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Candyce
The Monadnock Region, NH
(Zone 5a)

December 23, 2007
11:22 AM

Post #4321408

Victor:

Of course you would write about evergreens!

This is a great article, and I found myself listed under the 'planting all of one type of evergreen' category. I guess that this would be an example of what NOT to do ...

Thumbnail by Candyce
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gloria125
Greensboro, AL

December 23, 2007
11:47 AM

Post #4321425

You've given me a new perspective, Victor!

In the south, evergreens include hollies and magnolias. My 100 yr old property is anchored by 3 huge Magnolia Grandifloras. But, you have reminded me I need more.

Recently, adjacent properties have been clear cut, leaving me exposed to straight line and hurricane winds. The protection of some tall sturdy evergreens is just what I need to baffle the wind and keep me cozy during winter storms.

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

December 23, 2007
2:51 PM

Post #4321645

Thanks ladies. Gloria - my Norway spruces have made a very noticeable difference on the wind. Our bedroom is in the front of the house where they are and we used to dread windy winter nights. Though we have good windows, we don't have Tyvek wrap, since the house was built in the early 60's.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

December 23, 2007
3:00 PM

Post #4321671

I am still interested in the extent to which trees can moderate wind. I don't think this has been studied to nearly the extent that we need, given the increases in wind damage we are getting on some parts of the country.

My house as Ive said is 100 years old+. It has a temporary siding on it, awaiting the time I can have cellulose blown in to insulate it. Unfortunately, my lot is quite narrow on the north side, so Ill need some skinny evergreens if I am going to get any relief from the wind on that side.

Guess we needed an engineer to point this out, Victor!
Dea
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2007
3:02 PM

Post #4321673

Absolutely fantastic article Victor. You've described the varied types and uses with such great enthusiasm. We love evergreens and particularly conifers.

Don't know how we would ever get through the dreary winter months without them.

Your photos by the way are stunning - well done - this was a real treat to read !
planolinda
Plano, TX

December 23, 2007
3:04 PM

Post #4321677

thanks for the information--i have a few evergreens in my yard and one just came up on it's own and i have no idea how--guess some animal dropped a cone? anyhow-i just bought a little pine for a christmas gift and noticed it is an "island" pine and must stay indoors ---which i can do but i had thought it would say the opposite--to plant it outside --i want the pine needles that fall under the big pines!! (none of mine are big)--i think those pine needles would make a pretty mulch!

ViburnumValley

ViburnumValley
Scott County, KY
(Zone 5b)

December 23, 2007
3:43 PM

Post #4321808

Good article, Victor. Now, when can we expect volumes II - XXII?

The use of plants to attenuate wind and sun has been practiced for quite a long time, though that doesn't mean it is common knowledge.

One can easily google or otherwise to find plenty more information about how to strategically locate plants to aid in energy efficiency. The height of the plant and the distance that wind is affected has been studied and calculated. One then can apply this principle to the site in question.

Unfortunately, some folks will find (like Gloria) that their property dimensions might not allow the maximum value of plant protection. They'll have to find some other solution. This information is best applied from the planning perspective, as in when someone is purchasing new land or building a new house. It DOES matter to think about such things ahead of time.

This is a veiled plug for use of landscape architects in planning and design. No LAs were harmed in the generation of this message.
doccat5
Fredericksburg, VA
(Zone 7b)

December 23, 2007
4:03 PM

Post #4321862

Great article, and filled with wonderful information. Thanks for sharing.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

December 23, 2007
4:18 PM

Post #4321907

Well, VV when you buy an historic property, of course you buy the history of landscaping that goes along with the clapboard siding and slate on the roof. Unfortunately, in the old days around here people knew perfectly well that trees deflect wind from buildings.

It is only the new-improved generation with their chain saws who think things would "look" better if all the old trees were removed and sold for timber or used for fence posts.

As a result in some historic sections old houses are exposed to environmental forces which they never were intended to sustain because of the removal of evergreen trees which were part of the original design of the property.

A note on "design".

gloria

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

December 23, 2007
4:51 PM

Post #4322003

Thanks all.

VV - yes, it felt like Mission Impossible trying to write one article on evergreens, especially when there were sub-topics that had to be mentioned. It can easily be a multi-part series.

On the energy savings aspect, there are certainly many situations where a LA would be invaluable. I liked that ever so subtle LA plug - only thing missing was 'I am VV and I approved this message'! Of course many do not have the advantage of a 'clean slate' and I just wanted to mention another use of evergreens that people might not be aware of.

Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

December 23, 2007
6:15 PM

Post #4322177

Victor, great article! You reminded me of our home in Colorado so very much...the evergreens were sometimes the only part of the landscape one could see!

It is very difficult sometimes to stop an article from becoming a tome, isn't it? These topics - especially the ones we "choose" instead of ones that are "requested", just want to carry us away to a world were everyone and everything is about that particular topic. Great job of finding just the right balance of great information and advise without overpowering the reader.

Looking forward to much more from you...
Happy Holidays!
Shari

pixie62560

pixie62560
South China, ME
(Zone 5a)

December 23, 2007
6:40 PM

Post #4322247

Great job Victor! I love evergreens, (might have something to do w/living in Maine)and was so glad you choose that topic. As you know we bought the field behind our house, and a wide open field it is!
DH and I were just talking about what we will plant as a barrier from the wind of the lake and also for noise reduction from the 18 wheelers that travel our road. I couldn't of ask for better timing of your article to plead my case with DH. I thank you, as I do believe I won!! LOL

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

December 23, 2007
7:14 PM

Post #4322298

Thank you Shari. Wow - that's some change of venue for you. Right now I would choose your current home! Very true on 'holding back' while covering these topics. Happy holidays to you and yours - thanks!

Thank you Celeste. Glad to be of help - though I certainly want no part of domestic discussions!
Sofonisba
Beacon, NY
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2007
7:32 PM

Post #4322329

Terrific article Victor!! I'm more and more thinking that I'm gonna put a bunch of conifers in my NW corner of the property.

I really loved your article. Thank you!!!!
Harper

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2007
10:54 PM

Post #4322795

Thank you, Victor. When we get some of the unidentified brush cleared out I will definitely put in an evergreen something, and I know whom to ask when I'm ready...
xxx, Carrie
bbrookrd
Nantucket, MA
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2007
11:12 PM

Post #4322834

Victor, I was so happy to learn the identity of one of the evergreens in your well written article. I had seen a small tree on two occasions, but both on the property of non gardeners, so they had no clue. I had kept my eye out when visiting nurseries for the last couple of years and never saw one, but now it is in my DG wanted journal. I will plant a dwarf deodar cedar 'Silver Mist' next spring and most likely surround it with a few bulbs. I would appreciate a list of your other favorites that are dwarf conifers. We have a much loved Dwarf Alberta, which has grown to a noble size from a tiny table top tree, but I have lots of room to add some interesting other small ones in my mixed perennial beds. I don't want to do an alpine garden, though I love seeing them. I will go visit the Arnold Arboretum in Boston this spring to see their collection as I haven't gone in a few years. You have sparked my interest. Thanks again, Patti
jadajoy
Newport News, VA
(Zone 11)

December 23, 2007
11:16 PM

Post #4322846

Ahhh!
So thats how you put up a privacy screen without offending the nosy neighbors :-)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2007
11:27 PM

Post #4322870

Hey Patti, let me know when you go, I'll go with you! I'm not sure they have many dwarfs. xx, Carrie
bbrookrd
Nantucket, MA
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2007
11:37 PM

Post #4322892

Carrie, only if I can sing. No, actually that would be fun. Something around Lilac weekend would be terrific, but I am totally flexible. Victor could be our guide. Patti

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

December 23, 2007
11:42 PM

Post #4322898

Thanks ladies! Patti, I will try to get back to you with some that I like.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2007
11:57 PM

Post #4322941

Patti, you are welcome to sing, whatever pleases you. It would probably be a long trip for Victor, don't you think? And you're a couple zones warmer than the Arboretum. Maybe you should go drop in on Victor at SingSing instead! Actually, Lilac Sunday is totally jammed. Lilac Friday or Lilac Monday is much better. x, C
bbrookrd
Nantucket, MA
(Zone 7a)

December 24, 2007
12:07 AM

Post #4322965

Actually we usually go before the official Lilac Sunday as it is often so late. I don't think I have every been on that Sunday. Plus a weekday is always better. I try to get to Mt Auburn Cemetery on the same day. I grow plants in Vt too. But Nantucket is warmer but harsh at times so I think of summer as a zone 7 but some trees and shrubs on the exposed NE side as a zone 6. Better safe than sorry with trees/shrubs. And I wouldn't ruin your day with even a peep. Patti
AYankeeCat
Fairfield County, CT
(Zone 6b)

December 24, 2007
1:28 AM

Post #4323159

Great article! Thank you!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2007
1:30 AM

Post #4323168

You, Patti, could NEVER ruin my day. Mt. Auburn is lovely as well but have you ever been to the Forest Hills Cemetery? MUCH closer. x, C

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

December 24, 2007
3:35 AM

Post #4323477

Thanks Cat.
grammyphoeb
Upper Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 5a)

December 24, 2007
9:15 AM

Post #4323910

Great article!! Very informative and well written! Eleanor
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2007
10:47 AM

Post #4323958

Loved the article Victor! Andre Viette's conifer beds inspired us to plant one of our own, so many textures and the color transformation in winter is beautiful. I'm a real fan of Cedrus deodara and 'Silver Mist' looks like one I'll have to add to my list :)
bbrookrd
Nantucket, MA
(Zone 7a)

December 24, 2007
1:45 PM

Post #4324119

Carrie, Forest Hills Cemetery was unknown to me until I just googled it. I definitely would love to visit it. Sounds wonderful. Mt Auburn is where most of my DH family are buried, and is significant to me as it is the original farm site of my family back in the 1600's on my mother's side. I also like to go there to bird. I will want to go to Garden in the Woods in Framingham this spring as it has been far too long since visiting there which must be close to you.

rcn48, I looked at Viette's site. That looks like a wonderful nursery. Lucky you. Patti

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 24, 2007
2:48 PM

Post #4324240

Forest Hills Cemetery is on the way between me and the Arboretum, literally. Of course, you will want to visit Mount Auburn! Let's discuss this further when it's warmer out! x, C
sanannie
White Lake, ON
(Zone 4b)

December 25, 2007
4:13 PM

Post #4326097

I enjoyed your article, Victor. I'm really starting to appreciate these wonderful shrubs and trees and have planted some dwarf conifers in a new garden bed. I hope you write a whole series of articles on conifers, especially how to prune conifers. This is all great information. Thanks.

Sandy

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

December 26, 2007
5:04 PM

Post #4328421

Thanks Sandy!
Candyce
The Monadnock Region, NH
(Zone 5a)

December 28, 2007
2:20 PM

Post #4334433

I'm with Sandy. Victor knows so much about evergreens that I hope he writes a whole series. Please, Victor?
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

December 28, 2007
3:38 PM

Post #4334664

Himm. I thought that the point of conifers was that you didn't prune them, just pinch the growing tips.

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

December 28, 2007
3:39 PM

Post #4334669

Thanks Candyce, but I'm hardly an expert! I appreciate your kind words and will consider doing some that cover more specific topics.

DonnieBrook

DonnieBrook
Southwest , NH
(Zone 5b)

December 29, 2007
1:09 AM

Post #4336251

Great job, Victor! I had never focused on some of the points that you made about evergreens...didn't even realize that there were the two types, needle and broadleaf...and the photos you included were top quality. Like everyone else, I am left wanting you to say more in future articles. However, this article was a great introduction with specific points that allow it to stand alone as a very well-written, informative and interesting article. I will come back to this one again. I was happy to see that you included the tip of including some natives in the living fence suggestion. I think I will research some evergreens to include in the living fence we are doing down here in Fla. so we will have an outdoor Christmas tree to decorate for the birds next year. Keep your pen working on a "next" article!!
Candyce
The Monadnock Region, NH
(Zone 5a)

January 1, 2008
4:03 PM

Post #4347513

Hear! Hear!

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