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Soap and Candle-making: Crayons

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stumpenursery
Florence, AL

December 28, 2007
10:47 PM

Post #4335842

Has anyone ever used crayons for coloring your CP soap? If so how do you do it?

Pam
pashsoapmakers
Plant City, FL

December 30, 2007
1:14 AM

Post #4339195

I use crayola for coloring CP soap. For 10 lbs of soap I put in 1 1/2 large crayola only, crayons along with 2 tbl spoons of the hot oils, in the microwave for about 1 1/2 minutes. I stir really good and when the crayon is the same temp as the oil and lye when I combined them, I add the crayon and stir with the stick blender. I am part of my granddaughters schools green plan, they give me the broken crayola's.
stumpenursery
Florence, AL

December 31, 2007
2:08 AM

Post #4342371

I was not sure this could be done. A friend of mine uses crayons all the time, to keep from buying dyes. Just didn't want to mess up my soaps. But this could save money, and everybody has broken crayons in a box somewhere.
pashsoapmakers
Plant City, FL

December 31, 2007
1:05 PM

Post #4343314

Sometimes if my temps are not perfect the soap comes out with teeny tiny specks but they really look pretty and people seem to like it. It won't color you either and if kid's can use it it's got to be safe. I also have bought a box of 400 large crayola's straight from the company.
stumpenursery
Florence, AL

December 31, 2007
9:28 PM

Post #4344906

Thanks, that makes ne feel a little better about using them.
Gonna try, will let you know how it turns out.

Pam
pashsoapmakers
Plant City, FL

December 31, 2007
9:35 PM

Post #4344933

Good luck Pam. The only problem I had was with red because I live in humid Florida comes out orange, and I tried to mix a pink with purple and they came out neon pink. Both of these soaps were sold as ugly but smell good soaps at a discount.

Sharon
pandora125
Symsonia, KY
(Zone 6b)

January 7, 2008
5:56 PM

Post #4371507

the prettiest blue soap i ever made was colored with blue crayola. i melt the crayons with the oils before adding the lye mixture
pashsoapmakers
Plant City, FL

January 23, 2008
4:52 PM

Post #4442904

I was just in another blog that states using crayons to color may be illegal per the FDA. Everything I have read, as long as you don't make any claims other than a cleansing bar, the FDA does not get into it. All it say's anyway is what should be used for cosmetic grade. The box of crayons also say's all art products are non toxic and the only precaution is for small pieces being a possible choking problem for children under 36 months. Anyone have any idea's on this, I don't see how it can hurt you if it's non toxic.
Thanks
pinkpoodlegirl
Rock Hill, SC
(Zone 7b)

January 23, 2008
7:47 PM

Post #4443640

Interesting...I have used crayons to color my soap with no problems. What would be illegal? Selling products colored with non cosmetic grade colorants? I would be interested to know what exactly was illegal about it.

Anyone out there know anything?
pashsoapmakers
Plant City, FL

January 23, 2008
8:25 PM

Post #4443761

The person was not very nice about saying how if I went to court because someone was hurt by this the judge wouldn't side with me because I misused crayons as a colorant. She didn't like me much because I don't see how something non toxic is going to hurt anyone. Needless to say, I unsubscribed from that blog.
stumpenursery
Florence, AL

January 23, 2008
10:17 PM

Post #4444222

Ya'll have got to be kidding me, people will come up with anything. How can a crayon be harmful to anyone, you only use a small amount anyway.
pinkpoodlegirl
Rock Hill, SC
(Zone 7b)

January 24, 2008
1:00 AM

Post #4444879

If someone is going to be sensative to a colorant it could just as easily be a cosmetic grade colorant as well.

Sorry to hear they were not nice about it...I guess I am also a criminal type in their opinion. LOL I have not had a single complaint from anyone I have gifted my soap to. Lots of requests for more but no complaints.

This message was edited Jan 24, 2008 9:27 AM
pashsoapmakers
Plant City, FL

January 24, 2008
1:56 AM

Post #4445182

This makes me feel a lot better and I will continue to use crayola.
Thanks
pandora125
Symsonia, KY
(Zone 6b)

January 24, 2008
5:56 PM

Post #4447764

i wouldnt hesitate to use crayons in any soap i would be using for myself-i cant figure out why they would be bad for you. i mean, they are made for KIDS to play with and as we all know, kids tend to put things (like crayons) in their mouths. beeswax is a soap ingredient...what is a crayon? colored wax? the crayon melts and is saponified just like the other waxes/butters/oils in the soap recipe.

i tried ultramarines/oxides/micas to color my soap this week and WOW what pretty colors! i also made my first salt bar... i like it!

Vicki
stumpenursery
Florence, AL

January 24, 2008
9:48 PM

Post #4448716

I made a batch of glycerin soap using the crayons as color, prettist color I ever had.
I'm not going to be afraid to use or give it or sell it.
pinkpoodlegirl
Rock Hill, SC
(Zone 7b)

January 24, 2008
11:44 PM

Post #4449167

Me either...we will have our own crayon support group! LOL
stumpenursery
Florence, AL

January 25, 2008
1:41 AM

Post #4449767

LOL
ottoson
Yucca Valley, CA
(Zone 9a)

February 6, 2008
3:52 PM

Post #4502344

I'm not trying to be meanspirited or rain on anyone's parade here, but be sure to read carefully through the FDA's website if you are selling your soap...they have very specific regulations that apply to using colorants. The thing about the FDA staying out of it as long as you only sell it as a cleansing bar is partially true, but the regulations regarding colorants still apply. It gets kinda tricky as to whether they consider your product just soap, or a cosmetic, or a drug---in some cases you label as soap but it is regulated as a cosmetic, etc. You can sort that out by reading their page at: http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/cos-218.html. You can click on the cosmetics link at the bottom of that page to get to the main page where you can link to the guidelines/rules for colorant usage. Again, please don't take this as trying to be hateful...just trying to provide information because there are many, many people out there who literally make their living by filing frivolous lawsuits and even if a judge sided with you that crayons are safe and non-toxic, by that point you've spent tons of $$$ for a lawyer and way too much of your life in court...time and $$$ you could have enjoyed making more soap!!! :) The FDA approved colorants aren't that expensive & you use so little that to me it's well worth it to "color inside the lines"...sorry, couldn't resist the bad pun!!! Happy soaping!!!
jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

February 6, 2008
6:19 PM

Post #4503082

I think I'd be hesitant to use ones made in China with all the crap going into stuff there. My son used to eat crayons constantly. (His diapers looked like technicolor DIsney poop!) He's 6' 4" and 26 now.m Guess it didn't hurt him and I think he's over it now. (Though I havent checked lately)

Every once in a while I worry about someone trying to sue me over my soap. All it would take is some mean spirited person to get some in their eyes. I had a woman call and complain that she was alergic to cinnamon (it was clearly listed on the lable) and she got a rash from my soap. I asked why she would by "Oatmeal Cinnamon Soap" if she was alergic to cinnamon? She hung up on me. So the next year I went way overboard on the lables. I listed everything that might have come in contact with the soap or equipment (including peanuts, just in case) and had two paragraphs of warnings. I ended it with a warning that if I were to be sued they would automaticly be awarded my house with it's leaky roof, My husband, two dogs, three cats and a car that doesn't run. Two pints of blood would be optional. Most people got the sarcasm and thought it was a riot.
pinkpoodlegirl
Rock Hill, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 6, 2008
6:40 PM

Post #4503253

jylgaskin...too funny about your warning label. People do get crazy about wanting to sue everyone they think they can squeeze a dollar out of.

I don't sell my soaps at this point. I keep them and gift them to my friends and family but would look into approved colorants if I did choose to go that route.
ottoson
Yucca Valley, CA
(Zone 9a)

February 6, 2008
7:02 PM

Post #4503340

From your warning label I would assume the husband isn't handy with home repair or car repair...dang it!!! :) Mine either...but he's the world's greatest computer guy & a fantastic cook so he earns his keep!

It really is sad to have to constantly be vigilant about frivolous lawsuits, but those folks are out there...I've run into someone I knew years ago several times in the past few years and I think every time I've seen her she's talked about being involved in a different lawsuit. I find myself wanting to say "wouldn't it be easier & more honest to just get a real job?"
pashsoapmakers
Plant City, FL

February 6, 2008
7:14 PM

Post #4503385

I've tried using mica's in my CP soap but they all come out white. What would you suggest that would be better? I'm afraid to use herbs like cayenne as suggested because I'm just afraid it would burn.
ottoson
Yucca Valley, CA
(Zone 9a)

February 6, 2008
7:58 PM

Post #4503583

I would definitely not try cayenne...if it acts anything in soap like it does in food...yikes! If you want to use plant type colorants here's a list I found online:

Alfalfa – medium green
Alkanet – steep in oil first - deep purple to muted blue
Annatto Seed – steep in oil first - yellow orange
Beet Root – muted pink to red
Ground Calendula Petals - yellow
Carrots, shredded or ground - yellow to orange
Ground Chamomile – yellow-beige
Chlorophyll - medium greens
Cinnamon - tan to brown – can be an irritant
Cocoa powder– brown
Coffee/coffee grounds - brown to black
Comfrey Root – light milky brown
Curry powder - yellow
Henna, ground - olive to deep drab green - brown
Indigo root - deep blues - caution, can stain
Kaolin Clay - white
Kelp/seaweed - green
Madder root - rosy red - purple
Milk (goats or cow's) - tan to brown, depending upon sugar & fat content
Morrocan Red Clay - Brick Red
Paprika – light peach to salmon - can be an irritant
Poppy Seeds - Blue-grey to light black specks
Pumice, ground - grey
Pumpkin, pureed - lovely deep orange Example
Rattanjot – lavender to purple
Rose Pink Clay - Brick red
Rosehip seeds, ground - light tan to deep brown
Safflower Petals- yellow to deep orange
Saffron - yellows
Sage - green
Spinach – light green
Spirulina/Blue-Green Algae – blue-green
Titanium Dioxide- bright white
Tumeric – gold to amber

And here's some advice I can raise my right hand & swear to...if you add ground vanilla beans to your soap the lather will be a brackish nasty sewage color...lol!!!

I generally use ultramarines for color...they are pretty easy to work with and I like the results. It's a personal choice, but my favorite soaps are the ones I don't add any color to & put things like ground lavender, ground mints, or calendula petals in instead...I love the natural look. Just be sure if you are using things like rosemary you grind them very finely or you'll end up with soap that feels thorny. A friend went to Rome recently and brought me back a bar of really gorgeous soap...full of all kinds of seeds & herbs & stuff...it's nice to look at but that stuff could take the hide off an elephant.

If you send me a dmail with your mailing address I can send you a bit of ultramarine powder to try if you'd like.

stumpenursery
Florence, AL

February 7, 2008
12:30 AM

Post #4504699

Ya'll are way too funny with the warning labels. I too put labels on mine that says it's your responsibilty to ensure capability with skin type. But most of the people that buy my soap have sensitive skin and ask for it. It's the only soap they use now. I have several with ezsema that buy a whole batch at a time. Most of my soaps are of natural color, they just look pretty that way.
jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

February 7, 2008
3:45 AM

Post #4505716

Ottoson,
Actually my husband is a maintainence manager for a multi million dollar casino. My toilet paper holder still falls off the wall.

I would guess that 80% of my soap is sold to return customers, They have learned that I only make it for a few months each year and stock up. I usually leave it a natural color, that is whatever color it come out with what I've added. I've found that if I dry herbs in the microwave instead of naturaly, they give more green. I do add a bit of iridescent glitter to my snow soap to make it sparkle. (My husband discovered that some of the sparkles stay on the skin while he was at work). If you are going to add colorants, watch out for any scents that have vanilla or milk soaps, they end up brown and yellow and depending on the color you add, it could distort.
ottoson
Yucca Valley, CA
(Zone 9a)

February 7, 2008
4:01 AM

Post #4505783

Too funny jyl...I totally get it though...when I get to the point of loudly proclaiming I'm about to take this !@^$ computer apart myself and figure out what is wrong with it he moves pretty quick! :)
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2008
5:25 AM

Post #4576124

So has anybody checked with FDA about using crayons in your soaps? Do you sell them? With all th e whackos out there, why would you want to risk getting sued by anybody .

There are too many other ways to color your soap that is a lot safer. I'm not trying to rain on anybody's parade here either. Better to be safe than sorry, BTW, I loved that list you posted ottoson, I'm going to print it off.

I don't color mysoaps, Most of the folks who dmail or email me for soaps, have specifically said they don't want colorants in their soaps at all.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

March 15, 2008
6:10 PM

Post #4667628

Hey there...maybe it's better to be happy, loose and or lightfooted than scared stiff of a cross breeze. Yet another point! Crayons could not be on the market with all ages of kids eating them if they were not relatively safe.

Barbie # 1 was dark of skin color and had slanted eyes, therefore the first toy recall in toy history. Barbie # 2 quickly re-manufactred came up with kids wanting to chew on her because she smelled like a crayon. Recall #2 came up quickly.
Barbie # 3 solved all the problems. Matell became the first toy company to have manufactrued a single million dollar toy with Barbie.

Barbie #1 Mint in the Box, Unopened has sold above $6,000.00. Barbie #2 Mint in the Box, Unopened has sold above $2000.00.

I would think the odor of a cayon colored product would be a memory pleasing event even if no-one understood why.
jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

March 15, 2008
6:45 PM

Post #4667723

One of my best selling soaps smells like playdough. The other smells like Tide. I wish I could make one that smells like crayons. I'd make it bright colors too!
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

March 15, 2008
9:47 PM

Post #4668299

As a doll doctor of some repute I used common canning wax about a pound and several pieces of red crayon and a very little bit of red oxide to create the eye lids on truely antique dolls. The red of course made the pink. The red oxide was my attic dust that made it look like aged wax originally placed on those hand blown glass eyes between 1885 and 1920 mostly by the German doll makers.
pinkpoodlegirl
Rock Hill, SC
(Zone 7b)

March 16, 2008
12:15 AM

Post #4668700

Interesting info doc
kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

March 16, 2008
11:01 PM

Post #4671980

Like Ottoson, I want to just inform people selling soap colored with crayons to be cautious. There are many people allergic to the dyes used, yes in crayons. Especially the Red Dyes. Even with a warning label, you can be sued which is a hassel just in legal fees even if you don't have a lot of "assets" worth taking. Whats worst, a person could have an allergic reaction and be subjected to discomfort. Also, to sell a soap or any other "cosmetic" product to the public (soap is considered a cosmetic because it is applied to the skin), the FDA mandates that your product must be insured and should something happen, you should be able to produce testing results on your products.

While at a craft show a few years ago, a FDA investigator showed up to every booth selling soaps and bodycare products. I didn't even know such a thing existed! First, any item without a INCI ingredient list was removed and fined $1,000.00. Second, ingredients lists were scrutinized and we were questioned heavily on each ingredient. Third, a wonderful wonderful woman selling soap that she used "red wine" in (simply as a colorant) her Merlot soap was fined ($1000.00) and she was told she could not sell soap made with any alcohol product because she did not have a liquor license. What!? I couldn't believe it. I never thought such a thing could or would happend at a simple arts and crafts show. How did this start? A customer who wanted a refund because she did not like the scent of a soap she bought called the FDA hotline and complained. Whats worst, the vendor she bought from (who I know well and know that he makes a good product) was not at that show (there's a different show in each city run by the same promoters). It brought about headaches and drama for everyone else because of a customer that none of us had even sold to.

Luckily, I follow the FDA guidelines strictly so I had no troubles, but I would hate to see any of you have to deal with such things because of one bad apple. It's not worth it at all. Had someone said all of this to me 12years ago, I would think they were being over dramatic and overly cautious, now I know better since I have seen the problems with my own eyes.

kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 17, 2008
1:19 AM

Post #4672554

That's scarey stuff Kanita, Thanks for posting , When I use to do shows I always made sure that The INCI ingred were listed. I no longer do shows and no longer sell in stores. So I don't list the ingredients that way .

If I ever got into it as I use to I would make sure of doing things with in the FDA guidelines. It's just too scarey not to these days.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

March 17, 2008
1:31 PM

Post #4674005

Thirty five or forty years ago the FDA made the makers of the famous Smithfield Ham owners line the inside walls of their smoke houses with stainless steel. In one stroke of the pen the hams were isolated from the wood which contained the entire hundred year flavor history of the Smithfield Ham.
...no chemistry derived flavoring even approaches what was taken away. There are now just a few Southern Ham producers most likely because the value of the smoke house has been taken away from all commercial producers. Few if any small farmers have hundred year old smoke houses or anything even close to it.
...I understand all the baloney about living longer without all that salt and the horrors of real honest hickory smoke. I WOULD sign off to or for anyone for one of those Original Smithfield Hams today.
...All FDA... like many other government posts today... do nothing much but shuffle paper and create updated paper legislation. I believe the number is less than 10% of anything actually gets inspected.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 17, 2008
2:25 PM

Post #4674219

Well, t he fine they were slapping on the folks at that show kanita talked about is enough to scare me off. Who'd want to take that chance.
pashsoapmakers
Plant City, FL

March 17, 2008
3:23 PM

Post #4674425

I'm confused, this is what I get from the law's on just soap, not a cosmetic soap, just soap "no claims made"
Soap, as long as we can remember, has enjoyed an enviable respect in polite society and this could be at least a part of the reason why Congress placed soap above the law in enacting the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938. This law exempted soap from regulation as a cosmetic.

So long as no cosmetic representations are made for soap, other than that it cleanses, and no claims are made that it will affect the structure or functions of the body or treat a disease, it is beyond FDA regulation. When such claims are made the soap must meet all FDA requirements for a cosmetic or a drug or both, whichever is appropriate. If it's represented as a drug the label must list all active ingredients; if represented as both a cosmetic and drug or as only a cosmetic the label must list all ingredients.

For instance, if a soap is labeled as a deodorant soap, FDA considers this to be a cosmetic claim and the label must, as with other cosmetics, carry a list of ingredients. If the soap makes a medical claim, such as that it will cure dandruff, it is considered a drug and must carry required drug labeling and also meet FDA safety and effectiveness requirements.

jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

March 17, 2008
4:17 PM

Post #4674615

You know, life is full of risks. I could get hit by a bus tomorrow just for crossing the street. Me, I'll keep selling my soap, just like I always have with a simple ingredient list. If I worried about the government all the time, I'd get nothing done. I have better things to worry about.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 17, 2008
4:29 PM

Post #4674672

Hum, that's interesting pashsoapmakers. Glad you posted that, I'd like to hear some comments on that from the experts that do list the INCI names on their toiletries.

When I use to sell it at shows and stores, I was always told to have the INCI ingred listed , I did so and I also had the regular name in parenthesis after that to be on the safe side, I never claimed that my soap would treat anything as you do. This is interesting. Cause I always though t if you sold it you had to do it this way.

Now I just list the ingred the simple way, have doneso for many years also like you and others. I see lots of folks at craft shows listing their ingred, list like this also. Not worrying about the INCI names,

I too am not going to worry about listing the INCI names folks always looked at the ingred list and never could figure out the ingred when I did it that way. I don't sell in volume either, and this is working for me just fine too.



kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

March 17, 2008
5:38 PM

Post #4674964

Pash, I am sorry, if that is your interpretation, of the rule, it is wrong. The rules have changed drastically. The 1938 act has been rewritten many times over. On a soap, you can't even call it "moisturizing" or else that is considered a claim. In 2006 due to the popularity of homemade soap, soap was officially moved to the cosmetic section.

Because of the size of my company now, I am registered with the FDA and had to undergo extensive training to understand FDA regulations. Someone even came to my factory from the FDA.

What you have to understand is they (FDA) want to be able to charge you for something. They want to be able to take a piece of anything that is bringing in sizeable amounts of money.

Also, true you could get hit by a bus today, but if I see a bus coming, I am going to try my best to get the heck out of the way.
jylgaskin
Williamsburg, MI
(Zone 4b)

March 17, 2008
8:16 PM

Post #4675436

Ahhh, there is the diffrence in you and me. My business NEVER brings in a sizeable ammount of money. If I was a commercial soapmaker, I would worry more. I just make some soap on the side to suppliment my art business and have a small, but loyal customer base.
kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

March 17, 2008
8:44 PM

Post #4675545

Boy, do I miss those days. I truly do. You loose some of the pleasure when you are making 3000 bars of the same soap, or a soap you don't particularly like for a customer that you definitely don't like. Lucky you.
pashsoapmakers
Plant City, FL

March 17, 2008
8:47 PM

Post #4675563

I too list all my ingredients on my soaps and sell at small craft shows. I see other soapers who have huge rigs and trailers, and they don't even list any of the ingredients on the soap bars. I too will keep doing what I am doing as I feel is within the laws. Funny thing, FDA has approved food (sick cows etc) and med's that have killed the public, gotta love it..
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 17, 2008
10:16 PM

Post #4675847

Kanita, I feel for you, It's become a job now, hate it when hobbies turn into jobs. Sometimes gardening becomes that way for me LOL

Sewing has definitely become a job.
kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

March 18, 2008
1:03 AM

Post #4676430

The FDA is hippocracy at its finest! They don't make the decisions for the safety of the consumer, they do it for the padding of their pockets, lets keep it real. Its all about their ability to get "their share" of your creation.

I don't mean to sound like I am complaining, I am grateful that I have the business and all, its just some times, it gets tough, especially with some customers. What was once a sign of a handmade product, now gets labeled as a flaw and certain clients won't take it. So to sell a 3000 bar order, I have to make 3500-4000 bars "just in case". It would be different if I had a soap making machine, but I am the machine and I can't pull all nighters like I used to, especially now that I have a shop to try and run and promote etc.

Okay, enough of my whining, back to work.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

March 18, 2008
1:26 AM

Post #4676536

How do you make that many bars of soap Kanita? You must have a very elaborate set up. Do you have help?

one huge cook stove? Do you do cold process?

I can't even imagine making that much at one time.
kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

March 18, 2008
6:58 AM

Post #4677467

Well, its much different than when I first started. I don't use a stove any more, I have a custom built 80 gallon melting tank, and yes I do cold process. I also make transparent soap base using hot process. I do have help when working on really large order, but still it seems most of the work is done by me.

I thought I had it rough until I visited another small factory in Marseille France. Their hot process method of soap making is sooo difficult, its unreal.
pashsoapmakers
Plant City, FL

March 18, 2008
2:58 PM

Post #4678300

On the lighter side, sometimes I might drop a little coconut oil or palm oil on the kitchen floor. Well, out cat Willow is always with me when I make soap and she just laps up the spillage, I have to say she has the prettiest coat you've ever seen.

Kanita, I think I want to just stay small and have fun. I give you a lot of credit for the hard work, I only make about 120 bars a week and taking care of the house and my 89 year old mom, and doing weekend shows, I don't think I could do any more.
kanita
Los Angeles, CA
(Zone 10a)

March 18, 2008
6:27 PM

Post #4679141

120 bars a week is a lot in its own right. Hats off to you taking care of your mom on top of everything else.
SkinDeepBeauty
Wichita Falls, TX

August 30, 2008
6:56 PM

Post #5487576

I have used crayons in HP soap. It came out very pretty.
However, I don't know what chemical reaction occurs when the crayons combine with the ingredients in the soap, so I've decided it's best not to use them anymore.

I use herbal and natural colorants in my soapmaking as well as essential oils.

The FDA does not require listing ingredients on soap labels as long as you sell it as soap and not a cosmetic.

Also, I always list the essential oils and plant colorings used on my soap label just in case someone is allergic. Pregnant women and children are sensitive to certain plant extracts and essential oils.

Better to be safe than sorry.

Happy soapmaking!

miraculousbeads.com
soaper1218
Gulf Breeze, FL

October 21, 2008
5:58 PM

Post #5699820

I have used crayons. They are made from stearic acid which seems to work great as a soap colorant. Since crayons are used mostly by kids they are designed to be relatively safe.

Steve
Free Blender Soap Recipes
www.colebrothers.com/articles/soap.html
sw1fty
Schenectady, NY

December 3, 2008
8:54 PM

Post #5855394

"I've tried using mica's in my CP soap but they all come out white. What would you suggest that would be better?"

I'd suggest soap colorants. I personally use Select Shades from Tradewinds but there are others. Some micas are stable at the high pH of soap, but many are not. Your supplier should be able to tell you which are. I can look for other suppliers later.

Soapers, and all manufacturers and sellers of any product, have a responsibility to follow the rules and to produce a safe product. You many make the assumption that a crayon is safe in soap, but if you get sued you'd better be ready to (pay) prove it - if you use approved colorants then someone else has already done that for you.

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I got wax and empty pop bottles for christmas veeja3 10 Jun 1, 2010 7:56 PM
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New at making soap Patty08 62 Dec 19, 2007 2:35 PM
Hello, new candlemaker to this forum... waxedout 11 Aug 10, 2014 8:23 PM


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