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Article: Fungi As Your Garden Partners - Enlisting the T-22 to Terminate Root Pathogens: I always enjoy your articles

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Forum: Article: Fungi As Your Garden Partners - Enlisting the T-22 to Terminate Root PathogensReplies: 8, Views: 48
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Illoquin
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2008
9:52 AM

Post #4594907

Dear LariAnn,

I always enjoy your articles - you have a unique way of making even the dullest topics very interesting.

Suzy

P.S. That last B&W image should be an ad for an upscale dancing school.
LariAnn
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 27, 2008
10:51 PM

Post #4597740

Suzy,

Thanks so much for the compliment and encouragement! I like to share the wonder I experience when I learn new and (to me) exciting things about my plants.

LOL about the B&W pic comment!

LariAnn
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

July 26, 2010
9:26 AM

Post #7997952

Very interesting. I am just getting into 'better gardening through organics' but still use some of the chemical stuff on occasion. One of the all time resistant pests are leaf curlers. I have paid a fortune for neem oil and BT, used in combination with everything from liquid dish soap to cayenne peppar. The BT was applied both topically and as a root drench to try to control the beasties systemically. They still infest my bushes and trees. Perhaps not as badly, but they are there. Any suggestions. I did start my applications just as the leaf buds appeared and then after they popped.
LariAnn
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 26, 2010
9:31 AM

Post #7997967

Unfortunately, BT does not work systemically and if the little pests don't eat anything that has the BT on it, they won't be affected by the BT. Neem oil likewise has to hit the actual pest or it will not have any effect. If the beasties are hiding within rolled or curled up leaves, they will be protected from those control measures.

Just to be sure we are talking about the same thing, are these leaf curlers little caterpillars that roll the leaves up around them?
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2010
7:05 AM

Post #8004150

Yup. they lay eggs, look like butterfly catepillars at first (green), then you find what look like somewhat larger black ones later. Jeff Lowenfels says that they cycle from the ground around the bush or tree, up to the tree, then drop back down to the dirt. Wouldn't a systemic killer work? the idea being it is taken up through the roots of the plant and into the 'fabric' if you will of the plant which the beasties then eat?

Thanks for any help. I hate to think I am spending literally hundreds of dollars on stuff that doesn't work

Mary Stella
LariAnn
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 29, 2010
11:57 AM

Post #8004710

Mary,

Yes, a true systemic would work, but the challenge is finding one. The best ones were restricted pesticides that have been taken off the market. I remember when I could make up a tank mix of Metasystox R and Lannate and take out anything that moved on my plants, even if the pests showed up after I sprayed. Lannate is still available but to licensed applicators only. Metasystox R is not available any more.

Now I wish I could recommend a pesticide or control measure that would work. At this time I use Merit for general pests if necessary but I don't know if that is labeled for leaf rollers. I have Lannate and that certainly does the job, but I know you can't get it without a license (which I have). For small infestations, "two bricks" works well, but for acreage or large plantings that would be impractical.
LariAnn
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2010
3:30 PM

Post #8005143

I appreciate the info. I never know if I have the 'full story' and so keep throwing money at it. Jeff says that if you can spray down your trees and bushes right before they leaf out and really soak the ground you stand a fighting chance. I did that using BT and Neem Oil, so maybe the infestation this year is less than it might otherwise have been.

Do you sell plants or seeds? And also, which do you find to be the hardiest of the delphiniums.

How's your weather down there. We are all turning into mushrooms up here with the rain. It seems like summer has barely unfolded and now we are looking at fall on its heels. But I couldn't handle the heat and humidity you all have. I correspond with a lady who moved there from New York. she is my Koi fish and pond guru. So we swap weather news.
Regards, Mary

Thumbnail by Oberon46
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LariAnn
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 29, 2010
6:12 PM

Post #8005425

Mary,

I do sell plants, but they are tropical to ultra-tropical, so unless you have a well heated greenhouse with lighting (for the long winter nights) you wouldn't be able to grow them there. I've never grown or had Delphiniums so I can't advise you about them.

The weather here is brutal now - 90s and sometimes high humidity and/or no wind. I wish for some thunderstorms just for respite, but certainly don't want to see any hurricanes. However, because of the plants I love and grow, I need to be in an area like this. The snow is very pretty and still winter nights with snow are magical, but most of the time in the bitter cold you have to be inside a heated home! I grew up in Maryland and remember how it was on snowy still nights. You could hear the soft sound of snowflakes landing. I also spent a year in Minnesota so know what bitter cold is. One year was enough - I headed straight for south Florida after that and I've been here ever since.

Kind regards,
LariAnn
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

July 31, 2010
10:02 PM

Post #8010175

I grew up in Fairbanks, Alaska. Think -50 to -60 with long stretches of -34 to -40. Ice fog so thick you can't see one car length ahead in winter. I bundled up my son when he was about two years old and put him in a sled to go across the street to the store rather than fight with a car. it is much more mild now, even in Fairbanks. I cherish my memories of growing up in such a harsh place. Memories are ever so much better than the reality. lol. But it tends to put life in perspective. Packing snow in a tin tub to melt on an oil stove to bath in or wash dishes in. A five gallon tar bucket in the far corner for a latrine. Only for one winter, but still and all special memories. Weird I know. But it gives perspective on life.
Regards,
Mary

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Other Article: Fungi As Your Garden Partners - Enlisting the T-22 to Terminate Root Pathogens Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Absolutely fascinating! doccat5 2 Feb 28, 2008 12:04 AM
More research with T22 starlight1153 1 Feb 28, 2008 1:53 AM
Using T-22 Indy 2 Mar 8, 2008 9:17 PM
soil health mableruth 3 Jun 16, 2010 6:55 PM
Concern about BT the_naturalist 1 Jul 26, 2010 3:40 PM


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