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Article: Spiderwebs, Spiderwort, and Aunt Bett: Loved it! Another great adventure!

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Forum: Article: Spiderwebs, Spiderwort, and Aunt BettReplies: 40, Views: 198
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Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 10, 2008
5:52 AM

Post #4785618

Thanks, Sharon.

Now you have me wanting to dye things blue (my favorite color!).

Have never eaten spiderwort but I'll give it a try, and let you know if you've missed out on a special delicacy all these years!

Shoe
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

April 10, 2008
10:01 AM

Post #4785747

Thanks for another lovely chapter!!

pixie62560

pixie62560
South China, ME
(Zone 5a)

April 10, 2008
11:24 AM

Post #4785863

One of my favorite flowers too but not sure I want to eat it! Another great story, your so lucky to have had an Aunt Bett!!
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

April 10, 2008
12:14 PM

Post #4786061

My first Spiderwort bloomed yesterday, and I had been waiting for it:). They are my favorites, too, and seem to be spreading, much to my delight! Thanks for a great story, but I don't think I can eat them, either. Shoe, will you let us know when you massacre, uh, I mean Harvest them?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 10, 2008
12:37 PM

Post #4786138

I join the list of those who love spiderwort, and have reservations about eating it! I, too, shall wait for Shoe's proclamation, Aunt Bett notwithstanding. :)
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

April 10, 2008
2:07 PM

Post #4786556

My spiderwort has begun blooming. It is one of my favorite flowers. Thanks for the series of articles.
Soulja
Louisville, KY

April 10, 2008
2:16 PM

Post #4786610

DEEELIGHTFUL!!! Aunt Bett, Medicine Woman. No wonder you turned out so good.

You really do describe that landscape so I can be there too Shar. The Eastern Ky Hills & Mountains must have been a magical place to grow up. And some people are just born gardening. You are lucky to be able to go back there in such a cerebral and visceral way, and we're lucky to accompany you. I'm sweating in my Asphidity bag right now!

Whew, there I just took the dern thing off!!!


Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 10, 2008
3:22 PM

Post #4786955

Shoe, hello! I am so glad you enjoyed the "blue" part of the article. Just be careful what you dye! I want to see pictures!

Dutchlady and Pixie...still my favorite flower, too and I have several clusters in my gardens, but no...I would not ever eat them.

Margo and flowrlady, I am jealous because you have blooms. I think I still have a couple weeks to go, but mine is really tall and strong already.

You can take the asphidity bag off now, Soulja...it is only for when you need protection from the mountain creatures that you might need it. I doubt any have invaded Louisville. But do keep it close by, cause you never know.

So glad you all are enjoying following Aunt Bett and me. I really do miss those crazy mountain journeys. I have read and written so much about her recently that I can hear her voice in my mind when I take a look at a new plant that has just popped out of the ground.

Thank you for your kind and fun words.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 10, 2008
3:29 PM

Post #4786997

Darius, I think of you when writing these articles because you are living right now in the mountains that I love, and not too far from where I wandered those years ago. And you are probably familiar with all the flowers that grew along those ridges. Thank you for reading the articles, I do appreciate your comments.

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 10, 2008
4:07 PM

Post #4787165

You make meI wish I would have had an Aunt Bett!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 10, 2008
4:21 PM

Post #4787211

If I could I would share mine with you, Nanny. I wish I still had her around, too. I wonder what she would have thought of this world today?
tucsonjill
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5a)

April 10, 2008
5:06 PM

Post #4787420

Thanks for sharing Aunt Bett with us again! Always enjoy your stories!

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


April 10, 2008
11:07 PM

Post #4788947

Another lovely story. Aunt Bett's legacy continues to grow.

victorgardener

victorgardener
Lower Hudson Valley, NY
(Zone 6b)

April 10, 2008
11:10 PM

Post #4788960

Another nice memory, Sharon. Thanks again! The dying looks like fun for kids.
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 10, 2008
11:12 PM

Post #4788973

lovely!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 11, 2008
2:35 AM

Post #4790119

Great fun! Thanks too for the recipes. I love the spiderworts and would sample them if someone else did the cooking. Believe I'll pass on the spiderwebs tho...

Glad to enjoy another Aunt Bett encounter, thank you!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 11, 2008
2:46 AM

Post #4790172

Thank you all so much. So glad you like Aunt Bett.

DonnieBrook

DonnieBrook
Southwest , NH
(Zone 5b)

April 11, 2008
6:45 PM

Post #4793105

I enjoyed this one very much, Sharon! My spiderwort comes back every year in NH, and I - like you - could never eat the lovely flowers. They are the most stunning color of blue. Thanks for taking the time to share your memories of Aunt Bett! Every new chapter is a delight! Louise
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 11, 2008
7:04 PM

Post #4793183

Thank you.
I have the wild spiderwort growing in my yard, too...lovely blue color. I have others as well, but they can't match the blue of the wild ones.

DonnieBrook

DonnieBrook
Southwest , NH
(Zone 5b)

April 11, 2008
7:12 PM

Post #4793217

Interesting, Sharon... I didn't realize that some are wild and others not. I bought mine years ago and it just keeps coming back!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 11, 2008
7:50 PM

Post #4793424

The wild is very small compared to that which you buy. The flower is a bright blue, and never varies in my experience. That is the way it was in the mountains, and here as well in the western part of the state. I have not researched it, but would guess the ones we buy have been cultivated. They are beautiful too, but slightly different from the ones that Aunt Bett and I gathered. I have more of them than I do of the wild.

Now Bee Balm doesn't change...except I only ever saw the red growing wild in the mountains. (Previous AB article) Dye can be made from the bee balm flower also. But the plant itself seems to always look the same, in the wild or in the nurseries.

Starzz

Starzz
Newcastle, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 11, 2008
11:20 PM

Post #4794533

I always learn something when I read your stories Sharon. Thanks for the delightful "ahhhh" moments.
You are lucky to have such treasured memories.
I grow spiderwort in my garden too..the cultivated kind.

Cheers,
Carol
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 11, 2008
11:25 PM

Post #4794558

Thanks, Carol...I do appreciate you!
adoresaiken
Clemmons, NC

April 14, 2008
5:46 PM

Post #4807611

I have some of the wild spiderwort in my garden. I "rescued" it from the side of a NC mountain road years ago and it spreads like crazy.

Every once in awhile, I have to thin it out or that is all I would have! I can't bear to throw it in the compost, so I give the plants to everyone that will take them!

Pat
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2008
9:45 PM

Post #4808665

Nice to know that, and rescuing is how I got my wild spiderwort, too.
I thought it needed a new home.

Thank you, Pat.
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

April 25, 2008
5:46 PM

Post #4862913

I have three colors of spiderwort growing at the mailbox. It is so beautiful in the morning. I also got a pink one from Yardbird last week, so I'll now have some pink, too. I love spiderwort.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 25, 2008
7:12 PM

Post #4863256

Me, too, FlowrLady...thanks.

DonnieBrook

DonnieBrook
Southwest , NH
(Zone 5b)

April 25, 2008
11:49 PM

Post #4864275

Mmmmmmmm, pink spiderwort??? Sounds really pretty!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 26, 2008
12:01 AM

Post #4864322

I haven't seen it in pink, DB, so I would guess it must be new.

DonnieBrook

DonnieBrook
Southwest , NH
(Zone 5b)

April 26, 2008
12:04 AM

Post #4864331

I may just have to do a search for some, Sharon. I think the pink would be so pretty mixed in with my lovely shade of blue flowers! I'm looking forward to getting back to the farm to see if mine is peeking through yet.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 26, 2008
12:17 AM

Post #4864381

It should be, mine is...I am talking about the wild blue...my purple and dark purple ones are huge but not in bloom yet.


FlowrLady, if you get the pink, I would love to see a picture.

DB, you leaving this week??

DonnieBrook

DonnieBrook
Southwest , NH
(Zone 5b)

April 26, 2008
12:33 AM

Post #4864461

We're leaving on Wednesday, Sharon. This is my last Friday night here for awhile! Now that we have a security system and a safe here, I'm able to leave with a bit more peace of mind. I'm also leaving the front of the house looking more "lived in" by leaving a wicker chair on the front porch with a very real-looking fake Boston fern. Also, we're leaving a car in the carport, so hopefully we'll fare better this time!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 26, 2008
1:25 AM

Post #4864720

Good for you! I am anxious to see pictures from your wonderful farmhouse. Safe trip to you...

DonnieBrook

DonnieBrook
Southwest , NH
(Zone 5b)

April 26, 2008
1:30 AM

Post #4864764

Thanks very much, Sharon. I'll be buried in garden clean-up for a bit, I'm sure, but it will be nice to be back up on the hill!! Hope you are enjoying your gardens as we speak!! Louise
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 26, 2008
1:35 AM

Post #4864805

sure am...lots of blooms. AND my first two roses are in bloom. Remember, this is my first year for roses.

DonnieBrook

DonnieBrook
Southwest , NH
(Zone 5b)

April 26, 2008
1:38 AM

Post #4864833

I'm hoping mine made it through the winter. I usually cover them with leaves in a cage...but didn't get to it in the fall. Gulp! Our favorite is a very old one from the 1800s.. That one is very hardy, and loves wood ash from our cook stove. Night night!!

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

June 24, 2009
2:50 AM

Post #6730103

I just now found this article, but this time last year I was transplanting spiderwort that came up volunteer in the narrow space between the alley and chainlink fence. They are currently blooming in my rose garden along with the daylilies that I transplanted from my mother's yard. However, the space by the alley is filled with even more spiderworts. I also have a weedy bright blue spiderwort that comes up volunteer in my flower and veggie beds. I don't know where it came from & I've lived here 20 years.

I love reading all of your articles as I find them very informative and entertaining.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 27, 2009
4:56 AM

Post #6744336

Greenbrain, Hello...
I have been traveling this week, and just now returned to enjoy your comment.
Aren't spiderwort just the neatest things. Those little bright blue scraggly things do finally catch on and take over and provide a great little show in some shady spots, don't they. I have them, too, as well as the larger cultivated species. I think my favorites are the little bright blues.

So good to hear from you, and thanks for reading the articles. I hope you continue to find them entertaining. And I hope your summer is going well. By the way, I was just in Chicago for a few days, goodness it was almost as hot there as it is here!

Sharon

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

June 27, 2009
7:17 PM

Post #6746095

Hi Sharon,

I'm no where near Chicago. I'm directly across the Mississippi River from downtown St. Louis, MO in an area called the American Bottom near Horseshoe Lake. I've discovered another plant mentioned in one of your articles that's come up volunteer among the spiderworts -- jewelweed. I also fight creeping charlie, but love the star of bethlehem. I've planted lamb's ear and witchhazel. I want, but don't have room for spicebush. I discovered it growing wild along a creekbed that drains into the river. I'm sad that I killed my Oakleaf Hydrangea, but I do have 2 nice Annabelle Hydrangeas. I also have many herbs; including yarrow. Two years ago I ordered native bamboo (canebrake) from Mo. Wildflower Nursery, & it's finally taking off. Any stories about canebrake? We seem to have a lot of plants in common as far as native vegetation. This is my first year for a bumper crop of blackberries. I have much more; such as; pears, crabapples, and bush cherries all on two city lots.

By the way, my parents moved here from Weakley County, TN in the early 50s, so I'm very familiar with rural TN life during the 50s and 60s spending time on my relatives farms. I really miss the good old days. I believe that's another reason I love your stories. Thanks for the response & hope you had a nice time in Chicago. I've never been there. I usually travel south; not north. : )

Betty (my 89 yr old grandma who is originally from Mayfield, KY calls me "Betts")
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 27, 2009
8:02 PM

Post #6746243

Betts, Hello!!!
I love your name, of course. And love your love of plants. You know, I would not trade my heritage and knowledge I gained from it for anything, and obviously neither would you. I have just been outside in this 100* heat sitting beneath one of my maples in my blue garden, (the subject of another upcoming article) and enjoying everything around me. At the moment I am overrun with daylilies, and garden phlox, and I was thinking just before I came in that I have the best of both worlds, the memories and the knowledge of my growing up years, and the plants that were given to me by all my family and friends.
And I have done some crazy things...started a couple of magnolia trees from seeds, rescued broken garden furniture that everybody told me to throw away and painted it cobalt blue...(broken by last winter's ice storm) and I can think of no place on earth where I would rather be right now.
Sounds as if you feel the same way.
Funny how our roots are so evident.

I haven't thought about canebrake, but with your suggestion, I might. I have some nice native bamboo, too, planted to take up some of the natural spring water that seeps in the spring down my back yard. Lovely in fall when it has its tiny tiny pinkish blooms.

And on the other side of the house, where the sun doesn't touch, I have all the old bishop's weed, and variegated vinca, chameleon, some pale green sedum, lots of spurge...some hosta, and I call it my white garden, though there are few if any blooms in it.

Do you ever get back to Mayfield? Only the next county over, and only about 20 minutes from me. You need to let me know, and also I would love to see pictures of your treasures.

D mail the photos if you want, we can share e mails too that way.
This is fun...kindred spirits.

Thanks about the articles, always a pleasure to share.
Sharon
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 22, 2012
2:18 PM

Post #9016168

Another article I missed until now! I love the way you paint pictures with your words, Sharon. I can see all those pretty blooms and you pouting while lopping them off.
I didn't know they were edible. I wonder if Shoe ever tasted them...

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Other Article: Spiderwebs, Spiderwort, and Aunt Bett Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Darling Aunt Bett Bettypauze 14 Apr 16, 2008 1:47 AM
etymology of "spiderwort." Dollykat 1 Apr 14, 2008 9:44 PM
blue dye rubyw 0 Apr 15, 2008 7:50 AM
your story is such a delightful treat! florida_newbie 3 Jun 9, 2008 3:10 PM
Capturing the color of Spiderwort LaFleurBonne 1 May 15, 2010 5:32 PM


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