Ultra hot peppers

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

here is a comparison, -- what else is out there? what do you grow?

Thumbnail by Michaelp
Clinton, CT(Zone 6b)

None of the above yet but I did order Bhut Jolokia seeds from New Mexico State U yesterday. The lady who took the order said germination can take almost two months. Did yours take that long, Michaelp?

Los Angeles, CA(Zone 10a)

I don't know about Michael, but I know I have had some peppers take that long, but now, I make sure to keep the seed warm til they sprout, about 80 degrees or so.

North Hills, CA

I have all of them plus Trinidad Scorpions,Scotch Bonnets and a few other hots/super hots.
My super hots took about 2 weeks to pop up then they grow real slow so far.
They were sprouted in a south facing window around New Years give or take.
Dorsets seem to be the most fragile so far of the super hots.
Red Savinas are growing lots faster.3 times the size of the rest.

Frederick, MD(Zone 6b)

Wowza! I admit it, I'm a wimp. My heat tolerance tops out with 'Red Savinas' and similar habs. Michael sent me a 'Naga Morich' and the only flavor I could taste was "pain."

Check out the thumbnail photo at the top of my article today to see the difference bottom heat can make on germinating peppers. It used to take me that long just to get those seeds to sprout! http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/556/

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

I use a heat mat under the seed trays, with a thermostat, --it speeds things up a lot and also improves the germ rate a bunch, --I had Bhut Jolokia in 9 days that were an inch tall, [ not all of them --but some] they will sprout for a coupple of weeks, --they are a little variable in the sprouting times-----Michael Porter

Clinton, CT(Zone 6b)

Michaelp...guess my $5 package of Bhut Jolokia seeds is going to turn into a $70 plus or minus investment in a two tray heating pad and thermostat. I needed it anyways. This just pushes me over the edge into buying. What temp do you suggest? Around 85?

Frederick, MD(Zone 6b)

I'd suggest 80'F, no more than 82'F. And although I did provide alternatives and links to plans using Christmas rope lights etc. in today's article, I think the "official" seedling heat mats might be your best bet... I got mine from Park's, and they have a combo deal where you save a little by buying the mat and thermostat together. But check the Watchdog, as some folks have reported shipping delays and customer service problems with them lately (mostly with regard to plant orders, though, I think).

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

Mine came from Parks also, -I like the thermostat temp switch, --as the temp in the greenhouse changes a lot, --I think I cooked some seed before I added that, --in the morning the temp in the greenhouse may be in the 40's, in the afternoon it may top 100 degrees, --if the heat mat was still on, --the seed was getting very hot, --- some of this seed is not very vigorus anyway, and needs all the help it can get. --also be sure not to fertilize until after germination, -I have lost quite a few that way also, and for pepper seed you need well drained seed starting medium, ---- Michael

Clinton, CT(Zone 6b)

Critterologist....that was true with my orders with Parks. Three seed and supply orders were fine. Happy with everything. Dinner Plate Dahlias were delayed almost a month. The tubers grew to throw off wonderful blossoms. But the season was a month shortly than it should have been.

Looks like this is turning into a two flat heating mat, a thermostat plus two bio-domes. That looks to be the best deal at Parks right now.

Appreciate your article. I had been thinking for two days if I really needed a heat mat and then if I really needed a thermostat. For the number of pepper and eggplants I'm starting, I do (started 125 tomatoes last year and they did fine with no bottom heat...about 5 days to germination for all the cultivars).

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

I grew some "trinidad Scorpions", --they were not hot and did not look right either, --I suposedly have some seed on the way to try again, --I don't know what the others realy were but my Jalapinos had more heat than those, --good flavor and productive though, --I may keep them around just to can with a few hot ones to make a nice eating snack, -I like to munch peppers while eating other food, ----I still have some Bishops crown left from a great trade, I like to can and eat those also, -- What else is real hot--I don't believe the promo-jive until I hear from a real grower, --

North Hills, CA

I wonder if your Trinidad Scorpions were really trinidad perfume since they had no heat or got crossed with something.
did they look like trinidad scorpions?
The only scorpions I've ever eaten were from a friend and they hotter than most hot peppers,at least equal to Red Savinas.

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

They did not have the tail, --so I am sure they were something else, -they were a little hot and sweet, --when you get things from E-bay or a few "seed suppliers" you are never sure what will turn out, --the Naga Morich, Dorset Naga, Bhut Jolokia, I got were extreemly hot, --but only one seed was vaible,when I got the Naga Morich --but now I have lots, --a little of those goes a long way, --Michael

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

Smokemaster --thanks for a great trade, ---Michael

Lawrenceville, GA(Zone 7b)

What's a Trinidad Scorpion???

That's a new one to me.

BB

Lawrenceville, GA(Zone 7b)

SO like, who really eats these things???

North Hills, CA

I do.They have a flavor that milder peppers don't have.
Caution is advised when handling these fireballs.
They can be mixed with other peppers so you get the taste but not all the heat.

They are good for entertainment purposes too.
Especially if you have a sweet or mild pepper that looks like an ultra hot.
Walk into work chewing on a red seasoning pepper (mild to sweet taste) complaining that your trinidads aren't hot this season.
Make sure they see you bite into the pepper your eating.
Hand some sucker the real thing and ask them what they think while you pop another look alike into your mouth whole.

They are great for shutting up that guy who says there isn't such a thing as a pepper hot enough that he can't eat it whole.

Instead of using a dozen other peppers to heat up your hot sauce recipe you only have to wave a Bhut Jolokia over the stuff your making to make it hot.

Dacula, GA(Zone 7b)

Smokemaster,

ROFLMAO on the trick to your co-workers. It reminds me of my son when we first moved to GA from TX. I was growing jalapenos for salsa. DS was 7 and loved to pick and eat them off the plant. He gave one of them to a neighbor kid who ran home crying. The mom was not amused to say the least. He still like it hot. (He's 31 now.) I grow hot ones for him to make curry past for asian cooking. Usually the Thai ones.

Becky

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

I agree, --the flavor is great, and it takes a lot less pepper, --I just made a Quart jar of hot sauce,- vinegar, salt, Bhut Jolokia, --it will last quite a while, --1/2 tsp is all I can stand in my 3 egg omelet, --but it is OHHH, --SO --GOOD

North Hills, CA

From what I've read the hot sauce producers and peppers growers are trying to find a way to copyright or patent the Bhut Jolokia so they can rake in the bucks when it gets grown commercially here.
Instead of using a ton of other peppers they will be able to use 1/10 th the amount of Bhut Jolokias instead when they make their sauces,salsas etc..
If a grower could get rights to the pepper and seed they could get a royalty whenever someone uses it for anything.
What makes Bhuts so attractive is that it is a big pepper not like other hots like Chiletepin,Pequin etc.

There are too many variations of the Bhut that a patent or copyright isn't going to happen most likely.



Rutland , MA(Zone 5b)

i am growing them for the first time this season. in fact, i will start some seeds later today. i like hot peppers but these seem over the top but still i just want to see what happens.

can anyone give me some secret hints on how to grow them. i am not a newbie to growing plants from seeds but if there is anything special i could do to increase my chances. by the way, i live in upstate new york. my last frost date is may 15th but i don't put my stuff out until june 1st. my hot peppers and eggplants are the only ones i keep upstairs in the heated part of my house until it is time to harden them off. my tomatoes i put down in unheated basement after they get their second set of leaves and are about 5 inches tall.

thanks for any help with the bhut's.

Lawrenceville, GA(Zone 7b)

Herbie:

I did notice that they really like bottom heat to germinate although I had some germinate without it. I keep mine very warm pretty much until I am ready to harden off which I do a little later then my maters.

BB

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

I agree that a heat mat will improve germ rate.
The Dorset Naga and the Naga Morich are just as hot as the Bhut Jolokia.
I have eaten them all, --the Bhut Jolokia is bigger, but not as productive [for me] as the other two mentioned, -- Michael Porter

Clinton, CT(Zone 6b)

Just started some Bhut Jolokia seeds in a 7" self-watering container. In the mudroom on a wooden shelf above a cast iron radiator. Checked the temp of the soil this morning and it was 84.6 degrees. Perfect!

Now all I have to do is hope the weather stays below freezing the next week so the heat in a two story Victorian is on as high as it was last night.

How sick is this?



This message was edited Feb 21, 2008 6:19 AM

Rutland , MA(Zone 5b)

somneone sent me a few naga morich seeds but wasn't planning on starting any. now maybe i will. i do not hve a heat mat but i ususally surround the seed trays with plenty of blankets and place near my radiators. it has worked before but this is the first time where the soil needs to be near 90 degrees. will see what happends.


one other thing. do you think the bhut jolokia can surive if i planted them in a 2 gallon container or should i use the 5 gal one??

thanks

Lawrenceville, GA(Zone 7b)

Does anyone have any bhut seed they can spare for an sase?

BB

Rutland , MA(Zone 5b)

bronx boy - i can spare you a few and will mail out later today. no need for postage. d-mail me your name and address.


Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

I have raised Bhut Jolokia in 2 gal pots, --it worked fine for a single season program, --Michael

Rutland , MA(Zone 5b)

michael - thanks for that tip. it makes it a lot easier and gives me more room on the table.

frank


Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

cool-- enjoy, ---

Clinton, CT(Zone 6b)

Bhut Jolokia emerged today after 9 days. Bottom watered with temps between 82 and 86.

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

Congrats, --enjoy, [ I did] Michael

Rutland , MA(Zone 5b)

i planted mine on the 22nd of february. will check and see when i get home from work today.


Lawrenceville, GA(Zone 7b)

How large does the jolokia plant get?

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

mine are about 4 feet tall by 3 feet wide, --Michael Porter

Clinton, CT(Zone 6b)

Becoming a little concerned over the germination rate. Two days after the first of 5 seeds germinated, no others have poked their heads up.

Rutland , MA(Zone 5b)

michaelp = wow thats pretty big and you asaid you have grown them in 2 gallon pots??

david - i planted mine on feb 22 and swtill have nothing. i remember the planting insturctions said it might take 2 to 3 weeks and in some cases 5 weeks for germination. i hope not.

Glendale, UT(Zone 5a)

For a single year program the 2 gal pots worked fine for me, -- after the first year I re-pot them to a bigger pot, --but I still have some 2 years old producing fine in the 2 gal pots, --I just feed them when they start to fade, --Michael

Rutland , MA(Zone 5b)

thanks for the info. up north they will only last a year so i think i will plant one in a 2 gallon and one in 5 gallon and see how they do. i am now getting germination on them. i was worried for awhilethere.

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