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Cut Flowers and Floral Design: source for chrysanthemum cuttings

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watersedge
Northeast Harbor, ME

December 17, 2007
7:22 PM

Post #4304406

I'm looking for a source for chrysanthemum cuttings so that I can grow them for cut flowers for next fall. Does anyone have any recommendations? Thanks!
pupilpropogtr
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

December 17, 2007
8:30 PM

Post #4304582

Hi watersedge. I am the newbie here, but I am sure Terri or Karma or several others may know. I am growing mine from seed in a cut flower garden. I'll make sure one of these fine ladies get back with you.

Have fun.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

December 17, 2007
8:36 PM

Post #4304595

Try King's

http://www.kingsmums.com

Is that what you needed?

Suzy
edited to add: If you buy anything cool and need to split the order because of cost, count me in! LOL!

This message was edited Dec 17, 2007 3:39 PM
motts1
south central, WI
(Zone 5a)

December 19, 2007
5:24 AM

Post #4309448

I purchased from Kings a long time ago, got great plants. You do need to check their zone status. Some mums needed warmer than I get here, so I adopted out my "Kermits"
Drat-they are among my favorites, but I let my enthusiasum overlook the zone needs.
Edited to say "bloom time". We often have one killing frost early in October, then everything else is OK for a couple of weeks.
That spider "Icicle" is lovely...may re-think my resolve about zone envy.

This message was edited Dec 18, 2007 11:28 PM
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

December 19, 2007
6:02 AM

Post #4309525

Oh, yeah, Zones -- I forgot about those. :)

I always think f mums as being pretty hardy, but there's a whole other world of mums I forget about :)

Suzy
watersedge
Northeast Harbor, ME

December 20, 2007
1:23 PM

Post #4312950

It looks like King's will fit the bill. I'll be growing these in a greenhouse anyway. Thanks!

Karl
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

December 20, 2007
4:47 PM

Post #4313513

You're welcome!

Suzy
bermudakiller
Union Grove, AL

January 9, 2008
12:34 PM

Post #4378795

I used to raise show mums and Kings was by far the choice of the majority of the growers. This was several decades ago, Many, though by no means all, were winter hardy in a cold frame in 6B, Columbia, TN where i lived at the time, I'd let the stock plants bloom as well as the new cuttings, so i got earlier blooms and smaller, more charming ones, these we would use for mass in arrangments and the disbuds for the inflection points.

Icicle is very lovely, tough as nails, works well for show and also excellent as a garden mum, best use as a filler around shrubbry, I'd let it get 3 feet or so and then peg it and have a shower of smaller blossoms. Hardy here, 7b without protection. Lilli Gallion (sp) is also fairly tough and works for pegging but not as vigirous or as hardy as Icicles, but the striking color combination is quite useful.
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

January 9, 2008
12:43 PM

Post #4378805

Really? That's amazing. I never knew you could peg mums! (Of course I have never bought anything taller than about 14" LOL!)

Thanks for telling us that!

Suzy in Zone 5 :(
pupilpropogtr
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

January 9, 2008
5:23 PM

Post #4379860

Ummm...what is pegging?
bermudakiller
Union Grove, AL

January 9, 2008
5:26 PM

Post #4379866

Hey Suzy most show mums will get pretty tall depending on how many stems you want, 3 is usual and then you disbud for the large blossoms, These tend to be a bit awkward as they are quite large and you need an enormous arrangement to carry them off, lots of them will hit 5 feet or better. If there is a mum club in your neighborhood, go talk to them as they will know what works best there, also go to a show, you will see mums in amazing configurations, it has been decades since i did much so I've forgotten the terms, but tree form and waterfall forms are just a start, mums are very ameanable to frames. The pegging was my idea as the mums would flop badly without staking, but if you peg them they usually stay put :)
bermudakiller
Union Grove, AL

January 9, 2008
5:29 PM

Post #4379885

staking something, usually with hairpin like stakes in a bent position, imagine an umbrella sunk into the ground and the stems tied to its ribs, usually only a few stems but you can do an umbrella with many flowers, old fashioned roses ( pre 18 80's) are frequently shaped like this
Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

January 9, 2008
5:44 PM

Post #4379950

Or Pupil, You just bend a stem down to the ground with a nice arch to make it pretty. Don't just pull it close to the ground and smash it -- think artistic...a preschooler could walk underneath it, like a bridal arch.

Now, If you step on it with your foot where it meets the ground, that is pegging. Except you can't do that and still eat and go to work, so you put a U shaped thing (like a giant bobby pin) over it and push it in the ground to hold it. That is pegging.

On roses little stems pop up all along the cane,,,but I didn't know mums would do that. Can't even imagine, tough of course I've seen the show beds where the plants are taller than the lady and man that are growing them. LOL Disbudding is not for the usually for the gardener. Disbudding is to make one single flower bigger you take off all the side ones -- Peonies, and Mums and Dahlias are the main 3 I know about... but you could probably put carnation and a host of others on the list, too.
My problem is that if I have a rose with 6 long, long canes peg to the ground. It looks like a sparkler or peeled banan or something -- like they are all upside down...it really only looks good if one side of the rose is up against the building, shrubbery or somethhing so al the canes come out of one side only.

Suzy
pupilpropogtr
Birmingham, AL
(Zone 7b)

January 9, 2008
6:03 PM

Post #4380011

Thanks!! I love the idea with the arches. So much to learn and sooo little time!
BLOSSOMBUDDY

(Zone 5a)

February 18, 2009
11:52 PM

Post #6157687

Mum cuttings are not hard to root. Take three inch tip cuts, dip the stem in rooting hormone and pot in a medium, keep moist but not overwatered and they should root within a couple weeks.

I use flats to start my cuttings in. Bump them next to a geranium pot which is a 4.5 incher..then to a one gallon nursery can and up.

Just need sources of garden mums!

We used to do a few pot mums...then we planted hardys out in the garden... had some that were darned near 3.5 foot tall. Had smoe 75 varieties at one time! Lord, I miss that farm! Cant grow them here much at all due to flooding.

They require a bit of fertilizer. Pinching to get them thick in bud and whalah!

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