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Beginner Vegetables: anyone grow Artichoke from seeds ?

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taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 8, 2008
1:10 AM

Post #4373311

I got a fee packet from Baker Creek
Purple of Romagna Artichoke
i might think of trying it or just doing a trade .
any help would be great
thanks
sue
chickenrancher
Nova, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 8, 2008
11:34 AM

Post #4374681

I'm trying them this year, but haven't previously, no.
Megan

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 8, 2008
7:52 PM

Post #4376205

honestly as dumb as this sounds lol i never really thought of artichokes from seed lol :) you will have to let me know how it goes ?
which type are you doing ?
sue
chickenrancher
Nova, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 11, 2008
5:37 PM

Post #4387716

Sorry I didn't get back to you sooner I've been sick :(
I'm trying Green Globe! I will let you know how it goes.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 11, 2008
8:17 PM

Post #4388335

hey no problem
i hope your feeling better :)
I will plant some of mine and we can see what comes out of them :) lol
compare notes
sue
chickenrancher
Nova, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 12, 2008
12:03 AM

Post #4389226

Sounds good to me.
kalika22
Denham Springs, LA
(Zone 8b)

January 12, 2008
12:35 AM

Post #4389323

I'm jealous, haven't the room to grow artichokes, but man are they tasty.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 12, 2008
3:55 AM

Post #4390254

oh oh
I m not aware of how much room i might need lol :)
but i do have alot of room
i love artichokes too
sue
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 12, 2008
5:46 PM

Post #4391710

We've always grown artichokes and cardoons from seed. I never seen an artichoke seedling around here. They will get quite large. If you are in an area that is dry, with high summer heat, the violet artichokes from southern Italy are better. The green globe artichokes are one of the commercial types. They do well on the coast with all the fog, but can be tough when grown inland.

This is the type that does best for us in Sunnyvale. The artichoke is somewhat tulip shaped, with very fleshy leaves and large thorns.
[HYPERLINK@growitalian.com]
MikeD
Liberal, OR
(Zone 8b)

January 12, 2008
7:34 PM

Post #4392066

Artichokes (and cardoons) are great beginner gardener plants. The seeds germinate easily, they transplant easily, and they literally grow like weeds. A cousin to thistles, they can grow just about anywhere sunny and warm.

As previously mentioned, the coastal areas of California are commercial growing areas, but when I moved from such a climate in the late 80s to our farm here in Oregon, I dug and brought my artichokes with me. They survived the climate change for years until they petered out (which happens to all living things eventually).

They are attractive plants to creatively integrate into your landscape. Don't feel limited to putting them in straight rows in a big open veggie garden. They are a nice perennial to plant at the back of flowerbeds.

Here is a picture, in this case Cardoon, in such a bed:

http://www.victoryseeds.com/catalog/vegetable/artichoke/cardoon_mature.jpg

And the same bed from a different angle. This is later in the season after the plants have gone to seed and I am waiting for them to finish to save seed:

http://www.duntonfarms.com/images_trials/farm/seasonal_pics/farm_smokehouse_flower_garden_091703.jpg

Here in the Willamette Valley of the Pacific NW, they pretty much come back with no problem or effort from year to year. However, if the ground freezes hard, you could lose them but with some effort, they can be grown from seed as an annual.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 13, 2008
4:10 AM

Post #4394298

Garden i remember Half Moon Bay is famous for their artichokes if i recall.
hey thanks for the info
I m getting excited about this. i really didn't think i would care to try them but now i m getting interested.
thanks MikeD i will look into those links
sue
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 13, 2008
4:32 AM

Post #4394382

We did artichoke trials in our community garden last summer. We had started about six varieties from seed. It was very exciting to see them grow up into majestic plants and then harvest all those artichoked. All but the violetta were very tough. The ones that like the moist coastal climates will get tough if grown in the hot & dry valley. I suppose we could have watered them more.

Castroville, near Salinas, is the "artichoke capital of the world". Lots growing in Half Moon Bay still on the ag preserve land.
brownerthumb
North East, MD

January 13, 2008
2:35 PM

Post #4395317

My husband and I tried globe artichoke in a large pot in a sunny location here. They came up quite readily and grew nicely although we didn't get any chokes. We thought we'd try them again but in the ground after starting them inside to get a head start. Needless to say, they didn't make it through the winter but we didn't try to protect them either. That would definitely be a consideration although we don't get as cold as you do!

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 13, 2008
3:24 PM

Post #4395486

How big do they get ?
Im looking foreward to the varitey i got from Bakers
sue
brownerthumb
North East, MD

January 17, 2008
3:44 PM

Post #4414772

Sorry for the delay. I'm in zone 6a and used a pot 12" wide x 15" deep. The chokes grew beyond the edge of the pot a good 8". That's not big compared to how they'd grow in soil. I've seen them growing in soil measure 4' across and about 3' high (not counting the bloom stocks).

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 17, 2008
3:59 PM

Post #4414839

good to know browner
always good to know how far apart something like that would get
sue
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 21, 2008
6:29 PM

Post #4433512

The artichoke plants here will often grow 5-6 ft high.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 21, 2008
8:18 PM

Post #4433951

good to know garden .
thanks
Have you grown them from seed before garden ?
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 21, 2008
9:13 PM

Post #4434257

Yes, we usually start them from seed. Artichokes are a thistle. Thistles are vigorous plants. Those little seeds are very determined to sprout and grow, just like their cousins the dandelion.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 21, 2008
11:05 PM

Post #4434777

oh really
so they are pretty easy ? that is good to know also
i like easy sometimes.
hmmm getting really excited on this
thanks garden
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

January 23, 2008
3:07 PM

Post #4442445

Have to share a smile I got just now :). I'm reading all my seed packages, and trying to sort things out. I finally found the Italian seeds that I ordered, at least the package is mostly in Italian. The English part reads "Violet Chioggia Artichoke. Large, Globular heads, with firm green bracts with violet tinges, without prickles.

I love translation idiosyncracies, I have one set of instructions that advises me to "disopen" a door, and another to "disclose" a box...

For some reason, I find knowing that this kind of artichoke is "without prickles" very comforting, considering the effect the thistles here have on my legs in summer *g*.

Of course, first it has to grow...

This message was edited Jan 23, 2008 10:10 AM

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 23, 2008
3:45 PM

Post #4442635

No prickles is always a good thing
expecially on legs
AresDraco
San Francisco, CA
(Zone 10a)

January 30, 2008
11:35 PM

Post #4475419

I had great success with Artichokes in my Oakland, California garden. Unfortunately, in zone 7, it's unlikely you'll have a growing season long enough to allow for bloom, nor are Artichokes from seed a good way of getting superior buds. 'Globe Artichokes' are grown from off-sets, for instance.

That said, you CAN grow 'Cardoons', Cynara cardunculus. You blanch and eat the leaf stalks, and I find them even more flavorful than artichokes. Plus there's more edible material produced by each plant.

I now garden in Dallas, Texas (Z-8), and have GORGEOUS plants. I'd grow them for the beauty of the foliage even if I never harvested a single stem.

Go ahead and plant the seeds. It's a no-lose situation. Wait until warm weather, and make sure you have room. These puppies get BIG.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

January 31, 2008
12:23 AM

Post #4475654

good to know AresDraco
i will look into those varietys you mentioned .cardoons i have herd of them
thanks
sue
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 6, 2008
8:44 PM

Post #4503739

Artickokes are not hard to raise from seed. They have deep roots though, so need open ground. They are a nice plant that attracts lady beetles, has a beautiful flower & is healthy for surrounding plants as like Borage, they bring leeched nutrients back up to the surface. I am growing Green Globe & Cardoons atm, though the Cardoon is really a weed here. I am expecting some seed for the Violet Chioggia soon if you want a couple.
Cynara btw in the name of the Cardoon refers to cyranin which is a chemical that sweetens the taste of things eaten after an artichoke. Apparently, the US wine industry did the relevant studies.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 7, 2008
12:37 AM

Post #4504732

Thanks Granville
I htink i will try this type i got for now :)
funny how weeds are actually highly nurtious for the soil and us. ! i was reading an article in oh i think it was Mother Earth or Grit mag about the nutritional value of weeds .
thanks for hte info , i m getting more and more excited about growing them this season
thanks
sue
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 7, 2008
8:36 PM

Post #4508288

There is also Cynar, an Italian appertif made from artichokes & herbs.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cynar
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 7, 2008
9:00 PM

Post #4508409

OK. That is interesting. Wonder what it is like. The Italians have a dwarfed variety that produces year round too. Haven't managed to find its name yet though, let alone its seed. You won't regret growing them Taynor.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 7, 2008
9:14 PM

Post #4508468

I do love a good artichoke
how long before i can see some chokes comming up to harvest ?
i also really loved those little ones . THose where yummy too
OHIOBILL
MINERVA, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2008
1:52 AM

Post #4509689

HI, I ORDERED A PACKET OF THE Purple of Romagna Artichoke ALSO AND AM PLANNING ON STARTING THEM TODAY. I'VE BEEN READING UP ON GROWING THEM IN THE NORTH AND FROM WHAT I READ WE NEED TO "TRICK" THEM INTO THINKING THEY HAVE GONE THROUGH A WINTER ALREADY. I GUESS THEY USALLY DON'T PRODUCE ARTICHOKES UNTIL THE SECOND SEASON BUT WON'T OVERWINTER IN THE NORTH. THERE ARE SEVERAL WAYS TO DO THIS. THE 1ST SAID TO PLANT YOUR SEEDS IN POTS AND WAIT ONE OR TWO DAYS AND PLACE IN THE FRIDGE FOR ONE MONTH, KEEPING MOIST BUT NOT WET. TAKE THEM OUT AND START AS NORMAL. THE OTHER WAY IS TO START THEM 6 WEEKS BEFORE APRIL 1ST. THEN PUT THEM IN A COLD FRAME AROUND APRIL 1ST AND "RUN IT BACKWARDS". OPEN IT WHEN TEMPS ARE 26 DEGREES OR ABOVE AND SHUTTING IT WHEN IT IS WARMER TO HOLD THE COLD IN. THE INSIDE TEMP OF THE COLD FRAME SHOULD BE BETWEEN 39 AND 43 DEGREES. THEN PLANT IN GARDEN AFTER SIX WEEKS. I AM A LITTLE LATE FOR THE SECOND METHOD BUT AM PLANNING ON TRYING THEM BOTH (WITH A SHORTER TIME IN THE COLDFRAME) AND SEEING IF I CAN GET ARTICHOKES THIS YEAR. ANOTHER METHOD I SAW SAYS TO START THE PLANTS AND AFTER SIX WEEKS PUT THEM IN THE FRIDGE FOR 8 HOURS AT NIGHT AND REMOVING DURING THE DAY FOR SUN. YOUR SUPPOSE TO DO THIS EVERY NIGHT FOR A MONTH. MIGHT TRY A COUPLE OF PLANTS THIS WAY TOO, CANT HURT RIGHT???. HOPE THIS HELPS.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2008
2:28 AM

Post #4509883

Yes that does help
thanks
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 9, 2008
11:54 AM

Post #4514945

OK. This fridge trick is similar to a method used to germinate stone fruit which like to spend a winter in the ground before sprouting. It would probably work but I wouldn't do it because forcing early flowering will inhibit the growth of the plant & possibly shorten its life span. Even late planted artichokes that flower in the following summer are often not harvested for the same reason.
OHIOBILL
MINERVA, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 11, 2008
9:12 PM

Post #4525040

I DO KNOW THE BOOK SAID THE ARTICHOKES THEMSELVES WOULD BE SMALLER, BUT A SHORTENED LIFE SPAN FOR THE PLANT REALLY ISN'T A PROBLEM HERE BECAUSE THEY REALLY ONLY HAVE 3 1/2 TO 4 MONTHS AT THE BEST FOR A GROWING SEASON, AND IT IS TOUCH AND GO IF WE CAN OVERWINTER THEM AT ALL. IT SAID THE CROWNS MUST BE KEPT IN WELL DRAINED SOIL AND BE MULCHED HEAVILY AND THIS STILL DOESN'T GUARANTEE THEY WILL LIVE UNTIL THE NEXT SEASON. SO WE WOULD REALLY BE TRYING TO GROW THEM AS AN ANNUAL INSTEAD OF A PERENNIAL.
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 12, 2008
4:44 AM

Post #4527015

OK. It is hard for we in Australia to understand how cold it is over there. My artichokes become hardier in the cooler months & needed to be shaded from the worst of summer. I haven't heard of them not surviving winter before.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 12, 2008
2:50 PM

Post #4527927

Granville
lol
today here in Ohio it snowed and is 18 degrees . I believe that is -7.8 celsius ? if i m doing my math right lol :)
sunday we had 45 mile hr winds making it -14 Farenheit so with my math being what it is . -26.5 celsius
I believe your summer are much hotter than our. We usually have an average in our summer months of 90 farenheit with alot of humidity
i would make a cover for them in our cold temps like a cold frame for them. If that would work. or keep them in the GH over to winterize.
I have no idea yet on these ideas but Bill makes good point to follow here in the states
hope it helps
sue
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 12, 2008
9:32 PM

Post #4529515

Our whole year sounds a lot hotter than yours. I have noticed that your climate zone system for gardening is based on minimum temperatures, whereas ours is the opposite. Have you thought about throwing a greenhouse over some of your garden?
I bought a cheap one from Ebay a little while back, made of reinforced plastic that could blow away of course. That problem was solved by placing it in a sheltered position & laying a fallen log down the centre of it; to which I secured the central roof-pipe with vertical wires screwed along its length. The sides are dug in & weighed down with containered mango trees, ginger & so on. It is steady as a rock now even in storms, the log itself I grow stuff around & hollowed out a little for a small lemon tree. Next up, I will be putting in things like Heliconias which just would not live around here otherwise.
Perhaps you could try something like that. You would enjoy the options it allows.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 12, 2008
9:44 PM

Post #4529570

yes we are going to do a cattle panel GH this yr.
your sounds really pretty with all that growing around it
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 13, 2008
10:34 PM

Post #4534711

Well it is becoming one of my favourite places, as yours will no doubt. You won't look back after building it. I'd like to get a couple more but will probably build a solid glass one next. With the old pine log, I was inspired by a New Zealand bonsai site on which a bloke was showing bonsais he'd grown using natural containers like stone, fallen timber & the like instead of trays. I don't know how the lemon tree for example, will react to being planted in a pine log but friends say it will root through. It should look interesting & of course, I can shape it along the way. Been trying to get moss growing on the log too, which should give it the final touch in time. You don't hear gardeners talk about moss much but really, it can be quite beautiful. You see stunning examples in Japanese gardens.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 14, 2008
12:00 AM

Post #4534964

Ha i love moss ! :)
i look for it in our woods all the time. I enjoy it.
i am going to use it in my lanscape around our new house. Instead of grass i am going to just use the moss.
We are building a log home in the woods so it will fit in just right.
Funny. Your right moss is definetly underated.
Bonsais is somthing i wanted to get into, but just never have gotten around to it.
sorry i got off subject LOL :)
sue
OHIOBILL
MINERVA, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 15, 2008
3:14 AM

Post #4540119

HI AGAIN, A GREEN HOUSE SOUNDS GREAT BUT DOUBT I WILL HAVE ONE FOR A GOOD WHILE. TODAY WHEN I LEFT FOR WORK IT WAS 5 DEGREES FARENHEIT. I THINK THE LOWEST I HAVE TRACKED THIS WINTER HAS BEEN 2 BELOW ZERO F. I DID SOME MORE READING ON THE INTERNET AND ANOTHER OPTION IS TO LIFT THE CROWNS IN LATE FALL AND KEEP THEM IN MOIST (NOT WET) SAND AND KEEP IN A SPOT THAT DOSN'T FREEZE. THEN REPLANT IN THE SPRING. I HAVE A CRAWL SPACE UNDER MY HOUSE AND THOUGHT THAT MIGHT BE A GOOD SPOT. I HAVE KEPT APPLES AND MY CANNA AND DAHLIA BULBS THERE FOR THE WINTER AND THEY HAVE DONE FINE. IT IS A COLD CLIMATE HERE BUT WE ACTUALLY HAVE IT BETTER WITH MORE PLANT CHOICES THAN THE ZONE 3 OR 4 PEOPLE.
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 15, 2008
2:36 PM

Post #4541428

OK. I am glad we don't have to deal with temps like that. By comparison, cardoons grow wild around here. They can be a bit of a weed. I suppose the ground freezes regardless of whether you had a hot house, now that I think about it. Good luck wintering them. To be honest, it sounds dicey but you don't have a lot to lose. Have you thought of growing them in a container as an indoor? I have one artichoke in a container & it is going fine.
The log cabin sounds nice Sue. I could handle living in one I reckon. The moss sounds like a great idea too. A bit of work but it could look amazing. It is too dry here for anything like that.
Ian

Thumbnail by GranvilleSouth
Click the image for an enlarged view.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 15, 2008
2:42 PM

Post #4541455

never thought of a container. might be a fun project.
wow that is a great pic. excactly what i am planning on doing in the front of your house. THanks for hte pic
Bill that is a good idea with a crawl space.i never thought about that . I am thinking of making a root cellar in our basement.
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 16, 2008
1:57 AM

Post #4544292

The picture is just one I found on the net but its an inspiration. I wish I had that sort of climate. Actually, I wish I was a millionaire who could afford to keep gardens in about 3 different climate zones. Keep on dreaming, hey? This picture is mine though. It is the artichoke in a container, about six months old. Pls excuse the weeds. You can see it is happy, as is the borage & mint. I'd recommend borage. Its purty & its tasty.

Thumbnail by GranvilleSouth
Click the image for an enlarged view.

GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 16, 2008
2:00 AM

Post #4544308

Whilst I am posting thistle photos, here is another I took this morning. There is beauty in every plant I reckon. You just have to look for it.

This message was edited Feb 15, 2008 10:01 PM

Thumbnail by GranvilleSouth
Click the image for an enlarged view.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 16, 2008
3:57 AM

Post #4544763

ohhhh nice
yes i do have some borage seeds
it is nice to see some green .No green here yet still ice out
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 16, 2008
8:39 AM

Post #4545215

Spring can't be too far away I hope. We are heading toward Autumn now. My favourite time of year. That thistle is typical of everything seeding atm. Some trees are starting to colour too. Hopefully I'll get some good autumn pictures.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 16, 2008
2:47 PM

Post #4545653

Autum is pretty
I love that time of yr too
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 16, 2008
3:09 PM

Post #4545756

Well I hope the artichoke problem is solved by containering. It would be a shame to lose all that growing time even if the plants survive wintering under the house. Btw Bill, did you know that writing in capital letters is considered shouting on the net? I know we have been off track & all but no need to yell at us. :)
I see so many nice pictures I would like to use as wallpaper on this site, but they are mostly small & all watermarked. I have this idea about posting 1024x768 original photos in a thread to collect for desktops. There is the hosting & watermark problem, but we can avoid it by linking to photobucket or other domains. Do either of you know if it has already been done somewhere? I've had a look through the forums & seen nothing so far.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 16, 2008
3:19 PM

Post #4545837

not that i know of :)
GranvilleSouth

(Zone 10a)

February 16, 2008
10:54 PM

Post #4547734

I found it. Thanx. There seems to be an annual photo competition. You can read about it here ...
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/668961/

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

February 17, 2008
12:14 AM

Post #4548021

I know they have a calendar out. i got one for my mom at christmas 07 she really liked it

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