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Article: Quest for the Ultimate Ground Cover: Wonderful "tapestry" you're "weaving"!

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rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2008
11:25 AM

Post #4649740

Once again lovely photos and a great article :) Sad to report I "lost" my 'Buttered Popcorn' - probably from over-zealous DH with Roundup! I watch him closely with my Epimediums however, one of my favorites as a ground cover :)
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

March 11, 2008
11:34 AM

Post #4649751

Nice article with some great ideas; I feel zone suggestions would be helpful.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 11, 2008
11:55 AM

Post #4649778

Good suggestions/ideas, Victor! I'm now at a place where my garden takes too much mulch so your article is very timely for me. Thanks. I love Creeping Jenny, had forgotten all about it. I had sweet woodruff as a shade ground cover around my hostas in a previous home.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

March 11, 2008
12:19 PM

Post #4649825

Great article...I have been searching for ground covers to replace mulch as I have several large areas that take way to much mulch and time.
DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2008
2:17 PM

Post #4650170

Nice article, Vic. Besides geraniums, I have been using thyme as ground cover. Takes some foot traffic and nice spring flowers, but turns brown in winter in Zone 6. Mother of thyme is shorter, and works well around stepping stones, and stays greener longer in winter.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2008
2:23 PM

Post #4650186

Eventually, I think each of us must find our own solutions, although each of your suggestions is valuable, Victor! A ground cover which is perfect in a pot in the sun on one side of the house takes over and plans world domination or languishes, near death, in the damper shade on the other side.

I, too, have never cared for pachysandra, but I very nearly bought it (under another name) based on the glowing description given somewhere. I think the moral of this story (and many other garden stories) is that a garden is a living, breathing work in progress!

xxx, Carrie
Dea
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2008
3:38 PM

Post #4650502

Looking forward to seeing future photos of your living mosaics ground covers. Lovely article Victor :)

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 11, 2008
3:41 PM

Post #4650509

A very beautifully painted picture you give us with your living tapestry, Victor.
And I do love my Creeping Jenny, I sometimes even grow it in pots just for its hanging effect.
Thanks for all the information, well done as always.
robcorreia
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

March 11, 2008
5:41 PM

Post #4650866

I bought a flat of creeping Jenny and Baby Tears and planted them 1ft apart. Did I spread them too much? It's taking forever! How do you guys space new groundcover plantings?

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

March 11, 2008
6:32 PM

Post #4651012

Thanks all! Rob - that's plenty close enough for Jenny. Is it getting enough water? They do need water.
bigcityal
Menasha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 11, 2008
7:27 PM

Post #4651198

Good useful information Victor. There are enough options out there for everyone to try some.
DiggerDee
Ffld County, CT
(Zone 6b)

March 11, 2008
8:57 PM

Post #4651481

Great article Victor! I love ground covers, and think I need to find one or two per bed instead of the many mixes I have. Or maybe even just one or two, period, and make some kind of continuous, connecting pattern in my whole yard.

I've planted golden creeping jenny in a pot, but as of yet am too nervous to let it loose. I have to admit to being afraid of some of the others you mentioned, like the ranunculus, but man, it is awfully pretty, isn't it?

Your June hostas and creeping jenny are gorgeous!
grampapa
Wheatfield, NY
(Zone 6a)

March 12, 2008
12:18 AM

Post #4652150

A valuable article. thank you, Victor. I, too, would very much like to replace my mulch with groundcovers. I've never tried the creeping Jenny, but I should. It's very pretty. I have a lot of varieties of creeping thyme. Most are evergreen for me in z6. I planted one woolly thyme and it is now over 3' wide, so don't dismiss it as being just for filler.

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

March 12, 2008
12:32 AM

Post #4652197

Thanks. Maybe I'll give thyme a try too.
roybird
Santa Fe, NM

March 12, 2008
12:50 AM

Post #4652267

Good article. One thing to think about is whether the ground cover will actually end up taking water from other plants. I guess it depends on what kinds of plants, zone, etc. I find the lambs ears very invasive but easy to pull up. I also have violets that are tough as nails and invasive, but bee magnets. and I like bees. Trial and error.

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

March 12, 2008
1:05 AM

Post #4652385

That is something to watch, roy. More of a problem in your part of the country.
gessiegail
Taft, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 12, 2008
2:06 AM

Post #4652822

nice article and thanks. We can't grow the plants you mentioned except creeping jenny if someone has a pond. One of our very best ground covers in either shade or sun is wedelia. I noticed at the church last Sunday it was just beautiful and thick with the yellow blooms. I had heard that wedelia wouldn't get thick enough to get rid of the weeds, but it is doing a good job at the church.

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

March 12, 2008
2:12 AM

Post #4652835

Thank you. I am not familiar with that one. A quick search on PlantFiles shows a few people saying it's quite invasive in FL. You really have to check how things grow in your area and then watch it closely when you try it as an experiment in your garden.
gessiegail
Taft, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 12, 2008
2:15 AM

Post #4652849

It can be very invasive here and needs to be trimmed just like everything else in zone 9. I had it planted in Houston for years and it is the prettiest plant. We just use a weed eater around the edges of the beds they are planted in. (which would have to be done anyway in our zone with anything planted)

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

March 12, 2008
2:19 AM

Post #4652862

That's funny - it's different world in zone 9 compared to 6!
gessiegail
Taft, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 12, 2008
2:12 PM

Post #4654145

I lived in zone 6 for 11 years and what I grew in the summer there was what I grow in the winter here. It is two different growing conditions totally. You won't find true perennials here. I miss them.

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