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Article: The Invaders: Milkweed: I'm glad there was a happy ending!

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Forum: Article: The Invaders: MilkweedReplies: 19, Views: 165
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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2008
12:07 PM

Post #4641197

I've been carefully growing some asclepias from seed, as they don't grow wild in the city, and by one-third of the way through your article I was ready to cry! I'm very glad there was a happy ending and that I'm growing the right kind of Asclepias. Thank you, Lois, for a well-written article that was both relevant and packed with suspense! xx, Carrie
DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2008
2:36 PM

Post #4641614

A timely warning! I have a few butterfly weeds tucked away from the main gardens, but they too tend to produce scions which pop up in unexpected places. Luckily, they are fairly easy to pull up when young. I tried transplanting the strays to more distant locations but they did not transplant well, probably because I did not get the entire taproot.
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

March 9, 2008
2:45 PM

Post #4641650

Very nice article.
LTilton
Glen Ellyn, IL
(Zone 5b)

March 9, 2008
2:52 PM

Post #4641682

Don, I have read that they do root easily, though I have never tried it myself, being in no need of more milkweeds.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 9, 2008
3:43 PM

Post #4641879

My experience with common milkweed has been exactly the same. I am selectively pulling the shoots and leaving some because I do like the scent and bees.
ladygardener1
Near Lake Erie, NW, PA
(Zone 5a)

March 9, 2008
4:28 PM

Post #4642064

I have both Common (Syriaca) and the Tuberosa milkweed, The common one self-seeded in my back yard. The Tuberosa I grew from seed myself.
I have noticed that the monarchs prefer the common milkweed, I have never seen any activity on the Tuberosa. So I will just deal with the common and enjoy looking for M cats to raise and release.

Good article.
LTilton
Glen Ellyn, IL
(Zone 5b)

March 9, 2008
5:04 PM

Post #4642242

I wonder if the monarchs would go to the Tuberosa if the Syriaca weren't available right there.
Pamgarden
Central, VA
(Zone 7b)

March 9, 2008
5:15 PM

Post #4642283

Personal experience was that monarchs line up for both the asclep and the tuberosa. DH and I used to run all over Orlando looking for plants to try to keep up with the M cats during their breeding season.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2008
5:20 PM

Post #4642306

Monarch butterflies lining up, in my garden. Well, well, well. x, Carrie
Dea
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2008
7:56 PM

Post #4642925

Great article - we pull the shoots as they appear. Great plant for the Monarchs.
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 10, 2008
3:39 AM

Post #4644692

If you ever want to put milkweed in a flower arrangement take a lit match to the cut end of stem.
Put it in water, it goes from limp to very pretty. Like magic.
Sidney
LTilton
Glen Ellyn, IL
(Zone 5b)

March 10, 2008
9:58 AM

Post #4645223

Neat tip!
Annepaola
Manahawkin, NJ
(Zone 7a)

March 10, 2008
1:54 PM

Post #4645663

The warning about common milkweed is well taken. I have had the same experience but there are over 100 types of milkweed to plant, and the monarchs and other milkweed butterflies are said to prefer the tropical milkweed (blood flower) and the swamp milkweek to lay their eggs because the growth of the leaves is more tender for thier cats. I have butterfly weed and I like it but in my yard I have never seen a butterfly nectaring or hosting on it.
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 10, 2008
2:14 PM

Post #4645804

I have tried time and again to grow butterfly weed. No such luck.
valzone5
Mountain Top, PA

March 10, 2008
3:33 PM

Post #4646094

I want to start my Swamp Milkweed seeds (Asclepias Incarnata that I understood was the common one) indoors soon and now that I've read all of these comments, my question is: if I plant it on the far side of our small creek, will it jump over it into my beautifully arranged shade garden? Or is Incarnata not too invasive? And from Spring Hill I ordered tuberosa plants, and just to be sure, it will NOT spread? Thanks for any advice!! Valerie
LTilton
Glen Ellyn, IL
(Zone 5b)

March 10, 2008
4:29 PM

Post #4646301

Jumping the creek might be a bit much for it, and it does prefer sun. Of course you can't say what the seeds will do, but seeds can come from anywhere.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 10, 2008
6:11 PM

Post #4646676

Luckily for me, there is only one area will they grow on our property--at the edge of the woods, where we don't do any gardening. We have the swamp milkweed (it does smell heavenly!), and the pretty orange one. I have saved some seeds and plan to clear some of the weeds near them so that there will be room for more to grow.

We don't have a lawn, and due to the abundance of rocks, clay, and tree roots here, our gardens are in containers. I would be upset if they took over a lawn and lovely gardens, too!
LTilton
Glen Ellyn, IL
(Zone 5b)

March 10, 2008
7:12 PM

Post #4646865

I think the common milkweed, the pink one, is the really invasive one.

And in my case, I let them go too long before realizing they were getting out of hand. The key seems to be not letting them get started out of the area where you want them.
Pamgarden
Central, VA
(Zone 7b)

March 11, 2008
5:58 PM

Post #4650914

I started out in Orlando (z9) with a plant in a gallon container of tuberosa from the farmer's market. I'm thinking I must have grown some from seed because they are such prolific seeders, but what I was successful with was cuttings. I don't recall that it was ever invasive. I know I had more M-cats than plants to go around, so I'm thinking they weren't invasive because they got eaten to the ground. They were a little weedy and lanky looking, but I kept them in one area, so I didn't mind. More important to keep those monarchs going than to look perfect. What I've seen here in VA is the common milkweed in the field and they are generally cut down in June before they flower. But they grow back quite quickly so I will have to keep an eye out.
cedar18
Lula, GA
(Zone 7b)

March 12, 2008
7:58 PM

Post #4655322

Thank you for your article and for saving me from the same mistake. I have transplanted many wildflowers in our rural area and would have tried milkweed too. We also have A. tuberosa wild and I'll stick with that (although I do grow it from seed since it's supposed to be difficult to transplant). Especially timely since I spent today pulling up variegated vinca that yes, seemed like a good idea at the time!

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