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Recipes: Polish or other Eastern European Holiday Foods

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wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 6, 2007
12:48 AM

Post #4265796

My mother's side of the family is Polish and Czechoslovakian, so at Christmas time we make things like pirohi, fried fish, kolachki, etc. I'm interested to hear what other families of similar heritage will be making. Any special traditions that you care to share?
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 8, 2007
12:47 PM

Post #4273969

>talking to myself< I'd forgotten about "City Chicken" ... not really Christmasy per se, but brings back great childhood memories.

Surely we must have some pierogi / pirogy / pirohi makers on DG??? Hey Pittsburgh, Scranton, Detroit, and Binghamton members, where *are* you? Come out, Come out, wherever you are! LOL

wind

wind
Mount Laurel, NJ
(Zone 7a)

December 8, 2007
1:12 PM

Post #4274005

hi wrightie, my neighbor is polish and makes awesome pierogi's :) We made them together once it was alot of fun and ummmmm good! my mom's boss is polish too and we always get a bread of some sort from her at Christmas time...not sure what it is called...round and sort of tall? babka? she dosn't make it from scratch though.

edited for typo :)

This message was edited Dec 8, 2007 8:13 AM
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 8, 2007
1:25 PM

Post #4274031

Could be Babka (Did it look like the bread on that old Seinfeld episode?) -- LOL.

Oh, Wind, you just reminded me of another Christmassy food - Poppyseed bread. Basically a brioche dough that is filled and rolled with a sweet poppyseed and walnut mixture. YUM. Why oh why must I be on a diet?

For Christmas this year, I'm going to combine my British Isles and Eastern European heritages ... Could be pretty weird.


wind

wind
Mount Laurel, NJ
(Zone 7a)

December 8, 2007
6:46 PM

Post #4274882

you can still eat a little bit of everything of a diet :)
do you have a recipe for the poppyseed bread?
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 8, 2007
6:56 PM

Post #4274895

Oh gosh, the last time I made it, I pretty much "winged" it with a sweet brioche, filled with a can of Solo poppyseed, chopped walnuts, sweetened to taste (if needed). I'll see what I can dig up from my mother's old cookbooks, recipes and post here if I find it.

In the meantime, I've used this company in a pinch when I didn't have time to make and ship my own. Here's their version(s): http://www.polishpierogi.com/nutrolls-p-5.html Mind you, I haven't tried their food because I've only used them for gift-giving, but all reports were Two Thumbs Up. :)
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2007
2:26 AM

Post #4276104

Wind, this looks about right for the poppy seed roll: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/makowiec

I *might* lose the raisins and glaze because I don't recall my grandmother and mother using those in their delicious recipes, but I am definitely going to try this one even if it is slightly different!

Edited to note: After consulting several different recipes, it seems that the raisins and glaze are key components! Shame on me! lol





This message was edited Dec 9, 2007 10:18 AM

wind

wind
Mount Laurel, NJ
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2007
2:40 PM

Post #4277087

that recipe looks wonderful! I'm making a copy now and will surely try it out. I love baking :) ...used to work as an asst. pastry chef in Phila.PA, went to school for it and all that fun stuff! I'm trying to remember if my mom got a poppy loaf like that too last xmas along with the babka??? I'll go ask her now.

Anything else polish you want to post? I'm going to email my polish neighbor and see if she remembers any special goodies from the holiday season in her family.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2007
2:54 PM

Post #4277125

I have been looking through my late mother's cookbooks and notes and have not yet found the family poppy seed / nut roll recipe (yet), but that recipe, above, looks really close!

How exciting about your pastry experience! My mother and all of her sisters learned to become fantastic cooks from their Polish mother. As a child, I loved to "bond" with my mom in the kitchen. So at five or six, I was helping her make pastries, bread, homemade egg noodles, dumplings, etc. etc. This is the time of year that brings back those great memories.

I just found a church cookbook from my hometown on ebay that I scooped up. It's called "Favorite Recipes Collected by St. Mary's Ladies Guild," St. Mary's Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Church, Endicott, NY, 1984. It has a wealth of old family recipes in it!!!

This is a fantastic, authentic Polish cookbook which I can highly recommend to anyone interested in Eastern European cooking, "The Art of Polish Cooking" by Alina Zeranska http://www.amazon.com/Art-Polish-Cooking-Alina-Zeranska/dp/0882897098 Btw, I took a quick look at their poppy seed roll recipe and it looks very much like the one posted earlier.




This message was edited Dec 9, 2007 10:12 AM
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2007
3:02 PM

Post #4277153

Oh, regarding holiday faves -- Christmas Eve was when we had our big family feast on my mom's side. No meat on Christmas Eve, so we had fried fish (haddock). As children, we would load up on mountains of pirogies (in my generation they were usually potato-cheese-onion, and lekvar filled dumplings since the kids didn't like cabbage much) and fried fish -- so much so that I can barely remember what else was served.

On Christmas Day, we would drive up to my other (English) grandmother's house for a totally different kind of feast - ham, prime rib, turkey, etc. LOL

wind

wind
Mount Laurel, NJ
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2007
11:25 PM

Post #4278479

Well I can't say I learned much cooking from my mother...no bonding in the kitchen here! In my imagination I wish I could say I had kitchen/cooking family memories like yours...In my mind I can see all the women in the family coming here to cook Italian goods in preparation for the holidays...ahhhh...NOT!

Only a few women first of all, and my sister is exactly like mom! I love mom dearly but her idea of a meal was to eat out somewhere!!! When my dad was alive, he did all the cooking. After he died it was tv dinners and fast foods. Trying to make up for it now, we eat really well in my house and I would love it if I had more time to spend in the kitchen :) When I made the pierogi's with my friend they were sooooo delicious but haven't made them since.

I sent my friend a copy of the link to the poppy seed recipe, she was thrilled and wants to try it also! She mentioned something about lots of fish at xmas too.

wind

wind
Mount Laurel, NJ
(Zone 7a)

December 9, 2007
11:27 PM

Post #4278483

oh...forgot to mention Thanks for the cookbook link, I'll check it out :)
janemarierose
Utica, NY
(Zone 4b)

December 10, 2007
10:04 PM

Post #4281603

oh... i finially perfected my ppirohi dough...

I make atleast 15 dozen and it still is not enough...

6cups flour
4 eggs
1 1/2 water
1/2 oil
then roll , fill, boil, and try to freeze some! I use a tuna can to make the circle... yes i sti;ll have to roll and cut circles,,, not that good yet :)
janemarierose
Utica, NY
(Zone 4b)

December 10, 2007
10:20 PM

Post #4281653

hey wightie,

what recipe do you use for your kolachki?

jmr
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 10, 2007
10:42 PM

Post #4281719

Hi Janemarierose!!! I'm just checking in from work (sshhhhh).

Quick reply: For pirohi, I use a sour-cream dough per my mother. She and her sisters would argue over whether sour cream vs. potato water was the better way to go and I am my mother's daughter! lol To form them, I use a wine glass or anything else that's handy.

For kolachki, I keep it very simple - cream cheese dough with walnuts, sugar, egg, vanilla. I roll the pastry into rectangles, cut into long strips, fill each strip with walnut, then roll them. After rolling, I cut them. That's just how my family always did it and that seemed to be the standard shape in the Binghamton area... If you want actual recipes, just say the word and I'll post them later.

How much snow do you have on the ground up there?
janemarierose
Utica, NY
(Zone 4b)

December 10, 2007
10:51 PM

Post #4281745

a few inches... the ice was pretty wicked though... most melted today :)

we missed the storm they called for last night...i think it went south of us... but they say we are in for 2 more... "OH YEAH" how i hate when the car is mess looking... all the white salt stains... no pretty at all...

What 'bout you?

How does this sound for a recipe...

http://www.recipezaar.com/81373

http://www.recipezaar.com/81373
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 10, 2007
10:58 PM

Post #4281762

I saw that recipe earlier in the week. The kolachki dough looks about right, but I don't like the looks of the walnut nor lekvar fillings --- LOL --- because of course everyone's family does it the BEST way! We add an egg to the walnuts and a little sugar as well as a splash of vanilla (we're heavy-handed with vanilla though). I'd be worried that that walnut filling in the other recipe would be too dry, if that makes any sense.

Lekvar: I don't even follow a recipe, never have. Throw pitted prunes in a saucepan and just cover with water, maybe a little extra water. Let them cook down, with occasional stirring until smooth. Splash of lemon juice and a little bit of sugar to taste. That recipe looks too sweet for my tastes - prunes are sweet enough on their own, imo. EDITED to add: Throw a TB or so of butter into the lekvar as well!

LOL, mind you, my mother was extremely anal retentive about the family recipes and she made it very clear that her recipes were the best (and I believe her!).

We had a whopping 3 inches last week, but it's all melted now.

I'm heading home and will come back with the family secrets...

This message was edited Dec 10, 2007 6:00 PM
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 11, 2007
1:34 AM

Post #4282218

Pirohi Dough a la Wrightie

4C unsifted flour
3 eggs
3T oil
1C sour cream

Note: It is extremely important to mix the above as gently as you can. Let dough rest for at least one hour.

Carefully knead the dough until smooth. DO NOT OVERWORK THE DOUGH. Touch it as little and as lightly as you can possibly get away with, otherwise you will end up with tough dumplings. I cannot emphasize this point enough (and I don't want to upset my mother - LOL)! Roll out and fill with your favorite fillings.



Kolachki

Dough:

8 oz. cream cheese, at room temp.
8 oz. butter, at room temp.
3 C flour

Mix butter and cream cheese till smooth, add flour and mix again until smooth. Roll into a ball, wrap it, and refrigerate for at least an hour or two before rolling out.


Walnut Filling

16 oz. ground (or well-chopped) walnuts
1 egg
1 C sugar
2 tsp pure vanilla extract (or until a sticky consistency is obtained)

Again, go easy on the dough. Be gentle and work quickly. Roll out, Fill and bake at 375 F for 10 - 15 min. until *lightly* browned.

Once cool, roll cookies in confectioner's sugar.













Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

December 11, 2007
3:39 PM

Post #4284049

Wrightie that church cookbook sounds like a great one. Care to share some more recipes from it? You know those ae some of the best around.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 11, 2007
5:02 PM

Post #4284252

Marie - I just ordered the church cookbook yesterday. Those recipes above are my family's recipes. I'll let you know when I get the church recipes - I absolutely agree with you. They are pure Gold!
Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

December 11, 2007
5:26 PM

Post #4284327

I searched for that cookbook and came up with 3-4 recipes from it that have been posted in various forums and they all sound so gooooooooood!!! I am going to try the ones you posted too. I am from Pennsylvania and very much miss that food from there and that side of the U.S.
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 12, 2007
12:16 AM

Post #4285536

i am lithuanian and our recipes are simular to polish--one recipe i always loved was bacon rolls and i love kugula-- and i love perohis--i buy the grocery frozen ones now but maybe will make some from scratch for the holidays
Dea
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6a)

December 12, 2007
12:25 AM

Post #4285562

Oh wrightie - that's the dough alright :) My DH is 100% Polish - I fill mine with sauerkraut :)

And no problem with mixing the British venture!! A roast prime rib of beast is a fav!!

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 12, 2007
12:33 AM

Post #4285595

Dea, maybe we should arrange a pirohi swap. :~) I confess ... I am ashamed to admit that I have never tried the sauerkraut kind. I'm sure that I would love them. Are you willing to share how you make the filling?

Planolinda, please please please describe your bacon rolls and kugula!
Dea
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6a)

December 12, 2007
12:43 AM

Post #4285633

Yes, please, do share! You never see me posting after 8 pm (well, almost never) cuz I have to be at the office by 5:30 each day, so I'll definately post the sauerkraut thingee manana :)

plutodrive
Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 12, 2007
2:18 AM

Post #4286031

Everyone please share. I can do a internet search but prefer to get some recipes from you folks here. It tastes better for some reason.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 12, 2007
2:22 AM

Post #4286056

I couldn't agree more, Plutodrive!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 12, 2007
2:29 AM

Post #4286101

I figured we didn't post recipes after 8 pm cuz we'd have visions of Kolachkis dancing in our heads. Getting too hungry after 8... but looking forward to the recipes especially with the sauerkraut.

Love this food...
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 12, 2007
3:00 AM

Post #4286247

Does anyone else make (or know of) City Chicken? There's no chicken in the recipe at all, it's actually skewered veal and pork because way back when those cuts were cheaper than chicken. Here's a recipe that looks like my family's: EDIT Changed the link -- this one looks more like Mumsy's: http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1939,159185-250200,00.html Oh my gosh, it's soooo good! Who else makes it?

Btw, I pretty much gave up veal as a young child but once in a blue (reallllllly blue!) moon, I'll have a taste.

This message was edited Dec 11, 2007 10:05 PM
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 12, 2007
3:14 AM

Post #4286318

i will have to get back with you on the lithuanian foods since i am getting tired --but i love polish foods too and grew up in chicago with lots of both!
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 12, 2007
3:14 AM

Post #4286319

I want to know how you serve the cabbage and sauerkraut "peedogies" -- sauteed in butter and onion, sour cream on the side?
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 12, 2007
3:15 AM

Post #4286327

I'm hitting the hay, too. Nighters.
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 12, 2007
3:51 AM

Post #4286501

I'm really enjoying this thread. I'm Polish on both sides and my Mother always made her Pierogi filling with cottage cheese. These are still a family favorite, although I buy the potato and cheese ones in a package at the grocery store too. Her filling is:

1 pound (or what is available now, could be 14 or 12 ounces) DRY cottage cheese
1 egg yolk
scant tablespoon of sugar
a couple of sprinkles of cinnamon

Mix together and use a couple of spoonfuls per pierogi. As it sits, it will form extra liquid so try to take spoonfuls of the mixture, leaving the liquid in the bowl so the pierogi won't get too wet inside and tend to tear.

I have a recipe for a dough given to me by a friend because my Mother always just "threw" a little of this or that together and had no written recipe. I don't like my recipe because the dough ends up just too springy. It reminds you of dough for homemade noodles and tends to spring back when you roll it out, necessitating much rerolling and a lot of work! The finished product is delicious but time consuming to roll out and make. I can't wait to try the dough recipes you all have shared. I like the idea of sour cream in the dough too!

Anyone have a recipe for a plum filling? Apparently, my Grandmother (who died shortly after I was born in 1952) made pierogi's using purple prune plums. I've never seen or had these kind, but my Father, who is 87 fondly remembers these. I'd love to surprise him with some!

Keep those Polish recipes coming!
Linda
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 12, 2007
11:11 AM

Post #4287023

Oh, Linda, thank you. I'm so glad that there is interest in this topic -- I was afraid that my thread was going to sink into cyber-oblivion.

Regarding your mother's plum filling - she used *fresh* plums before they dried (became prunes)?

Dry cottage cheese - do you buy the small/large curd stuff and then drain it in cheese cloth, or can you buy it dry?
Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

December 12, 2007
1:56 PM

Post #4287333

I was going to ask the same questions wrightie.
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 12, 2007
5:47 PM

Post #4288014

I'm clueless about the plums. I thought that they were fresh (or maybe canned?) but I'll ask my Mother if she knows what her Mother-in-law used. She always used the term "plums" and not prunes to describe the filling.

You should be able to buy dry cottage cheese. Here in western PA, that is what it is called. If you can't find it at a local grocery store, ask the manager to order it for you. There are lots of pierogi makers in this area and it is usually available at at least one supermarket. Most of the local churches who make pierogi's to sell, unfortunately, fill theirs with potatoes and cheese most of the time. So, if I want mine with cottage cheese filling, I have to make my own! And after reading the dough recipes here on this thread, I may just decide to make a batch soon.

Linda
Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

December 12, 2007
6:15 PM

Post #4288099

I will have to look for it the next time I go home to Pgh for a visit.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 12, 2007
7:02 PM

Post #4288234

I've seen that some of my mother's recipes call for dry cottage cheese, but I haven't seen it available in MD ... maybe some groovy little shop in Baltimore would have it though.
echoes
South of Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 3a)

December 12, 2007
7:45 PM

Post #4288368

Plum pyrogies in my family were just a half of a prune plum with about a teaspoon of sugar in the hollow. The trick is to get them boiled without the seals breaking so the wonderful juice stays inside. Served with sour cream of course.

I have gained 10 pounds just reading this thread.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 12, 2007
8:15 PM

Post #4288440

OMG, Echoes!!! That sounds amazing. Do you saute them in butter after boiling or are they served straight from the water? Bet they'd be great either way.
echoes
South of Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 3a)

December 12, 2007
8:19 PM

Post #4288455

My mother served them straight out of the water, possibly with bread crumbs fried in butter, because some in my family didn't like sour cream. They are too tender to fry and the juice would be lost.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2007
1:03 AM

Post #4289135

Wrightie,

I just have spent a whole day typing up old, good recipes from my files into the computer.
There is a cottage cheese cake (done in a jelly roll pan) that also calls for DRY cottage cheese.

I have, casually, asked around the local grocery stores, but they do not carry it.
The preferred form of this is what is called "Pot Cheese" or "Farmers Cheese". Check your local Giant? If not--check somewhere like here in Baltimore in the famous Lexington Market downtown. I do not know if they have it--just thinking that somewhere like this place SHOULD have it. I would call around! Maybe some kind of an International Deli?
PA for sure!

Let us know if any of you find it. I may need it too some day.

I guess if nothing else works, you can use the regular large curd Cottage cheese but cut back on any of the other liquids called for in the recipe----OR...Strain the large curd cottage cheese through layers of cheese cloth with a light weight on top of it for a few hours. Maybe that would work???

Love this post! So far, i would like to do something with the sour cream dough. Sounds good!

Gita

wind

wind
Mount Laurel, NJ
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2007
1:13 AM

Post #4289157

I made farmers cheese in culinary school and it was really easy. I'll look for the recipe :) just added lemon juice (acid) to milk and let it coagulate and then strained it, I think, thru a cheesecloth. It was so easy really, better than buying it. It was really good too, I've been wanting to make it again for use in danish.
~Diana
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2007
1:32 AM

Post #4289210

Gita! You *must* share a recipe, or at least a description, of some of your family's holiday delicacies!

Yes, I love fresh farmers cheese.

If I see the dry cheese I'll post it here. I'm trying to remember if I've seen it at MOM's. Would dry ricotta work in a pinch?
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 13, 2007
1:52 AM

Post #4289267

i find dry cheese (called farmers cheese at Fiesta grocery stores and Central Market but of course not all areas have those stores even tho they are chains--i love it--lighter and really good --it is kind of like ricotta so might be able to substitute

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2007
1:57 AM

Post #4289283

wrightie,

I really hesitate sharing some of the most favorite things we bake for Holidays, because they are all so labor-intensive, that i do not think most people will want to spend ALL day (literally) making ONE thing.
My fear is that people will try to find "shortcuts" because they are strapped for time and then then still think that they have made the "real thing"..

So, I keep all the special Latvian recipes to myself. Besides, some of the things that we consider "special" nobody would eat anyway. People in this country are funny about foods that are a bit away from the "norm"...They go more by the description or ingredients than actually trying the different dishes of the World. Too bad!

I don't know how many times I have posted my "Sauerkraut Soup" recipe on DG. To my knowledge, no one has ever made it. All they see is "sauerkraut" and "soup" and must have all these visions of what it is like. Never mind that is a most fragrant soup full of smoked flavors from a ham bone and hocks and fresh shredded cabbage, carrots, onions and a lot of Dill and caraway seed. Chunks of fresh pork as well. It is thick as a stew--almost. Eat it with a baguette spread with butter--and you will be in heaven!

Well--keep eating at Burger King for all i care! And Campbell's instant soups! WRETCH!

I can tell you, though, that without exception!!!!!! Every person that has ever tasted it has loved it and has thought it is the best soup they have ever had. Besides--the Polish make it too! So do the Germans, the Lithuanians and the Estonians. It is a favorite winter soup.

Maybe some recipes are best kept out of the limelight.

Gita
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2007
1:58 AM

Post #4289290

Hmmm ... there are lots of good South/Central American style cheeses in the local markets here. I'm sure that I've seen some that might qualify as dry cottage...

Also, there's that Italian Market in Annapolis and Crofton (Waugh Chapel) that has a good selection of Italian cheese.
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 13, 2007
2:05 AM

Post #4289314

yes lithuanians do make sauerkraut soup--my mother made it but i have never made it and now my mother is passed away --and yes some of the recipes she made and foods we liked would sound terrible to many--oxtails, pickled herring, beets, etc but i would like your recipe for the soup some time and will look for it--i have a lithuanian cook book and it is probably in there
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2007
2:08 AM

Post #4289324

Okay, you can relax, sister, you are with friends here on this thread. I had the same apprehensions about posting my recipes as well -- did you notice how I did not go into any detail on how to roll out, form or cook the pirohi? I am assuming that anyone reading this thread already knows how to do it or will seek out instructions elsewhere. Partly, because it's too taxxing to try to type out, but also because I learned to cook by feel, sight, taste. As for posting my secret family recipes ... yikes, that's a tough one. I can hardly believe that I made public the best pirohi dough formula on the planet (maybe I'll change my mind and delete it later) -- LOL!!

As for your sauerkraut soup? I know of at least one person from the Equine Forum who made it (she hates sauerkraut, btw) and is now HOOKED ON IT. She's the one who pointed me to your recipe here on DG, so I went and looked at it. Well, guess what -- your recipe looks just like what my mom often made in my house growing up. I made it two weeks ago.

I'm tellin' ya ... there are lots of us with similar tastes!
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2007
2:21 AM

Post #4289362

My mother and grandmother ate pickled herring, pig's knuckles, kiska, but I never really developed a taste for those things (being an American brat, I guess). I do *LOVE* beets though. I've started growing them on my little urban plot...
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 13, 2007
4:07 AM

Post #4289683

wrightie,the dry cottage cheese that is sold here is more like small curd cottage cheese that only contains the curds. Perhaps if you took small curd cottage cheese, rinsed it with water, and let it lay in a strainer to get the liquid out, you could use that in place of the dry cottage cheese. It should have the same consistency.

marieortiz, you will have no problem finding dry cottage cheese in Pittsburgh. I'm about 45 minutes northwest by car, and they sell it here. Try Giant Eagle or Shop'n Save. I've seen it at both chains. There's always the Strip District in downtown Pittsburgh too.

Echoes, your plum pierogis sound exactly what I'm looking for. Bless you for sharing you recipe with us! So, does that mean that we can only make them in the summer, when the prune plums are at the fruit markets?

Gita, your sauerkraut soup sounds wonderful. I'd love to try it. We make homemade bean soup every year after New Years, when we get a nice ham bone from whoever makes the ham for Christmas dinner. Our bean soup is full of fresh cut up veggies, so your sauerkraut soup would be no problem to make. Could you post the recipe or a link to it here on another board at Dave's?

Beets are a favorite too. I have a quickie recipe that allows me to make pickled beets in a flash and we have them quite often. When I was growing up, I remember my Aunt made borst, and now how I wish I had tried it and got her recipe. I am always looking for a good borst recipe. Anyone have one they use?

Adding another dimension to the pierogi recipes, my Mother-in-law made a pierogi for her family with a dough that was shredded raw potatoes, kind of like you'd use for potato pancakes. I never got to eat them myself, but they were described to me. My DH has tried to remember how she did them and he thinks she must have used some flour to hold them together to form a dough. The dry cottage cheese filling was in the middle. They were boiled and then fried. After that, she made a sauce that we make and use over our pierogis today:

Sauce For Pierogis (can be cut in half):

16 ounce sour cream
8 slices of bacon
Green onions (at least 4 o4 5) or other onion (1/4 cup chopped)
pinch of sugar

Fry bacon until crisp, adding the onion near the end, and break apart. You can also cut up the bacon before frying. Unless the bacon is extremely fat, leave the bacon, onion, and grease in the pan and slowly add the sour cream. When all the sour cream is added and you have a smooth sauce, add a pinch of sugar, and heat until very warm. Serve over your fried pierogis! We even make this to put over Mrs. T's Pierogis.
If the bacon is very fat and you have lots and lots of grease, remove some prior to adding the sour cream.

Linda
Dann_L
San Tan Valley, AZ
(Zone 9b)

December 13, 2007
7:18 AM

Post #4289976

Hi Gita,

I copied your Latvian Sauerkraut Soup last year when you posted it in the soup contest. I didn't make it at the time because it was a large volume of soup. I meant to reduce the recipe to smaller quantities and never got around to it. I like to make a small pot of a new soup to see if I like it before I make a quantity large enough to freeze some. I will do this in the near future and report back to you after I've made it. I am always looking for new soup recipes and yours looks like it would be delicious!

I apologize that you may have felt slighted because there wasn't any feed back to you form those that may have made it. I think it was more the volume that was imitating rather than the ingredients. A 21 qt. pot holds a lot of soup!

Dan :o)
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2007
11:54 AM

Post #4290103

Linda, that sauce looks delicious! And so do the "potato pancake" pirohi! :) Yum, now I'm craving potato pancakes all of a sudden. I've been so good about not making any latke because I knew I'd eat the entire batch in one sitting (there's just two of us, no children, and hubbie isn't as much of a Foodie as me).

Borscht -- I have several recipes for it, Linda. But ... it's hard to pick just one or to guess at which type you would like. I'll tell you, that good little Polish girl, Martha Stewart, has a couple recipes for borscht in the one cookbook of hers that I own (the big green one). I made one recently and I was in heaven. It was meant to be a cold borscht, but I had it hot instead and loved it.

I also own the cookbook from the now -sadly- defunct Russian Tea House and they have lots of yummy borscht recipes among their other delights. I don't think my mom wrote down her borscht recipes, she just *made* them by sight.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2007
4:39 PM

Post #4290928

OK! Here is my recipe for the Sauerkraut Soup.
Dan--just use a smaller pot and cut everything roughly in half. Soups come out good no matter how you make them. DO use a ham bone! Some small pices of smoked meat (smoked neck chunks?) and about 1lb of some fresh "country spare ribs". One small can of sauerkraut and half a small head of cabbage.
Play it by ear! Can't err here!



Gita’s Latvian Sauerkraut Soup

Note: This is delicious, full-bodied, cool weather soup. No actual
measurements are given. Only guidelines. Good soups are not based on a pre-
scribed formula. If it seems right to you….go for it!
(this recipe is for a pot of approx. 21 qts. capacity)

In a large stockpot put:
A big, meaty ham bone (smoked is best), a 2 lb (plus or minus) piece of fresh pork of some kind (picnic, country spare ribs, fresh ham, thick pork chops etc.) and, for extra flavor, some smoked ham hocks, neck bones or the like. These have a lot of fat but also add a lot of flavor. Anything with bone-in is good. It adds body to the soup.

Cover meat with cold water and bring to a boil. Turn down fire a bit and simmer, skimming off foam as it surfaces. Let simmer for about an hour.
**Do not add any of the seasonings until all the “foaming” has stopped, or you will be skimming off the seasonings as well.

Next add 1 deli-pack (or 1 lg. Can—32oz) of Sauerkraut, 1 med. head of green cabbage, cut with a knife in a coarse shred, 2-3 ribs of celery (sliced), 2-3 med. onions (coarsely chopped), 1Tbs. Caraway seed, about a tsp. full of whole peppercorns, (or fresh ground black pepper to taste), 2-3 Bay leaves, fresh chopped parsley (1/2c. or so), fresh chopped dill (stems and all-maybe a 1/3 cup), and 1-2 coarsely shredded carrots.

Note: This soup can have either barley (a ½ cup or so dry) or diced potatoes (3 or 4 med.—thick-diced) added for a fuller body. If you choose barley, add it now, as barley takes long while to cook until it is tender! If you choose potatoes, add them in the last half hour of cooking the soup, or they will turn to “mush”.

Add enough water (or saved broths—see note below) to almost fill the pot. Bring all back to a boil. Lower fire way down, and simmer the soup for a good 2 hours, stirring occasionally. Meat needs to be “falling off the bones” done.

At this point, using a slotted spoon, fish out ALL meats and bones to a large platter. Keep soup simmering ….you can now add the potatoes).

Cut away all edible meat in bite-sized pieces (sliver smoked skin from the hocks in thin strips, scraping off all underlying fat, and discard all other unnecessary fat. ***(Save bones for your favorite dog!).

Return cut-up meat to the soup and stir well to distribute all. Simmer another few minutes, or so.
The soup is now basically done. Let it rest a bit and then serve it with GOOD buttered bread of your choice—Rye bread and butter really complement this Soup.
Gets better and better when reheated…as all soups do!

Can be frozen in serving size bowls or containers, such as a margarine bowl. Microwave to re-heat and serve.

***This, and all soups, freeze VERY WELL and last for a very long time in the freezer without losing flavor. Years! Literally!!!

Frugality note:
You can save (and freeze) any liquids/broths from other “cooking” of veggies, potatoes, and meats and then add them to the soup. Why pour it down the drain???

Lots of success with this! You will love this soup! Everyone has-- that has tasted it. I can almost guarantee it!!!
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 13, 2007
11:44 PM

Post #4292067

oh i forgot the potato pancakes!! oh they are so good--thanks for reminding me!! and my mother also liked the pigs nuckles (or was it pickled pigs feet?)which i have never wanted to try! i like the potato cheese filling best for the pirohi and i love them with sour cream--the prune filling must be sweet?
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 13, 2007
11:49 PM

Post #4292083

My new "church cookbook" just arrived, so I'm sitting here flipping through it with a smile on my face.

The prune pirohi -- well, ours are a tad sweet, but not very. Also, we saute them lightly in butter before serving, so there's a nice savoury-sweet balance. They are an acquired taste -- but I acquired it as a child. YUMMO.
echoes
South of Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 3a)

December 14, 2007
12:16 AM

Post #4292153

Yes, plum (not prunes) pirohi are sweet. The trick is to get them sealed and boiled with the juice that forms, staying inside. Any sugar at the edges means trouble. I remember the dry dottage cheese ones too. The cinnamon ones sound so familiar. Mom sometimes made the cottage cheese with onion also.

My grandmothers and my mom used to make kuchen for special occasions too. I remember one cottage cheese one and one made with apples and crumbs on top. For more everyday fare they made plain kuchen with just the crumb topping.
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 14, 2007
2:00 AM

Post #4292596

Gita, thanks for posting the soup recipe. I will definitely be trying it!

Anything interesting in that church cookbook wrightie?

Linda
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
2:28 AM

Post #4292682

Lots of interesting tidbits!

Here's one that calls for that cottage cheese again:

Ann Kahanic's Polachinki (Crepes), p260

1/2 C milk plus 2 T water
1/2 C and 2 T flour
1/2 tsp salt
4 eggs

Beat all ingredients to make a thin batter. Pour a scant 1/4 C of batter into hot butter in an 8 inch skillet. Cook on both sides; fill with cottage cheese and roll up. Put in a glass baking dish. Bake at 300 F for 1/2 hour. Makes about 12 crepes. Serve with sour cream.

*************************************************************

My mom made crepes pretty regularly when I was young. They were usually filled with applesauce though.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
2:32 AM

Post #4292697

echoes--and everyone else.

Here is something great--and different! I bet any of you that have grown up with Eastern European parents might have had this.

This is a pan-type of a cottage cheese cake that is out of this world!!!! I DO think it is a European thing. It is one of the recipes i was typing into My Documents the other day, because my sister wanted it.

There are 2 types of cakes I am going to post here. I have hardly EVER made them, but I have eaten them. They are SOOO good! A lot of time and work is involved (isn't everything?) but well worth the effort. Alas--these both also require the Dry Cottage Cheese.

The first one is made on a cookie sheet with high edges (Jelly roll pan). The second one needs a 9" cake pan. I need to try these myself some day--they are definitely a part of my "memory bank"...

Gita

ESTONIAN/LATVIAN COTTAGE CHEESE “CAKE”.
(Mare Roomets—who always made this for sale at our Festivals and Parties at the Estonian House in Baltimore. It was the best!—and SHE was the best. It was HER specialty!

This is a double batch. Makes two large Jellyroll pans full. Halve recipe for a single pan.
***These directions were verbally given and I wrote them down.

Dough: Mix all the following together by hand.
3 cups flour—(2 c. “Wondra”—1 cup regular flour)
¾ cups sugar
2tsp. Baking powder (Mix the above ingredients together)

Beat 1 stick unsalted butter with 2 eggs
Add two reg., full tsp. of grated lemon rind (one large lemon)
2 heaping Tbs. reg. Sour Cream.

Sprinkle flour on waxed paper and roll out to fit pan size.
Or--leave dough in a loaf on a cookie sheet and refrigerate.

Filling:
3lbs. DRY, large-curd cottage cheese—sieved or ground. (maybe food-processed???) Pot Cheese is best.
1/3 cup Evaporated milk or ½ and ½ cream
Juice of one whole lemon
Juice of one orange
2 tsp. Vanilla
2 heaping Tbs. Sour Cream
1 stick unsalted butter—very softened
(Mix all these ingredients together)

Whip 8 eggs with ¾ cups sugar until very “airy”. (Long time…)

Gently, fold egg mixture into cottage cheese mixture
Add ½ package (about 8oz.) golden raisins (soften first--not sure?????)

Putting it all together:
Take out refrigerated dough.
Press/roll half of dough into a size suitable for each cookie sheet, working it flat and up the edges as well. Trim off excess.

Pour filling into prepared pastry in the pan
Spread surface, lightly, with additional Sour Cream
Sprinkle top with crushed Almonds.

Place foil under pan and bake at 350* for 30 min. or until set.
Cool completely in pan. Slice in squares to serve.


Notes:
If you use store-bought Cottage Cheese, even if it called “dry”, it is not dry enough.
You may want to decrease some of the liquids asked for in this recipe.
Ex: Cut out the milk, or cream. Decrease eggs to 6; Possibly decrease orange and lemon juices. If you do not do this, everything will be a lot softer, you may need to use a pan with higher edges.
“Pot Cheese” or “Farmers Cheese: works good—if you can get it.



****This is another hand-written recipe for another COTTAGE CHEESE CAKE:
This is baked in a regular 9”cake pan. Don’t know who’s this is, but I think I remember my Mother making this.

Crust:
1 stick sweet butter + 1 egg + one scant cup sugar + grated lemon rind from one lemon. –Cream all together.
Add flour until hard enough to keep a shape. Err on the softer side of the finished dough….
Kneed until dough comes free from hands and bowl--maybe 10-15 minutes.
Press into a 9” cake pan—going up the sides as well.

Filling:
One lb, cottage cheese. (If too dry, add 3 Tbs. sour cream.)
Add 3 egg yolks and one cup sugar. Cream/mix all. Add a handful of golden raisins (softened ??)

Beat egg whites until stiff and gently blend into cottage cheese mixture. Pour into prepared cake pan. Sprinkle top with sugar to give cake a nice crust.

Bake at 375*-400* until pick inserted in the center comes out clean and dry and top is lightly browned. About 1 hr or more. Cool in pan.

Note: I don't see WHY some of the "finishing steps" from the first recipe above could not be applied to this one as well. Like the extra sour cream smeared on top and some slivered almonds. Maybe--toast them first?

Please let me know if any of you went through the trouble of making this and how it turnrd out.
I, myself, need to do this at least once too-to see how it turns out.

Best--Gita
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
2:36 AM

Post #4292704

Here's a Borscht that calls for beef:

2 1/2 lbs cubed beef
2 large red beets
1 C navy beans
2 large sliced carrots
1 large onion, diced
2 large potatoes, cubed
1/4 head of cabbage, sliced
1/4 C vinegar
s&p to taste

Put the cubed beef in a kettle containing 5 quarts of water. Bring to a boil. After it boils, skim off the top. Add beets, beans, onions, carrots and salt & pepper. Boil until meat is tender. Add potatoes and boil. Then add cabbage and vinegar. Boil until tender. Serve with heavy cream if desired.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
2:42 AM

Post #4292725

OMG, Gita. I want to try that first one for sure. Haven't studied the second recipe yet.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
3:01 AM

Post #4292774

Wrightie,

We cross-posted...
I make those "pancakes" (crepes) quite often--just for breakfast. Eat them as usual--with syrup or just sugar. I like to think of these as "finger food".

Yes! I do remember that they can be filled with the sweet cottage cheese/egg/sugar filling---except, once they were wrapped up, we always just browned them in butter on the frying pan. We never baked them. This is a very nice breakfast dish.

NOW!!! Another way to make these is to fill them with a meat mixture. Then it becomes a nice dinner food. If you know any German--these are called "Komm Morgen Vieder" (Come again tomorrow).

For the amounts of meat mixture i am posting below, here are the approximate amounts for the batter;

3 eggs, just beaten
2 cups of milk
a dash of salt
flour to make the batter a very thin, but pourable, consistency--maybe 2 cups. It is better to make it a bit too thick and then thin it out again as this will get rid of any lumps.
Since you need this batter to barely coat the bottom of the hot pan, thin is better.

If you have never made these--have your 10" frying pan buttered and hot. Holding pan in your left hand, scoop up about 1/2 a ladle-full of batter. As you pour the batter in the pan, rotate it quickly to just cover the bottom.
Fry only for about 30 seconds and then flip the whole pancake over, trying not to tear it in any way. Use a spatula to do this. Fry the other side for only about 15-20 seconds and then slide it onto a dinner plate. Repeat all the above and keep stacking them on the plate as they are done.

Here is the Meat Filling:

1lb. good ground beef mixed up with one can of Corned beef (like Libby's or Hormel).
Dice up one onion and saute in a pan in about 1/4 stick butter. Add the meat mixture and really heat it through well. Yes! It will be fatty!

Assuming your pancakes (crepes) are already made and stacked on a dinner plate, put about 2Tbs of meat mixture in the bottom center of each pancake and wrap it up "envelope like". Have all the pancakes wrapped and ready before you brown them.

Melt some butter in a 10" pan and brown all the filled, wrapped crepes until golden on both sides. Start with the seam side down--as this will seal it shut.

You can make these ahead of time and freeze them before the browning process.
Then--thaw and brown as directed above.

SOOOOOO good! I like to eat mine with my home made Cranberry sauce.

Enjoy!!!! Gita

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
3:03 AM

Post #4292781

Wrightie,

We cross-posted--again...Nice to have an active Post! Thanks for starting this!

Re the "Cheesecake" I posted above--maybe the second one would be easier to start with. They are pretty similar.

Gita
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
3:09 AM

Post #4292793

Oh my. The savoury ones sound yummy. I don't remember ever baking the finished crepes either.

I cannot remember the last time that I made them. But ... I will *soon*!

I'm loving this thread. Keep 'em coming, Kidz. Please? :)
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
3:23 AM

Post #4292840

Gita, can you find good (crusty outside & chewy inside) RYE BREAD near you????? If so, please post details. I miss *real* bakeries, not the annoying corporate chains that bake the goodness right out of the bredddddd.

I can make my own, sure, but ... nothin like being able to pick up a few good loaves and I'm planning to be in baltymore this wknd.
plutodrive
Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 14, 2007
3:34 AM

Post #4292890

Gitagal- I'm making your soup right now. I needed to substitute for the ham bone because I can't get it here. That is the main reason I didn't try it earlier. I halved it and used a smoked turkey drumstick, two smoked ham hocks and one pound of pork stew meat. It is cooking away and smells wonderful. I actually found a real jewish rye to go with it. I was really excited to see that since I really miss Rosen's rye bread in Chicago.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
3:36 AM

Post #4292909

Oi Vei ... Can I come over, PD?
plutodrive
Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 14, 2007
3:38 AM

Post #4292925

Anytime!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
3:46 AM

Post #4292979

Wrightie,

No, sorry! I do not know where you could get crusty rye bread. Make your own????
In the Summertime, we have all these Ethnic Festivals here in Baltimore, and I know that the Russian/Slavic festival usually has awesome rye breads for sale.

Did you see this link in aPost? Not sure it was from this Post????

www.thefreshloaf.com

Plutodrive--

Next time you buy a Mashes ham in a grocery store, just save the bone.
I am sure the smoked turkey will be just great!!! Let me know how it turned out??? PLEASE!!!!

One of my favorite breads from the stores is Seeded Jewish Rye bread. LOVE IT!

Gita




This message was edited Dec 13, 2007 11:48 PM
plutodrive
Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 14, 2007
3:49 AM

Post #4292994

Sure thing- I'll take a pic too!
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
10:29 AM

Post #4293493

I used to keep rye bread starter in the fridge. I'll have to make some more and resume some bread baking. This thread is inspiring me. Gita, can you give me a shout when you've got some festivals or baked good sales going on up there? I need to find a good 'church sale.'

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
2:15 PM

Post #4293864

wrightie,

There are Ethnic Festivals in Baltimore EVERY weekend all through Summer--from end of may (Lithuanian) to Labor day. They are held all over the place--in Parks, churches, halls, etc. Years ago, we all held them at Inner Harbor, but those days are long gone! It was so much fun! My Ex was in charge of them and I used to have a Body Painting booth. I also belonged to the Estonian Folk Dance group and we would dance out hearts away. Drink lots of beer, etc...

I do not go to any any more. I bet you could find the schedule if you go to Baltimore Tourism and promotion...whatever!

My Mom also used to bake a very dark, dense rye bread. She always kept a small jar of "starter" in the fridge.
How do you make a starter--if you don't have one?

Gita
Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

December 14, 2007
2:54 PM

Post #4293958

Gitagal and wrightie thank you for posting the recipes. They sound wonderful. Please continue to share your family recipes Gitagal and from that cookbook wrightie. I am Lituanian, German and scottish I believe but I was not given the privilege of eating any of my Jewish Lithuanian grandmother 's (long story) cooking nor my German great- grandparents. I am making copies of all of these for future testing. I do not mind spending the day to make something that is really home made and not store bought.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 14, 2007
5:54 PM

Post #4294538

Darn it, I wish those festivals were not only during the Summer months. Sounds like a lot of fun!

You can make your own starter with some yeast and rye flour, which you let sit on the counter for a few days before it's ready. Here's an example that calls for potato water as the liquid. http://www.goodcooking.com/ryebredr.htm There's just *nothing* like the taste of a good, fresh loaf of Jewish Rye (WITH SEEDS!) that has been slathered with butter - plain, toasted, in sandwiches, croutons, whatever ... yum yum yum yum!!! Of course, pumpernickel rye is pretty incredible, too! I love real bread.

Edited to Add: It's thought that to really make a good starter, you must also include "old bread." For a little background, you can read about it here or just google it, or consult some of the better bread baking cookbooks -- http://breadnet.net/nyrye.html

This message was edited Dec 14, 2007 1:03 PM
plutodrive
Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 15, 2007
7:36 AM

Post #4296449

Gitagal- The soup was awesome! I totally pigged out! Two big bowls and six slices of bread. The bread wasn't as good as the Rosens- no seeds either, but was a huge step above the rest. I'll eat some more tomorrow and freeze the rest. My roomate loved it too even though he doesn't like sauerkraut. Lol- turkey was great in it! The smokey flavor is what makes it I think. I couldn't take a pic because my batteries ran out of juice. I'll take a pic with the leftovers. I'm sure it will be even better. Thanks again- I'll be making this every year.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 15, 2007
4:00 PM

Post #4297152

Pluto,

See? I was NOT lying about this soup! It IS awesome!

The more you eat it as a leftover, the better it gets--and--it will last in your freezer for years!

Curiosity question: Besides using the turkey, did you change anything else?
In my mind I have wondered that--in case you can't find any smoked meat--a few drops of "Liquid Smoke" would fill the bill???? Might be too "mesquity"--if you know what I mean...

Thanks for the positive feedback!

Gita

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 15, 2007
4:03 PM

Post #4297167

forgot...

wrightie--thanks for the above links. I coppied out both of those recipes and saved them in My Documents--for my sister...

Hey All,
I have a request! PLEASE add your picture to your "Personal Page"! When we chat with each other for so long as we have on all these threads, I sure would like to see what you all look like. Mine is there--just click on my name.
Thanks, Gita

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 15, 2007
4:36 PM

Post #4297299


Here's a couple more recipes--The "Kugelis" is a beloved Lithuanian dish. This recipe was provided to me some years ago by DG member "sveiks" from Stoneham, MA.

Kugelis (Lithuanian Potato Cake)

6-8 strips of bacon - Cut into pieces - Fry (years ago they used salt pork)
When half brown, add diced onions (1-3 onions or as much as preferred) Add oil if necessary - Should have at least 1/2 c fat in pan.

5 - 7 lbs. potatoes - peel and GRATE. Sieve/strain off juice from grated potatoes
Optional: A white starch will settle to the bottom of the strained off juice - this white starch (potato starch) may be added back into the grated potatoes for more body. Sometimes I don't bother with this step because there's just not much of this white starch (depends on potatoes).

Add four (4) beaten eggs, 1/2 TBS. salt, 1/2 tsp. pepper.

Add 1 TBS. flour and 1 TBS. baking powder.
Pour into baking pan (a 9" x 13" or thereabouts)
Bake at 475 F. for 20 minutes. Turn down to 350 F. for 30 minutes. Then 450 F for 30 minutes. Top should be brown but not burnt.
Serve with a generous dollop of sour cream.

*******************************************************************

This one is from ME--It is a popular "pastry" in most Eastern European countries.

OK Everybody!!!! I dug and dug in my shoeboxes of recipes and found the one for the "kruchkys" aka "Rabbit Ears" aka Elephant ears, etc...I also had a copy from a newspaper that seemed to be a Lithuanian recipe for the same, but the directions were too vague for a beginner.

Deep Fried Twists (this is from a Latvian cookbook)

Ingredients:
(unfortunately, they are given in grams I have estimated the equivalents...help!)

Flour--500gm. (1lb+)
Butter--50 gm. (1/2 stick)
sugar--50gm. (between 1/4 and 1/3 cups)
3 eggs
4 Tbsp. sour cream (regular--not measured)
1 shot flavoring--(Brandy or rum)
1 tsp. Baking powder
Rind of 1/2 lemon--grated (I don't think the whole thing would hurt?)
Pinch of salt
Veg. oil for frying
Confectioner's sugar-lots

Directions:

1. In a lg. bowl, cream sugar and eggs
2. Add sour cream, lemon rind and flavoring
3. Sift flour and Baking powder together, then "cut" butter into flour using a pastry cutter (as for pie crust)
4. Mix egg/sugar mixture into flour. Turn dough out on a pastry sheet and kneed until all mixed and smooth, maybe 5 minutes or so.
5. Refrigerate dough at least 1/2-1 hour before starting the rolling out process. Dough will be slightly elastic. Lightly flour pastry sheet as you proceed and add more flour-as needed.
6. Roll dough out VERY THIN (1/16"-1/8") with rolling pin.
7. Cut rolled dough into 1"-2" strips. Cut strips in 3"-4" rectangles with the tip of a sharp knife--on the diagonal. Cut a 1" slit in the center of each piece and slip one corner completely through the slit, gently pulling it straight. Line up ALL finished pieces on paper towels or wax paper.
***DO ALL pieces before starting the frying. Re-roll any scraps of dough until it is all used up. Frying goes VERY fast!
8. Heat 1" oil to moderately hot in deep frying pan. Drop in twists, a few at a time, and fry--turning once (almost immediately!) until golden brown. Drain on absorbent paper and sprinkle with Confectioner's Sugar while still warm. (I use a flour-sifter cup).
9. Let cool completely before storing in air-tight containers.

**Note #1: If you are not able to roll the dough out thin enough you can roll it out thinner once cut up in the rectangles. If this makes the squares too large, trim off edges-but who cares? This could almost double the yield. Here the rule is--"the thinner, the better!".

****Note #2: Because the frying goes so fast, it may help to work in twos. One minding the frying--the other one doing the sugaring and putting them away as they cool.
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 15, 2007
4:43 PM

Post #4297323

oh thank you--the kugelis is a favorite of mine--it is tricky tho--sometimes the potatoes get discolored if you do not work quickly and sometimes it has turned out bad after all that work--but i have gotten better at it--i think when i first tried making it i didn't strain the potatoes enough--and i left out the bacon--BEG mistake-do not leave out the bacon!!! it adds so much flavor--i love it with sour cream and salt--
echoes
South of Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 3a)

December 15, 2007
4:49 PM

Post #4297346

Gita, we call those cookies frissen hosen (don't know how to spell it) Torn pants. I will look up the recipe later, if you want the measurements.


This message was edited Dec 15, 2007 10:51 AM
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 15, 2007
8:17 PM

Post #4297921

gita--my soup is on the stove!!! smoked ham hocks, smoked turkey wings and legs, fresh pork brisket bones simmering away--chopped celery, onion,cabbage, carrots, parsley (used cilantro parsley since it was already in refridg), and seasonings cut up and ready to go in--barley too---oh and the saurkraut of course!!

i had to go to fiesta to get the fresh pork, smoked ham hocks etc and they had green peppers 3 for a dollar so of course i picked up 9 small and am also making stuffed peppers--i always think of stuffed peppers a bit like sstuffed cabbage so i thought i'd throw in a little chopped cabbage with the sauce
plutodrive
Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 16, 2007
8:31 AM

Post #4299791

Gitagal- I didn't change anything else. I wouldn't put any fake flavor in it. I will put in a bit more caraway and dill next time. Folks at work will like the recipe. Do you care if I share?
plutodrive
Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 16, 2007
8:57 AM

Post #4299804

planolinda- Stuffed Peppers are the only thing my German/Polish mother cooked 'ethnically'- probably because my father can be picky. But that was cooked in a totally American way (with condensed tomato soup). She has given me the influences of sauerkraut, sausages and potatoes but never in a authentic way. Do you have a good recipe for Stuffed Peppers?

wind

wind
Mount Laurel, NJ
(Zone 7a)

December 16, 2007
12:48 PM

Post #4299928

Gita, to convert grams to ounces multiply by .035 :)

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 16, 2007
1:28 PM

Post #4299971

Pluto,

NO! Go ahead. I have now shared with the whole wide world, so it is OK. I just hope people don't mess with it too much...I have never used turkey--I hope this doesn't become a regular ingredient, but I am sure it is OK. In a pinch--maybe, but smokes pork of some kind has a different flavor.

wind--thanks for the conversion! I'll remember that!

Gita
Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

December 17, 2007
1:41 PM

Post #4303438

Gita thank you so much for sharing those recipes. As soona s I am able to I will be making both of those especially the Kugelis. I love anythign to do with potatoes and bacon is another favorite.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 22, 2007
3:46 PM

Post #4319502

Anyone else busy in the kitchen today? What are you making?

I've just started making a double batch of kolachki. I'll make the pirogi dough later today, then let it rest overnight before rolling & stuffing the dumplings.
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 22, 2007
7:12 PM

Post #4320003

I'm making cheese balls that I share with my daughters. This recipe was given to me by my Mother-in-law and we looked forward to receiving our cheese ball from her every Christmas. I am continuing the tradition. Last night I filled 7 dozen lady locks, and I have to make fudge before Christmas. Then I'm done for this year!

Coming to your house wrightie for the pirogis!!!

Linda
Joan
Belfield, ND
(Zone 4a)



December 22, 2007
7:29 PM

Post #4320045

I made peanut clusters and one batch of peanut brittle. I have to let everything soak between batches of brittle so I can wash it up for the next batch, so I'm surfing DG while it soaks. :)

I'm going to make some spinach dip for crackers, and then I think I'm done in the kitchen for today. We start the holiday celebration tomorrow already, because that's the only day we can spend with some of the kids.

We are going to just do sandwiches and hordourves, (sp!) and I bought a ham and a deli turkey breast for the sandwiches. I'll cook the ham and then slice and serve warm, but I'm not sure what to do with the deli turkey breast? It's fully cooked, but I'm wondering if it will get really dry if I warm it in the oven? Has anyone done something like this?
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 22, 2007
7:36 PM

Post #4320052

Linda, what's a lady lock? ... and what do you put in your cheese ball? Pirohi will be served on Monday night - come on over!

Joan, I'm glad that you asked that question, because I have a turkey breast sitting in my fridge right now and have no idea what to do with it (fully cooked from dietz & watson, I think).
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 22, 2007
9:31 PM

Post #4320230

A Lady Lock is a pastry that's rolled on metal pins or rods or (as I do) on clothespins wrapped in foil. It's a puff pastry that's used. Then you make a cream filling and using a pastry bag, fill the inside. Years and years ago, the recipe for the dough was difficult and time consuming. You had to mix the dough, roll it out and spread it with Crisco/butter mix, I believe. You rolled it up, refrigerated it. Then you rolled it out and spread it again, repeating the process several times. Now, I have a one-step dough recipe that is a snap to make and works well. Or, you can do what I did this year - visit the supermarket and Pepridge Farm makes puff pastry that comes two sheets to a box, you roll it out on a mix of 1/2 cup flour and 1/2 cup powdered sugar. Cut in strips, wrap around the clothespins, and bake. Remove from the pins, cool, and fill. They are very popular in our area.

Here's the Cheese Ball or Cheese Log Recipe

Leave 6 oz of Cream Cheese come to room temperature
Grate: 8 oz Sharp Cheddar
8 oz American Cheese (buy in a chunk at the Deli counter)
Let the cheeses come to room temperature after grating.
Add 1 T Worcestershire Sauce
1/2 t Tabasco
1/2 t garlic salt
1/2 t chili powder
1/2 t paprika
Mix together until well mixed (it takes some time to get it all mixed to a nice consistency, be patient!)
Form in balls or roll into logs. I make three small logs from this recipe. Roll in crushed nuts and place in foil in refrigerator
Note: I use a food processor to grate the cheese.
Serve with your favorite crackers and enjoy!

Thanks for the invite, wrightie! If I was on the other side of PA, I'd take you up on it. What kind are you making?

Linda
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 22, 2007
9:52 PM

Post #4320267

Wow, those lady locks sound divine! I'm very familiar with the frozen puff pastry, I use it pretty regularly. In fact, I'm making some "sausage rolls" made with pp to take to a party tonight. The cheese balls sound yummy - thanks for the recipe.

I'm definitely making potato/cheese/onion as well as prune pirohi, but might also try cabbage.

joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

December 23, 2007
9:32 PM

Post #4322623

Here's my perogie recipe:
Pyrohy Dough

2 ½ cups Flour ¾ cup Warm Water
1 tsp Salt 2 Tbsp Oil
1 Egg (beaten) 1 Tbsp Vinegar

Sift flour & salt. Make a well in the middle & set aside.
In a separate bowl, combine the remaining ingredients & blend well. Slowly pour liquid mix into well & mix continuously until well blended.

Knead dough on a lightly floured surface until smooth & soft (about 5 minutes). Put dough into a lightly greased bowl, cover with a tea towel & let stand for 2 hours.

Roll out thinner than a pie crust & cut out rounds (about 2 inch diameter). Put 1 teaspoon of filling in the center of the round. Fold over, forming a half circle & pinch the edges together with fingers to seal in the filling.

If you want to freeze them, uncooked, place them on a cookie sheet without touching (freeze individually). Once frozen, move them to freezer bags.

To cook, from frozen or fresh, drop into boiling water. Stir with a wooden spoon to prevent sticking. When cooked they will float to the top. Place in a deep dish & sprinkle generously with melted butter. Toss gently to coat evenly with butter & prevent sticking. Add sliced green onion

Pyrohy Filling

1 Small Onion 1 cup Dry Cottage Cheese
3 Tbsp Butter ½ cup Cheddar Cheese Chunks
2 cups Mashed Potatoes ½ tsp Salt
1 Egg (beaten) ¼ tsp Pepper
*Use DRY Cottage Cheese *DO NOT use “new or baby” potatoes

Sauté onions in butter & add to mashed potatoes Add remaining ingredients & mix well.
Cool the mixture thoroughly before placing onto dough.

Yield about 2 dozen

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2007
9:34 PM

Post #4322626

I've just finished baking kolachki and figured I'd post step-by-step photos of how we fill and bake them in my family.

Roll out 1/4 of the dough at a time, cut into strips approx. 3" wide x approx 14" ... fill along one edge, then roll up, leaving the seam side down.

Pic. #1

Thumbnail by wrightie
Click the image for an enlarged view.

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2007
9:36 PM

Post #4322631

#2

Thumbnail by wrightie
Click the image for an enlarged view.

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2007
9:37 PM

Post #4322634

Slice into cookies approx. 1 1/2" long, or to your preference.

#3

Thumbnail by wrightie
Click the image for an enlarged view.

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2007
9:39 PM

Post #4322639

I arrange them on a cookie sheet covered in parchment paper, throw in the oven, then start rolling out the next piece of dough and start the process over again...

#4

Thumbnail by wrightie
Click the image for an enlarged view.

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2007
9:43 PM

Post #4322649

Here is how the finished product looks, before they are rolled in powdered sugar. I purposely let this batch get a little bit darker than the others in order to show you what I mean by "light brown" ... I flipped a few over so that you could see the bottoms. Don't worry about whether the tops get any color to them or not; the bottoms cook very fast and can burn easily.

On top left side of photo is a gallette that I made from the leftover scraps of dough ...

#5

Thumbnail by wrightie
Click the image for an enlarged view.

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2007
9:47 PM

Post #4322658

Oh, wow, JB, I've never put cottage cheese and egg in with mine - I bet those are fantastic!

I haven't even started making the pirohi yet. The dough is in the fridge and I think I'll wait until tomorrow to put them together and make the potato filling. I can hardly wait to eat! I wish we could all have a big potluck and try each others delicacies! Heaven.
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

December 23, 2007
10:16 PM

Post #4322708

They are very tasty. I like to cut the cheddar in little chunks rather than shredding it. Gives a bit more cheddar flavor in that bite full. I used to buy homemade dry cottage cheese, but don't know anyone that makes it anymore...sorta need cows for that & we live in the city. The cottage cheese needs to be DRY cottage cheese.

I hope you like them if you try it. I have some other Ukrainian favorites as well that I will post.

Joanne
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2007
10:39 PM

Post #4322769

joannabanana, I have a friend of Ukranian descent and she and her mother used to make a cheese (strudel) roll and sold them at Craft Shows we attended together. She would not share the recipe and how I long for one of those. It had a braided top and you could see the filling through the braids or stips of dough. The filling contained regular cottage cheese and tapioca. I remember her mother telling me that. They resembled a nut roll in size (length and width) but had this braided top with the filling showing. She also made them with apricot filling. Any idea what this is called and how to find a recipe for it?

Thank you for posting your pyrohy recipe. Sounds like another one to try!

wrightie, you are so kind to take the time to post the pictures of your kolachki in progress to help us Newbies in making them. It's such a help to see them in each step. Thanks so much!

Linda

joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

December 23, 2007
11:24 PM

Post #4322862

Linda,

I don't have a recipe for the strudels, but I will ask my Aunts' if they have one.

Here another favorite

Nalysnyky (Ukrainian Crepes)

4 eggs
1-1/2 cups flour, sifted
3/4 to 1 cup milk (to make very thin batter)
pinch of salt
1 tsp sugar

Beat eggs until light & add remaining ingredients. Add extra milk if batter is too thick.
Drop a few tablespoons of batter on moderately hot buttered grill or frying pan. Tilt the pan to spread the batter evenly. You want the little pancakes to be about 3 to 4" diameter. Brown only one side...don't flip. When lightly browned on the bottom, remove & stack on a plate to cool.
When rolling the cakes with filling, have the browned side on the outside of the roll. Arrange in a baking dish & dot with butter for each layer of rolls. Pour whipping cream level with top layer. Add a bit of chopped dill. Bake @350 degrees F for about 3/4 hour.

Filling:
2 cups dry cottage cheese
2 egg yolks
2 Tbsp cream
1/4 Tsp Salt
1/4 Tsp Pepper
1 tsp chopped dill

Mash the cottage cheese. Add all remaining ingredients & mix thoroughly. Drop 1 Tbsp of filling per flat cake (browned side down). Roll & place ing baking dish. Arrange in layers in a baking dish & dot with butter for each layer of rolls. Pour whipping cream level with top layer. Add a bit of chopped dill to garnish the top. Bake @350 degrees F for about 3/4 hour.






wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2007
11:33 PM

Post #4322881

Oh wow, those look yummy-scrummy. Thank you, JB!
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2007
2:46 AM

Post #4323355

Thanks so much Joanne. Perhaps someone in your family has heard of something like I described. It's not made from a strudel dough but more like a moist bread type of sweet bread dough. The Ukranian crepes sound wonderful!

Linda
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 24, 2007
2:56 AM

Post #4323369

Igrowinpa, there are some "cheese cake" recipes similar to your above description in my "Art of Polish Cooking" book, but I am not seeing tapioca in any of the recipes. One in particular uses the sweet yeast dough like in a nut roll, then criss-crosses or braids the dough over the cheese filling. The filling for that one calls for eggs, sugar, vanilla, farmer cheese, butter, & candied orange rind. I'm going to keep digging for one with tapioca.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 24, 2007
3:42 AM

Post #4323493

Okay, I've been doing some online sleuthing on "Kolache" which sounds like the bread that Igrowinpa described. As usual, it can be spelled any number of different ways depending upon family and country of origin but it appears that this article has a recipe similar to the tapioca one mentioned earlier. The main difference appears to be the way that the author forms hers, but searching on "kolache" will bring back lots of other recipes that explain how to make a braided loaf: http://www.caller2.com/2001/october/17/today/fea-food/14846.html

Am I making any sense? must. go. to. sleep.
hope43
Tulsa, OK
(Zone 7a)

December 27, 2007
11:09 PM

Post #4332500

i was told today by friend in Ind. eating sauerkraut is a dish for luck for the New yr. being a yankee i had never heard of it. when came down here was told black eyed peas are here. so sent sauerk. soup recipe they are excited now to make it.
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 28, 2007
8:14 PM

Post #4335409

Your Kolache filling recipe (from the link) sounds right but as you said, the form was different. The thing that I'm describing was definitely in a strudel or nut roll shape with open top, braided on top of the filling. If I google kolache, will I get some things made as loaves? I will do just that and see what I come up with. Thank you so much for looking, wrightie!

hope43, saurkraut on New Year's Day is definitely eaten for good luck - we do it every year. Hope it works for you this year!

Linda
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 28, 2007
8:18 PM

Post #4335422

Yes, most of the kolache recipes that I found were for braided loaves, however, I had a harder time trying to find your tapioca + cheese filling, so I figured that that aspect would be more important. That's why I provided the link that I did.

After looking around at the Kolache articles, I started to vaguely remember a strudel like that which my grandmother used to bring us from time to time - open with a braid and cheese filling.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 22, 2008
12:15 AM

Post #5817450

I would love to see some other favorite family recipes here. Hint-Hint!

I just saw an advertisement on the local news for some local Ukrainian Bazaars -- I'd like to try to go check them out this weekend.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 22, 2008
2:00 AM

Post #5817788

Hey!!!!

Good idea to revisit this Post as the Holidays approach!

I had forgotten all the recipes I posted here as year ago!
AHHH---Old age!!!!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 22, 2008
2:16 AM

Post #5817842

Hey Wrightie:

I'm not sure what the origin is, but we always have sauerkraut when serving turkey. The sauerkraut is braised for a long time with juniper seed and apples and turkey drippings and parsely and chopped onions and whole peppercorns and garlic and whiskey (or brandy). I love it!
plutodrive
Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2008
2:17 AM

Post #5817844

Ha... Gita I just made your Sauerkraut Soup again last night! All 10 qts. I love that stuff. I gave a quart away as a gift too. It has become a regular recipe around here. Thank you very much.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 22, 2008
2:18 AM

Post #5817853

I'm comin' over, sistah! Hey, where do you get juniper seed? I can honestly say that I have never used it in cooking.
planolinda
Plano, TX

November 22, 2008
2:19 AM

Post #5817855

there was a chicken dumpling soup my lithuanian mother made that i just loved--it was a ground beef filling in big dumplings --she cut the rolled out dough with a glass top to give an idea of the size of the dumplings--the meat mix was sealed between two rounds of dough and cooked in the chicken broth--does this sound familiar to anyone?
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 22, 2008
2:23 AM

Post #5817870

Someone say YES!!!! I wanna see that recipe! :)
Joan
Belfield, ND
(Zone 4a)



November 22, 2008
2:31 AM

Post #5817901

Sounds like bisquick biscuits to me, rolled out, cut with a glass, (I use a doughnut cutter without the middle circle). I've used these bisquick biscuits often, and stuffed them with various things and dropped into stew, soup and sometimes I put them unstuffed on top of casseroles.

If I want to make them into the big fluffy dumplings with no stuffing, I just mix bisquick with enough milk so it forms a sticky, almost dry dough and drop by the spoonful into hot soup or stew. It's a nice variation from the hard little dumplings for knoephla soup, and my family likes these big fluffy ones better.
planolinda
Plano, TX

November 22, 2008
4:27 PM

Post #5819336

those sound great but these were not light and fluffy--they were heavy and dense--about 3 or four would fit in a wide soup bowl and the broth would just cover them--they were a meal-- i am trying to think of something to compare them with-maybe a ravioli type dough texture but bigger and i think the meat mix was most likely ground beef with onion and maybe an egg and salt and pepper--just guessing--they weren't spicy--not meatball spicy--
planolinda
Plano, TX

November 22, 2008
4:39 PM

Post #5819385

i was looking at the kolachki recipes - ours were little apricot cookies--maybe we called them the wrong name but they were a lithuanian treat--the cream cheese dough was tender and so good and we rolled it out and then cut in squares--a little spoon of apricot filling and then one corner folded over the top and the other folded across --kind of like if you were wrapping a baby! the top and bottom left open--sometimes we used a poppyseed filling--later i moved to texas and a friend brought over kolachkis for a treat--i was excited but found they were chechlovakian and different--a light airy dough with a little filling in the middle of the top--more a breakfast food--and we had poppyseed cake made like a bunt cake --so moist!
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 22, 2008
5:06 PM

Post #5819479

Linda, those all sound delightful -- there are so many variations from family to family and region to region. I, too, prefer a tender cream cheese dough to the airy style. Most places / stores seem to carry what they call rugelach and have the same shape but totally different fillings from what we made. My family's "log" shaped kolachki is the normal shape for the area in NYS where I grew up, and seems to be unique to that area(?).

As for the dumplings, they sound similar to many I've heard of, though that was not a common dish in my household. I'll peruse some of my cookbooks and see if anything looks close.

I just dropped by a Ukrainian Bazaar where they were selling some ethnic foods, including the cookies shaped and filled like you mentioned above. I bought a lunch platter which included (using my terminology, not theirs since Ukrainian is a foreign language to me!) pirohi, holupki, kielbasa, sauerkraut, borscht, and a slice of [fake] rye bread. It was quite tasty overall, but the pirohi had no flavor, imo and the borscht was boring. lol -- isn't it funny how we (*I*!!!) compare back to my childhood foods. Every family's specialties are the Best for them, eh?

Oh, I also bought several different types of kielbasa style sausage. This is particularly amusing to me since I have been moving towards vegetarianism lately. heh - I'll stick it in the freezer and pull it out for special occasions.
planolinda
Plano, TX

November 22, 2008
5:19 PM

Post #5819523

how lucky you are to be able to get those! when i lived in chicago it was the largest population of lithuanians outside of lithuania so easy to find the foods--in texas people aren't sure of where lithuania is and have no idea of the foods! not knocking texans! gotta love texans but not a big lithuanian community! i haven't had borscht forever! might wait till summer for that---i love lithuanian rye bread!
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 22, 2008
5:24 PM

Post #5819541

There isn't much of a selection around here really. It's just that the churches will sell goodies once or twice / year so I try to find them when I remember to! I miss a good rye loaf -- I used to make it since I couldn't get anything that I liked down here, but haven't done so in a long time. When I went back to my hometown in NY, most of the old ethic bakeries had closed down. So depressing...

They were selling 'real' rye bread at one of the stalls at the bazaar today, but the kitchen was serving a sad version of bread that was made by Atlanta Bread company - soft, like American white bread, no taste. Bleck.
planolinda
Plano, TX

November 22, 2008
5:45 PM

Post #5819605

my oldest sister is a bit a recluse--every so often an old boyfriend (from 40 some years back!) sends her a couple loafs of lithuanian rye bread--UPS! she is thrilled and i think it is so sweet

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 22, 2008
9:28 PM

Post #5820246

Love this thread,I just came across this due to the suggestion of Wrightey.
Austrian Plum dumplings are made with Potato nocchi dough rolled out to 1/8' or so cut into squares with 1/2 of a fresh italien plum (which when dried are prunes) with 1 sugar cube inside, pulling the dough around the filling, boiling them, 5 minutes, let them steam for almost half an hour. Tossingthem into bread crumbs browned in butter. Sweet dish. So I thing the plum piroghis mentioned must be the same.
My grandmother made "Pflaumentatchkerl" Plum pockets. Shape is square not 1/2 round. Same thing as piroghies. Helene

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 22, 2008
10:13 PM

Post #5820399

hahaha ... I was salivating over the description of those plum dumplings till I realized that they were pretty much the same thing as prune / lekvar pirohi! I will have to try the bread crumbs with them.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 23, 2008
2:22 AM

Post #5821104

wrightie,

You will have to make a trip to baltimore, as the Lithuanian Community here is pretty big and active.
They usually hold one of the first of the many Summer Ethnic Festivals here. It is held at the Catonsville Armory and is very nice and busy. It is usually in mid-late May.

You will gawk at all the amber for sale--all kinds of other hand-made things--be able to buy shots of their honey liqueur (Vyrita)--to die for! They also have some of the younger guys making potato pancakes non stop--they sell Lithuanian beer--and their party staple--"Kugelis"...
Lots of folk dancing performances by different age groups also.

I go about every 2-3 years as the people I used to know and associate with are all from their Sports Club--and they are the main cooks and servers and workers.

You can almost pick an Ethnic Group--and they have a Festival somewhere here--even the Polish. Italians...Greeks...Hispanics...Russians--(Oh, the rye breads they sell!!!) Germans--AH! That one is always fun... Of course! Oompha-pa music, German goodies and beers, Women all over in their drindles...men in their Lederhosen...

I just think that having all this going on here for umpteen years already--is what makes Baltimore so special. Nowhere else------????

I used to participate in the Estonian Festival for years! Had my own booth and all (Face painting). I also belonged to the Estonian Folk Dance group for 15 years and performed a lot.
My Ex, was the festival chairman and so we were all involved up to the hilt.
We cooked and baked and slaved in the hot sun--then some of us danced in our wool skirts and knitted stockings in the blazing downtown heat.

Back then--almost ALL the Ethnic Festivals were held somewhere or other at the Inner Harbor. Then--it all came to an end and those that wanted to continue--had to find other locations. Many of the smaller countries, like us (Estonia) just folded.

OH the memories I have of all this!!!!!!! The camaraderie--the pulling together for the "cause"...the endless preparations...the rain outs...the getting sloshed on chugging beer all day...and, then repeating it all on the next day!

Sigh...Gita

PS---I think, as the Summer approaches, if you go to the Baltimore Tourism page, you will be able to get the full schedule of which one when.

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 23, 2008
2:31 AM

Post #5821135

Where I grew up, we had a very active ethnic community, much like you described!Gita, maybe we should make a Date of it next Spring, eh? Maybe even drop by Druid Hill to wander around the conservatory?

I wanted to post this interesting little 'find' that I stumbled upon whilst looking for Planolinda's chicken soup w/ meat-filled dumplings -- http://www.inyourpocket.com/lithuania/kaunas/chapter/130-food__drink.html

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 23, 2008
2:40 AM

Post #5821165

wrightie--
You're on for the next Lithuanian, or Polish Festival.

The Polish hold theirs at Patterson Park. I so miss going to some of these, but wandering around all by myself just is NO fun! Need a Buddy! It is more fun to taste and sample and gab with someone else...
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 23, 2008
2:43 AM

Post #5821173

That will be fun, Gita!

PL, could you be thinking of Kreplach Soup? Beef & onion filled dumplings in a luscious looking chicken soup. Scroll down this page about 2/3 and check out that photo & description and see if it rings a bell: http://www.savethedeli.com/2007/11/
planolinda
Plano, TX

November 23, 2008
2:50 AM

Post #5821201

that's it!!! now i will go and google it for a recipe! be back later--thanks so much

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 23, 2008
4:26 PM

Post #5822541

Those pockets in the soup are "Tatchkerl" as we called them. I too will look for the recipe.Helene
detheo
Macomb, MI
(Zone 5b)

November 23, 2008
4:31 PM

Post #5822552

planolinda,

I've been looking a for a dumpling recipe...mmmmm ;o)
Do you have one you can share??

Thanks~
Delane
planolinda
Plano, TX

November 23, 2008
6:10 PM

Post #5822820

well i have been looking--i will pick one and post it later-it seems to be a basic dough with a ground beef filling with onions and salt and pepper and cooked in chicken soup till the dough is done--i really thought my mother made the mixture and put it in the dough and that it cooked in the soup along with the dough but all the recipes have it cooked first--i would like to use a really nice rich chicken stock for it--they called it peasant food on the different sites i found--said peasants used it to stretch out what they had--
please tell me about tatchkerl--i couldn't find it when i tried an internet search

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 23, 2008
10:01 PM

Post #5823544

Oh that's a bohemian expression. I think it means something like sandwiched in between.Like an italian ravioli. A nudel dough was used, rolled thinly with a zig-zag roll cutter (not sure what else to call it) 2x2" squares were cut and filled either with savory or sweet filling sealed from corner to corner. In Bohemia, they are known for their Povidel Tatchkerl._Sweet- "Lekvar" in hungarian
Yes the savory were cooked in either chicken or beef broth.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 23, 2008
10:19 PM

Post #5823613

with a little bit of research, it mean "taschen" pockets. this is how they looked.
This is a ravioli picture.

Thumbnail by helenethequeen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 24, 2008
3:04 AM

Post #5824574

The word "taschen" is definitely Germanic. I means "pocket book". Not a term in a really formal sense---but that is what it means. LIke--you could say "purse"---or you could say "pocketbook"...Same understanding...

My Grandmother and mother used the word "tascha" for a pocket book (purse).
So--you could loosely interpret that as something to put something else into----in this case, some dough that will hold a filling of some sort.

Aren't languages interesting?????? How you can track the meaning of something and how it has evolved into something else???

Gita

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 25, 2008
7:01 PM

Post #5830115

Here are two recipes for two types of Pierniki.

Pierniki Polish spiced cookies

1 1/2 cups honey
5 cups flour
pinch black pepper
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1/2 tsp. cloves
4 large eggs
1 cup sugar
1 tsp. baking soda(dissolved in a little water)

Preheat oven to 350F.

Heat honey until it boils, then allow it to cool to lukewarm. Sift flour with spices.

Beat the eggs with the sugar until thick. Add the soda, honey and
the flour; mix well.

Roll out the dough on a lightly floured board to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut cookies into what ever shapes you prefer. Bake on butteed sheets for 10-15 minutes or until just lightly browned.

Cookies can be glazed with a mixture of confectioner's sugar, water, almond or vanilla extract and a drop of food coloring.

Fruited Pierniki Polish pastry

1 1/2 cups honey
1 cup sugar
4 cups flour
1 package of yeast
1/2 cup beer, warm
1 tbsp. butter
4 large eggs
3/4 cup chopped dates
2 tbsp. finely chopped, candied ginger
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup chopped dried apricots
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. allspice
1/2 tsp. cloves
1/2 tsp. dried, grated orange peel
4 tbsp. cocoa

Preheat oven to 350F.

Heat the honey until it boils, then add the sugar and bring the mixture to a boil again. Cool.

Dissolve the yeast in the warm beer and add it to the honey. Beat in the butter, flour and eggs. Add the remaining ingredients and stir well.

Spread evenly into a buttered, oblong cake pan or individual molds. Bake for 40-45 minutes. Serve sliced very thinly.

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 25, 2008
11:20 PM

Post #5830962

M, thanks for those recipes -- I'm having a major childhood memory that has been buried for a zillion years. I think that those pierniki are the cookies that we used to cut and decorate to hang on the Christmas tree!!! Cool!

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 25, 2008
11:37 PM

Post #5831029

I make something very similar, used to be cutouts, now in the new life, we make half a nut size balls, place them on the cookie sheet, brush them with egg yolk, or just place 1/2 blanched almond on top, bake let cool, let them soften nice with tea and a shot of myers rum. Honig Busserl. A fat Kiss (Busserl) Honey (Honig) Helene Fruited Pierniki sound good. love anything with yeast.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 25, 2008
11:47 PM

Post #5831057

Here's a question for those with E. European roots: What were/are some of the foods served on Christmas Eve in your household?

We had fish, not meat, on Christmas Eve (like most European households, I presume. Grandma served breaded, fried Haddock (I think it was actually rolled in cracker crumbs, not bread) and tartar sauce, mushroom soup, and a bAZILLioN pirohi. I think that we always had green beans which were served with butter and milk. There were tons of other foods, but I hardly remember anything else because those are all of the things that I loaded up on. In those days, our big Feasts typically included 20 or 30 people -- the women would be in the kitchen for 3 or 4 days preparing for the holidays. Man, that was like a whole other lifetime.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 25, 2008
11:49 PM

Post #5831061

Cross-posted with you, Helene. Those cookies sound yummy. I cannot resist anything with nuts in it.
NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

November 26, 2008
4:45 PM

Post #5833053

Taking a break from work - program is doing things that it should not be doing, so I am trying not toss my computer out the second story window (also known as "downloading"). I am loving this thread. Wrightie, I remember City Chicken - we had it at least once a week in McKeesport, PA, when I was growing up. I made it for my stepchildren, and they LOVED it! I made it the day of Super Bowl XL, as we cheered da' Stillers, and of course, that's why they won! Here's something festive in the spirit of the thread.

Gibanica (Croatian) First letter is a hard "G" sound, like the "g" in "gap"
Pronounced "ge-BAN-i-tza, emphasis on the second syllable

This is NOT for low-fat, low-cholesterol diets, but it is outrageously good.
It's not exactly a quick and easy dessert, but it is impressive as heck,
and definitely worth the effort once in a while. I have made it with three
different fillings at once - the nut filling, the first apple filling, and the
cherry filling. I have made it for several potlucks, and have never taken
any home, much to my husband's disappointment.

Sweet cheese filling (I have not made this one, but
I have had it at festivals - it's good!):

6 eggs
1/2 cup sifted flour
1 tsp. salt
1 cup sour cream
2 lb. creamed cottage cheese, small curd, strained
1/2 lb. butter
1 lb. filo/strudel dough

Beat eggs until light and fluffy; add flour and salt. Beat well; add sour
cream and cottage cheese. Fold in thoroughly. Grease 9x13x2 inch pan.
Place 2 sheets of filo in pan. Spread with about 6 spoons cheese layers.
Repeat these two layers until 2 sheets of filo dough are left. Top with
remaining filo dough and butter well. Bake in 350 deg. oven for 1 hour.
Let stand. Cut into squares and serve warm.


Alternate fillings (can be used separately or together - one version that
I had in a restaurant had seven layers!)


A nut filling:

1 1/2 lb. ground nuts
1 Tbsp. honey
3 egg whites
1 c. sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
1 c. heavy milk or cream
1/3 c. sweet butter

Scald milk with butter. In bowl, add ground nuts, honey, vanilla, sugar and
scant salt. Add scalded milk with butter. Mix, then add stiffly beaten egg
whites. Add milk to thin if it doesn't spread well.


And another:

2 lb. apples, thinly sliced
1 lb. nuts, ground
1 cup sugar
2 tsp. cinnamon

Layer apples then nuts, sugar and cinnamon


Here's a rich one (Haven't tried this one):

1 lb. ricotta or hoop cheese
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup white raisins
1/2 pt. sour cream
1/4 lb. butter, melted
2 whole beaten eggs

Mix all ingredients together and spread.


A cherry filling: (I have used this *without* the
graham cracker crumbs and butter. It's still darned good!)

2 1/2 lb. cherries, cleaned, seeded and halved
1 or 2 jiggers of whiskey
2 tsp. nutmeg
sugar to taste - cherries may be tart or sweet so adjust accordingly

stir together and spread

12 finely ground graham crackers
1 cube butter, melted

sprinkle layer with ground cracker then pour over butter.


Another apple filling:

1 lb. tart apples
1/3 cup sugar
1/3 cup raisins
3 Tbsp. rum
1 tsp. cinnamon
3 Tbsp. fine breadcrumbs

Soak raisins in rum for 2 hours. Wash, core and thinly slice apples. Layer
first with half the breadcrumbs. Add apple slices. Add rest of breadcrumbs,
then sugar, cinnamon and well drained raisins.

Grated lemon rind is often used in some of these fillings.

Some versions use 4 to 6 sheets of dough, if you are using filo, and each
sheet is often layered with melted sweet butter.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 26, 2008
5:29 PM

Post #5833177

NanuBunny, Thank you for those recipes -- they look phenomenal! I want a piece of each of them. Right NOW. ;)

It's so nice to hear that someone else knows City Chicken. I used to beg my mom to make it all the time.

Hope your computer makes it through the day!
NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

November 26, 2008
6:35 PM

Post #5833368

Wrightie, look here:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/378073/

And my recipe is on that page. I mentioned on that page that my Mom and aunts always served it with mashed potatoes and peas. I think it's a federal law that you have to do that, because everyone else I talked with about it said the same thing. I, for one, do not wish to test it. I mean, I don't want the City Chicken police showing up at my door.

So far, the computer is surviving.

Bonnie

wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 26, 2008
6:43 PM

Post #5833385

Oh my gosh, I cannot believe I missed that thread!!!

BTW, it *IS*, in fact, a federal law to serve it without the obligatory mashed patooties and peas. Thanks for not making me send a gaggle of grannies and their rolling pins down to you.

I need to skim this thread and see if I've posted our city chicken recipe and see how it compares to the others.

smooch-smooch
w
NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

November 26, 2008
7:53 PM

Post #5833624

Okay, well, that's cleared up! Now I know not to mess with the established order of things, lest we have to reboot the universe! Looking forward to seeing your recipe!

If you ever come down this way, let me know, I'll have the CC and the obligatory side dishes in celebration!

Love,

Bonnie

This message was edited Nov 26, 2008 2:54 PM

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 27, 2008
4:47 AM

Post #5834922

My Polish neighbor serves on Christmas eve:

Relish Tray ~ Pickles and Peppers
Holiday Vegetable Salad ~ Barszcz z Uszkami
Baked Sauerkraut with Peas ~ Poppy Seed Strucla
Coffee ~ Pastries
Nuts ~ Fruits
Candies
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
11:54 PM

Post #5945203

So, are there traditional ethnic foods that you like to eat at the New Year? I don't remember my mother's side of the family doing anything particular, so I'd like to hear what I might be missing out on(?)...
NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

December 31, 2008
2:47 AM

Post #5946000

Back in western PA, my family and my ex's family always had roast pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day for good luck to start the year. The pork seems to be a pretty widespread tradition since my mother was Italian. Here in the South, it's black-eyed peas, ham of some kind or salt pork, and collard greens. We will be having black-eyed peas with ham and cornbread. My DH is a native North Carolinian, and that's one of his favorite meals. We will skip the collards, since they're not my favorite, and will substitute spinach lightly sauteed with olive oil and garlic.

Love and Happy New Year to all,

Bonnie

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 31, 2008
3:16 AM

Post #5946112

wrightie,

This tradition is SO old and I have never done it myself---but i DO remember it...

On New Years Eve--peas were fried (fairly dry) in a pan--probably in some bacon grease--and they were crunchy...
If all the peas were not eaten by midnight--they would all represent tears-to-come in the new year.

We also "pour Lead" for good luck and fortune telling on New Years Eve...That's another story and has nothing to do with food or recipes...

Gita

Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 31, 2008
4:11 PM

Post #5947552

Defintiely pork and sauerkraut here in western PA on New Years Day. I will be getting out the crock pot and filling it with sauerkraut, pork chops, hot dogs, sasuage, and any other left overs that I can find in the freezer that will work. We like mashed potatoes - real ones - and then we put some of the sauerkraut and juice over it. In a day or two, my hubby will make navy bean soup with a ham bone and meat on it that someone in the family had for Christmas day. There are several more days of good eating ahead! Happy New Year to everyone,

Linda
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 31, 2008
4:57 PM

Post #5947733

linda i am using up my freezer "stuff" and i have hotdogs which i never eat anymore--i also have a jar of opened sauerkraut--not enough for crock pot but maybe to simmer on stove? do you ever use beef with your sauerkraut? veggies? i am wondering what else i might add to the mix from my freezer--no pork in there
NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

December 31, 2008
9:28 PM

Post #5948816

Planolinda, hotdogs simmered in sauerkraut are delicious! I never eat hotdogs any more either, except at sports events, but when we were visiting my brother back in western PA last October, my SIL made sauerkraut with hotdogs and Polish sausages for snacks while we watched the Steeler game. Comfort food!

Love and Happy New Year to all,

Bonnie
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 31, 2008
10:07 PM

Post #5948963

bonnie i went to allrecipes.com--and found a recipe for sauerkraut soup that called for sausage but because of linda mentioning hot dogs in the sauerkraut i made it with the dogs cut up--so here is how it was made and it turned out great
a carton of chicken broth
package of hash browns (they said can of potatoes but i am using up what i have)
pound of sliced dogs
half jar of sauerkraut (isn't it funny that that is the exact ammount i had?)
chopped onion
dill, garlic powder, salt and pepper
just simmer and eat
now i had a can of german potato salad that i put in too and i think that is a great addition-i have bacon that i might put on top -i just hope i didn't leave anything out
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 1, 2009
12:53 AM

Post #5949601

planolinda, I have never used beef with my sauerkraut but why not try it? Many hotdogs out there have beef in them, and they come out just fine cooked with the sauerkraut. They are like a different kind of hotdog since they taste so much better when cooked with the sauerkraut. We share the sauerkraut with the kids (married kids), and everyone always wants some of the hotdogs!

The recipe in your last message sounds wonderful. Lots of things mixed together can make a great meal. The bacon added would be a nice addition too.

Linda

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 1, 2009
12:54 AM

Post #5949610

Linda! Tsk...tsk...

Hot Dogs in Sauerkraut Soup?????? NOT in the Northern European recipes where this kind of soup rules! They never had Hot Dogs! Just good, down-to Earth ingredients...

I make this soup about once a year--NOT because I do not like it, but because I have NO room in my freezer. It seems to be always full--of whatever...

This is a VERY good soup! Great for the cold winter evenings. Thick and heavy with flavor (NO hot dogs! YUK!)--there are better things!
I have, truly, not EVER, met anyone that does not like this Soup--and NONE of them have ever had it before. It is like this awesome chalange when i bring it to work for them to try it. Normal reply--"EEWWW! Sauerkaraut Soup?????"...

There are people on DG that have gotten turned on to this soup. Hope you try it!

*********************************************************

Gita’s Latvian Sauerkraut Soup

Note: This is delicious, full-bodied, cool weather soup. No actual
measurements are given. Only guidelines. Good soups are not based on a prescribed formula. If it seems right to you….go for it! But--do not get "weird" about this! OK?
(this recipe is for a pot of approx. 21qts. capacity)..LOTS of Soup!
Start saving margarine bowls, Cooll Whip Bowls--or buy a zillion "Glad" saver bowls...

In a large stockpot put:

A big, meaty ham bone (smoked is best), a 2 lb (plus or minus) piece of fresh pork of some kind (picnic, country spare ribs, fresh ham, thick pork chops etc.) and, for extra flavor, some smoked ham hocks, neck bones or the like. These have a lot of fat but also add a lot of flavor. Anything with bone-in is good. It adds body to the soup.

Cover meat with cold water and bring to a boil. Turn down fire a bit and simmer, skimming off foam as it surfaces. Let simmer for about an hour.
**Do not add any of the seasonings until all the “foaming” has stopped, or you will be skimming off the seasonings as well.

Next add 1 deli-pack (or 1 lg. Can—32oz) of Sauerkraut, 1 med. head of green cabbage, cut with a knife in a coarse shred, 2-3 ribs of celery (sliced), 2-3 med. onions (coarsely chopped), 1Tbs. Caraway seed, about a tsp. full of whole peppercorns, (or fresh ground black pepper to taste), 2-3 Bay leaves, fresh chopped parsley (1/2c. or so), fresh chopped dill (stems and all-maybe a 1/3 cup), and 1-2 coarsely shredded carrots--NOT sliced.

Note:
This soup can have either barley (a ½ cup or so dry) or diced potatoes (3 or 4 med.—thick-diced) added for a fuller body. If you choose barley, add it now, as barley takes LONG while to cook until it is tender! If you choose potatoes, add them in the last half hour of cooking the soup, or they will turn to “mush”.

Add enough water (or saved broths—see note below) to almost fill the pot. Bring all back to a slow boil. Lower fire way down, and simmer the soup for a good 2 hours, stirring occasionally. Meat needs to be “falling off the bones” done.

At this point, using a slotted spoon, fish out ALL meats and bones to a large platter. Keep soup simmering ….you can now add the potatoes).

Cut away all edible meat in bite-sized pieces (sliver smoked skin from the hocks in thin strips, scraping off all underlying fat, discarding all unnecessary fat. ***(Save bones for your favorite dog!).

Return cut-up meat to the soup and stir well to distribute all. Simmer another half hour.

The soup is now basically done. Let it rest a bit and then serve it with GOOD buttered bread of your choice—Rye bread and butter really complement this Soup.
This Soup gets better and better when reheated…as all soups do!

Can be frozen in serving size bowls or containers, such as a margarine bowl. Microwave to re-heat and serve.

***This, and all soups, freeze VERY WELL and last for a very long time in the freezer without losing flavor. Years! Literally!!!

Frugality note:
You can save (and freeze) any liquids/broths from other “cooking” liquids of veggies, potatoes, and meats and then add them to this soup. Why pour it down the drain???

Lots of success with this! You will love this soup! Everyone has, that has tasted it.
I can almost guarantee it!!!

Gita
planolinda
Plano, TX

January 1, 2009
12:58 AM

Post #5949625

i would not have put the hot dogs in if i were not cleaning out my freezer and wanting to use up what i have--that being said the hot dogs tasted very good in it--maybe not as good as sausage but then i would not have used up the hot dogs i had --i know it isn't what the recipe called for but it worked--
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 1, 2009
1:05 AM

Post #5949644

My Polish / Slovak side of the family always cooked sausages and hotdogs (and hotdogs are a type of sausage, no?) in Sauerkraut, not to be mistaken for sauerkraut soup. They are delicious that way.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 1, 2009
1:28 AM

Post #5949776

wrigtie,

YES! I have had, and loved, smoked sausage (like Hillshire Kielbasa) cooked with Sauerkraut as a side dish. Especially, it the cook added some brown sugar to sweeten it.

Some of the people on DG that have become "hooked" on my Sauerkraut Soup have used smoked turkey thighs instead of hocks with favorable results. Well--OK...

However--being a traditionalist, I will stick to the original recipe that I, and my family, has used forever...I will not take any short-cuts...

That is one problem I have about sharing my ethnic recipes...Many people do not want to go through the trouble of doing it "right"--or from "scratch"...so people start substituting stuff--because it is easier. NOT fair!

If someone posts a recipe from another culture--you owe it to them to cook it EXACTLY the way they posted it. IF you decide to alter it, to suit your own personal choices or tastes, it is NO LONGER the recipe that was posted--and you cannot/should not call it that! Something just gets lost in this process...

ALL good cooking and baking takes time! You need to know that before you start.
The results will be worth it.

Just my opinion-----Gita
NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

January 1, 2009
2:04 AM

Post #5949930

Gitagal, that soup sounds incredible! The hotdogs and Polish sausage in the sauerkraut are not intended to be authentic anything but local comfort food, unless you count Pittsburgh as an ethnic culture, LOL. Actually, now that I think of it we've always had our own language (Pittsburghese, of course), so maybe we are an authentic ethnic culture... That stuff sure makes a Steeler game that much more fun. I may be 400 miles from the "old homeplace", but I still bleed Black and Gold, and still love the western PA comfort food... like City Chicken ;-).

Christmas memory - my Polish friend's mother was making pirohy, and ran out of filling. She went to the fridge and pulled out a container of homemade apricot cookie filling. She made what looked like pirohy, but filled them with the apricot filling, and deep-fried them, then dusted them with powdered sugar. I was in first or second grade, and I STILL remember how delicious those were! Yowza!

Love and Happy New Year to all!

Bonnie

This message was edited Dec 31, 2008 9:05 PM

This message was edited Dec 31, 2008 9:05 PM
planolinda
Plano, TX

January 1, 2009
4:25 AM

Post #5950389

i got my recipe from allrecipes.com--it did not make a claim to be a dish from any region --just said it was good--i did not use your recipe gita-although i did make yours a different time and it was very good---but i also liked this one which was also very good--and bonnie i think comfort food is a good description!

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 7, 2009
11:57 PM

Post #5979024

Don't know how I missed this thread.
I'm 100% russian and hubby is part polish and german...so we are always trying to find the best pierogies, an orthodox church near where we used to live sold them every year at Easter, they were absolutely the best we've ever had.
Hubby wants his last meal to be hot dogs or kielbasi.

I didn't realize until I pulled that link for polishpierogi.com that the side dish I make with egg noodles, onions and cabbage was called 'haluski'.
I don't usually do ethnic cooking for Christmas(usually save it for Easter, has to be fresh kielbasi) but this year did lumpkies(stuffed cabbage)
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 8, 2009
12:08 AM

Post #5979089

Funny you say that, Jen ... my mother's last meal actually was homemade pirohi! (I think she died and went to heaven.) I should be so lucky. =0

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 8, 2009
2:17 AM

Post #5979561

Just joking here----
But I think I would like my last meal to be about a 1lb. fresh, Maine lobster tail with about a cup of drawn butter...
OR---The best Seafood platter in the world! No fish!
Or an amazing Surf and Turf-----droooooolll...

Can you tell I live in seafood country?????? Never getenough of it--as i do not go out, but I just love ALL seafood!!!!! I MAKE GOOD CRAB CAKES, THOUGH! Gotta be all lump crab meat from the Maryland Blue crabs--nothing else will match the sweetness or the flavor...

You people that live on the West coast and have all these huge Dungenese Crabs to eat and DO NOT use the "Old Bay" Seasoning------You don't know what you are missing!!!!! If you can buy them fresh--then steam them in a kettke with a grid on the bottom. Pour a can of beer and some vinegar 'down there"--then bring it to a hot steam. Put in the crab, well seasoned with Old Bay and coarse salt, cover it and steam it until done. Just taste the difference!!!!
I have been to Oregon and Wa. and they sell it only steamed/cooked with salt. Yuk! Do it the Maryland way and you will never again just eat a plain, cold dungenese crab from the seafood market!

IF you know anyone on the East Coast--have them send you some--or buy it on-line...
Here, you can get it in EVERY grocery store!

Gita

Here it is--for those of you who have NO clue what this looks like. It comes in about 3 different-sized tins...

This message was edited Jan 7, 2009 9:22 PM

Thumbnail by Gitagal
Click the image for an enlarged view.

NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2009
3:32 AM

Post #5979915

Absolutely, Gita - I think it's against state laws in Maryland, Delaware and Virginia (and maybe North Carolina too) NOT to have a can of Old Bay in your kitchen. Heck, we even carry it in the RV. That stuff is great!

Bonnie

This message was edited Jan 8, 2009 9:08 AM
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 8, 2009
5:46 AM

Post #5980303

In Louisiana, we use Zatarain's which we consider perfect. I have never tried Old Bay. I guess I should do a taste test some day.
planolinda
Plano, TX

January 8, 2009
11:29 PM

Post #5982916

i am making turkey rueben sandwiches tonight--i've ordered them from a deli (heart healthy item since it is turkey) and i liked it so now i've got the sauerkraut draining and will be using swiss cheese also and some good mustard-- since i am not using the whole jar of kraut i will be thinking what else to use it with ---i've had sauerkraut soup recently so am looking for something else--ideas? i could always do sausage with it (won't be doing hot dogs this time gita!)
nice last meal wrightie! love those pirogi!!

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 9, 2009
12:43 AM

Post #5983211

pork loin or chops and sauerkraut?
planolinda
Plano, TX

January 9, 2009
1:02 AM

Post #5983293

that does sound good--might give that a try!
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 10, 2009
2:18 PM

Post #5988435

I do boneless chops and sauerkraut lots of times. I have a small, not tiny, crock pot and there are just the two of us now. It makes for a very easy and satisfying dinner. The crock pot cooks and I don't have to - LOL! I just add mashed potatoes on the side, from scratch preferrably, and we love it.

Linda
planolinda
Plano, TX

January 10, 2009
5:35 PM

Post #5989296

that does sound good--and i never make chops--don't know why but i just don't--thanks for a good idea--so put them in the crock pot and cover with sauerkraut? anything else to know? and yes with mashed potatoes sounds perfect!
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 10, 2009
7:34 PM

Post #5989679

I grew up on sauerkraut and pork chops or sauerkraut and spare ribs or sauerkraut and wieners. I always put in the sauerkraut and some chopped onion and the chops or other meat because that is what my mother did. I quit eating sauerkraut and wieners after I got sick from some served at the Yellowstone Park Cafeteria when I was about 8 or 10 but ate the others all my life. My father's favorite was sauerkraut and pig's knuckle which my mother did not cook, but that he could get at a local German restaurant.
As far as I know none of my ancestors were Eastern European but there was quite a diverse population in Wyoming where they grew up. Or maybe the Germans eat these things as part of their culture. I suspect they do.
planolinda
Plano, TX

January 10, 2009
7:40 PM

Post #5989695

YES!! another sauerkraut and hot dogs person!!!

my mother ate pigs knuckles but i never tried them--and don't want to!
still using up my freezer foods and so today threw some stir fry veggies (baby corn, snow peas, water chestnuts, etc) into chicken broth and added a can of white chicken meat, noodles, some fresh rosemary, lemon juice, dried mushrooms and just a spoon of sauerkraut (just for a little flavor) and have it heating up now--tasted some and it's good--
planolinda
Plano, TX

January 10, 2009
8:54 PM

Post #5989898

ok--my boneless porkchops and sauerkraut are in the crockpot--just added a little carroway seeds
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 10, 2009
9:10 PM

Post #5989934

I think pig's knuckles are rather like pig's feet or pig's trotters, as the British call them. They have a lot of pig skin and cartilage on them, which is very delicious. I used to cook pig's feet Chinese style ( braised in soy sauce for a log while.) Delicious. And the skin turns the broth into a jelly when it is chilled.
A wonderful French chef in Santa Fe, near where I live, cooked Pig's Trotters, a traditional French dish, for the special in his restaurant. Not one person ordered it and he said he would never, never, never serve it again. Poor guy.
We Americans, for the most part, are so far removed from the farm that we don't eat all the parts of the animal and most people think all the parts we don't eat much of taste like liver and/or kidneys and/or intestines. Not so!
I am a vegan now and don't eat that stuff, but not because I don't like it -- because I am trying to take care of my health.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 10, 2009
9:12 PM

Post #5989937

Something else my father absolutely relished was pickled pig's feet which he bought in a jar. I don't know if this is a Southern thing or a European thing, but my mother was horrified by them but I rather like them. She told me not to eat them because they were fattening, so I didn't eat very many of them, but they were interesting.
Igrowinpa
Beaver Falls, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 10, 2009
10:03 PM

Post #5990095

planolinda, now you did it! You made me hungry for sauerkraut. We have about 6-7 inches of snow on the ground and it's been raining freezing rain on top of it all afternoon. It's a great day for a crockpot meal-not that any day isn't a day for crockpot cooking! I had some sauerkraut and meat leftover in the freezer from New Years. I also had 4 lowfat hotdogs left in a package in the freezer and I have them simmering together on the stove. Now for the mashed potatoes...

When I make my sauerkraut, I open the container it comes in, be it a bag or can, and take a taste. I only wash and drain the sauerkraut if it is really, really sour. We like a bit of "bite" to our kraut.I put it in the crockpot and sprinkle around chopped green onions or any kind of onions chopped, a little brown sugar, and a small apple that is sliced. I add a bit of water depending on how much liquid was with the saurkraut. Then I add the meat I am going to cook with it, put on the lid, and cook on high for 5 hours. If I have caraway seeds, I add them too. I got these additions to the sauerkraut from somewhere - TV? magazine? - can't remember, but the sauerkraut always turns out great, no matter which brand I buy. And anyone who's had it here has liked it too. Even non-sauerkraut lovers!!!!

My Grandfather was from Poland and came here in the early 1900's. I know he lived near the Germany border and worked in Germany before coming here. He loved Pig's Feet. I never tried them and don't think that I could. He became a good cook in his later years, after my Grandmother died. He would send over home made bread - a real dense kind of bread, almost a sweet bread - pirogies - bow ties sprinkled with powdered sugar - and even his own sauerkraut from scratch.

Linda

Linda
planolinda
Plano, TX

January 11, 2009
12:29 AM

Post #5990541

linda we just ate our pork chops with the sauerkraut and mashed potatoes along with some applesauce and oh my was it good!!
i added the caroway seeds, a little tiny bit of sugar and after i emptied the jar of applesauce i put some water in it and shook it up to get the last bit and added that to the sauerkraut--oh and i added a spoon while it was cooking too--
did not drain the kraut--
i know that most everyone likes real mashed potatoes best but i have always loved the instant--i hardly ever eat them but i do with certain meals and this is one they go well with--i also like them with meat loaf
anyhow thanks for introducing me to such an easy and good meal!
enjoy your sauerkraut and dogs!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 11, 2009
3:07 AM

Post #5991103

OK! Lots to comment on...

I am also from northern Europe (Latvia) and sauerkraut and pork and all that is common fodder. If you go further up in this Thread--I posted my recipe for Sauerkraut Soup...TRY IT---YOU'LL LIKE IT!

As for pigs feet---that is as old as the hills in my country. There is a cold dish we all make "up there" and you MUST have pigs feet in it for the gelling properties, as this is also served cold and gelled with either vinegar, mustard, or Horseradish as a side-flavoring.
In thee "Old days" they cooked this dish and left all the pigs feet in there and everyone just ate them up. No one worried about fat and cholesterol back then. Fat was necessary to keep people "hardy"...

Everyone, when I tell them about this dish-- just goes "Yewwww! I guess it is hard to describe it, so the best I can come up with is "Jellied Pork" and that sounds even YUK to me! Cold pork "Aspic" is not right either--as aspic usually contains vinegar.

So--What do you do to make this dish?

Briefly--you cook a lot of fresh pork--I like fresh ham, picnic, or country spare ribs--(can add veal too) with all the veggies and herbs and seasonings AND about 3-4 pigs feet in a big soup pot with water just to cover. Cut up pigs feet expose more of the cartridge--the necessary ingredient--or it will not gel. You can buy them sliced--or ask the meat guy to do it for you. Some people try to get away with using unflavored gelatin--but the flavor just is not there.
Talking about spices and seasonings--Caraway seed and pork go together like a horse and carriage! Also lots of Dill. Besides that--the usual--carrots, lots of onions, celery, s&p , Onion Powder, a bit of Garlic Powder, etc...

Now--after you have cooked all this to the falling off the bones stage (at least 2 hrs.), you fish out all the meats and bones and put them on a platter to cool so you can get to work cutting up all the edible meat in bite-sized pieces. This is a fun project--and snacking and licking is allowed! I like doing this while watching something really, really important on TV--Like Dr. Phil and Oprah...
So you gather a bunch of small bowls--any shape--and fill them about 2/3 full of any edible meats.
Now--there is NO meat to speak of in a pigs knuckle! It is just a lot of skin and cartridge and a few tiny bones. They have served their purpose--so don't try to save much from them. Sometimes i DO take the skin, scrape off all the underlying fat and sliver it and add it to my edible meats. I also slice the carrots in rounds and include them for color.

So--you fill all the dishes 2/3-full with meat. This molds easily--so you can also use a mold to put this in. Sometimes I lay the colorful carrot rounds in a nice pattern on the bottom of a mold, b/c when you unmold it--they will be on top and look pretty.
Bones can go to your favorite dog--all other fat and "unedibles" are trash.

Now--you take a large bowl and put a colander in it and pour all the 'soup" liquid through the colander. Stir it to get every drop! Discard the left-over "junk"...
Mixing this to distribute all spices--ladle the strained broth on top of the meat in the bowls and give it a small stir. Cover- and refrigerate. That's it!

Notice, I did not say anything about skimming off the fat! Why? Because the fat will rise to the top and harden in the fridge. Before you unmold these bowls--scrape off the fat. It acts as a seal and the gelled things will last longer...

When served--this can be cut with a knife. It is semi-hard. If you used a fluted mold--it will look absolutely wonderful presented on a pretty plate, garnished with some greens. You never have to tell anyone what went into making it! It really tastes great!
As I said--try it with the above condiments--or of your own choosing.

I even froze a couple of these small containers. They still tasted great when thawed.

In Latvia--we call this dish--"Galerts". In Estonia--they call it "Sult" (with an umlaut over the u). Let me know if any of you try this and how it turned out and how it was received.

Long live the pig!!!!! Gita

edited to say--if you have any liquid left over--freeze it in bowls and add it to any soup or dish (like the sauerkraut and pork chops) for flavor. I tell you! I could drink this broth for dinnerIt is awesome!


This message was edited Jan 10, 2009 10:14 PM
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 11, 2009
4:49 AM

Post #5991475

Sounds absolutely fantastic. I gather you serve this cold? It is a bit like hogshead cheese, but there is no head.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 11, 2009
3:00 PM

Post #5992147

pajaritomt,

Yes. It is served cold--as I said you put it in the fridge where it gels to a soft-solid. You can gel it in any container--square or round, but the presentation is sooo pretty when it is in a mold and you unmold it (upside down) and have all those pretty rounds of carrots on top.

Just to clarify--there is NO vinegar in this dish. When I mentioned vinegar, spicy mustard, or horseradish--you use them as you eat the gelled meat for flavor. I personally prefer a bit of vinegar.

I used to eat "Head Cheese" as a lunch meat. I always liked the vinegary flavor of it. I no longer buy any kinds of lunch meats--as I try not to eat salty things.
I also like Tongue Loaf, which is made by the Germans and is also called "Blood Pudding" or "Blood Sausage". It is also a lunch meat.

Hope you try this dish! Gita
planolinda
Plano, TX

January 11, 2009
4:03 PM

Post #5992347

head cheese is something i cannot even look at--i never did like the jell in foods like that--something about the texture and look
but i imagine it has a lot of flavor

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 11, 2009
4:44 PM

Post #5992514

Yes...I do believe it is the texture that most people don't like...or don't care to try.

Than--how come Americans consume oceans of Jello??? ...

Just food for though...
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 11, 2009
5:56 PM

Post #5992846

Head cheese is a spicy Christmas dish made at Christmas in New Orleans. It is not a lunch meat, but rather a party food, that you put out in a loaf and slice it for Christmas parties. Mostly people buy it at some of the better deli's there that make it. There is also a similar dish called daube glace. Both are yummy.
I have to say, I too was put off by the jelly at one time, but learned that with all the herbs and seasonings it is quite wonderful.
Sorry Gita, I won't be trying your recipe, though I would love to. For health reasons, I have become a vegan -- though I go eat meat on Christmas day, my birthday and a few other special days. Alas, blood sugar, cholesterol and triglyceride problems have forced me to live on veggies and grains and nuts -- which isn't as bad as it sounds, but does keep me from dishes I truly have loved over the years.
But I have eaten similar dishes to the ones you describe and did enjoy them hugely. Planolinda, if you can get up the nerve to try these, you might be pleasantly surprised. The lunch meat kind aren't the best.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 11, 2009
6:40 PM

Post #5993001

I would sooner eat aspic than Jell-O! yuck.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 11, 2009
6:42 PM

Post #5993010

Me, too. I don't do jello, much to my DH's distress. He loves it. To me it is a bunch of toxic chemicals.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 11, 2009
6:46 PM

Post #5993025

lol - it's always sort of freaked me out a bit. When I was a child, my mother would occasionally make it and she'd put a CAN of that fruit cocktail in it. DOUBLE YUCK -- especially the texture of those weird canned grapes. Scarred me for life! ;p
Dea
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6a)

January 11, 2009
7:01 PM

Post #5993065

Not necessarily holiday recipes, but my DH is 100% Polish and there was a thread on some recipes I thought you might enjoy.

Here is the thread: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/507821/ And further down is a link I gave for some good stuff :)

http://pages.prodigy.net/l.hodges/jp-rec.htm

Hope everyone is having a great day!

Dea

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 12, 2009
3:29 AM

Post #5994814

Dea,

Those recipes really look good! Hope I can make some of them--sometimes...
Thanks!

I sent the link to my cousin's daughter and her husband in Latvia (that's where I am from). He is the cook. Lots of good Europen food in this link.

I was there this past summer--and he (Jessie) joked and said---"I think Latvians have only ONE spice--DILL!"
I noted to him that it is nor true--as in most of these Ukranian recipes Dill is used with abandon! I LOVE dill and Onion Powder. Two things I could not cook without.

Gita

pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 12, 2009
5:04 AM

Post #5995083

Gitagirl and all,
It is so nice to know about Latvian and Ukrainian cooking. Thanks for the ones you posted. Also thanks for letting us know what the food there is really like. Latvia, I am aware, was once in a confederation with Poland which explains why there is a similarity with Polish food.
All of this is fascinating for me, though I won't be cooking much meat -- except for DH. He likes sauerkraut, too, and i understand it is very good for the health. So maybe I will learn to make it.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 12, 2009
2:33 PM

Post #5995782

paj,

All I know about any connection between Latvia and Poland is that, some time in the 1300's, a polish Prince married a Latvian maiden and overnight--all of Latvia became catholic.
Latvia is not Catholic, but is predominantly Lutheran as is Estonia--whereas Lithuania is totally Catholic.

I have never heard of Latvia being a confederation of Poland...Oh well--that's what Google and Wikipedia is for.

This may, or may not be true...you know how tales go...

As far a NE European and Slavic food goes--these are all small countries close together--so it is no wonder that the foods are similar. Also supply probably plays a role--like Latvia has access to the Sea (Baltic Sea) so fish is a main staple.

I want SO badly to make my Cabbage Rolls! I am out of Sauerkraut soup too. Soon...
I have no room in my freezer at this time...

Gita
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 12, 2009
4:45 PM

Post #5996353

Sorry, Gitagal,
Briefly my brain equated Latvia with Lithuania. Sorry, I generally know better. DH is in a play about two Lithuanians and I briefly confused the two, because of family conversations about Latvia and Poland.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 12, 2009
5:44 PM

Post #5996636


paj,

Don't feel like the Lone Ranger----Many people do. maybe because they both start with "L"????
I even confused myself! Just unforgivable!!!!!
The Polish Prince married a Lithuanian Princess--and, by that, LITHUANIA became catholic overnight!!!!! NOT Latvia. She had nothing to do with these nuptuals...

Sorry!
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 13, 2009
8:06 AM

Post #5999649

Just to confuse matters more, I once met the ex-Minister of Tourism of Estonia on a train in Mexico. She was a lovely person. Now are you confused? Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania at least have some geography in common and are all 3 fascinating countries. On that note, I will wait for another post on Eastern European goodies. They sound fabulous!
planolinda
Plano, TX

January 15, 2009
11:58 PM

Post #6010136

lots of confusion over the 3 countries but when i tell people i am lithuanian they don't even know there is such a country--they sure did in chicago which has the largest concentration outside of the country of lithuania
ok--here is my question--i was at the store and they were unloading holiday stuff that didn't sell--i saw a can of poppy seeds and got it remembering how i loved poppy seed cake-so moist! anyone have a good recipe for it? i also remember kalachkis made with it- i think maybe it is something used by eastern european countries -at least from the can--everyone uses the little spice jar i guess
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 16, 2009
1:29 AM

Post #6010496

I **love** poppyseed cake but have never made it. Can't help. And even if I had a recipe that worked for me, it wouldn't work for you because my altitude is 7,300 ft. But there have to be thousands of recipes for it on the internet. Good places to look would be at www.epicurious.com or a Lithuanian recipe web site.
wrightie
Metro DC, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2009
2:24 AM

Post #6010708

poppy seed cake is different from poppy seed "roll", right?

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2009
2:27 AM

Post #6010724

Well--You know, Poppy seeds can, and are, used in a lot of breads and pastries.

When I make my Latvian Pirags and end up with too much dough left over--I roll out the dough in a rectangle, as best i can, and then spread butter all over it. Then I sprinkle a lot sugar all over it and then a lot of Poppy Seeds all over--
Then I roll all the dough up, jelly roll fashion, and pinch the seam shut.
Now you have a long "snake" of dough, with all these layers inside the roll.

You can elongate the roll, or whatever----Then you slice 1" sections off of it and pinch the bottom of each section shut. When you do this--the top will open up in a "rose fashion" (because you rolled it and sugar and Poppy seeds will not stick together). Then you smear egg all over it and bake it.
These are YUMMY! I call them "Poppy seed Roses"...

In a recent Laura Dean Cooking Magazine, there was a recipe for Poppy Seed Bread...OH, my gosh!!!! I so want to try that!!!! Pretty much the same thing...Home made Yeast dough--rolled out and all the same as above...

To bad Poppy Seeds cost so much as a spice! People with a lot of acreage should just grow their own Poppies and gather the seed for cooking...

Gita
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 16, 2009
2:41 AM

Post #6010759

Have you tried buying poppy seeds at an Indian grocery? They use them a lot and sell them in large plastic bags at bulk prices. If there is an Indian grocery near you, this is the place to buy your poppy seeds. or you can buy them in bulk from Penzey's fairly reasonably -- see:

http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeyspoppyseed.html

I buy a great many of spices from Penzeys and they are an outstanding purveyor. No need to spend a fortune on poppy seeds -- plus you can grow them and save the seed. I have done that.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2009
2:50 AM

Post #6010799

paj,

I will have to ask my new neighbors...They are from Pakistan and shop at a certain store all the way across town...Pakistan? India? Close enough!

I get the Catalog from "Spices, etc"--much like "Penzeys". However--I have ALL the spices i will ever need---and then I run out of ONE of them! I really do not want to order that one spice on-line--as I would have to pay for shipping...The way to go with these Spice catalog Companies is to find people to share with. I do not know anyone in that category!
As I said--I will check with my neighbors...

Gita

planolinda
Plano, TX

January 16, 2009
2:51 AM

Post #6010802

i guess i should have mentioned it is poppy seed cake and pastry filling--it is a 12 oz can --i did go to my favorite recipe site allrecipe.com and they did have recipes but not for the filling style poppy seed--the can says there are 2 recipes on the inside of the lable--after working way too long to get the heavily glued paper off-there is the recipe for both the cake and cookies my mother made
i see why so moist for the cake--besides a can of poppy seed filling there is a cup of sour cream! and a cup of butter!! i still think i will make it this weekend even tho i haave been trying to be good!
the cookies are called hamantaschen and tells that you can also use plum (lekvar) filling
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

January 16, 2009
3:06 AM

Post #6010860

Gitagal,
Your neighbors are a good bet. At the very minimum, your neighbors will know where the nearest Indian/Pakistani grocery is. I find those are the places where one gets the cheapest and freshest spices, because that is where spices come from! They use them by the handful instead of the teaspoon full.

Planolinda,
Do pass along your recipes now that you have them. I am sure people can figure out how to turn poppy seeds into the pie and cake filling kind. Do let us know how your recipe turns out!

Best of luck all of you!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

November 21, 2010
3:51 PM

Post #8223903

BUMPING THIS UP FOR YOU ALL--for the Holidays!

With many thanks to "Ladygardener" (Chris) who dug up this Thread from the archives----
there is a wealth of Holiday foods and everything in this Post...
Lots of goodies! Lots of comments and instructions...Lots of pictures...

It is the Post i was searching for...

I know it is already long--but let it go a bit longer before a new Thread is made from this one...

OH!! I drooled just reading all this again!!!!

Gita

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

December 2, 2010
5:07 PM

Post #8241352

Well if you buy Poppy seed from Turkish/Indian/...ask to have it ground.
They'll do it under the counter as the PS is illegal here in USofA.Yous should not grow it. Can be arrested. It has Opium, a narc.

Funny story. Moma had workers in the vineyards in Yugoslavie where the woman brought the small children and fed them PS to keep them quite and subdued. ...?

The canned is sweetened and ground and ready to use.

We make Strudel - Sweet yeast dough rolled/flatened into rectangle, sprinkle liquid butter over it, sprinkle a few raisins and then spread the filling, roll jelly roll style bake and then cut into pieces. Now that is living. Or same way into Phylo dough. Also very good. Helene
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 2, 2010
6:20 PM

Post #8241431

the canned is what my mother used
poppy seed cake, kalachki (i know not spelled correctly but spell check is not helping me) i remember getting a little taste of that paste and it was so good--oh the batter for poppyseed cake was wonderful
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

December 10, 2010
6:00 AM

Post #8252981

Oh you guys. You have made this italian gal homesick for Brooklyn.

(I do love TOUGH Pierogis tho) Can't help it - love tough pasta in general.

Lyn Stallworth and Rod Kennedy Jr. - authors.
There is a cookbook called the Brooklyn cookbook

Recipes from all over Brooklyn neighborhoods. ---italian, german, polish, lithuanian,irish, etc. etc. (my hubby is part Lithuanian and I always tell him that he is one of 5 - now Linda I can tell him that I have found another!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 10, 2010
8:49 AM

Post #8253231

rosie--

Come to Baltimore! The Lithuanian population is quite large here---many came and settled
here in the early 1900's--after WW-1. way before all the other ethnic groups--after WW-2--
which emigrated en masse her in the late 40's-early 50's. all refugees that had left their homelands
to escape the imminent Soviet occupation.
That is how I came to the USA as well--in 1951.

The Lithuanians have a big Hall here which is the hub of their activities. Way in the center of downtown.
They also hold a big Festival every year--in May. So do many other ethnic groups.
Baltimore is very international in this way. Lots to see ans experience. Lots of good food to be had.
Many, many great restaurants--of All genres...

I am from Latvia-..The third neighbor is Estonia. My Ex-husband is Estonian.
The three, small Baltic Countries up there in Northern Europe--just below Finland.

Gita
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

December 10, 2010
9:07 AM

Post #8253264

l will have to tell him.
He loves Baltimore - especially an 'upside down' restaurant (Italian) and Legal Seafood which I believe is not there any longer. The taxi from the hotels also carry him to an italian neighborhood and he has gone to quite a few restaurants there and all are great. I will have to tell him to ask for a Lithuanian restaurant -thanks Gita.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 10, 2010
9:22 AM

Post #8253281

rosie--
That "Italian neighborhood" is known as "Little Italy" and is just to the East of Inner harbor.
It is a very famous grouping of Italian Restaurants...Parking is impossible--as this is a tight,
row-house-filled neighborhood.

There is no Lithuanian Restaurant!

Lithuanian Hall is off of Lombard Street to the West of downtown central. Near the RR Museum.
The streets that intersect where the Hall is are--Parkin Str. and Hollins Str. Parkin dead ends on Hollins.
The Hall is on that corner...
I believe the Hall's Bar area is open to the public on Friday nights for dinner. Not sure if they still do this.

If you Google Lithuania--I am sure you could find a reference to the Hall in Baltimore.
Better yet--Google Viryta...

Have you ever had their potent Honey Liqueur? It is called "Viryta"...Wowsa! SOOO yummy!
But--it is 80-proof...Go slow...Only the Lithuanians do shots of this--Gulp--and gone!!!!

Come visit me--I have several bottles of it---because I have "connections" with the man who makes it...
A great Lithuanian friend...

Gita
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

December 10, 2010
10:19 AM

Post #8253337

No but I have a family of honey lovers --- we call my son 'honey boy' and have for years. He says 'if it has honey ma...I'm there!"

I will tell my husband about the area (he goes there alot but I know he would have mentioned if he knew about the Lithuanian connection. The hotel taxi will take him anywhere he wants to go..but not sure about the pickup -- I bet he can arrange.
His memories of his grandma has something to do with a cookie that she gave him with jelly in it. She died when he was just a little kid.
I may take you up on that visit Gita - I usually make it to Baltimore once in the summer. 80 proof ... I just have to sniff alcohol and I am a goner .. so maybe I will just dab it behind my ears! 9

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

December 10, 2010
2:33 PM

Post #8253669

those are 'Linzer Cookies"

Just finished making them. DH is putting them together with apricot marmalade. His fav. His mother made them all the time
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 10, 2010
2:56 PM

Post #8253712

rosie chicago has a huge lithuanian population also--i think the biggest outside of lithuania--
funny about telling him only 5 folks from lithuania--i have to tell people here where it is sometimes--and i never seem to run into anyone who is lithuanian

we had a cookie like what you called and we call them kalochki (i know -wrong spelling) but apricot or poppyseed were the main fillings we used

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 10, 2010
3:38 PM

Post #8253762

Linda

I carry a small map of the World in my orange, HD apron pocket (probably from the "Geographic").

It is SO redundant--as I still have vestiges of an accent when I speak--even though I have been
in the US since 1951 and speak English much more correctly and fluently than most.
But i was 14--and I think that is a bit old to totally lose one's accent. I think 12 is the
"breaking point"...
People always say--"Where are you from"? and I answer--"Latvia"--then I get this blank stare...
IF they know where Latvia is--I give them a thumbs up and say--"You get 10 points for that!"...

Most people have this assumption that if you are from Europe--and you have an accent--
you MUST BE from Germany!!! I wish I had a dollar for every time someone has asked me that...

Next predictable question is: "What do you speak in Latvia?" I answer: "We speak Latvian"
Next predictable question is: "OH! You have your own language??--Is it like German?"

Can you see how this is going?????...

So--I have to explain the whole thing about the three BALTIC countries---NOT Balkan.

Then I show them my map...

It is a shame that World Geography is hardly taught in our schools any more...only the USA's.
Few people of the younger generation have any clue of other Countries...

All I can say to you all with any "roots" from another culture---PLEASE ask your elders to share all they
know and remember--especially recipes and customs. When they are gone--all that is gone with them!

YES! I still speak Latvian--fluently--even though I seldom get to use it...Maybe once a year?
But--when I have been to Latvia--people there say I have an accent. Hmmm--must be the English
invading how I now speak and pronounce words in Latvian.
Do you know how long it took me NOT TO roll my "R's"?????
Latvian and Lithuanian are sister-languages. Quite similar--but not to the point where I would
understand it. Many words are the same--and many more are not...

Here's another tid-bit...Lithuanian is the oldest, still spoken, language in the whole Indo-European
family of languages--which 50% of the World speaks.
Latvian is the ONLY language similar to Lithuanian--which must mean we are the 2nd oldest!

Priecigus Ziemsvetkus un Laimigu Jauno Gadu!
(Merry Christmas and Happy New Year)

Thanks--Gita
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 10, 2010
4:26 PM

Post #8253847

gita you are doing a great job of showing your pride in latvia--i am not from lithuania--my grandparents came over as young adults --but my mother was proud of her heritage and so she cooked lithuanian foods and we lived fairly close to an area where many lithuanians settles in chicago---market park area

since you live in baltimore i imagine you have been to the cathedral --i believe it is dedicated to mary---if i remember correctly it has a lower level with alters for many countries and the lithuanian one had lots of crosses

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 10, 2010
6:05 PM

Post #8253962

The crosses are very much part of Lithuanian heritage and religion. They are all Catholic...
Why are they all catholic?
Sometimes in the 13th Century, a Polish Prince married a Lithuanian princess--and, overnight,
the whole country of Lithuania became catholic. So I remember...I have hear this...

In Lithuania--there is a "Hill of Crosses".

Here's a link...you can read about the meaning of it...

http://sacredsites.com/europe/lithuania/hill_of_crosses.html

Gita
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 21, 2010
5:06 PM

Post #8271455

Well I totally admire and appreciate Latvian and Lithuanian heritage and culture but to be correct here there are older pure languages still spoken including Hebrew and Greek. Now if you want to say Latvian and Lithuanian are the oldest Baltic languages I'd agree. Regarding Baltic-Indo-European language, that covers a lot. I agree that it is important to keep our cultural heritage vibrant and pass along the traditions that are part of our heritage. Have a good holiday.
Laurel

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 21, 2010
7:37 PM

Post #8271706

Laurel---

I did say that Lithuanian is the oldest still spoken (live) Indo European language.
I did not say "Baltic"...
There are ONLY two Baltic languages in the Indo-European class.
Lithuanian and Latvian.
Estonian, even though it is considered a Baltic Country--their language is in the
Fino Ugric class...Their "sister" language is Finnish--and Hungarian--a distant relative. That's all!

Here is a link---go down to the Baltic Branch of Indo European languages...

http://www.krysstal.com/langfams_indoeuro.html

I leave it to the language experts to, exactly, ID which is which...

I was just passing on what I had learned.

What is your source of information, maypop?

Gita


MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 22, 2010
8:55 AM

Post #8272385

Hi Gita, I was recalling the pile of language history and linguistic books I brought home from the library several years ago when we were going to spend part of a summer in Basque country. Not that Latvian or Lithuanian language has anything to do with Euskara, but their development was discused and compared to isolate languages, which are tose that seem to develop without outside influences. I remember reading about a comparison of Latvian and Lithuanian language though and thought that Latvian was more modern than Lithuanian because it had adopted some Germanic language influences.
greyhorsegarden

December 15, 2012
9:10 AM

Post #9358945

bump

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 15, 2012
2:33 PM

Post #9359234

greyhorsegarden---

THANK YOU---THANK YOU--for bumping this Thread up once again.
Because of it--it showed up in my "watched Threads"...What a nice surprise!

With all the pre-Holiday things I should be doing--I sat here for over an hour, and re-read the whole thing.
So many memories of all I had read and written before! So much input from people we no longer see posting.

Hope you all will take the time to read all this. The Holidays are here---and you could cook something
"different" and wonderful for your family and gatherings...

For one--I decided, yesterday, after several years, to again make "Galerts", the often misunderstood,
avoided dish-- because of the way it looks---gelled meat in a mold.

Dear people---IF you ever make good soup, you know that, adding bones and other cuts, heavy in cartridge,
will make all the difference in the world. These soups will be rich and have a nice "body".
When you refrigerate these soups--they, often, are partly jelled because of all the bones and cartridge in them.
When you re-heat them--it all dissolves back into a rich broth.

SO! My "Galerts" is just a jelled version of all this. It is fresh pork and, yes, Pigs feet and tails (for their content of cartridge)
that you MUST include--cooked to death with carrots and onions and Dill and seasonings--all of it cooked to falling-off-the-bones done.

Then all the meat and bones are removed to a platter and all the edible meat cut up and put into small bowls or molds.
The broth is strained and then ladled over the meat in the bowls and then refrigerated.

SO? What happens???? The juices "Gel" once cold. Just like in your good soup you cooked.

This jelled dish is then un-molded and served cold with your choice of either White Wine vinegar--Dijon Mustard--or Horseradish--
or whatever you may like.
Any of these are such a compliment to this cold dish--along with some good, buttered bread.

Yesterday--I decided to make "Galerts"--the cold, jelled, pork dish I have been craving for a long time.
Had it for a snack yesterday--and for breakfast today--along with some buttered bread.

Just to show you all---I un-molded one of the containers for you to see how pretty it looks.

I attach the picture of the un-molded "Galerts" below.

I am also moving this Thread up to Part #2 as we have a lot of Posts on this one.

Please join us here--to continue with all these great Holiday recipes.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1291118/





This message was edited Feb 11, 2013 11:20 AM

Thumbnail by Gitagal
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speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 11, 2013
8:03 AM

Post #9415287

Oh dear... I clicked on the provided link and it's a link to edit a post. YIPE! Where oh where is "Part 2" please? I wanna gooo!!!!! =)

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 11, 2013
8:26 AM

Post #9415319

speedie---

I cannot get any of the links to open...Tried to c/p and change it--no go. maybe it is inactive?

Part #2 only has 4 posts in it. No new recipes. Go to the recipe Forum--and look for part #2. Dec. 15th, 2012
It is only a few threads down from part #1.

I did c/p the link and edited it into part #1. I still could not open it...Wassssup????
Gita

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 11, 2013
8:45 AM

Post #9415346

Ah, you have fixed it, thank you, you're a GEM!

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


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