Fragrant Xeriscape plants...

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Are there any? In researching the most common one I found really doesn't do well here. Lavender.

Does anyone have any suggestions for fragrance in the Xeriscape garden?

mulege, Mexico

My rosemary doesn't need much water. Oregano and sage are also low water plants.Also basil. Check out other herbs, a lot of them don't need much water, in fact many are better with very little.

katiebear

Brandon, MS(Zone 8a)

Pod, this may be your answer. http://mygardenguide.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1014&Itemid=27

((Hugs))

Martha

mulege, Mexico

JLHudsonseeds.net has lots of salvia seeds though not clevelandii right now. They are good aobut telling you if the plant is fragrant and its water needs.

katiebear

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Katiebear ~ thanks! I didn't think of herbs when I asked this. I do grow most of those you mentioned. How delightful.

Hello Martha! I miss you at every turn. Odd the Clevelandii sage is another I didn't think of. I was given seeds and foliage for this sage from from DGr Karri_Sue. I loved the fragrance of the dried so am sure the plant will be wonderful. Neat link ~ thank you! Off to explore it.... and start some seeds. pod

mulege, Mexico

A lot of the brugmansias and/or daturas are have fragrant blooms and many require very little water. You might check out the forum. Lots of people seems to be starting them from seed so you could probably get seeds here. Just don't get them mixed up with your edible herbs!!

katiebear

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Thanks for the suggestions Katiebear! It is appreciated... pod

mulege, Mexico

Pod - I've been thinking about this because I live in the Baja which has a climate similar to yours. The trees that have the little Mexican limes - which are maybe the same as key limes - require very little water to survive and produce. Their blooms are very fragrant.

Hudson also lists a lot of acacias. I remember one is peppermint scented. It's a fun catalog to read and they have lots of seeds of plants from Australia - often very drought tolerant.

katiebear

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

I haven't been to their site yet, I will explore it shortly. Thanks...

Kearney, NE(Zone 5a)

Agastache smells amazing!

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Really? I have not grown it... Which one do you have and it does well with less water? I will have to look into it... Thanks

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

Check out High Country Gardens website, they've got tons of Agastaches. 'Blue Fortune' and the Agastache rugosa cultivars can handle more moisture (although I think they do fine will less as well), but most of the other Agastache species do very well in dry climates with little water and actually won't do well if you live somewhere rainy or water your garden too frequently. I'm not sure why lavenders don't do well for you, but if it has to do with too much rain/poor drainage then I'd stick with 'Blue Fortune' and A. rugosa and not try the others, they like similar conditions to lavender.

Brandon, MS(Zone 8a)

Pod and ecrane3, I have Red Forturne Agastache purchased from High Country Gardens. I'll let you know how it fairs this summer.

Martha

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

I have worn the ink off the HCG catalogues ~ LOL I will hope Martha will test drive it and let me know her successes. I think the lavender problem here is humidity rather than actual moisture.

Brandon, MS(Zone 8a)

Somewhere in the back of my head I had an idea that Agastache, Lavenders, etc., liked alkaline soil. Y'all let me know if that is correct. I sprinkled some lime on my Agastache this spring. I'll report back after bloom-time. I sprinkled bone meal on my Linum (Appar Blue Flax), and there was almost an instant difference. These little flax greened up and swelled with pride. They are so pretty now and will be prettier when they bloom.

Martha

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

Soils in dry climates often tend to be on the alkaline side so that means that many dry climate plants can do well alkaline soils, but I don't think I've ever read anywhere that they require it, neutral or mildly acidic soil ought to be fine too.

Brandon, MS(Zone 8a)

Your probably right. I don't know where I got that idea.

Martha

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

I could see how the confusion came in--many plants that do well in alkaline soils won't do well without it, but then there are other plants that do well in alkaline soils but will also do fine in neutral or even mildly acidic soils. Based on what's in Plant Files and what I've read elsewhere, that's the case for lavender and agastache, they can do fine anywhere from alkaline to mildly acidic. If you've got really acidic soil though then the lime would definitely be beneficial.

Brandon, MS(Zone 8a)

Thank you for clearing that up, ecrain3. Soooo, the lime I dusted around my Agastache won't harm it!

Martha

Tucson, AZ

Podster, I am not sure about your climate...I live in Tucson,, but these are shrubs that have wonderful frangrance when in bloom: Sophora Secundifora (Texas Mountain Laurel), a purple, grape bubble gum smelling flower that is blooming now; aloysia gratissima has vanilla smelling clusters of tiny white flowers that goldfinches love; leucophyllum pruinosum (A variety of Texas Ranger) small purple flowers that smell like juicy fruit gum, Tagetes Lucida has small yelow flowers but the leaves when crushed smell like licorice or anice. Tagetes Lemmonii also has a distinctive smell, some like it, some not, I do. I will try to think of others as well. Good luck,
Kate

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Hi Kate! Thanks much for your input...

I've have heard so many folks recommend the Tx Mountain Laurel. It sounds wonderful but #1, I am not sure I have room for a tree and #2, it is disappointing that the blooms are shortlived.

Aloysia gratissima is one I need to check out. I was given a start of Aloysia virgata ~ Sweet Almond Verbena which I am anxiously awaiting blooms on.

The Leucophyllum is a lovely plant. My last was eaten by a vagrant dog that I had taken in. I was tempted to feed him to the buzzards. Gave him away instead. I believe that is one I want to replace ( plant not dog). Mine didn't bloom frequently and I honestly didn't remember fragrance.

Now, I am excited. You mentioned Tagetes ~ I picked a small plant up yesterday. I love tarragon but it won't grow here. This was marketed as Texas tarragon. How's that for a marketing ploy. I know it is commonly Mexican tarragon. I nibbled leaves all the way home. Love it!

I think Tucson winters are a bit more mild than here but equally sweltering summers. Thanks for the great ideas and suggestions. pod

Thumbnail by podster
Maricopa, AZ(Zone 9b)

By chance have you looked at or considered Hyptis emoryi ;

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/149409/

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

I'm not sure if that one'll work on zone 8--from what I've read it doesn't like frost very much and is only hardy to 25F. I know PF lists it to 9a but I'm not sure if that's right or not, I think it may be more like 9b. It also needs perfect drainage and I don't think it'll be a fan of summer rain (or watering) once it's established. http://www.laspilitas.com/plants/351.htm

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

That is definitely a pretty plant but I believe Ecrane speculation will be correct here. Thanks for the suggestion and information tho...

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

High Country Gardens had an article linked to their latest email newsletter that talks about fragrant xeriscape gardening. They've got some tips, as well as links to their lists of fragrant plants http://www.highcountrygardens.com/fragrantSteps?utm_source=ezine&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=April08

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Thank you, I will check that out. I receive their catalogues but don't get their newsletter. Appreciate it...

Whitesboro, TX

Try heliotrope or turnsole - puts off pretty purple flowers & a heavenly cherry vanilla scent. Grows well in southern exposure in north Texas & requires very little watering (1" a week) & gets about 12 to 18" tall. Put in 8 of them in my garden this year & all are starting to bloom well now that it's getting hot.Check out the Proven Winner's site for suggestions on xeriscape plants - they usually list where the plant trials where grown & the best plants for your type of garden - I like it for getting ideas for my full southern exposure garden from there. Hope this helps & Happy Gardening Y'all.

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Thanks for the suggestion! I am off to check it out... 8 ))

Maricopa, AZ(Zone 9b)

Podster , There is one that is very fragrant here but again it might be streching its range to where you are at . It is regarded as large shrub or small tree . For me it blooms multiple times through the summer .Tenaza ;

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/60169/

http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Fabaceae/Havardia_pallens.html

Sierra Foothills, CA(Zone 8a)

Hello, all!

Our summers stay in the 80s-90s until about November, and then it snows. The soil is hard clay. I have rosemary everywhere, even many are self-sown, as there are two, thriving in gravel! They only get an occasional water. Also it is one plant that the deer will not demolish, tho' an occasional nibble and spitting out, or the male deer, bucks, like to rub their antlers on any plant they see, it rutting season. I rarely water the rosemary plants, only if there leaves look stressed

I have a huge lavender on a clay hill, and 6 white lavenders in my White Flower Border, and they have little drainage and lately regular water, since I have been planting more into that garden. The bublebees are all over those lavender. I started to cut some for the house, as also I like to prune them frequently, as the one on the clay hill would die if I did that. If you prune the hard wood, it's all over, though the dried dead wood should be removed to make them look better. I do that at least twice during the growing season. They look better, if you start pruning them when they are young, as then you get more green per plant. I made the mistake when I never pruned the one on the clay hill, as it is very large, but scraggly and sparse, though it still blooms.

So if you are looking for a fool-proof plant, rosemary would be my first suggestion, and the bees love it!

The next drought tolerant one that has done well is Asclepias tuberosa, butterfly weed. They take regular watering the first season, then they are one there own with little watering. Some species prefer more water, and some less. I have planted them for the butterflies.

The next one of the list would be yarrow. Again, regular water to start, then it will do well, but watch out, Achillea milliifolium and cultivars of this plant will spread by runners, as I had made the mistake of planting it with others. (It will not "play nice" and go all over!) I am still digging out the plants out of my "Peach of a Garden", so I put them on the end of the border in a space of their own - for "mass planting". There are other cultivars that are not so agressive, such as Achillea 'Moonshine'.

Another one that seems to thrive in negect is Teucrium marum, commonly known as Cat Thyme. It is a grey-leaved plant and you can leave it alone for a long time, though I shear the flowers off to promote a second blooming. It doesn;t get any higher than 1 1/2" and spreads slowly.

Another Teucruim that is know as Germander cham, the herb, tho' not edible, another one on the "deer-proof" list. It grows slowly, has small glossy dark green leaves, and once established will not require any care, tho', again, I shear off the flowers, when they are done, to get a second bloom. The are in bloom now and the butterflies and bumblebees really enjoy it. There is another Teucrium, T.lucidrys, which has grey leaves and grows up to 12'' or more and has soft light blue-violet flowers in the summer, and it as well, is drought tolerant.

Most varieties of Cistus, or Rock Rose also prefer little water once established. Oh, the reason I say that, is when I was a younger (much younger) gardener, I thought that drought tolerant meant you could plant it and give it no water. That does NOT work! I sure found out that in a hurry!

That should get you started. There are more, and as somone mention High Counrty Gardens, they have nice plants, tho' a bit pricey, but be sure to water them the first season, especially if the first season is summer. I got quite a few from them, and they are good-sized plants, and arrived very fresh and healthy.

I hope this helps...there are more...

Sierra Foothills, CA(Zone 8a)

Oh! And the rosemary is VERY fragrant, even when it isn't in bloom. Agastache has different fragrances, according to which variety you choose. The rock rose's leaves are fragrant as well, as most of the thymes. Several Teucriums have fragrant leaves as well, T.'Paradise Delights', T 'Purple Tails', T. 'Summer Sunshine' Those varieties are available at Forest Farm and Digging Dog Nursery, both on Dave's top picks.

Evelyn

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Thanks for the suggestions. I have two different rosemarys and this year added four agastaches. I know I will like them! I have two Rock Roses ~ Pavonia and no fragrance. I need to check yours out. This summer I put pennyroyal in a sun tough bed and it is spreading well with little care.

The Teucrium is one I'd only read about, primarily wall germander? I will have to check out those plants. I had to laugh at your description of a drought tolerant gardener when young. Think most of us have been there. Appreciate the ideas, thank you. pod

Sierra Foothills, CA(Zone 8a)

Oh, I forgot! A truly fragrant long-lived shrub...lilac. It requires hardly any care at all, once it has been established. Just make sure that you have the room for it, though there are some smaller varieties available as well.

I cut mine way back this year, as it was taking over the White Flower Border. Then I read, I was supposed to cut it back in a non-flowering year. Well, it is done and cannot be undone. I will not worry, as next year should be a non-flowering year anyway! I do not really see the sense in it. Now I will check, to see if it does not flower in 3 years! If I live that long! :-) Or if I remember to check...

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Lilacs I love but they don't do well here. They are truly fragrant.

Brandon, MS(Zone 8a)

Pod, I love the way you have such positive comments to every poster, even if you cannot use their suggestion. A nice gift to have!

Martha

Sierra Foothills, CA(Zone 8a)

If you get a catalog from Forest Farm, they mention which varieties have fragrance, as well as other categories. It is a thick catalog, as they do carry a large assortment of plants. I am sure you will find many plants that I don't even know about. Also, not to rule out shrubs and small trees. FF has a huge selection, as well as hardey perennials and grasses.

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Hi Martha ~ sorry, I've been "out of pocket" with computer headaches. Glad to see you are still hanging in there.

Evelyn, I will have to check out the Forest Farm wish book. I love catalogues and hadn't heard of that one... thank you!

Sierra Foothills, CA(Zone 8a)

Pod,

Go to http://www.forestfarm.com

Hope you find something interesting. Their prices are fair, and their shipping is excellent, tho' hard to open, as they have many staples, but otherwise great!

Evelyn

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Thanks much! I will check it out ~ somehow... I feel I am "doomed"... LOL

Oakley, CA(Zone 8b)

How about Wallflower? I have mine growing with my lavender, smells great and the butterflies love it.

Post a Reply to this Thread

Please or sign up to post.
BACK TO TOP