we loved them. I'll see
if I can find my old recipe.

MMM!
Equilibrium

November 13, 2007
5:42 PM

Post #4189149

Fellow gardeners! A recipe for cabbage rolls I can do. I come from a long line of cabbage roll lovers but... as was said by TWChef- why re-invent the wheel? Check this out this contribution from KatG-
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=4050652
[quote] Tonight’s batch:

2 heads of cabbage
1 large can of diced tomatoes
1 large bottle of tomato juice
½ green pepper
A couple sprigs of fresh dill
1 jar of sauerkraut

Filling:

1 ½ lbs of ground Chuck
1 lb of ground Pork
1 large Onion diced fine
2 cloves garlic crushed
About a teaspoon of Rosemary
About a teaspoon of Oregano
About a teaspoon of Paprika
1 1/2 cups of nearly cooked long-grain rice
A small handful of sauerkraut
Pepper
Salt

Boil a big pot of water and take the cabbage and score it around the core so that the leaves fall off easy. Put the cabbage into the water and let it simmer and then peel off the leaves as they get partially cooked.

Combine all the Filling ingredients and mix well (hands are good for this)

Trim off the hard core part of the cabbage leaves. Lay them flat and fill with about 3 tablespoons of meat/rice filling (for larger leaves – use more, but don’t overstuff). Fold the bottom of the leaf over the meat, take the left side and roll tightly and tuck in the top. (like an eggroll)

When they’re all rolled, pierce each one with a small knife so that the juices can be absorbed.

To assemble:

Line the bottom of a large pot with leftover cabbage leaves (prevents burning) Sprinkle a handful of diced tomatoes over these and start layering the cabbage rolls. Put a thin layer of Sauerkraut over the cabbage rolls and another sprinkling of tomatoes and repeat this process until the pot is full.

Pour the tomato juice over everything until it’s just barely covered. Sit the Green pepper and sprigs of Dill on top and simmer for about 2 hours!

The scent is incredible – In fact…Mine are nearly done now and I just have to do a testing! LOL

Kat [/quote] She also has a good recipe for latkes somewhere in that thread that looks like a duplicate of the one my family uses, scroll down to below the Cabbage Rolls recipe-
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/772736/#post_4050652

For me, I don't particularly care about presentation of food. I only want it to taste good and be some semblance of healthy- quantity helps too. I so hate it when somebody doles our a portion that is for a six year old because I know darn well I'm going to leave looking for something else to eat on the way home. Red meats are pretty much history in our home these days unless added to a casserole, soup, or side dish.

Maxine- threatened and endangered plants that are native to the US, carnivorous plants, and orchids. That pretty much sums up what I love to grow and I am very picky about how I grow them. Other than that, I'm pretty much a native plants person save the spattering of tropicals inside my home. A gross over exaggeration but I guess the best way to describe the potting mix analogy would be that you wouldn't want to plant a Tacca (extremely fussy plant that I kill all the time) in a mix meant for a cactus and in the same vein of thought, you wouldn't want to be making substitutions in a recipe lest you risk having a bunch of hungry people sitting around the table suppressing their gag reflexes. Best for people like me (who aren't all the creative or adventuresome) to stick to what's in print that has served others well. Not a good idea to start experimenting when you've got a house full of hungry guests coming just as it's not a good idea to start experimenting when you have a little Nepenthes cutting that just cost you $100. Like I said, I'm not all that adventuresome with food or plants. It's one of many personality flaws I have because I guess if a recipe calls for salt... there's a reason why the recipe called for salt although I may not fully understand what that reason is. Just call me the boring direction follower who is too chicken to experiment.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 13, 2007
5:47 PM

Post #4189173

[quote]I so hate it when somebody doles our a portion that is for a six year old because I know darn well I'm going to leave looking for something else to eat on the way home.[/quote]

Too funny! Too true! It always makes me laugh to see someone
on those fancy cooking shows put hours into a two inch square of
food with squiggles and a piece of grass on top.

Is that a meal or a tidbit for the hamster? LOL.
Equilibrium

November 13, 2007
6:17 PM

Post #4189292

It's no secret, I like to eat which is why I like to cook when the gardening season is over. I sort of got bored with cooking the same things over and over again and then I sort of got sentimental and was longing for some of my old family recipes that I lost which was one of the reasons why I started this thread.

Also too, don't everyone laugh too hard but...
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/789958/

Proof I am frequently not the brightest crayon in the box given almost everyone in that group is from the deep south- home of the best southern Bible belt sweet potato pies on earth but when one is dumb... one pays. Here's hoping somebody has a prize winning recipe they can share with me so I don't have to hear about how I told them all I had it in the bag in the years to come.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

November 13, 2007
7:21 PM

Post #4189486

The sweet potato pie recipe I can't find has sorghum syrup in it and it is made with evaporated milk. It goes in a flaky regular pie crust, not a graham cracker crust. It does have cinnamon and freshly grated nutmeg. This is an approximation, plus many more sweet potato recipes.

http://southernfood.about.com/od/sweetpotatodess/r/bl31011h.htm

No, it doesn't get marshmallows.

If you have sweet potato pie, you also have to have buttermilk pie, and of course, pecan pie. Here is a recipe for buttermilk pie.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/563150/



This message was edited Nov 13, 2007 2:41 PM

This message was edited Nov 14, 2007 7:43 AM
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 13, 2007
7:24 PM

Post #4189498

My recipe is about like everyone elses except I do the ginger tomato sauce and thicken it with flour so it winds up with a very thick sauce after being baked.

CABBAGE ROLLS

1 head cabbage

1 # ground beef
1 # ground pork
1 # ground veal

1 small grated onion
Minced garlic
Salt
White pepper
3 eggs
1 cups cooked rice
1 tsp marjoram
14 oz diced tomatoes
8-16 oz tomato sauce

Core cabbage and put in microwave to soften leaves, the more cooked the cabbage is, the easier to roll.

Mix the rest of the ingredients well.
Place some on each cabbage leaf, fold and roll, tucking ends under.

Place in Dutch oven or large casserole dish and cover. Pour sauce over rolls and bake 350 degrees 30 min to 1 hour.

TOMATO GINGER SAUCE
Melt 1 stick butter in pan; blend in 6 T flour and cook a bit to cook out the flour taste; add 32 oz tomatoes, diced, one diced onion, fresh garlic,, 2 T Worcestershire Sauce, 2 tsp brown sugar, 1 tsp salt, lots of fresh grated ginger, 1-2 T vinegar. Simmer until blended and thickened.

Pour over cabbage rolls. sprinkle Paprika all over the top
and bake 325-degree oven for 1 hour, uncovered.



TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 13, 2007
7:25 PM

Post #4189503

Obviously, I'm not a very good gardener either or I would be outside taking down more vines instead of in here where it is nice and warm discussing food.
Maxine
Western, WI
(Zone 4a)

November 13, 2007
8:01 PM

Post #4189609

Arlene, could I substitute my home canned tomatoes for the canned purchased tomatoes.
Much prefer my own?
My recipe that I recd. from my son-in-laws mother is different. Its hamburger mixed with cooked rice, rolled in cabbage leaves.
one layer of rolled items
place sauerkraut over it [ a layer]
strips of cooked bacon

Then start over until all the cabbage items are used up. This is put in a crock pot and cooked on low over night.
Nothing much left when I serve this. Even the people who don't like sauerkraut enjoy it.
Of course I never tell them what it is!! My Mother didn't raise a dummy.

Maxine
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 13, 2007
10:41 PM

Post #4190027

Eq,

Not sure if you are still seeking recipes for
Ghyulbe-sheker and shemsiyye.

My apologies for the scanned image instead of
typing it out. In my World Cookery book, I found a
recipe of Turkish origin you may be able to use.



Thumbnail by WUVIE
Click the image for an enlarged view.

WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 13, 2007
10:44 PM

Post #4190032

Rose Petal Preserves
(Recipe repeated as is)

This is a very old method of making a preserve.
It is rather more liquid than the usual jam, and
makes an excellent accompaniment for ice cream.

Pick dark red, scented roses early in the day.
Strip the petals and remove the yellow tip at
the base. Cover with the minimum cold water
required and simmer to a pulp. To each pound
of pulp, add one pound of sugar and boil until set.
Pot in small jars.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 13, 2007
10:57 PM

Post #4190061

Maxine,
You can easily substitute your home canned tomatoes; just might want to add a little more brown sugar; I only know my mother's home canned and anything she made (chilli etc) she always used more sugar; and maybe you wouldn't need to add vinnegar.
Equilibrium

November 14, 2007
3:31 AM

Post #4190975

I could be wrong but seems to me I remember something about apples or apple juice being added to the rose hip jelly??? Didn't realize rose hip jelly = Ghyulbe-sheker and shemsiyye.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 14, 2007
3:38 AM

Post #4190991

Hi Eq, I guess in Turkey it does. LOL.

There are some very interesting Turkish recipes in this book.
I think the apple juice is a filler with flavor, perhaps?

KM
Equilibrium

November 14, 2007
4:08 AM

Post #4191053

I dunno. Sheesh, I had to cut and paste those two other names for rose hip jelly into what I was posting because I could hardly spell them let alone spell them properly and I'm not all that bad with spelling!
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 14, 2007
1:43 PM

Post #4191659

Oh, Eq, you should see some of the odd things in this book.

Somun-balighi kyul basstissi (Broiled salmon with sauce)
Tawuk kyul basstissi (grilled chicken)

Thought the translation was odd considering kyul basstissi shows
up in both, but the subjects are different. Hmm.


Equilibrium

November 14, 2007
2:16 PM

Post #4191766

I'm not particularly fond of Middle Eastern seasonings in general so I would probably shy away from Turkish recipes. One seasoning that I really don't care for is curry which appears in many Indian recipes. I will eat just about anything and am generally very open to trying new dishes but there is something about the smell of curry powder that I really can't stomach.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

November 14, 2007
2:33 PM

Post #4191827

Equilibrium: What is sold as "curry powder" is really a combination of spices, that Asian cooks actually grind fresh as they use it. You may be smelling rancid spice, since most really do go rancid soon after theyve been ground.

One component of curry powder is turmeric which has recently been hailed as a deterent to Alzheimer's disease and microscopic deterioration of chromosome endings producing what we call "aging".
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

November 14, 2007
2:36 PM

Post #4191835

By no means an insult to any particular ethnicity, I know the
smell Eq mentioned. It is repulsive to my nose. When my son
developed a taste for foreign foods, I tried various dishes only
to find we were dumping the dishes in the pig trough.

Ugh!

Now Chinese Five Spice, I cannot live without. MMMM!
Equilibrium

November 14, 2007
3:25 PM

Post #4191968

I don't know exactly what curry powder is or isn't. What I do know is that I had a girlfriend who was from India (she passed away as a result of an auto accident) and she used it all the time. Although I loved her dearly, I couldn't stand the smell of her apartment when she was cooking with that seasoning and no way was I going to try anything she cooked with it. I've gone to Indian Restaurants with groups of people and have found myself looking for the closest door to get OUT. There is something about the smell of curry powder that makes me nauseous. Freshly ground or not, all curry smells rancid to me.
TwinLakesChef
OC, CA & Twin Lakes , IA
(Zone 4b)

November 14, 2007
4:54 PM

Post #4192285

Curry . . . you either like it or you don't . . . seems to be no middle road.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Recipes Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Banana Split Cake / Personal Pizzas Gayl 1 Aug 14, 2012 9:18 AM
Recipes of ALL the USA States gardendragon 102 Jul 20, 2011 5:26 AM
Crescent Lasagna Nebraska_Jewel 3 Aug 22, 2011 6:35 PM
S.Louisiana Dirty Rice justmeLisa 68 Oct 6, 2010 7:51 PM
Just for GardenDragon Brook 6 Aug 18, 2012 2:15 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America