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Tropical Plants: "what-can-I-grow-in-my-zone"

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mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2008
5:22 PM

Post #4577648

Sorry Terry, but you made the Thread Name too Easy not to use! :o)
I am hoping to get replies from those of you who CAN GROW ANY Tropical Plant in the COLDER climates with GOOD results. I would like to get a list going of what has been tried and failed/succeeded in your area, what your climates are NORMALLY like, etc...This is for those of us who want to PUSH the ZONE and have our own little PARADISE, even though we do not LIVE in PARADISE. :o)
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

February 23, 2008
5:23 PM

Post #4577652

Hedychium coronarium grows beautifully in Portland, Or. - in the snow. Mulched heavily, in a warm corner by a wall.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2008
5:26 PM

Post #4577664

Thanks Carol, now I just need to come up with a way to keep a 'running list' of names so as not to jump back and forth through posts to try to remember what people said! :o)
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2008
5:34 PM

Post #4577699

I am reserving this spot to place the names of plants that are given to be 'more hardy' and might survive in our colder Climates. I am trying to keep up with names people are giving, but I am not able to find all of them in plant files, so please be sure to look at other's lists to make sure something isn't missed! :)

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1297/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1251/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/63589/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/130457/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/51598/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/74970/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/53957/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/161422/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/158847/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/67518/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/64952/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/160178/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/168269/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/979/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/55701/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/62234/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/64165/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/80951/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/56790/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/53663/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2255/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/157817/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/59706/



This message was edited Feb 23, 2008 2:06 PM

This message was edited Feb 23, 2008 3:22 PM

This message was edited Feb 24, 2008 10:37 AM

This message was edited Feb 24, 2008 10:38 AM
distantkin
Saint Cloud, MN
(Zone 4b)

February 23, 2008
5:40 PM

Post #4577727

I am the wrong person to ask!! LOL-I try to grow everything-no matter how much work it takes...I am sure by this fall I wil be sticking to perennials for my zone only!!! :o)
Robbi
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2008
5:41 PM

Post #4577733

NEVER on ALL counts Miss Robbi! LOL :o)
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2008
7:48 PM

Post #4578218

Wow, 30 views, and only two other people posting besides myself? Come on people, help us out here, please! :o)
NYVOICES99
Corning, NY
(Zone 5a)

February 23, 2008
7:57 PM

Post #4578244

Wish I could help you out:)Anita
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2008
7:58 PM

Post #4578248

Well, you stick around and we can both learn! :o)
NYVOICES99
Corning, NY
(Zone 5a)

February 23, 2008
8:04 PM

Post #4578280

;)I am, I thought you may have had an answer, but it was just you posting. I'll be right here with you!
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 23, 2008
8:06 PM

Post #4578287

Here is a rough list of some plants I have over wintered in zone6 some of these get protection each year with either mulching or other forms of protection a few have survived with no protection once established.


Amaryllis 2 species some hybrids
Amorphophallus Henryi
Amorphophallus Kerrii
Amorphophallus Konjac
Colocasia Big Dipper
Colocasia Gigantea
Colocasia Pink China
Colocasia Black Pearl
Crinums I am growing 4 forms
Ecomuis forms
Musa Basjoo
Musa Becarii
Musa Itinerans
Musa Rajapuri
Musa Sikkimensis (hookerii)
Musa Textilus
Musa Thomsonii
Musa Velutina
Musella Lasiocarpa
Agavie Perri forms
Opuntia Sp Hardy Yellow Flowers
Petasites hybridus
Petasites Japonicus Var. Giganteus
Petasites Purple Leaf
Pinellia Tripartita
Tetrapanax Papyriferus
Thaila Delbata
Trachycarpus (Hayes Stiffie) Possible Hybrid
Trachycarpus fortunei (Atlanta)
Sabal Palms
Yucca Rostrata Many other yuccas
Their are others like Bamboos a few begnoias and many cactus type plants if the drainage is good.

Here is my mothers yard. Her yard is like a big experiment she is given certain possible hardy tropical plants each year and test them to see how they preform for her. She takes nothing inside but does mulch the plants up every fall. I have more photos of the place when it's mulched up and dormant.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2008
8:08 PM

Post #4578293

LOL Anita! The 4th post down is where I will be posting the ones that are told to be 'hardy' in colder climates. :o)
ginnylynn
Blyth, ON
(Zone 5b)

February 23, 2008
8:15 PM

Post #4578308

Hi there. I don't know if you consider this a tropical plant, but I have overwintered Musa basjoo in the ground in zone 5b - sort of :-) See this post for details http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=4573863

You may already know this too, but in Southwestern Ontario (Point Pelee) Canada we have native Opuntias, one of which is O. compressa. Perfectly and completely hardy at least to zone 4b.

--Ginny
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2008
9:18 PM

Post #4578548

Hi Ginny, thanks for the info! I have already added the Musa Basjoo in the 4th post, but will be sure to check out the ones you talked about! :o)
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2008
9:21 PM

Post #4578562

I couldn't bring anything up for the "Opuntias"? I was able to find it with the Latin Name you gave, however.
cat64129
(Cathy), MO

February 23, 2008
10:18 PM

Post #4578782

Hi everyone. I will be watching this thread also. And looking up plants like mad, as people name them! :-) Good idea Princess Tammy!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2008
10:45 PM

Post #4578898

Thanks Miss Cathy! OOPS I almost put the wrong name there! LOL :o)
weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2008
10:52 PM

Post #4578932

I have tried growing Wandering Jew (Tradescantia zebrina), although it was pretty, I guess my house wasn't. So it wandered out of my pot to the unknown. I couldn't keep it healthy so I gave it to my mother who supposedly has a green thumb, and she promptly killed it. For someone that has bad luck with house plants, does any one have any suggestions? I can grow a thin leafed, trailing type fern pretty well.
weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2008
10:55 PM

Post #4578942

Has anybody grown Cycas circinalis?
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2008
11:06 PM

Post #4578987

This realy interests me a lot.. I am moving from zone 8a to some 7a/6b this year and really really realy love and want to keep my tropical yard!

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2008
11:28 PM

Post #4579061

Hiya Tammy. If you think that I shouldn't worry since I'm living in a zone that's much warmer...wrong..at times it'll be zone 7!!
So, thanks for doing this, likewise will keep a tab on all the names given.
joegee
Bucyrus, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2008
12:08 AM

Post #4579207

Bwilliams is a great resource for you. Another user to check out is hikaro_takayama. The following things grow outside for me here in 6A/5B, given siting close to a foundation or a fence with no other protection:

jasminum x stephanense, Stephan's jasmine
gelsemium sempervirens, Carolina jessamine "Margarita"
dioscorea oppositifolia, cinnamon vine
yucca rostrata "Blue Skies"
albizia julibrissin, mimosa
pawlonia tomentosa, empress tree
poncirus trifoliata, Japanese bitter orange
phyllostachys aureosulcata, yellow grove bamboo
mirabilis jalapa, four o'clock (returns from the roots)
opuntia humifusa, eastern prickly pear

I rake leaves over:

musa basjoo, basjoo banana
rhaphidophyllum hystrix, needle palm

I had a gardenia jasminoides "Kleim's Hardy" make it through the winter with protection. I killed it by pulling it (I thought it was dead) before it could recover from the roots. :(

I also planted two generic lagerstroemia indica crape myrtles, in a decent location, and had them come back from the roots, but they were too small when I planted them, their root systems never stood a chance at recovering, and they were too dry. They lasted two seasons. L. indica "dynamite" shows good hardiness. That's my next crape myrtle victim. You should be able to easily grow most crape myrtles as die back perennials, as well as several hardier crape myrtles with no appreciable loss of limbs.

Trachycarpus fortuneii thrives for some. I gave it a good location, and some protection. It went into decline. This winter, its third season in Ohio, and its sixth year on the planet, it spent inside, in seclusion. It desperately needed a break.

This year I am adding two sabal minor "McCurtain" palmettos, gardenia jasminoides "Chuck Hayes", hippeastrum johnsonii hardy amaryllis, and a few other tropic-like plants.

The "tropic-like" plants I want to add include:

magnolia macrophyllum, big leaf magnolia
ligularia stenocephala, Japanese ligularia
euphorbia cyathophera, summer poinsettia
dracunculis vulgarum, voodoo lily
arum italicum, Italian arum
arisaema triphyllum, Jack in the Pulpit
arisaema candidissimum, cobra lily
passiflora caerulea or passiflora lutea, hardy passion flower
akebia quinata, five-leafed akebia
actinidia kolomikta, Arctic beauty kiwi
asarum arifolium, evergreen ginger

You might also want to check out the Ackerman hybrid camellias (stressbaby suggested these to me.)

Araucaria aruacaria, the monkey puzzle tree, might make it, as might chilopsis linearis, desert willow, which I have heard is hardy to Colorado Springs, CO. Check here, 2Lazy2P , http://members.aol.com/fitzroya/2Lazy2Prareplants.html for information correlating drought-resistance to cold-hardiness in otherwise "tropical" species.

Weedsfree, I have checked out the cycads as a possible palm substitute. Cycas circinalis absolutely needs tropical conditions all the time. The Florida coontie, zamia pumila, might make it into zone seven, but from my research I don't think most cycads can go much lower than zone 8. I welcome being corrected by someone.

-Joe

This message was edited Feb 23, 2008 7:44 PM
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
1:28 AM

Post #4579527

WOW, I go away for a bit and here all you are!!!! I am so tickled to see all of you here and REALLY appreciate all your input!!!! I don't have time to do all the links right now, but I will do my best to get links for these and post them in the 4th posting on here. SO SO glad you all joined in!!!! :o)
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2008
2:14 AM

Post #4579724

Well this is a very exciting thread!! I got big plans for my little yard.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
2:14 AM

Post #4579729

Be sure to save room for those EE's now Kim!!! :o)
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2008
2:23 AM

Post #4579761

No worries got a spot for everything ;*)
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
2:29 AM

Post #4579786

GOOD! :o)
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2008
2:44 AM

Post #4579863

Hi All,

I have some brugs outside this winter. I cover them when a cold night is predicted. They did lose their leaves, but were doing fine until -- my daughter's blasted dogs trampled all over them. I saw the other day that one of them is putting new leaves out from the bottom. I do think the others are still alive, but they sure are shorter than they were.

Here are some sites that list cold-hardy palms info:

[HYPERLINK@www.sunpalmtrees.com]

[HYPERLINK@www.hardiestpalms.com]

[HYPERLINK@www.centralfloridafarms.com]

Interesting advice on cold-hardy palms:

[HYPERLINK@www.junglemusic.net]

Here's a nursery in SC with a lot of cold-hardy plants, including palms:

[HYPERLINK@www.chillypalmtree.com]

Karen

PS: I tagged this thread so I can find it again. Love this info -- just great!

Photo of a brug last summer in downtown Tuscaloosa. I saw it the other day. Didn't appear to me that anybody covered it or protected it with anything. It is leafless, but it's clearly been there for several years.


Thumbnail by glendalekid
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
2:50 AM

Post #4579885

WOW, thanks for all that info,, and the gorgeous pic, Karen!!! :o)
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2008
3:18 AM

Post #4579994

Oh, I forgot to mention my daughter's passiflora. I don't remember the name, but it's the ordinary blue one. From a very small plant, it grew huge last year, covering a four-foot trellis about 10 feet in each direction. We've had night time temps down into the teens, and it never even lost a leaf.

Karen

Thumbnail by glendalekid
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
3:23 AM

Post #4580006

WOW, I didn't even know what a passiflora was till now. That is quite an interesting plant, Karen! :o)

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2008
4:36 AM

Post #4580249

Giving you some hope with all these info, eh Tammy? Some modified tropical paradise without leaving home.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
4:38 AM

Post #4580259

Yes Dear Jaye, it sure is! :o) The response has been amazing and I am very greatful! Now just to keep up with em all! LOL Well, I might have to leave home once in a while to make a trip to buy one of these purties!!!
Tropicman
Bushland, TX
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2008
5:02 AM

Post #4580367

Well seems to me you have got your hands full with a lot of exciting links from some very knowledgeable people who know there cold hardy plants!!!!!
Whats exciting to me is the people who can remember the names of all these plants!!!
I'm the person who forgets another persons name 30 seconds after they told me,don't know why but names of people as well as plants,won't stay put in my mind!!!!!
I have to hear them several times over for them to stick!
Lots of great info here,I hope a lot more people will come and gather this free information!!!
Don

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2008
5:10 AM

Post #4580411

Hey Don! You are too modest!!! All that info you keep sharing with us on tropicals, don't come from an 'addlepated' brain!!! (Stressing with love, not mockery)
Then the icing on the cake, this Tropicman can cook too!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
5:19 AM

Post #4580470

Hey, there is our Sweet Tman!!! So glad to see you here!!!! ♥
Now Don, are you one of those that has to scroll back to see what that particular persons name was till you get it memorized? HA HA HA Guess I kinda told on myself, didn't I? :o)
Jaye, what on earth is "addlepated"??? My pea brain just don't get all these big words you all use! LOL Oh yes, he can cook and he rubs it in our faces all the time, too! HE HE HE

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2008
5:24 AM

Post #4580490

ADDLEPATED,
ADJECTIVE: 1. Befuddled; confused. 2. Eccentric; peculiar
Tammy, we know Don is none of that!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
5:25 AM

Post #4580497

HMMMMMMMMMMM kinda like discombobulated! HE HE HE
Nope, Don is none of that! ♥
Tropicman
Bushland, TX
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2008
5:48 AM

Post #4580601

Hmmm,Now whose the hillbilly here????
Youall using those big words that I can't even pronounce!!!!!
When I use the word rub,I mean the dry barbecue I rub on a side of beef before I put her in the smoker!!!LOL
Then just before it's ready to come out of the smoker,I pour on the liquid barbecue,to moist in her up,hmmm sounds like I'm sweet talking my way into a womans heart!!!!LOL
Ole saying a way to a womens heart is by starting at the stomach and working your way up!
You got to get to the heart,before she has a chance to think with her b rain!!!!!LOL
Love you guys,heading for the showers,or the coach won't let me in the game!!!!!
Nite!
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 24, 2008
5:52 AM

Post #4580608

LOL I hope you score. Will b Rootin for ya!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
5:54 AM

Post #4580614

OMG DON! You just had to bring food over here, didn't ya!!! HE HE HE Darn it, now I want some BBQ!!! Gonna send me some next time ya make it, huh, huh? :o)
We love you two you food rubbin, plantaholic feller!!! ♥
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
5:54 AM

Post #4580616

OMG, you all are making my chest hurt from laughing so hard!

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2008
5:55 AM

Post #4580618

Guess we can grow love in this zone!!!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
5:57 AM

Post #4580623

Now see, I feel the love from Kansas all the way to North Carolina! :o)
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2008
6:00 AM

Post #4580630

Hugs for evryone (((( !)))

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2008
6:01 AM

Post #4580633

BWilliams, perhaps you could share your fertilizing tips with us too.
Tammy, glad this thread is up. Love ya, and nite nite!

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2008
6:03 AM

Post #4580636

Oops, Kim! Not so tight!
He he he!!!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
6:05 AM

Post #4580641

OHHHHH feel the squeeze, Kim! :o)
Yes, Brain, would love any tips you are willing to offer! :)
Jaye, I am glad to call you my friend, luv ya too, and nighty night! :)
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2008
6:06 AM

Post #4580644

Sorry I was caught up in the moment :)
Sleep Tight!
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2008
6:08 AM

Post #4580651

Speaking of fertilizing ...what can I feed my tiny Alocasia seedling to make it a monster?
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
6:10 AM

Post #4580655

Its ok, Kim, we all do that at times! :o)
Yes, I would love to know how to make all mine grow!!!
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 24, 2008
7:12 AM

Post #4580793

The steps

1 Sun - You have to have a sunny to partial sunny spot to get the size and color you will want in the garden

2 Rich organic soil - This can take years to get a really good soil but it is the foundation for your plants, good soil can go a long way. Compost manure coffee grounds all can help make a rich organic soil that holds moisture and drains well.

3 healthy plants, tubers, bulbs or rhizome - Often over looked but strong tubers and rhizomes usually mean strong healthy plants. Some plants can have a virus be deformed or just bad cultivars. Try to go for the strongest forms.

4 bone/blood meal - Bone meal is just that crushed up bones. This helps bulbs and tubers produce roots usually a small dusting of the bulb is done before it is put in the ground directions are easy to follow on the bags.

5 Liquid root hormone - This is not always needed but I like to push the plants faster than most. I usually wait for the plants to get up and start pushing out 2 to 3 leaves then I hit them with a light dose of liquid hormone at the suggested measurements. It is not good to use this on small seedlings or plants that are not doing well.

6 Preen or pre emergent - Now that the plants and rhizomes are in the ground it's time to think about one of the worst things in a garden the weeds. This is the best time to spread around preen or other pre emergent to keep seeds from sprouting and keeping the weeds under control.

7 Mulch - Over looked all the time but mulch will play a large role in most peoples tropical landscape. I prefer brown hardwood mulch is cheep and breaks down each year and turns to good soil. The main reason mulch is needed in tropical landscapes is it helps keep the weeds out that would choke your plants it also helps hold in moisture. Dry hot days and the ground will dry out fast and crack but mulched areas will hold more moisture and keep your plants happier.

8 fertilizer time release - Well this trick is pretty interesting. I only use it on the larger plants and the ones that need more food than most. Bananas, Ensetes and anything look forward to being a center piece in the landscape. You need to come out from the plant around 8 inches to 1 foot or more and use a stick to make a whole in the ground. I then fill this whole with time release fertilizer like osmacote. This acts like a fertilizer spike. The plant will grow roots to the fertilizer and help keep it feed all season.

9 liquid fertilizer - Finally we are to the fertilizer. The biggest mistake people make is over fertilizing. I often see people with happier plants who don't fertilize. This is because when young, plant roots will rot if hit with a strong fertilizer this will also stun the plants. I usually do not fertilize here till around late May or early June. I use a wholesale brand with the numbers 20-20-20 anything for a vegetable garden fertilizer is usually fine for tropicals. When fertilizing, only hit the plants that are growing healthy which are the plants that are moving and have a few new leaves. It is not worth while to fertilizer plants that don't have proper roots, so establishing the roots from earlier will make it possible for these plants to now take in the fertilizer. Do not over do it and follow the instructions they are usually best.

10 Epson salt / Magnesium sulfate- I personally like using epson salt which helps darken leaves and make them thicker and stronger. I find this helps variegated plants take a bit more sun it also strengthens those weak leaves and stems. Use when needed 1 teaspoon per gallon of water.

I find if you follow these steps you should have a great garden. Their are tons of other chemicals that can be used but I have found this to be the best for me.

This message was edited Feb 24, 2008 10:38 AM

jordankittyjo

jordankittyjo
Bessemer, AL
(Zone 8b)

February 24, 2008
11:48 AM

Post #4580938

karewn, where did your daughter plant her passi? i have 4 i want to plant outside this spring, and don't want to dig them up in the fall :o)
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2008
1:29 PM

Post #4581117

Brain that is some great info...I will put it in my files thanks! :)
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
3:00 PM

Post #4581416

WOW Brian, thanks so much for the in depth information you have so kindly shared with us all! Now we will all have more beautiful tropical gardens this year! I love the dark foliage, so I will definitely be following your instructions!
Good morning everyone! :o)
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2008
4:32 PM

Post #4581845

Brian,

Thank you so much for the terrific info. Will be a great help to me. I am bad at not fertilizing. I have little patience for 12 different fert schedules for 20 different types of plants, e.g. 1/4 tsp per gal every two weeks, 1/8 tsp per gal every week, 1/2 tsp per gal every 4 four weeks, etc. I need to do a "one-size fits all" schedule or it's just not going to happen.

jordankittyjo,

The Passi is growing on a trellis at the end of her raised front deck. The bed is in morning shade, full afternoon sun. I mulched around it. We did not dig this one up. Except for the fact that it's not blooming now, it looks just like it did all summer. Here's a photo from early last summer. It actually grew to about three times this size by summer's end. This is a west/south facing corner.

Karen



Thumbnail by glendalekid
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2008
4:40 PM

Post #4581869

Everyone be sure to keep an eye on the 4th posts for any updates! :o) I just did most of what Brian had posted but I wasn't able to find everything, sorry.
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2008
11:40 PM

Post #4583525

For anyone interested in a book on this subject I really enjoy reading 'Palms Won't Grow Here and Other Myths' by David A. Francko. It's a really good book and tells you all sorts of tricks to grow palms and other 'tropical' plants outside through the winter.

Steven
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
12:00 AM

Post #4583628

Hey Steven, I think I might just have to look that one up, thanks!!!
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2008
12:26 AM

Post #4583733

Steven,

Oh, yeah, sounds like a winner. Thanks,

Karen

Tropicman
Bushland, TX
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2008
2:06 AM

Post #4584162

I have and read that book,good from the front to the end!
Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2008
2:17 AM

Post #4584200

First of all Brian, you mentioned there were 4 types of crinums hardy to zone 6, I know bulbispermum types are, but I am totally curious and intrigued what else?

misty----*sigh* for those of us that long for exotic places and live in er...not-so-exotic places...I am so dumb I put this on the wrong thread..lol

In order to give more specific advice to your area, do you have mostly sun or shade?

How many months of 80 degree days do you get? (lol)

How hot does your hottest month of summer get, and how long does it stay that way?

and what is your soil like? as in sandy/loamy/clay/rocky...

From my limited experience in my area I can offer this. At home we have full baking sun, part sun/shade, deep shade, and red hard clay. The property is slightly sloped so I have tried to cram as many tropicals on the low side to lower watering.:
---Soil drainage is most important here in terms of keeping things alive over winter. Many tropical plants can do fine in colder weather provided they are dry
---Thick layers of mulch around your tropicals will help conserve moisture in the summer and added leaf mulch in the winter will also keep them drier (and hopefully a little warmer). For plants I am growing that are a little outside of my zone limits I try to keep at least about a foot of shredded leaf mulch around and over the plant.
---A plant that is grown in more tropical regions...for instance, hedychium cornarium, will be noted by growers in those areas as full sun/part sun..etc. If a grower in Hawaii says part shade, then you can surely plant it in more sun because you won't have the same powerful, brutal heat.
---If I could start again, I would start with Evergreen hardy shrubs and trees and plant tropicals around them...lol...winter is so bare! There are some cool evergreen arums, rohdeas..etc that can help fill in with winter, also
my favorite hardy evergreen shrubs that can give a tropical look:
aucubas-- [HYPERLINK@davesgarden.com]
photinias-- [HYPERLINK@davesgarden.com]
mahonias-- [HYPERLINK@davesgarden.com]
camellias-- [HYPERLINK@davesgarden.com]
not my fave, but azaleas: [HYPERLINK@davesgarden.com]
rhododendrons: [HYPERLINK@davesgarden.com]

I'm sure I have more but I am exhausted!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
2:43 AM

Post #4584322

WOW You want me to work, too! Where did you post it at anyway? :) LOL Ok, on to answer your questions:
Months of 80 weather-HA HA HA Maybe one, if we are lucky! :)
We have been known to get to 100 plus in the Summer, but usually in the 90's
Soil-All of the above!
On the South Side of the house we have Sun from morning till late evening, which is the largest part of the yard, which I plan to take most of this Spring! HE HE HE
The East gets morning sun, and the West gets afternoon sun.
The North only gets mainly evening sun.
We have about 20 evergreens planted in our yard already, but have Crape Myrtles planted on either side lining our yard from the neighbors. Our driveway is also line with evergreens, again to some day block the neighbors! LOL
Thankfully we live in a place where we can go load up on as much mulch as we want for free, so that is not a problem. I plan to fill in the very back portion of our yard with very large plants to block the neighbors dogs behind us as we can't even step out our back door without being barked or growled at! And we have a large back yard.
Thanks a million for your info, and please come back once you have rested! :)
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2008
4:22 AM

Post #4584778

'Palms Won't Grow Here and Other Myths' - I looked this up on Amazon. All ratings for it are 5 stars and rave reviews. Can't say the same for other books professing to cover the same ground as this one. I put this on my wish list.

Karen

Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2008
4:44 AM

Post #4584844

misty it is great that you have all of those evergreens for structure. and talk about work...lol...

you're probably going to want to focus on planting the south side first because you have the best chance at keeping things over winter. lol

---Might be a good idea to play it safe the first year and stick to plants that you know will survive a zone cooler than you. It stinks to loose a bunch of plants the first year...and you may lose some. All of the above are good choices for you (only I am having a heck of a time with musas other than basjoo and velutina). The folks in your local area, zone, or slightly cooler will be most helpful to you because the climate is similar. If you want to really push it, you can try plants that are known to be hardy to 7a or 7b with lots of mulch in a sunny protected spot and fingers crossed...lol
---It's easier to group your plants according to water requirements...T. Fortuneii, needle palm, yucca, and optunia would go together well because they prefer dry conditions...etc.
---I don't worry much with fertilizer, actually. I try to do things organically and now and then mix up composted cow manure, coffee grinds, wood ash, bone and blood meal, and sometimes plant-tone with some perlite and peat and work it in around the plants. Things might not get as big as they would with chem fertilizers, but it works.
---Shredded newspaper under your mulch attracts earthworms and conserves moisture. Also keeps weeds down significantly.

you should be able to grow cannas...right? lol. I would say with any musa or elephant ear to really be big on the drainage and mulch, but especially up there. I wish there was some kind of "heating mulch" you could get for winter...lol

shady areas--bletilla, rohdeas, lots of ferns, roscoea, sauromatum venosum, I think tricyrtis and soloman's seal look cool in shady spots, not sure if they are tropical. you can add things like tiarellas and heucheras for color. also zingiber mioga is supposed to be very hardy

sunnier areas--gunnera should grow for you, but I don't know for sure, persicaria (not topical but bright flowers and can get big), lots of the newer variegated yuccas are hardy as well. lantanas won't be hardy for you but you can buy them cheap usually and they do add lots of color (coleus too for shade)

I know I'll remember a few more after a little bit...lol
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
4:55 AM

Post #4584871

Boy I guess you went and rested after that last post, huh! LOL
You wanna talk about work, we planted all those suckers in one day even! It was one of the hottest days of the year and I coulda wrung DH's neck for bringing them home like that! LOL BUT, they were on clearance for a buck a piece, so couldn't complain too awful much!
I meant to tell you earlier that your links didn't work from the last post, so not real sure exactly what plant they would be?
The South side is where my focus is going to be, for sure. I have a shallow ditch back there where I want to plant a lot of stuff that likes more water as my neighbor is bad for turning his water on in his garden and just leaving it! There was a couple of times last year that our yard was nice and wet, and it was all free water! LOL So I am thinking this will be my best spot for a 'boggy' area. I am thankful that our water here is very cheap, so I can afford to keep everything watered on a regular basis.
Oh yes, Cannas I can grow! LOL I have several ready to be planted as soon as I have no fear of frost. Heavily Mulched and laying the cut foliage over them here will bring them back year after year. My neighbor is who got me started on them, and his aren't even in a good spot to keep coming back, but they do.
OHHHHHHHHH Coleus, another of my new addictions! LOL
weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2008
5:00 AM

Post #4584885

Oh, I thought about it today Tammy! I got a headache from visiting my in-laws today.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
5:06 AM

Post #4584898

Oh no, the in-laws! HE HE HE
Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2008
5:07 AM

Post #4584905

I looked up all those plants, and then the link didn't work cause surely I did something wrong...lol...I'm tired...been digging clay all day...;)

you're lucky for the built in bog...we've had drought conditions for over a year here in NC

I'll try again in a little while or in the morning
weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2008
5:13 AM

Post #4584911

It was actually the screaming baby they have! The oldest child was being unco-opertaive and thought it was funny so mom just got more and more angry. That sort of thing.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
5:13 AM

Post #4584913

If you copied and pasted it from the other thread, someone once said it didn't work?
It would be great if those giving info here would put links to what they are telling about, this way we can be sure to have the info on all of them. Hint! Hint! LOL
Oh yes, that boggy area is a callin my name, fer shure, fer shure! HE HE HE
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
5:14 AM

Post #4584917

OHHHHHHH you poor thing, lotsa tylenol!
weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2008
5:28 AM

Post #4584951

I know, I know. I am a wimp. I am good now. I actually had to step out into the cold and it went away. How's that for natural treatments!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
5:32 AM

Post #4584961

Hey, I have 3 kids at home, well 4 if you count DH! HE HE HE Just kidding on the last one, though! :) I sure wish that stepping outside worked for me, but I always seem to be followed!
weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2008
5:51 AM

Post #4585007

Think of it this way, you have helpers! They obviously think they want to help. I think gardening can be a great "get - away - from - it - all" activity. you first have to be alone. Enough of that. How are you coming with your tropics list? Got any good ones you think you absolutely won't be able to live without?
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
5:54 AM

Post #4585017

I have been adding to my want list! LOL There has been some wonderful information given so far! I may have to rethink how I have been doing the list of links, though.
weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2008
5:59 AM

Post #4585029

I hope I didn't chase people away from mentioning the in-laws! You have a good thing going here.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
6:03 AM

Post #4585042

Nah, I think most are 'lurking' really, but we have already received a wealth of info here! :)
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
6:31 AM

Post #4585074

Just learned of these and found them quite interesting!
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/76800/
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/668/
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 25, 2008
7:38 AM

Post #4585137

Here are a list of the ones I have tested here with mulching. I usually put bags of leaves around the plants and fill the circle with mulch to keep the trunks from freezing. I have in the past put 6 to 8 inches of leaves with good luck but lose the trunks and they return from the base. Many of these forms have different clones and I am sure their are hybrids of these on the market that maybe tougher. These have worked form me for the last 3 to 5 years.


Crinum powellii
Crinum bulbispermum
CRINUM MOOREII
Crinum americanum

This message was edited Feb 25, 2008 1:03 PM

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2008
4:29 PM

Post #4586263

Karen, thats definatly a great book to put on your wish list!

Does anyone know if those cape fushias are hardier then zone7?

I'd like to add Fuchsia magellanica 'Aurea' to our list of hardy plants, I've overwintered it sucessfully here in zone 6, it needs to be well covered though, I found out that whatever stems aren't covered/mulched will die back here. Theres also a plain green type and a white flowered variety but I haven't tried those. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/125973/

Steven
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
4:47 PM

Post #4586338

Hi Steve,
I am sure someone will be along to help you out with that question. But in my opinion, I would tempt it here since it shows the lowest temp as 5. Of course, I like to tempt fate, too!
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2008
5:00 PM

Post #4586395

I really like the pink one and it says -17C (0F) as the coldest. We do get temps colder then that, but in a sheltered spot with some mulch you're probably right! Now I just need to get my hands on one!

Steven
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
5:09 PM

Post #4586438

Add it to your want list and maybe someone will find something you have that they want and vice versa! 'smile'

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2008
5:35 PM

Post #4586535

Wow...Brian we ask, and there you are being your generous self again, thanks!! Steve, that's definitely required reading even for those that can grow palms easily.
Kara, my dear...that tip in using newspapers under mulch..I'll certainly use it.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
5:49 PM

Post #4586596

Hey there sweet Jaye! ♥

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2008
5:51 PM

Post #4586605

Hiya Tammy! Ain't this nice, don't have to navigate all over the place, and one thread answers most of your questions!
Plus such nice DGers too.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
5:55 PM

Post #4586624

AMEN sister! We have some wonderful input thus far and am hoping to get a ton more!!!

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
9:12 PM

Post #4587289

Shhh! I'm still lurking.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
9:28 PM

Post #4587367

I didn't hear a thing, Robin! smile
Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2008
9:31 PM

Post #4587376

---btw Robyn, I got your package mailed off today :) lol

Brian,

Good for you, I guess after I thought about it the only one I am surprised about is Moorei, because I have heard it reported hardy to 7b-8a, but doesn't bloom as well. Is your moorei blooming consistently over time? I sure hope so because I have some I was planning to try this year

misty, it occurred to me that there are people in Canada and other cooler climates trying to grow exotic plants, they may also be a good resource. Plant Delights can give you lots of ideas (and drain your bank account fast..lol) : http://www.plantdelights.com/

and my daughter is home but I'll try to get those links for you later, here's one that has caught my eye..I haven't tried it outside but I will this year (it may be listed above), livistona chinensis. If you scroll down the comments there was someone in 6b overwintering it : http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/57887/
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
9:33 PM

Post #4587385

I WILL NOT LOOK AT THAT LINK
I WILL NOT LOOK AT THAT LINK
I WILL NOT LOOK AT THAT LINK
HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 25, 2008
9:34 PM

Post #4587392

Here is a pic of the cactus garden outside in Atlanta Botanical gardens. A lot of the stong growers for them will survive up here if in a really well drained spot. Usually with cactus and succulents being drier is more important than the cold. Also with a hardy tropical landscape it does not take a lot to make a tropical to jungle effect. You can do a lot with Musa basjoo, canna ,and a few hardy colocasias.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2008
9:35 PM

Post #4587399

really though, you could probably ask for what looks exotic in canada and have a safe hardy garden...lol...it would be much easier, I love tropicals but I am so sick of this clay.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
9:36 PM

Post #4587403

I would love to find some Cacti and Succulents that would withstand our cold, other than just the hens and chicks. Also something that isn't dangerous when you reach in to do something in your garden! HA HA HA
Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2008
9:37 PM

Post #4587406

you gotta get some yuccas misty (lol..ouch!), I love them, the flowers are awesome
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
9:45 PM

Post #4587434

I have a Yucca Palm and it is staying in its pot! HA HA HA

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
9:47 PM

Post #4587448

Thank you Kara.

I just got Plants Delight catalog and I must say WOW!

Yuccas are great and they don't hurt too bad if you reach in the right way.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
9:48 PM

Post #4587455

This think is dangerous if you aren't careful!
Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2008
9:48 PM

Post #4587456

So Brian do your Crinum Moorei bloom consistently?

alright, gotta go...lol
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 25, 2008
10:09 PM

Post #4587565

If I were in Canada I would probably be trying to create a more prehistoric type effect with the following plants. The guys from the creationism museum visited here looking for a list of plants to do a prehistoric garden. It would be interesting to see how their garden came out I may go visit this season to and see how they did.

I added links to some of the plants to show what they look like most are large foliage plants.

Skunk cabbage which can get around 3 to 4 feet tall. probably found native in most parts. Their are 3 forms one form is a bit smaller grower.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/adlesparrow/992537233/in/photostream/

Another would be Bracken ferns they spread but get around 6 feet tall and look tropical.

http://www.missouriplants.com/Ferns/Pteridium_aquilinum_page.html

Another fern would be the ostridge fern which I have heard of reports of it growing over 6 foot. Aparently their is a larger form possibly a tetraploid form that can get huge.
http://www.saxifraga.de/foto_bot/matteuccia_struthiopteris.jpg


One of my personal favorites which I have been collecting forms of is petasites.
http://www.bellewood-gardens.com/Hortulus Farms_Judy.jpg

One of the more invasive but prehistoric plants would be horses tail - equisetum their are a lot of different forms from minitures to 9 footers a lot are hardy in cool climates. This form shown is very interesting.
http://www.ualberta.ca/~mjs14/vascpics/images/Equisetum sylvaticum (2).jpg

Other plants I would suggest are ligularias , rhubarb, gunnera, true calla, peltendra, Their are tons but some need certain conditions usually were it stays cool and damp. Others I can grow here year rounds. Oh and hardy hibiscus their are some nice new forms.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
10:17 PM

Post #4587594

Hi Brian,
That last link didn't work, but the rest of them make my mouth water!!!
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 25, 2008
10:25 PM

Post #4587628

The cirnum did not do much the first year possibly one bloom for me. The last few years it flowered just about all summer and usually was full of flowers. Here is a pic of it front and center.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2008
10:57 PM

Post #4587723

Hey, does any body want some tropical milkweed seeds? Please d-mail me. Sorry about the post that isn't supposed to be here Tammy!
AuntB
NE, KS
(Zone 5b)

February 25, 2008
11:01 PM

Post #4587731

I followed you guys here, from somewhere... It was a thread where a possibly new "hardy tropical" forum was being discussed... So here we are... I'm a self-proclaimed zone pusher, nothing embarassing or shameful about it. Brian got me interested in growing things not "ethical" to my zone. I've tested banana's in my zone... I'd never grown banana's, so some of my failure could have came from inexperience, but I kept one in the ground all winter and it came back, not as prolific growing as the summer before, but it came back... I hope to get re-interested in nanners, and continue my trials. If you can find a micro environment next to a foundation or building, you can push 1 or 2 zones higher for that area. I have cannas, that have come back for 4 or 5 years - no digging in fall. I am testing a method on a brugmansia I'd planted in the ground last spring, chopped of at ground level and covered with mulch and plastic bags of mulch; Mulch itself for protection from cold and the plastic bags keep moisture away from the dormant rootball. I anxiously await warmer weather to see if there is anything to see. Next winter, I'll be testing Brian's Pink China in my zone, and a few other ee's as well. At the moment, I can't think of new to add to the list. There is a purple passionvine that is hardy here, I can't remember the name and I don't have one, yet. Thanks Everyone! I didn't realize SO many people in the norther states were interested in the tropicals. Since we have people like Brian, out there inventing tropicals for the not-so-tropical garden and everyone else here at DG, sharing their experiences, it won't be long until we're all wearing grass skirts and coconut bras...er something like that!
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2008
11:18 PM

Post #4587809

Brian, whats the leafy plant in this picture? The one behind the cannas http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=4587628
It's quite nice!

Steven
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2008
11:24 PM

Post #4587838

Weedy, what are you talking about? I don't know of any post that isn't suppose to be here silly girl! 'smile'
Hey AuntB, you are my kind of girl! smile
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 26, 2008
2:31 AM

Post #4588702

Well in the pic is three of my hybrid cannas to the left is Banana itinerans and to the right is the plant I think your looking at called Amorphophallus paeonifolius. This is a small one here is a picture of a big one. It is a zone 8 plant and I have been able to over winter some smaller tubers if well mulched but the larger tubers I always dig up and store. The flowers are possibly one of the oddest in any garden.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
2:36 AM

Post #4588740

Wow! Cool plant Brian. I'm really starting to like tropicls more and more. I need to start collecting.

AuntB, are you talking about Maypop, passion vine?
AuntB
NE, KS
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2008
3:35 AM

Post #4589009

Yes, I think that's what they call it, Robyn. Do you have some? I mean, zone 6b isn't that much different than zone 5b, but wait, did someone change the zones recently...? I think I'm in zone 6 now... maybe I could snag a couple cuttings this spring? I just love the amorphs, I noticed one I have in a pot is going to bloom, in the basement...I hope it takes it's own sweet time, I might have to bag it.. Such foliage to lend a tropical look, and the bulbs store dry in winter. I have some laying in a flat on a shelf down there, too. Oh, I also have some volunteers I leave growing about 3-4 ft from the foundation of my house.. whatever zone it's in, they don't know, they just grow there. When they get big I'll probably dig them, too.
1cros3nails4gvn
Bluffton, SC
(Zone 9a)

February 26, 2008
4:02 AM

Post #4589108

AUNTB!!!!! how are you???
joegee
Bucyrus, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 26, 2008
4:47 AM

Post #4589239

I have ordered from PDN. I have several of their plants now, yucca rostrata and sabal minor mccurtain. They are a magnificent place.

-Joe
Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 26, 2008
4:55 AM

Post #4589263

just had to quickly second joegee on PDN before I look up all that stuff. You should check out plant delights not just for the temptation factor, but mainly to give you more ideas on things to plant. They have been trialing plants here in NC for a long time, do TONS of research, and they also have hardiness notes..etc. Whatever their catalog says I can grow has worked out very well for me. If you're ever closeby, it is worth a scheduled visit...beautiful place.

bwilliams, nice blooms, hadn't thought of the garbage bag thing...would have been too easy this winter


mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
5:02 AM

Post #4589284

OK, I guess I will go take a look at the thread then! HA HA HA
Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 26, 2008
5:14 AM

Post #4589339

OK, back to shrubs..lol. :
aucuba :
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/130/
photinia:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/58261/
mahonia--really love this one
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1898/
camellia
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/710/
azalea
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/415/
rhododendrons (laurels also)
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/58228/


farfugiums are cool also, if you check some of the comments you'll see folks noting survival in upper zones:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/55089/

yep...you should have a ton of info by now...
joegee
Bucyrus, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 26, 2008
5:43 AM

Post #4589450

Tropicanna, Tony Avent sells a farfugium as a ligularia japonicum that he says is hardy into zone five, so I'd say there are at least a few of these that are hardy into the northern states. :)

-Joe
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
1:39 PM

Post #4590042

Good morning everyone!♥
Thanks so much for posting the links, it is most helpful!!!!!
Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 26, 2008
2:51 PM

Post #4590340

I first saw farfugiums at Plant Delights fall open house a couple of years back, they really are eye-catching (and so are asarums : http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/adv_search.php?searcher[common]=&searcher[family]=&searcher[genus]=asarum&searcher[species]=&searcher[cultivar]=&searcher[hybridizer]=&search_prefs[blank_cultivar]=&search_prefs[sort_by]=rating&images_prefs=both&Search=Search
and there should be a few of those as well that will be hardy for you. They really do sell a number of very versatile plants, and I'm not sure if there's a way to browse through the old catalogs of theirs, but over time they have just done so much in the way of trialing they are a huge resource.

..lol...which reminds be of the lespedeza they have by their waterfall, there's another one you could try: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/878/

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
4:01 PM

Post #4590659

Those are pretty neat plants I would kill for a Camelia. (not really kill) but you know what I mean.

AuntB, I may have some Maypop seeds, I will look.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
4:12 PM

Post #4590726

HA HA HA Robin! I REALLY need a larger yard you know!!!!
weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

February 26, 2008
7:08 PM

Post #4591523

I would love some rhododendrons and camellia, but I don't have acidic soil. I have read that it is a real pain to maintain it if you don't have acidic soil. Is this true?
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 26, 2008
7:40 PM

Post #4591625

Thanks Brian, that is the plant I was looking at! I really love the full sized one, I put it on my 'wish list' right away :)

Robyn, know what you mean about the Camelia :) I would love one myself!

Steven

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 26, 2008
8:14 PM

Post #4591766

Yes Weedsfree, rhodos, azaleas and camellias love acid. Hence they'd flourish when grown alongside pine trees.

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
8:18 PM

Post #4591780

Jaye you're so good. Thanks for a suggestion on location.

heavenscape

heavenscape
TabacVille, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 26, 2008
8:41 PM

Post #4591877

Don't kill for a camellia Robin. I'll try rooting some for ya!

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
8:52 PM

Post #4591916

Thank you Jaye, I heard it was hard to do that.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
9:17 PM

Post #4591998

Go take a nap and I miss out on flower conversation! ♥
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
9:31 PM

Post #4592054

Here is one I hope to have soon!
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1759/
NYVOICES99
Corning, NY
(Zone 5a)

February 26, 2008
9:33 PM

Post #4592061

I have the Arum , but have yet to see any flowers on them? :)Anita
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
9:36 PM

Post #4592083

Oh I just love it for the foliage, but flowers would be a great extra! But the hardiness on that is another thing that really caught my eye.
joegee
Bucyrus, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 26, 2008
9:37 PM

Post #4592088

Chilopsis linearis, desert willow, http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/265/ is being grown in Denver, zone 5A, in a dry sheltered location. This tree has scented orchid-like blooms. Plantfiles says zone 8A, but many of the reports down below are from 7A or even colder, National Arbor Day Foundation and Texas University say 7A, so I would say the PF is incorrect.

I am thinking about adding this if/when I clear some space currently occupied by a blue spruce.

-Joe

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
9:38 PM

Post #4592089

Just like you Tammy to want a Cuckoo.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
9:40 PM

Post #4592099

Cuckoo for us Cuckoo's, right?! HA HA HA
I would love to have that tree, Joe, if I had room!
NYVOICES99
Corning, NY
(Zone 5a)

February 26, 2008
9:59 PM

Post #4592194

This list has many common plants, but it is also loaded with very interesting plants as well. A Hardy Begonia? Yep we do have 1 for zone 5:)Anita
http://www.sunfarm.com/plantlist/plantlist.phtml
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 26, 2008
10:04 PM

Post #4592227

Thanks, Anita! My friend has some Begonia that comes back every year, and she always gives me some, and I always manage to kill it! sigh
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 26, 2008
10:08 PM

Post #4592247

The Acanthus group is really tropical looking as well. Some of the newer hybrids are tougher than the species. I believe this is Acanthus spinosa in MOBOT zone6 I have seen some forms get 6 feet tall.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

NYVOICES99
Corning, NY
(Zone 5a)

February 26, 2008
10:17 PM

Post #4592281

Brian,
I have that one, Mine looks no way as nice as yours, but it will grow in zone 5 too.I need to move a few things away from it this year, I was told it would NOT grow here, I have had it for 3 years now:)Anita

Thumbnail by NYVOICES99
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
1:08 AM

Post #4593289

I sure wish I could read with my eyes closed! HA HA HA
Seeing all these pictures and thinking I need every single one of them!!!
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2008
1:11 AM

Post #4593308

Chilopsis linearis, desert willow - grown as street trees in Phoenix, AZ. I love this tree.

However, the lady I bought mine from is in NM at 10,000 elevation -- has to be at least a zone 6 there. She grows them from seeds and sells them. She told me that they grow all over town there. Having said that, I guess I'll be buying more from her as I think I bumped mine off. LOL

Karen
mamajack
Fate, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 27, 2008
4:31 AM

Post #4594467

here i am. so what are we doing? are we giving you a list of what we can grow outside in each of our zones? cause if we are i like it already.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
5:32 AM

Post #4594661

Hey there miss ornery! smile
We are trying to give everyone an idea of what plants are hardy for colder climates. Say something is said to only be hardy to zone 8, but I live in zone 6 and I am able to keep it going year after year, then I would tell everyone, hey, I have a Brugmansia that over winters here and does just fine. ALL input is greatly appreciated!!
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 27, 2008
6:42 AM

Post #4594784

Speaking of Brugmansia I have had one over winter here for 4 years. I mulch it high each year cut it to a nub. Each spring it grows and usually flowers right at the end of summer. I believe lots of protection and good drainage is the key for over wintering it.

While I am here I will put a pic of some I crossed and grew from seed.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
2:20 PM

Post #4595457

I like that yellow/orange one, what are the crosses that got that one.

I have to get me an orange one.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
2:53 PM

Post #4595593

WOW Brian, those are amazingly beautiful! I was sitting here saying, Golly, look at those Brug flowers!!!
Hey Sis, feeling better I hope?
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 27, 2008
3:03 PM

Post #4595644

I like the idea of this thread -- it is great to get advice on growing plants with a tropical feel up north. Great idea for a forum.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
3:04 PM

Post #4595649

Thanks, Happy! I am pleased with it as well, although it would still be great to have some sort of Forum for it!
joycet
Franklin, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
3:04 PM

Post #4595652

Brian, are brug blooms usually so large???? Those are AWESOME!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
4:12 PM

Post #4596026

Ok everyone, I want to make sure this is noticed by the person who sent it to me!!!
I am not going to say who because she knows who she is!!! But I want you all to know that I just got a package in the mail and it is a book called:
Hot Plants for Cool Climates
I want her to know she brought tears to my eyes for sending this to me, but it is wonderful, happy tears!!!!! You are the sweetest thing ever my dear!!!!

jsxtiger

jsxtiger
(jax) Dundalk, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 27, 2008
4:15 PM

Post #4596043

Hello all! Fantastic idea, this thread. Like many others, the Tropical forum did not answer all my questions. I am one of those in the chilly 7a who love tropical plants. I will be lurking about, picking up info and compiling a list. Right now, I am most interested in hardy bananas and ee's. But, I am sure I can get more ideas from all of you, right?

Jax
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
4:18 PM

Post #4596052

Hey, I have a book I can look stuff up in now!!!!! WEEEEEEEEEEEE HAAAAAAAAAA
(yes girls, you can take the points!)
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2008
4:28 PM

Post #4596109

Jax,

Yes! I want some of those, too.

As soon as spring gets here -- it is coming; right? -- I'll let everyone know what did fine and what didn't. I am seeing that some stuff is probably not okay although it should be and others that shouldn't be okay are coming through like champs.

Karen
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
4:53 PM

Post #4596223

Here's the link to the hardy begonia in the PlantFiles http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/722/

I've also sucessfully grow Carex comans with no extra winter protection
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/90988/
The whole plant once got coated in ice during a winter storm and came through just fine.

Steven
Tuinkabouter
's-Gravenhage
Netherlands
(Zone 8b)

February 27, 2008
5:05 PM

Post #4596291

Purple pennisetums do nice in 8b! And so does Exochorda eximia...
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
5:18 PM

Post #4596364

Hey Tuink!!!!
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 27, 2008
5:43 PM

Post #4596460

well hey there all you status quo rockers! what a ton of wonderful information! I am putting in a xeri bed outfront thanks to Tropicans inspiration...she is full of good ideas!I would like to incorporate some "zone pushing" out there but worry about it being non protected since it's out in the front..any thoughts anyone? The bed is pretty large and I am open to ideas...thanks! The first pic is from a distance so you can garner the width of it (yes it is going to be connecting two other beds when all is said and done..)

Thumbnail by rednyr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
5:44 PM

Post #4596464

WOW Red, I am envious! That is huge!!!!
JanLynn
(Jan) So Milw, WI
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2008
5:47 PM

Post #4596477

Hello all!!!

I'm "coming out" from lurking Tammy!!! Thank you for getting this thread started for us zone-pushers/tropical wannabes :)

I started some 4:00's/Mirabilis jalapa from seeds over 5 years ago, have never had to dig the root tubers up or reseed, and it comes back each year from the root. Also have prickly pear/opuntia humifusa growing in my garden for 4 years.

I'll be back...Jan

edited to say: AuntB, you're SILLY!!! Ok, I'll put on a grass skirt and coconut bra AFTER you do...NOT!!!!!!!!!

Another edit: I also have hardy hibiscus in my garden and actually have had people going by my garden asking what I'm growing and they're speechless when I tell them it's hardy :)

This message was edited Feb 27, 2008 12:53 PM
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 27, 2008
5:49 PM

Post #4596482

I started planting one side of the bed...it has an ilex, 6 yuccas, liatris bulbs and some salvia in it...I still have about 8 more saliva to put in it and some lavender, russian sage etc...but would like to continue a nice "bone" structure from the middle to back going across of some tropicals ( I already have a brug bed and two canna beds) so please feel free to shout out some suggestions

Thumbnail by rednyr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
5:51 PM

Post #4596493

Hey Jan, nice to have you out of lurking!!! smile
Red, I am sure someone with more knowledge than myself will be along to help you with ideas!
joegee
Bucyrus, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
5:58 PM

Post #4596524

Red, I like http://www.highcountrygardens.com/ for a decent selection of xeriscaping plants. For cactus lovers, a zone 5 hardy claret cup is an amazing thing. They have zone 5 tested agaves, all kinds of neat stuff. :)

-Joe
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 27, 2008
6:04 PM

Post #4596531

Red I personally think their are 4 different hardy tropical looks and it is usually best to to stick with one for each section. You can mix them up some but usually they look better in their own groups.

One is the Hardy desert look. Mostly yuccas agaves and other hardy looking cactus

The jungle look. This is usually bananas colocasias and cannas with a few others.

Shaded tropical or prehistoric look. This usually deals in hostas petasites airasema and a lot of other odd shade foliage plants

The last one is the Mediterranean look using hardy palms and cycads as well as a mixture of other plants.

Now this does not mean you cannot or should not mix the plants but usually they work well together in these groups. I often like to have a transition from one to the next. You may go jungle in the bright areas and in the shaded go prehistoric and back to another area with the Mediterranean over to desert look. So you can have all of them in one garden but some areas you will water much more and some areas will need more or less light. Your light and soil and drainage can play a key on what areas are best.

Here is a small area of my mothers yard were it goes grasses and somewhat succulent plants over to a desert area fairly fast. She wanted to try some desert plants and this well drained spot worked out find. It is still only a 6 to 8 foot from here pond but its up high and dry and looks fairly natural in the area were it's at.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
6:08 PM

Post #4596553

WOW Brian, please tell your Mother her garden area is beautiful for me!!!
plantaholic186
Winnetka, IL

February 27, 2008
6:12 PM

Post #4596570

Tropicals or tropical-looking plants in zone 5b:
I have a grove of Arisaema sikokianum and A. candidissimum that's very happy.

Nelumbo nucifera will do well, as long as it's sunken to 3' or lower under water,

I'm trying Agapanthus 'Hardy Blue', advertised as hardy to z5, and I've mulched it, but we'll see.

Echium vulgare self seeded this summer, so I'll be curious to see if I get seedlings this spring. Lots and lots of snow this year, so at least they've been very well insulated.

I'm trying Alstroemeria 'Freedom' and A. psittacina 'Variegata', both reputed to make it to z5, but lifted some for safekeeping in the garage just in case.

I'm also trying Bignonia capreolata 'Tangerine Beauty' on the south side of my greenhouse; we'll see.

I have had Passiflora caerulea, which I ripped out when it came back the next spring, in the original spot, and also 10 feet away! It's in a pot now : )

Weedsfree- I have a particular affection for Rhodies, and have clay soil, so I built a raised bed in which to grow my beloveds.

Anita- I am going for Begonia evansii BIG TIME! Thanks a lot >: p

This is a dangerous forum...

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
6:19 PM

Post #4596592

Yes, this could be a danger to our pocketbooks, couldn't it!?! smile
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 27, 2008
6:21 PM

Post #4596600

Joe and Brian...thanks for your input! it is exactly what I need...but Brian...I want it all...LOL but if I have to choose jungle it is...awwwwawwww (umm that was supposed to be interpreted as tarzan's yell LOL)

this bed will be getting nearly all day sun (my shade bed with hostas, ferns, old time bleeding hearts, hydrangeas, gardenia, camellia etc is on the right where the daffodils are) The left bed in front of the one I am inquiring about ideas for has lilys, iris's and mexican petunias in it and the bed in between the shade and mexican petunias have cannas and various lilium species in it - so with that said would you mind suggesting some bananas and EE that can tolerate all that sun?

tammy's right...your moms bed is gorgeous! I have admired many of the pics you have posted on the other thread too...she's gotta love having a son in the biz who can supply all her plant tastes LOL
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 27, 2008
6:24 PM

Post #4596609

I will let her know. She retired this year and I am already hearing she wants every plant I have LOL. I told her I only wanted her testing the hardy stuff but I think shes going to go for some other things like the red banana and a few others.
I was really impressed with one area we worked a few years back. I gave her a lot of cannas hybrids to grow out for me. They were all unknown hybrids but she did a good job and I may have her help out on doing it again.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

joycet
Franklin, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
6:30 PM

Post #4596631

What a stunning bed. Love it!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
6:38 PM

Post #4596663

OOOOOOOOOOOH there is a red banana, too!!! I knew of the pink but not the red. Yet another to add to the list! HE HE HE
HI JOYCE!!!!
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 27, 2008
6:40 PM

Post #4596666

Well Red in your zone most all colocasias are ok to grow to its best to pic out the nicest forms rather than go spreading weedy green forms. The bananas you have a bit of choices their as well. You could probably even get a few ensetes to over winter if you mulch them up well. Basjoo is a must. Their is a list I put up top this forum that shows most of the really hardy forms. The cannas are the same way. I find it's always best to go with the better performing plants. You maybe able to get the tall red flowering canna cheep possibly free but their are others out their that just out do it all around. My advice would be draw your lay out on paper list the areas that are shade sun and so on. Also list any areas you would like to look like a desert. The best part of the desert garden is you can throw them far out by the road or away from your original garden and they will do well with little care so finding a spot for them now or in the future is fairly easy if you have the land. Then I would suggest doing some research on the plants you like. Some bananas get large 20 feet plus while their are others that stay miniature same with the colocasias. Pick out your favorite. Once you have the plants I usually like to take them while in the pots and set them around to get a feel of what the landscape will look like. It's good to have a idea of what sizes they will grow to. I wrote about this on another forum and will see about copying it and adding it here. Over all it's fairly easy if you do mess up next year just dig the plant up and move it. Most of the plants are fairly tough and can be moved easily.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 27, 2008
6:40 PM

Post #4596667

Brian - that is a feast for the eyes...so very nice!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
6:45 PM

Post #4596687

Brian, eeeeeeeeeeeeeeewinggggggggggggggg and awwwwwwwwwwwwwwing over that picture!!!! (yes girls, more points!!!!)
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 27, 2008
6:48 PM

Post #4596700

I have a lot of cannas currently - from Cleopatra to Wyoming to Black Knight and a few others I haven't been able to ID yet...a friend moved...she didn't want to dig them up and bring them to her new home , I offered to, she said no she didn't want the hassle in her new yard but said take whatever you want...so I did...guess who now wants her cannas back...and guess whos not getting her cannas back LOL
Tropicanna
Clemmons, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2008
6:50 PM

Post #4596710

Hey rednyr...

You should start a separate thread so that we can show continued and sustained interest...(and I swear i'm not trying to be cute here), plus, you're in a different region than misty and it might be helpful to other folks

I have to get a few pics together before I can start a thread but the more discussions we have in hardy gardening ...

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
6:50 PM

Post #4596711

OOOOOOOOOOH Black Night sounds very interesting!!!! I love anything black, or as close to black as I can get!!!!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
6:51 PM

Post #4596716

Good idea you have there, K!!!
joycet
Franklin, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
6:54 PM

Post #4596725

Back at ya, Tammie. ;o)
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
6:55 PM

Post #4596728

Don't go tell the girls about my boo boo's, Joyce! HE HE HE
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 27, 2008
6:55 PM

Post #4596731

Well their is not much for planting a good tropical display. The thing is I have to do it differently than I would if I were just trying to make a colorful tropical effect. Here are my common rules to making a tropical display. Plant in mass groups. One of each canna next to each other is not as dramatic as large full clumps. I suggest this for most of the flowering stuff. If you have display plants sets of 3 to 5 are best in triangle patterns. 3 bananas in a triange patter look better than one. This is the same with Caladiums one form in a mass display is much nicer than tons of different forms scattered. Another thing to always do is lay the garden out as if it were a stadium minitures in the front mediums next and so on till you get to your tall stuff this give a better over all effect. The problem in my case is my displays are not just for show. I am breeding with the plants and I need as many of each form as possible. I also have found that planting new hybrids in the landscape can lead to odd effect. I planted cannas in the front and second roll of my beds a few years back all were new seedlings and very small. By the end of the season I found I had used omega in quite a few of the hybrids they were extremely tall and right next to the walkways. It took away from the effect but just something else to look out for in my future breeding.

Misty I usually plant coleus, caladiums, Eucomis, callas, amaryllis and oddly enough some amorphophallus up front. After that I usually use a zig zag pattern for Colocasias Alocasias and cannas. Then in the back is usually the bigger things like Ensetes bananas and larger cannas. It's hard to go wrong just most people don't know what to expect form their plants. At times they put what looks bigger at that moment in the back and plant the small bananas up front. It's easy to learn and as you do it more and more you get a feel of what should go where.

Years ago a friend of mine did a display using canna bengal tiger and Colocasia illustrius in a zig zag pattern. It was a large clump of bengal tiger then slightly out front of it was a larger clump of Illustrius colocasia this went on for around 100 feet and was one of the most coloful displays I have seen. Non of the plants were extremely rare or hard to find but putting dark colors next to light colored plants always draws attention.


This is not the greatest display but it seves it's purpose. I needed a place to propagate and grow out more of my pollen parent cannas. I also wanted to make a display that could be seen from the road draw people in to visit. A lot of people thought I was crazy when I planted those little plants out their but they kept looking as they grew up.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
7:07 PM

Post #4596773

Brian, and others,
For those that don't have green houses, do you think that a sort of hoop house for over wintering plants would be helpful? I would think that they could be built right over the plants so they can be left in the ground? You would just have to cut them back so that you wouldn't have a hoop house 10-20 foot tall! HE HE HE
JanLynn
(Jan) So Milw, WI
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2008
7:16 PM

Post #4596818

I have a hoop house 8' L x 4' W x 6' H but can't overwinter plants in it as it's very basic (no heat!). I use it in winter to store some of my pots and trays in there and then, when the weather gets nicer (as in "goes above 40 degrees"!!!), I bring out some of my plants to start hardening them off.

Jan, who prefers brugs, EE's, cannas, etc. than tulips, daffs, crocus...
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
7:20 PM

Post #4596830

Thanks for the input, Jan!
Was wanting to get everyones thoughts on starting another thread for only posting names of more hardy plants with the hyperlinks in them? There is so much information here, I think it would be much easier if there was a specific link to just the plants so that people can more easily search to find things that they like Please give me your input, and if it seems to be a go, I will start another thread as such.
Thanks again to all who are giving the wonderful information!!!!
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 27, 2008
7:21 PM

Post #4596832

Misty their are tons of ways to over winter and protect the plants. You can do the hoop house but may get the same results from these suggestions with less work. Here are a few off the top of my head.

Hardwood mulch. As it rots produces heat and stays fairly dry
Leaves in bags the bag of leaves helps insulate the plants.
Chopped up leaves similar to the mulch produces heat best if chopped up but retains more water.
Hoop house works great for palms and other slower moving tropicals added heat supply such as a light or heat cable help on very cold nights.

A new one which I have been testing is a large black matting. What you do is cover your plants with mulch or leaves for winter. This usually gives you 1 to 2 zone difference then if you add this black matting over the whole area it will give you 1 or 2 more zones as well. What the matting does is collect heat from the sun and thaws out the frozen ground. The ground will freeze again at night but only penetrating around 1 to 2 inches. This is the main difference between zones 7 and 8 compared to zones 5 and 6. The more the ground freezes the more damage the rhizomes and tubers receive. Preventing this will give you a much larger variety of plants to work with.
The matting I have tested is used on the ground in greenhouses and nurseries as weed control and for walking on. It comes in on a 10 foot roll and can be pinned down. It may look bad for the winter but the results are very good.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
7:24 PM

Post #4596841

Oh Brian I love that idea, thanks!!! And we are lucky enough to have access to free mulch, which is great! Stinks to high heaven, but very good.
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
7:28 PM

Post #4596856

Another thread with all the hyperlinks sounds great!
The links could be divided between several different posts which could be used to catagorize! IE: One post could just have links for different plams and another could just have links for bananas.

Steven :)
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
7:31 PM

Post #4596864

Now that would be nice if someone else wanted to keep up with all those links! LOL
I was just thinking of one thread where people can post the name of the plant/flower and give the link to plantfiles, or any other link that will give the information a person will need to know if there is any probability of it making it in their zone. So long as we have the names and the links, everyone could just click on it to check it out. Does that sound reasonable?

Brian, I actually put some black plastic bags on a portion of my green house to draw in more heat and it works great! But you would probably have to use like a pond liner for what you are talking about, right?
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 27, 2008
7:49 PM

Post #4596924

Misty pond liner is far to expensive and heavy to work with. This is not the greatest picture but you can see it has been layed out on the ground for the plants to sit on and on the left side you can see the huge roll of it. It's made similar to a tarp but black.

This message was edited Feb 27, 2008 2:50 PM

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
7:52 PM

Post #4596935

That does sound great and somewhat less complicated!
Its a great idea and maybe it could be made sticky so it's always easy to find? Just an idea :) I'd be willing to help with catagorizing the thread if it got too messy.

Steven
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
7:58 PM

Post #4596967

Brian, where do you find that? And I bet you can't walk on it barefoot when it is warm out!! :)
Steven, this may grow so big before long it will take all of us to keep track! LOL I do have something in mind, but I have Dmailed Terry to ask about something before I pursue it.
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2008
8:21 PM

Post #4597062

bwilliams,

I was thinking hoophouse, too. But your ideas sound easier and more efficient, not to mention cheaper.

Please explain the bag of leaves to me. Are these just set up next to the plant? I had thought of putting a chicken wire "cage" around plants and filling that with leaves.

Black matting. How deep do the leaves under the matting need to be? Can this method be used for plants already in the ground, i.e., mulch and then cut-outs in the matting for the plants?

Steve,

I like the idea of different threads for different plants.

misty,

These palms are growing outside a Mexican restaurant here in town. They have had temps down in the teens several times and mid- to low-20s many times with very little damage. I'm going to post the pics on the Palm Forum and see if anyone there can ID them for me. Because they were only planted a year ago, they don't have long fronds yet.

Karen

Thumbnail by glendalekid
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
8:25 PM

Post #4597087

Karen, that is one cool pic! Even my 5 year old daughter looked at it and said, WOW those are Palm Trees!!! I guess she really is paying attention to her dear old Mom! HE HE HE
joegee
Bucyrus, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
8:44 PM

Post #4597215

Karen, those looks like palmettos to me. :)

-Joe
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2008
8:55 PM

Post #4597287

Joe,

You think these are a fan-type palm and won't get the long fronds, then? I didn't know palmettos would get a trunk this tall.

Here's a pic of a different one.

Karen

Thumbnail by glendalekid
Click the image for an enlarged view.

bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 27, 2008
9:11 PM

Post #4597376

The bags of leaves works much like your chicken wire. I just found it much easier to put up and take down. Though it maybe a eye sore during winter. Take the bags and make a circle around your plant. Then add leaves or mulch around the trunks or plants your protecting. I then add more bags and more leaves till it is completely covered up. I usually use this one things like crinums and Musa basjoo. The stuff your interested in saving the trunks on.

As for the black matting is commonly called ground cover or weed protection matting their are a few form heavy duty and lighter forms. The tough form is what I use and can be used again and again.
What I do is mulch my plant regularly then add the matting over top. It is not level or flat some bags or rocks are on top to hold it down from the wind. This seems to work well and come spring is easy to remove and store. The mulch is then raked from the plants and spread out. The mat works good for areas with Colocasias, cannas gingers and other plants that die back fairly level with the ground. I dont think you would get the same effect if you used it as a weed barrier because you would then cover over the whole mat with mulch which will not collect as much heat. The other problem I find is that many tropicals will grow fast and spread usually under the matting and raise it up.

Now for small hoop houses or greenhouses. I usually only suggest them for Palms or similar plants that can take a lot of cold but need just a bit more protection. Here are some pics of our palms in their winter protected greenhouses. These houses have 2 spot lights which are turned on if the nights are cold. They produce just enough heat to keep the plants from getting damaged.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
10:18 PM

Post #4597624

Thanks so much again for the wonderful information, Brian!!!
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2008
10:29 PM

Post #4597673

bwilliams,

I've read about putting bubble wrap around bananas and palms to keep the trunks warmer. Have you tried this? Do you think a rajipura banana is hardy to my zone? I want some fruiting bananas as well as the ornamental ones. With the bags of leaves, do you have to take them off when it is warm during the day or can they just be left in place all winter?

I would not put the weed barrier down on the ground with the leaves on top, but I didn't even think about putting the leaves first and then the weed barrier. I hate that stuff as an actual weed barrier. But putting it on top is a terrific suggestion. We have lots of leaves as there is a forest behind the property.

I'm not concerned about how it looks during the winter. Right now I have blankets out there topped with frost cloth. I take them off during the day and then back up for the night. Oh, that's not pretty, for sure.

This bed now has a four-foot dogwire fence around it. My daughter's dogs got in there and had a lot of fun uprooting plants. Grrrr! She said, cheerfully, "Well, now you have an extra place for vines." Grrrr again! All I need is concertina wire on top for it to look like a maxiumum security prison for plants.

Your little palm greenhouses are similar to what I was considering for next winter to put over individual small beds where I have bougainvillea and a tropical hibiscus. I couldn't run a heat source out there, though. This year I tried filling the bed with straw up over the tops of the plants and put a frost cloth on top. Time will tell if that was good enough.

I have a window that faces onto the front deck. I opened the window, put a fan in it to blow air from the house out there, and then taped frost cloth on the window and down to make a sort of "tent". This is working very well. So, I thought I could enlarge on this idea by putting up a similar "tent", using a PVC frame to hold it up, over my sliding glass door on the back deck and put a small heater out there or else use the fan idea again for next winter. This would be for stuff that I simply cannot put in the ground and then cover them with something. I have several small orchids in the house now but I'm limited as to how many, because I have to keep them out of reach of the cats.

Joe,

You are right about the palms. I got the answer of sabal palmetto from the Palm Forum. I wasn't aware that sabal palmettos got that tall. Learning new things all the time here.

Karen



SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
10:44 PM

Post #4597718

Maybe on the new thread several DGer's could each manage a catagory? Just another thought!
Keep us posted on your idea misty!

Thanks Karen!

Steven
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
10:54 PM

Post #4597755

Now I think that would be great, Steven!!!! I am still waiting to hear from Terry. I guess she is really busy!
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
11:00 PM

Post #4597784

Thanks!
I found another plant for the list, I have it as a houseplant but according to some of the info in the PlantFiles it sounds like it might grow as a die-back perennial in some colder zones http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/54477/ It's the China Doll Tree.

Steven
mamajack
Fate, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 27, 2008
11:01 PM

Post #4597787

i like the idea of a thread for the links to the plants only, misty.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
11:25 PM

Post #4597861

Steve, I think, with heavy protection, it would probably do fine. Now just to figure out a way to get by with planting in my neighbors yard! HA HA HA
Hi Mama, are you gonna help add to it when it is up and running? smile
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 27, 2008
11:36 PM

Post #4597899

I think different threads would be awesome...tropical bulbs, tropical trees, tropical shrubs, starting beds, maintaining beds, amending beds, watering requirements...the list is endless and it would make a wonderful reference!
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

February 27, 2008
11:40 PM

Post #4597911

Same here and I know I would help... I am the nut with a lime tree and tropical hibiscus in zone 8a outside year round with little to no issues.
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2008
11:42 PM

Post #4597917

Then next time I'm in HD I'm going to see if they got any in again. I would love to have that as a foliage plant in my yard!
It makes me think of a Ming Arailia...just ALOT easier and not so fussy.

Steven

Mitch- Do you have latin name for your lime tree? So I could look it up :
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
11:46 PM

Post #4597936

Yes, the list is definitely endless. But I think, if we get it, we will only get one forum for all of these things. Which is why, in my opinion, keeping it to one thread would be easier to keep up with for everyone. Otherwise, it will get lost in the shuffle amongst all the other posts in this Forum. This thread for Chat, and another just for posting the particular plant/flower, along with the link to PlantFiles or some other link for description/care/propagation, etc... I really liked Steven's idea of each person keeping up with their posts. Then they could just post a little something like-I just updated my post, post #?, or something of that nature. I know this sounds like a lot of hassle, but until we show enough interest and possibly get the forum, it is all we got.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 27, 2008
11:47 PM

Post #4597941

Now Mitch, if you are a nut, so are we! HA HA HA
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

February 27, 2008
11:56 PM

Post #4597976

I love it... saddly no name on my tree - before I was into the names of plants I bought one on the border and brought it back... it never gets blooms out there and the throns are killer but I try. Date Palms I have tried and killed, every aloe under the sun I tried and killed... so many baby palms and bananas until I had a cover system going... killed them all sad to say but I had aloes, hibiscus, the one little lime, a few palms - the same old same old, mini musa, blood musa, and basjoo musa, duranta, EEs, several airods - will have to look up names, there was more out there - most are in pots now to move yet again North to Oklahoma this spring.. that is my biggest interest in this thread - what can I do there to keep growing these things! (Will start looking up latin names for the about plants to add.. )
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
12:00 AM

Post #4597996

Poor Mitch, I feel for you going backwards! But, look at it this way, if you are into guns and such you will be close to the largest gun show in the world!!! ☻
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2008
12:03 AM

Post #4598003

lol

I started my "trip" in garden life in VeraCruz Mexico... then to Dallas, now to Oklahoma... do you think I am going to give up on my tropicals? No way! Not now not ever.. just going to ahve to learn to make hoops and all this new - to me- stuff for winter... oh and buy a real coat for myself from what I hear...
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 28, 2008
12:05 AM

Post #4598016

Another plant that is highly over looked that I have had great results with is Manihot esculenta. I grow it like a small tree or shrub. It looks a lot like a miniature leaf schefflera. Each year cut it down and mulch the base. It also tends to send out a lot of seeds like a castro bean. I am looking to try more species for hardiness but it seems like a hard plant to find. Or I am not looking in the right places.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
12:06 AM

Post #4598020

HE HE HE A coat will be a must I am quite sure!!! ☻
7oaks
Wymore, NE
(Zone 5a)

February 28, 2008
12:06 AM

Post #4598024

Okay, here's my 2 cents worth, I'm in zone 5a. This is the type of stuff I'd love to find out more of! SE Nebraska can have such extremes in weather, it's hard to find those that will over winter here, and not fry in the summer. There has to be lots of us zone 5er's wanting that tropical look. Being in the country isn't in my favor either, too exposed, although, we're down in the creek bottom, which helps with some protection from the wind. Short on time now, but will be back!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
12:09 AM

Post #4598032

Welcome aboard 7oaks!
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2008
12:28 AM

Post #4598121

see Misty - I know the initial plan was to talk shop only and not trade pics and ask for assitance ( I raise my hand I am guilty - but ya'll are so darn smart I can't help it!) but this thread, merely 4 days old, is already chock full of wants, needs, advice etc that if Daves Garden can't see that there is a need for a forum for those of us who aren't well versed in zone hardy tropicals and tropicals pertinent to our zones, then...well...then I for one shall be deeply dissapointed...I for one am a HUGE fan of before and after pics, what someone did to aquire a certain look, what rate the plants grow at and how long it took to get the final effect...heck...that is WHY I joined DG in the first place..there were so many people with such awesome ideas and so very helpful I knew I had to join...so...here's hoping we are heard...here's hoping there is noone left feeling like..well hey why didn't you ask us...I for one am very very intitmated to ask about things from pro's...I may work at a garden nursery but that does not make me well versed in anything but small talk LOL
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
12:35 AM

Post #4598158

Red, I just meant no chat once we get the new thread just for plant/flower links. You all just chat away and post pics all you want to on here! Chat here and post pertinent information for the plants/flowers on a thread I will start later. I am loving every word and every pic!!!! I am still waiting on Miss Terry to respond to my dmail.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
3:26 AM

Post #4598935

Ok ya all, I am doing the happy dance here because I got germination on a canna seed!!!!!!! YIPPPPPPPPPPEEEEEEEEEEEE Now what? LOL H!E!L!P!
I have tried to germinate several different kinds of the larger seeds with no luck, so this is a GREAT surprise!!!!
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
3:28 AM

Post #4598946

Well I will do the dance with you :) lol!
Congrats..are they in soil?
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
3:30 AM

Post #4598955

Thanks, Kim!!! No, I used a napkin sprayed with water and peroxide, but now that it germinated I am lost! LOL I didn't expect it to happen for me, so didn't think ahead!!!
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2008
3:40 AM

Post #4598993

OMG you are flying by the seat of your pants...hmmm...where did i hear that earlier tonite...
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
3:41 AM

Post #4598999

I got so excited that I forgot the dog was outside going potty! LOL
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
3:45 AM

Post #4599019

I did the same thing with my seeds...then I just put them in a little cup of soil they are about 6 inches now. :)
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2008
3:46 AM

Post #4599023

well now his pants are frozen...you mean mommie you...dog abuse...calling the kennel here
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
3:47 AM

Post #4599026

Thankfully for her it is above freezing for a change! HA HA HA
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
3:49 AM

Post #4599036

Just plant the seed and it'll make a tiny little pointy green sprout and make a few leaves, then once it gets outside, loooooooookouuuuuuuut, he'll take right off! Oh, and I put an upside down baggie with the corners cut off over the pot for added humidity :)

Steven
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
3:50 AM

Post #4599043

Thanks, Steven!!! So the little spider looking part goes down and not up, right? Can you tell this is my first?! HA HA HA
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
3:58 AM

Post #4599089

What colour is the spider looking part? Do you have a picture?
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2008
4:03 AM

Post #4599120

YEA!! That is wonderful - keep us posted on this new baby!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
4:03 AM

Post #4599125

The spider looking part is green coming right out from the seed then turns to white. I did get a pic, but it is so small it is blurred.

Thumbnail by mistygardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
4:05 AM

Post #4599137

Thanks, Mitch! It is quite exciting!!!
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2008
4:08 AM

Post #4599152

Gives me hope to try my canna seeds here - might have to go digging them out... where would they be...
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
4:09 AM

Post #4599159

I just sat here at the computer the other day with a stiff fingernail file and scratched and scratched! HA HA HA I put it in the napkin and sprayed it and basically forgot, till tonight! TOO exciting!!!
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
4:11 AM

Post #4599169

Yeah the white part goes down, your picture jogged my memory!
I just planted a pride of barbados seed upside down(by mistake) a week or so ago and the root started growing out of the soil and so did the sprout! It grew down into the dirt and turned around and came back up!

Steven
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
4:12 AM

Post #4599173

HA HA HA Steven! That sounds like something I would do if I didn't ask first! ☻
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
4:24 AM

Post #4599220

And guess what?!?! It's doing the best out of the 3 seeds I planted!
not sure how that worked out but it's fine with me :)

Steven
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
4:26 AM

Post #4599230

How funny! I am going to try my hand with some more of the larger seeds to see if I can do it again!
Mitch, your article reminds me of how I am with my Purple Passions!!! I bought one at Christmas that was just beautiful, and I killed it! I had someone that sent me a cutting, rooted it in water, and promptly killed it! I love them, but they sure don't seem to care for me!!!
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
5:00 AM

Post #4599363

I've actualy had good luck this year, last year I tried and failed with a bunch of things...But so far so good this year! Lets see if we can keep it up! And that means me not poking in the soil to see if something sprouted :|

Steven
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 28, 2008
6:31 AM

Post #4599527

Misty your well on your way with the canna seed. You can place it in some potting soil just slightly covered. Give it good light and humidity and warm temps and it should grow up pretty fast. You have a idea which canna it is off of? I am getting ready to do the same here. I have been getting my seeds ready for the season. I am doing some experiments on them and I have a lot of very interesting hybrids seeds to work with this year as well. It should be a good year if the weather cooperates. Here is a pic of some of my seeds getting ready for spring. I think I have around 2000 give or take 1 or 2 :>)

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 28, 2008
6:50 AM

Post #4599552

Misty you may want to try this method for your seed or seeds it works great for me. Just take a clear 2 liter cut the top off right around the label and clean out put some good soil in the bottom around 3 inches and get it moist then set your seed on top of the soil. Place it in a warm bright area and it should grow well till spring were you can easily transplant it into a larger pot. Another old trick I really liked was these small round pots I could get and you take a clear plastic drinking cup and it would snap right into place similar to how you see venus flytraps sold. It was a great way to grow cuttings and seedlings. Only problems I had were they would out grow the cups really fast and fill it all up.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2008
12:27 PM

Post #4599832

but look at all that growth! I would die for seedlings/cuttings to look that great a filling the cup so fast... then would hate moving them over to bigger and better things... cant win them all I guess.
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2008
1:35 PM

Post #4600011

Hey Steve - you're growing pink pride too! we will have to compare notes during the growing season :o) I started mine 1/30

BTW though, I did have 3 seeds that are so hard even when soaked for several days and soaked in hot water etc...have you experienced that with any of yours? and if so, where you able to get them germinated?

This message was edited Feb 28, 2008 8:41 AM

Thumbnail by rednyr
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MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2008
1:38 PM

Post #4600018

Read the Palm article this morning... most of those are not hardy for me here but others looks like they might into zone 7 or 6 with some help!!!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
2:20 PM

Post #4600172

Good morning all, and thanks for your tips!!! I forgot to mention that this seed was NOT soaked for 24-48 hours, just sprayed the napkin and put it in there!!! I will probably be too busy today to get to any more seeds, but I WILL!!!
claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
2:34 PM

Post #4600234

mistygardener, I don't know if someone pointed this out already, but there's a good thread in the Trees and Shrubs forum about a tropical looking garden in zone 5.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/688851/
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
2:35 PM

Post #4600238

No, I don't believe I had seen that, thanks!!!
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

February 28, 2008
2:44 PM

Post #4600282

I will be out of town for a few days so will not be replying for awhile. Take care .
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
2:59 PM

Post #4600355

Thanks, Brian, you too!
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2008
3:39 PM

Post #4600583

misty,

Great going on those canna seeds. There were cannas planted here when we bought this property. They are the ones with the red, tubular flowers. When I was deadheading them I just threw the seeds off to the side in the grass. I'm not into growing from seeds stuff that takes years to bloom or worse yet months for the seeds to sprout. I was sure canna was in that category. Then I read here on DG that they are easy to sprout and bloom the first year from seed. Ack! I went back out and picked up all the seeds! LOL.

Here's a pic of them. The flowers are not as showy as some others but the hummingbirds absolutely love them.

Karen



Thumbnail by glendalekid
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mamajack
Fate, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2008
3:59 PM

Post #4600710

oh good grief...canna seed on top of the soil? what about that thing regarding planting according to the width and depth of the seed? maybe that's why i can't get canna seed to germinate. lol.
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2008
4:32 PM

Post #4600875

mamajack,

Isn't that amazing? I never would have thought of that either with a seed that large.

I had trouble getting lettuce to germinate. The instructions on the packages always say to plant 1/8" to 1/4" deep, covering the seeds. Then I found out apparently lettuce needs light to germinate, just press into the soil. Guess what, that works!

Karen

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
4:37 PM

Post #4600902

I just love Cannas, but I do prefer the red foliage as it is much prettier to look at, and you can have it in more of a shady area and still look pretty, even without the flowers!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 28, 2008
4:47 PM

Post #4600946

Ok everyone, here is the link to "Hot Plants for Cool Climates".

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/818512/

Please lets continue to chat here, but only post pertinent information on that thread.

Thanks to everyone who is giving all the wonderful input!!!!

Tammy
NYVOICES99
Corning, NY
(Zone 5a)

February 28, 2008
7:16 PM

Post #4601583

Not sure if anyone has said: Dracunculus Vulgaris?
Forgot the link:)
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2034/

This message was edited Feb 28, 2008 2:23 PM
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
7:41 PM

Post #4601654

Red, I nic'd or more like chipped away at my seeds with nail clippers, those POB seeds are so hard and have a couple seed coats as well. theres the outside which is light brown and the inside which darker brown. Once you chip through those you can see the white on the inside. This has been the same with most other hard seeds I've tried. On flat seeds I used nail clippers and on round ones I use a nail file and then out them in a damp coffee filter in a baggie until they sprout roots. Heres some of the notes I've made so far http://davesgarden.com/tools/journal/viewbycat.php?cat=58756 I need to take some more pictures as they've grown alot in the last few days!

Steven
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2008
7:52 PM

Post #4601684

Steven, the link was empty...
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
9:26 PM

Post #4601961

http://davesgarden.com/community/journals/viewentry/178232/ here it is again, hopefully it'll work this time! Just some basic notes
joegee
Bucyrus, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2008
10:05 PM

Post #4602070

The plants I have listed:

jasminum x stephanense, Stephan's jasmine http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/80118/
gelsemium sempervirens, Carolina jessamine "Margarita" http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/132696/
dioscorea oppositifolia, cinnamon vine http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/53822/
yucca rostrata "Sapphire Skies" http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/59706/
albizia julibrissin, mimosa http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1764/
pawlonia tomentosa, empress tree http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/391/
poncirus trifoliata, Japanese bitter orange http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/55494/
phyllostachys aureosulcata, yellow grove bamboo http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/81044/
mirabilis jalapa, four o'clock (returns from the roots) http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/92/
opuntia humifusa, eastern prickly pear http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/62234/
musa basjoo, basjoo banana http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1251/
rhaphidophyllum hystrix, needle palm http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/57180/
gardenia jasminoides "Kleim's Hardy" http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/79807/
gardenia jasminoides "Chuck Hayes" http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/151232/
lagerstroemia indica, crape myrtle http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1/
trachycarpus fortuneii, windmill palm http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2255/
sabal minor, "McCurtain" palmetto http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/133718/
hippeastrum johnsonii, hardy amaryllis http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/56501/
magnolia macrophyllum, big leaf magnolia http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/80566/
ligularia stenocephala, Japanese ligularia http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/51577/
euphorbia cyathophera, summer poinsettia http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/641/
dracunculis vulgarum, voodoo lily http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2034/
arum italicum, Italian arum http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1759/
arisaema triphyllum, Jack in the Pulpit http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/160657/
arisaema candidissimum, cobra lily http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1082/
passiflora caerulea or passiflora lutea, hardy passion flower http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1264/ , http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/58221/
akebia quinata, five-leafed akebia http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/369/
actinidia kolomikta, Arctic beauty kiwi http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/796/
asarum arifolium, evergreen ginger http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2025/
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 29, 2008
12:41 AM

Post #4602643

Hi all, is my link not working that I posted earlier?
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 29, 2008
12:52 AM

Post #4602682

yes m'am it does work! :o) I bet it was just overlooked to post links there
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 29, 2008
12:56 AM

Post #4602702

Well I hope no one decides they want to shoot me because you can't copy and paste the links, they won't work! ☻
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 29, 2008
1:01 AM

Post #4602726

i know i just tried that too so I could puts joes over there...I had to quickly go back and edit my post LOL perhaps it will work if you are the original poster
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 29, 2008
1:03 AM

Post #4602737

HE HE HE Red, way too funny!
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 29, 2008
1:06 AM

Post #4602759

I tried it again by pasting from a word doc..but alas...it did not work LOL
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 29, 2008
1:07 AM

Post #4602761

What is the old saying? Try, and try again, till you get it right! HA HA HA
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

February 29, 2008
1:16 AM

Post #4602800

ummm I believe that is what got me four children...
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 29, 2008
1:17 AM

Post #4602809

HA HA HA HA HA Well, I have three myself, so maybe that is what happened!!!!
joegee
Bucyrus, OH
(Zone 6a)

February 29, 2008
8:03 AM

Post #4603981

I got it. Edit the entry, then you can cut n paste. Thanks for re-pointing out the new thread. This thread has gotten rather, um, long-ish, and I missed your previous reference. :)

-Joe
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 29, 2008
2:29 PM

Post #4604460

Thanks, Joe! I was unaware we could do it that way. Yes, it is long, isn't it, but that is a good thing! smile
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

February 29, 2008
3:31 PM

Post #4604645

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/85449/
These are beautiful with the flowers, but I wonder why the ones I was always stepping on barefoot as a kid never looked like this?!!! HA HA HA
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2008
3:28 AM

Post #4607239

I shall leave Princess Tammys 9:29 post alone...it's not easy...but ...I must behave...
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

March 1, 2008
3:31 AM

Post #4607257

Hehehe!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 1, 2008
3:33 AM

Post #4607267

OMG ROTFLMAO!!! I never ever thought of that!!!!!
I am about to fall outa my chair laughing!!!!
mamajack
Fate, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2008
3:34 AM

Post #4607276

why is that rednyr? i wouldn't leave it alone. what'd she do? have you seen the way she spells "hee"? and that firefox thing...i don't get it. how do i find that? and why would i want to?
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 1, 2008
3:37 AM

Post #4607292

Now Mama, how did I know you would have to chime in and be ornery!!! HA HA HA
mamajack
Fate, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2008
3:43 AM

Post #4607317

well i wanna know what you did. and i was hopin' to get to see a little public humiliation if i could. lol.

look at kimarj...she spells hee just like you. now how do you spell tee when you write it with hee? tehetehe now you know that ain't right.
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2008
3:44 AM

Post #4607323

oh my it's friday nite isn't it..everyones asleep and I feel the need to go visit bluestone or plants delights..someone hold me back please...after parks last week I just need to get the scissors out

I must say Mr.Joes list is very impressive...I have several of his listed items started right now... I'm sitting here thinking just how you cover the windmill palm to get it to survive the OH winters! How long have you had the different palms? needle etc would you mind sharing how or if you do cover them in the winter...pics? thanks!!
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2008
3:47 AM

Post #4607333

mama- ain't it though! that is an expression I have come to love down here in the south...it's right up there with - "thaaat's raght" and "you a mess" :o)
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

March 1, 2008
3:47 AM

Post #4607334

I learnt it from Tammy :)
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 1, 2008
3:50 AM

Post #4607350

Here Mama, just for you! TEE HEE HEE
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/editpost.php?pid=4604460
Shame on you, Kim! LOL
rednyr
Sumter, SC
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2008
3:51 AM

Post #4607355

Kim after growing up in upstate NY and living in the midwest for numerous years living in the south has been a whole lotta cool!
mamajack
Fate, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2008
3:57 PM

Post #4612401

now misty, what was that that you sent me? i'm a little slow so you gotta spell it out to me.

and red, it's been a long time since i heard those words. thanks for the memories.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 2, 2008
4:02 PM

Post #4612422

Now Now mama! HA HA HA
mamajack
Fate, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2008
4:11 PM

Post #4612452

you know i just thought of something...over on that thread (or is it this one?) where we are writing what hardy tropical we can grow...i don't think any information that i can give is going to be useful to most of those folks. i can use what they say though. but that's why i have nothing to say over there.

aw-rite, yall ain't gonna tell me anything i can see. so i ain't gonna play witchall any more. so there. :PPPpPPPPP
what keys do you use to make that dang smiley face?
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 2, 2008
4:20 PM

Post #4612499

You are still welcome to lurk, and be your ornery self! LOL I usually don't use the smiley with the tongue, that is our Miss Robbi! :p I think it is?
cat64129
(Cathy), MO

March 2, 2008
4:29 PM

Post #4612526

It's a capital P Miss Tammy. Lauri taught me how to use it for mark one day. LOL Hi mamajack. Keep Miss Tammy in line!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 2, 2008
6:40 PM

Post #4612983

Thanks for clearing that up Miss Cathy! :P
weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

March 2, 2008
9:29 PM

Post #4613488

Does anybody know if nelumbo lutea water lotsu seeds are supposed to float? I thought bad seeds float, but they keep floating one by one.
plantaholic186
Winnetka, IL

March 2, 2008
9:47 PM

Post #4613536

I don't think that's a problem. When I started seeds, after sanding the coats, the seeds would stay at the bottom of the container for a few days, then float for a day or two, and then sink down and begin germinating. Maybe they float until the water can get in? Seeds are generally something like 2% water, and Nelumbo coats are wickedly thick, so maybe they'll float until you sand or nick the coat.
weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

March 2, 2008
11:37 PM

Post #4613897

Oh, I've sanded the coating. It's good to know that what they are doing is normal then. I won't toss them in the trash then. How about this one. Does a poinsettia "poison" the soil it has been in? I have been told maybe not. I transplanted some catmint seedlings in the same potting soil as the poinsettia was in and they are dying off quite fast. They were happy in a seedling cluster before. I thinned them thinking that might sold it, but nope. You are right plantaholic, the seeds did stay at the bottom of the jar for a couple of days. When they germinate, are they black to begin with? I think I see a bump where they were sanded on some and it is the same color as the seed.
plantaholic186
Winnetka, IL

March 3, 2008
2:03 AM

Post #4614537

Black? Do you mean the seed coat? I went through three batches of seeds before I could get them to sprout, and that was after I sanded deeply enough that I could see a clearly defined white 'spot'. Once they start germination, you should see the seed coat start to crack, like in my pic below. The shoot coming out won't be black, though. I posted this pic in a different thread. Note how big and deep my sanding was. I had no luck if I sanded on the side of the seed, only at the end. Good luck!

Thumbnail by plantaholic186
Click the image for an enlarged view.

weedsfree
Magna, UT
(Zone 7a)

March 3, 2008
2:07 AM

Post #4614558

Thanks. I guess I will have to try again.
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

March 4, 2008
5:47 PM

Post #4621788

misty and joegee thankyou so much for all of the listings. This is so strange because I was just talking with another member and saying I wish I knew what tropicals I could grow, and here it is.
Misty thanks so much for the thread.
bwilliams thanks so much for getting all of this started. I haven't looked up all of your listings yet , but I will.

Thanks to everyone who has listed a plantfile tropical. For us that are new to it, and have no idea even what to look up, this is wonderful.

More pics and plantfile references please please.

Debbie
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

March 4, 2008
5:49 PM

Post #4621797

Does anyone know where I can source a Cordyline tri color?

Debbie
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 4, 2008
5:49 PM

Post #4621799

Debbie, glad to be able to do this for all of us! I just wish everyone would come back out of hibernation and start posting again!!!
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

March 4, 2008
7:05 PM

Post #4622031

Back from my wonderful trip to SC. They look to already be starting spring there. I got to visit a 750 acre nursery and walk around charleston.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 4, 2008
7:29 PM

Post #4622102

WOW Brian! You have pics, right? :) I am sure all our mouths would water over pics from a 750 acre nursery!!!!
bwilliams
Louisville, KY

March 4, 2008
7:33 PM

Post #4622132

The nursery was huge and the owners were extremely generous. Here is a pic inside one of the many greenhouses. While I was their I found them a Yellow variegated basjoo hidden among the others growing. They were extremely happy that I found it.

Thumbnail by bwilliams
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 4, 2008
8:16 PM

Post #4622269

WOW How could you find anything hidden in amongst all of that!?! I bet they were happy, I know I woulda been, for sure!!! :)
1cros3nails4gvn
Bluffton, SC
(Zone 9a)

March 4, 2008
8:28 PM

Post #4622311

bwilliams, yes, we do start spring alittle earlier than yall here... usually by valentines day you can see hints of red on the maples and the redbuds' buds getting considerably fatter... and yet we still complain about winter!
plantaholic186
Winnetka, IL

March 4, 2008
10:35 PM

Post #4622688

Brian- where is this enormous nursery? I'm going down to Charleston next weekend, and would love to sniff around places that have plants I can't get yet.
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 5, 2008
2:49 AM

Post #4623819

Hey Brian, I would greatly appreciate it if you would go here and give me your opinion on this!

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/820392/
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 9, 2008
4:18 AM

Post #4640724

Where did everyone run to? We were going so strong there for a while and now it is just dead! :(
7oaks
Wymore, NE
(Zone 5a)

March 9, 2008
1:57 PM

Post #4641478

Lurking around and trying to decide what new and exciting plants we want to try this year!
kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2008
2:04 PM

Post #4641516

Hey Tammy!! I am going to the show :) I will be sure to take lots of pics.

Thumbnail by kimarj
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ginnylynn
Blyth, ON
(Zone 5b)

March 9, 2008
2:08 PM

Post #4641527

Still here. Maybe everyone who started with you here has just already given their input for what we can grow in our zones and we need to capture some new blood :-)
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 9, 2008
4:40 PM

Post #4642132

I am contemplating making a PVC "cage" over part of my back deck next year as temporary winter protection instead of wintering plants inside. Has anyone had any experience doing this? How well did it work? Also, would it be more effective to use greenhouse plastic or frost cloth?

Thanks,

Karen
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

March 9, 2008
5:52 PM

Post #4642447

What would be great and sooo helpful to those of us who are so new to tropical is this.

A picture so we can see at a glance if it will work for us
A plantfile link to it
A description of your experience in your zone with the plant

I have read soo much on so many threads. Looked up whenever a name is given. Tried to do research. But it all gets really confusing. If you guys and girls would bless us with these suggestions, this would be a saveable, printable reference for all of us. If you have already posted on this thread in words, please post again with the pic,link,and your experience.

Thank ya'll so much for sharing all this wonderful knowledge

Debbie

Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

March 9, 2008
6:23 PM

Post #4642565

Ok I'll start.

Canary Island Date Palm http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/738922/
I planted it in the middle of my new rose garden. LOL Little did I know that it will get about 40 ft tall and 4 ft around the trunk. Oh well, I love it and if it gets too big, I'll just move the roses. Plant files say zone 9a (which I just found out with the new zoning we are 9a) to 20 degrees. I also checked with LSU AG center which says the Canary Island Date Palm can take up to 15 degrees in our area.

Thumbnail by Debbie2007
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 9, 2008
6:35 PM

Post #4642626

I saw your pic over on the rose forum I think it was and I was wondering what that palm was, It's so cool looking. I would not be able to take a forty foot palm into the house darn it. Maybe I can keep it short and make a dwarf out of it.
Debbie2007
Port Vincent, LA
(Zone 8b)

March 9, 2008
6:48 PM

Post #4642678

Yucca Cane elephantipes http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/734/

And these two little short Yucca cuties will grow to about 20 ft. Well, they are cute.LOL


Thanks Robyn

Thumbnail by Debbie2007
Click the image for an enlarged view.

mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 9, 2008
6:51 PM

Post #4642697

Hi all! Glad to see ya back!!!!
Karen, my green house is built on our back deck and it is working out great. We are going to extend it to be on the whole thing so it will be good sized then. We just used 2x2's and the heavy plastic from Wally World as you can't find any good plastic at Lowe's for some reason here. For the roof we used 1x2's and covered with plastic. But I am planning to use some of that blue styro board insulation on the inside of the roof to help retain heat. It gets almost all day sun, so it shouldn't interfere too much with the light that comes in. I can't wait to get it extended cause now I have pots sitting all around the floor and no room to walk anymore! :oP
Forgot to add that we used the blue styro board on the floor, too.

May Princess Kathy have a great day!

This message was edited Mar 9, 2008 1:52 PM

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 9, 2008
6:53 PM

Post #4642706

You're welcome. They are all going to be vying for the same attention. Very pretty garden.

Robynznest

Robynznest
Pittsburg, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 9, 2008
6:54 PM

Post #4642715

Tammy this thread is getting toooooooo loooonnnnnggggg!
mistygardener
Saint James, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 9, 2008
6:59 PM

Post #4642737

Ok, per Robin's request, here is our new thread! :oP

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/822024/

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