Photo by Melody
It's time now to VOTE in our 14th annual photo contest! Voting ends November 7, so be sure to cast your votes for your favorites in each category here. Good luck to all contestants!

Article: Brussels Sprouts: Love 'em!

Communities > Forums > Article: Brussels Sprouts
bookmark
Forum: Article: Brussels SproutsReplies: 36, Views: 181
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

November 30, 2007
5:50 AM

Post #4245722

So is that why I love them, 'cause I'm originally from Louisiana? I never knew that's where they first grew them. I think this is one you either love or hate, from reactions I've seen. I was amazed the first time I tried them pickled--yummy! My favorite way to prepare them is steamed, served with seasoned salt, pepper, and butter. Mmmm.
Interesting history and great pics. Thanks!
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 30, 2007
11:14 AM

Post #4245881

Thank you! I'm a lover of this vegetable too and hiked all over town to find some nice ones for Thanksgiving dinner.
Scallionboy
New York, NY

November 30, 2007
11:39 AM

Post #4245912

I love them roasted, usually with Cajun spices. Unless they're real small, it's better to halve them before tossing them with some olive oil and the spices.

If you have some time on your hands, it's nice to cut out the bottom and separate the sprouts into individual leaves, which then can be quickly sauteed. But that is a fair amount of work for more than a couple of servings.
Dea
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6a)

November 30, 2007
12:57 PM

Post #4246041

Love brussel sprouts roasted, pickled, sauteed - love 'em!

Thanks for the history and beautiful photos :)

svplantingfool
South Venice, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 30, 2007
5:31 PM

Post #4246943

Nice article, I like the photo of the tall stalk with the sprouts attached!
My favorite recipe is halved sprouts, steamed until tender, then buttered and sprinkled with apple cider vinegar, yummy! I'll be looking for pickled brussel sprouts too.
Cathy
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

November 30, 2007
6:40 PM

Post #4247141

Great article. I love them too, and grow them every year. Unfortuately, my husband is not yet a convert and eats them reluctantly. I have tried all kinds of recipes, the fast cook, the steamed. He is still not a fan. But he is not a fan of very many veggies. His dislike is nothing against brussels sprouts!

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

November 30, 2007
10:42 PM

Post #4248071

Thanks - I love them. We cook them in chicken broth to take the strong taste away.
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 1, 2007
12:06 AM

Post #4248398

i also love them but i also like turnips so i guess i like a bit of a bitter taste--dutch lady i traded with you recently but didn't know you were from brussels--i visted brussels and most of belgum a few years ago and loved it! good to learn more about a favorite veggie--i just like mine with butter--well it's really the only way i ever have them!
daisyavenue
Long Beach, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 1, 2007
1:00 AM

Post #4248581

I have got to try the pickled ones. Been thinking of that all day! LOL
pieohmy
Independence, LA
(Zone 8b)

December 1, 2007
2:46 AM

Post #4248952

Yum! I love them too. I cut them in half and cook in butter with garlic and onions. I could live on broccoli, brussels sprouts and okra.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

December 1, 2007
5:33 AM

Post #4249423

Wow, the more posts I read, the more recipes I wanna try. Yay for brussels sprouts!
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

February 14, 2008
9:27 PM

Post #4538585

Don't know how I missed this when published.

Love them, too.

Planted some a couple of years ago - took forever like you said, but we harvested all winter. Only had 9 plants, but DW harvested the lower leaves and used for cabbage rolls. Even better than cabbage.

Got a few plants in the ground now. Will have to fight off the summer bugs and snails, but looking forward to this fall and winter.
planolinda
Plano, TX

February 14, 2008
10:41 PM

Post #4538877

bubba--do they like our hot summers? saw the plants at lowes and never saw them for sale before--do they take up a lot of space? if i only planted one would it be worth while? or is one plant just not enough?
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 14, 2008
10:52 PM

Post #4538915

I don't think one plant would be enough unless you live alone and maybe just want to eat them every three weeks or so...
planolinda
Plano, TX

February 14, 2008
10:53 PM

Post #4538927

thanks--
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

February 15, 2008
2:37 PM

Post #4541432

They don't particularly like the hot weather. The ones I had success with were somewhat shaded by tomato vines, and really took off when I pulled them out - late fall. We harvested from the bottom up, so continued to get "new" from the same plants. The absolute best flavored ones were harvested in February after several frosts/freezes.

DW blanched and froze all the leaves that were usable as we worked our way up each plant. Think we may still have a bag in the freezer - we have a vacuum sealer.

As for space, they grow vertically, and have a spread of about 12-18 inches.

Biggest problem we had was snails and some insects that liked them - so while there were some late summer / early fall produce, it was only good for the compost pile - I don't use insecticides.

I was disappointed taht I could not find any plant sets in the fall - but did find some in late January, so here we go again.
DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

January 22, 2010
1:54 PM

Post #7485065

Try them shredded and sauteed (with shallots or bacon or other veggies) in butter.
ic_conifers
Iowa City, IA
(Zone 5a)

January 22, 2010
3:27 PM

Post #7485363

I absolutely love Brussels sprouts!!! They are one of my top favorite vegetables. Last year my hubby found a recipe in some guy magazine that recommended the following:

- Place about 2 cups fresh Brussels sprouts in a bowl
- Drizzle with olive oil, stir to coat with a wooden spatula
- Sprinkle on steak seasoning mix, stir to coat
- Preheat oven to 400 degrees
- Place sprouts in oven-proof dish (reserve bowl with olive oil and steak seasoning mix) and roast 5-7 minutes, turn and repeat for another 5-7 minutes
- Remove sprouts from the oven and put them back in the bowl, tossing lightly one last time. Serve immediately.

This recipe has been my favorite recipe for vegetables for months now. We have broccoli, fresh Brussels sprouts (bought at the local co-op), asparagus and just about everything else this way.

I'm going to have to try the pickled recipe tonight!

Elizabeth

Edited to add:
This is the grill pan that I use to roast the sprouts (and just about anything else). This pan literally lives in our oven:
https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/product1_new.asp?menu=logic&idProduct=3988

This message was edited Jan 22, 2010 12:55 PM
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 22, 2010
4:54 PM

Post #7485659

Thanks for posting this recipe; we do them like that often too. I don't use steak seasoning, just salt and pepper and liberal lashings of olive oil and they get really sweet.
ic_conifers
Iowa City, IA
(Zone 5a)

January 22, 2010
6:49 PM

Post #7485917

I'm sure that there are plenty of spice substitutions that are great - this one came from some guy's magazine (Maxim maybe?) so that is probably why the chose steak seasoning. Cajun seasoning or Greek seasoning would probably be excellent substitutes also.
SerenDippity
Wylie, TX

January 25, 2010
2:59 PM

Post #7494717

Bubba,
I didn't know the leaves were edible! Other than like cabbage rolls, how else do you fix them? I am so going to have to try them now.
I didn't even try to grow them through the summer. I planted my transplants of variety Bubbles in mid September. Slow growing and not long now before we should be able to harvest.
I tried to grow some from seed and only two plants of Rubine varieties actually survived. They are not even close to setting fruit yet, seeds were started May '09 and set out Sept 15th.

I have two favorite ways to prepare them. I cut them in half and put them in a zip lock bag with crushed garlic, sea salt and just enough olive oil to coat them. Let them marinate for an hour or two and then roast them along with chopped bits of bacon. Usually by the time the bacon is crispy, they are done and starting to caramelize. YUM!
The faster way is to steam them whole til just barely soft and serve them with liberal amounts of butter and salt to taste.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

January 25, 2010
3:39 PM

Post #7494905

Your cooking methods sound good to me - lol.

We have only used the leaves for cabbage rolls, but they might be fine in a slaw, too. Taste is a little sweeter than cabbage to us.

talk about slow - I'm watching the 2 or 3 plabts that survived the freeezes - hope they beat the spring bugs, or there will be nothing for us.

However I have a great crop of garlic - about 8 - 10" high now - maybe 50 plants.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

June 7, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #9156210

Hi:
I hope someone is out there that willknow the answere to this question.
I grew brussel sprouts this year. They are coming in at the bottem, so I stripped off the big leaves and baked them last night .
First time I every fixed them and they were great!

My question is - the big leaves - can I put some beef and rice inside them, roll them up and eat them like a cabbage roll.
I already have done it but then I thought about oxalates and another fine author from Czezie that said they had to boil dock for a few minutes to get rid of something - I for got. Now I am worried about that with the big leaves of brussel spouts.

Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

June 10, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #9159614

Since we blanch the big leaves for a few minutes, then use an ice bath to shock them and stop the cooking, we have never had any adverse reaction to eating them.

We prefer them to cabbage for cabbage rolls.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

June 10, 2012
6:50 PM

Post #9159798

Hi Bubba;
Thank you for the answer.
I had worked hard on getting them rolled up - so I tasted them and they were actually more than okay - they were really good. I think I too perfer them over cabbage ..

I am such a newbie for brussel sprouts and Kale--

I- I couldn't see a member of a cabbage plant being all that different from cauliflower, cabbage, Kale, broccoil all eaten raw.
It is not like rhubarb leaf, or dock, or polk --surely?

As far as polk goes though -if not fixed correctly it is - Un-ate-able- a person should pay attention to such things - evolution of taste buds, and all that. So, I thought the brussel sprout rolls would be okay.

But I will blanch them next time, for now on just in case.
Not blanched they turned really dark and crispy but still they were really good.

Will these brussel sprouts just keep growing taller and making more all summer or will they slow down in the summer heat, and return to more vigerous growth in the cooler weather?
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

June 11, 2012
6:02 AM

Post #9160221

Your climate may be cool enough to keep harvesting, but here on the Gulf Coast, it is WAAAY to hot. February or early March is the end of the run for BS that were planted in late August or early September.

Like you, we harvest from the bottom up, so just a few plants supplies a weekly serving easily.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

June 11, 2012
10:52 AM

Post #9160768

Thanks for your answer. It must be meant to be planted here in March - why else would the plants be sold here at that time?

It sounds like on the Gulf Coast that you are plant these in the winter and harvest in the Spring. I have a sister-in-law that lives in Miss and she is harvesting her corn in ???? !!!!! --- April !!!!
I don't have mine planted untill the middle or even the end of May - frost you know.

I bought a package of seeds (cost me 4 dollars) since when does seeds cost so much!!!!
But I was thinking of starting them perhaps the middle of July and see how it goes this fall. If too late a frost won't bother them but I bet a freeze would.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

June 12, 2012
6:13 AM

Post #9161839

A light freeze makes them sweeter. They seem to tolerate temps down to about 26F if it warms up to freezing or above the next day.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

June 12, 2012
11:52 AM

Post #9162292

Freeze makes them sweeter!
Very nice! Then a fall crop would do better than a spring crop. It is not unusual to have that kind of weather up here till the end Nov, or even the beginning o Dec.

I could have these till Dec - that would cut down the grocery bill on fresh veg.

But what do you think, will my old ones from this spring last till this fall?
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

June 14, 2012
6:45 AM

Post #9164658

Maybe, but you might want to plant another few in late summer / early fall just to compare.

I let some cabbages go to seed and now have a fence-row of baby volunteers - we will see how they fair in our heat.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

June 14, 2012
10:21 AM

Post #9164891

Bubba:
Thanks, that is good advice. I will also plant some seeds too.
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

November 9, 2012
1:16 AM

Post #9328518

Our season is too short to grow them, but thankfully they are
brought in from the coast and USA. Thanks to everyone for
the different recipes. We will need to try them pickled.
Caroline
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

November 9, 2012
6:15 AM

Post #9328669

CL Scott;
I watched a video of a man in Alaska go out in the garden with snow up to his eyeballs and dig the snow around some poles he had marked his Brussel sprout with and get him some brussel sprouts for his supper!

Oh I found it again!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apHlcL9lL4w


This message was edited Nov 9, 2012 9:17 AM
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

November 9, 2012
6:34 AM

Post #9328689

Here is another one -- this is more professionals raising brussel sprouts in Alaska.
Although interesting -- not as sweet at the above link - were they are all aglow and keep saying "that is good stuff" from their own private garden.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUB9LGbkObw
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

November 9, 2012
11:06 AM

Post #9328935

Thank you for the links.
That is something I would not have thought of trying.
Maybe if I started some in the house, and then planted them in a shaded spot.
My worry would be that if we got a long period of chinook warm winds-----they might rot.
Could maybe add a layer of peat to insulate them.
Caroline
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

November 9, 2012
4:44 PM

Post #9329209

Well; I don't know if anything can survive hurricane like winds that can over turn trains as in the Bow Valley.
Is this the way it works, the winds warm up the climate, encouraging plants to grown and then here comes the cold again and kills all the new growth?

Is the winds only in the winter? or do they start coming down from the Rocky Mountains in the Fall too. Cold snaps gives brussel spouts a sweet taste -- and if frost and freeze does not touch them they are more bitter. They do well in the fall with heavy frosty cold snaps and then warm ups.
If anything could make it there in Alberta it would be brusselsprouts aaaa - and kale. . Yeap those two must have orginated way up north to begin with.

There are also two different culitvars of brussel sprouts.
One takes up to five months to mature and the other has a shorter growing period -- takes maybe three months.

Some one tell me if I am wrong???

If you plant after danger of frost -- June - by Oct they should be ready if you get the five months type. Up that far north by Oct you have had some good frost to make them sweet. And really they actually start producing sooner - about a couple of months early. So You could start picking off the ones on the bottems by mid August and then finish by cutting the whole plant down in Oct. like they were doing in Alaska..

The shorter growing season type - well you know your stuff more than me, you could plant maybe the end of June and by Sept and first of Oct. you could have some fresh ones.

And you can eat those huge leaves too - not just the little cabbages" the big leaves makes a good wrap around rice and something. Lots of recipes on the internet. .
How are Novembers up there? You might be able to keep them untill Thanksgiving. Apparently my cousins that married into a bunch of Germans up north thinks brusselsprouts are more important than the turkey!




CLScott
Calgary
Canada

November 10, 2012
4:12 AM

Post #9329464

Thank you for all the info on sprouts.
I shall try them next season.
I'll look for seeds of the short season kind.
Kale does well here.

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Article: Brussels Sprouts Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Good article, thank you! marcha 3 Nov 30, 2007 5:46 PM
Great pics! they look yummy grampapa 1 Dec 1, 2007 4:24 AM
The info I needed! dixcat 1 Jan 25, 2010 2:38 PM
Baby Frosted Brussels! NEILMUIR1 8 Jan 27, 2010 6:33 AM
My favorite veggie I love them. LavinaMae 0 Jan 22, 2010 1:01 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America