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Native Plants and Wild Plants: Spring Natives for '08

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crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 10, 2008
3:58 PM

Post #4787127

Post your spring Wildies for '08!
crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 10, 2008
11:45 PM

Post #4789148

Wooly Viola

Thumbnail by crimsontsavo
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crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 10, 2008
11:45 PM

Post #4789151

YellowRoot

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claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 11, 2008
1:15 AM

Post #4789595

Saw these Sanguinaria canadensis / bloodroot flowers by the side of the road today

Thumbnail by claypa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 11, 2008
1:16 AM

Post #4789601

I really need to get some of those for my future native garden. Theyre so pretty!
Nedhudson1
Thorne Bay, AK
(Zone 6b)

April 11, 2008
10:17 PM

Post #4794270

Claypa-you're ahead of me.I haven't even seen the crocuses & hyacinths bloom here yet.Just a few leaves up.
claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 17, 2008
1:07 AM

Post #4819327

Saw this Spring Beauty / Claytonia virginica today:

Thumbnail by claypa
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claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 17, 2008
1:09 AM

Post #4819345

Dutchman's breeches / Dicentra spectabilis

Thumbnail by claypa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 17, 2008
1:13 AM

Post #4819371

LOTS of trout lilies / Erythronium americanum... I think, anyway.

Thumbnail by claypa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2008
10:41 PM

Post #4824050

Very lovely Claypa, we have trout lilies in Texas too, but for a very short time.
crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2008
12:48 AM

Post #4824504

oh man i want some of those trout lilies! SO pretty!!
claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 18, 2008
1:13 AM

Post #4824614

My brother was describing these plants he saw in the park, and I thought maybe trilliums or something, so I went and looked at break time. I was really surprised, I don't think I've seen trout lilies before. The ground was covered with them, so I guess they can't be too hard to grow, if they're in the right spot. They were growing under tall trees, not too far from a stream. Maybe I'll look for seeds, if I can remember...

I really liked the Dicentra. I bet they're really easy to grow, if they're anything like bleeding hearts.
One more trout lily pic:

Thumbnail by claypa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2008
1:30 AM

Post #4824683

I hear that trout lilies take seven years from seed to bloom and they dye after they bloom and make seed, so if you want them blooming continuous years you have to plant seed seven years in a row.
crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2008
1:33 AM

Post #4824698

Im thinking we may have those here. They arent blooming yet but I think I saw the leaves by my trillium and wild violets. Ill have to check it out when my rash is gone.
Leftwood
Saint Bonifacius, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 18, 2008
1:42 AM

Post #4824733

A particularly nice form of trout lily, claypa. I didn't know there were any with colored petal backs.

I have never tried to grow Dutchman's breeches myself, so I can't actually say how easy they are. But I can pretty much guarantee they aren't as easy as old fashion bleeding hearts (D. spectabilis).

cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 18, 2008
10:46 AM

Post #4826025

We are still weeks away from the wildflowers starting, except for this one.
This Round-lobed Hepatica was found a few years back, when my SIL was camping early in our woods and raked the leaves off from it.
(they bloom hidden under the leaves)

The next year I found it and moved it to an area by the house. It has thrived.
I do have to find it under the leaves though.
I am sure there are others in the woods, (if I wanted to rake all the leaves to find them)

It has several blooms, but this is the first couple to open.

Thumbnail by cpartschick
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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2008
12:10 PM

Post #4826239

So pretty and such a hidden treasure!!!

cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 18, 2008
2:25 PM

Post #4826651

Thanks, I bet it is more open today. Should try for another picture.
crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2008
2:37 PM

Post #4826698

so pretty!!

cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 18, 2008
3:44 PM

Post #4827018

Thanks, just took this picture of the same plant.

Thumbnail by cpartschick
Click the image for an enlarged view.

frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2008
5:09 PM

Post #4827510

Wow! what a difference a day makes.
Colquhoun
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

April 20, 2008
2:36 PM

Post #4835376

Asarum canadense, first year we have got it to bloom

Thumbnail by Colquhoun
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Colquhoun
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

April 20, 2008
2:39 PM

Post #4835388

Podophyllum peltatum, Mayapple.. first year it has looked health or not been hit with a late frost. I think we have finally started turning a corner, in our woodland garden.

Thumbnail by Colquhoun
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LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

April 21, 2008
12:51 AM

Post #4837917

Oh, here's one. Nerve-Ray or Squarebud Daisy it's called. It's grows in the area (but not in my own neighborhood). For some reason it doesn't want to stick around very long if I move one or two into the yard. Putting seeds out does no good either, apparently. But I sure do like it!

Thumbnail by LindaTX8
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LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

April 22, 2008
2:36 AM

Post #4844130

This one just started blooming lately. Damianita, Chrysactina mexicana. The foliage is fragrant when crushed!

Thumbnail by LindaTX8
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cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2008
11:04 AM

Post #4845237

Very pretty.
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2008
6:36 PM

Post #4863120

Oh, that seed I put out for the Nerve-Ray finally paid off. I found one blooming on the front slope of my property. Yay!
crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 25, 2008
6:52 PM

Post #4863180

Yay!! Get pictures! :-)
LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2008
7:29 PM

Post #4867761

Nerve-Ray or Squarebud Daisy, finally one came up with no help other than seeds strewn about!

Thumbnail by LindaTX8
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LindaTX8
NE Medina Co., TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2008
7:33 PM

Post #4867769

And Marshallia caespitosa or Barbara's Buttons is blooming!

Thumbnail by LindaTX8
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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

April 28, 2008
4:25 AM

Post #4875140

Wild bleeding heart (Dicentra eximia) and wood poppy (Stylophurum diphyllum)

Thumbnail by trillium612
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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

April 28, 2008
4:26 AM

Post #4875148

Labrador violet

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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

April 28, 2008
4:27 AM

Post #4875154

Mitella diphylla- bishop's cap/mitrewort

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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

April 28, 2008
4:29 AM

Post #4875160

Thalictrum dioicum-early meadowrue with Dicentra

Thumbnail by trillium612
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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

April 28, 2008
4:30 AM

Post #4875169

closeup of D. eximia

Thumbnail by trillium612
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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

April 28, 2008
4:35 AM

Post #4875198

Anemonella thalictroides-rue anemone just opening. It could be Isopyrum. I do have difficulty with those two. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Thumbnail by trillium612
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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

April 28, 2008
4:37 AM

Post #4875204

And last but not least, everyone's favorite blubells, Mertensia.

Thumbnail by trillium612
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cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2008
11:28 AM

Post #4875708

Nice Trill. All that is zone 4b already? That is something.

Here we always seem to go from 30's to 70's in a day, then when you get the shorts out, it is back to 30's again. Usually the plants and trees are not even fooled by the early warmth.

This year though, it stuck around even reaching 80's for 3 weeks. The plants couldn't stand it, the birds, bugs and bees, could not wait. Now, we are in the twenties this morning. I am afraid there will be lots of damage.

Walking yesterday I saw many plants at least a week early. I even found wild strawberry blossoms.
The cold is suppose to continue. These may be the only pics I get of some of my wildflowers.

Here is a trillium ready to bloom (from yesterday)

Thumbnail by cpartschick
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Leftwood
Saint Bonifacius, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 28, 2008
2:52 PM

Post #4876556

Nice pics Trillium.

At first I was going to say your Anemonella thalictroides photo is Anemone quinquefolia, native here, but I don't think that's quite right either. But it is not A. thalictroides. Rue anemone will have multiple flowers per stem (on most flowering stems), and flowers often possess more than five petals. The leaves are also differently shaped, more like a paddle. BTW, Anemonella thalictroides is now Thalictrum thalictroides. I have a really bad pic of MN native T.t. below. Google will do much better.

So, I am wondering what that is in your photo. I suppose there could be a wide species variation of quinquefolia. But I suspect that, whereever you are, you may have a species I am not familiar with. It doesn't look like the Isopyrum biternatum (now Enemion biternatum) that is native here either.

Perhaps someone else can shed some light?

Thumbnail by Leftwood
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cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2008
4:29 PM

Post #4877016

We have wood anemone here, but yesterday I found what I think is a rue anemone on my walk in the woods. (never saw it before) It does have 3 flowers per stem, the leaves look right, but only 5 petals per flower.

Thumbnail by cpartschick
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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

April 28, 2008
9:18 PM

Post #4878422

It is not A. quinquefolia. I agree it is not thalictroides, like I said I confuse them sometimes, not so much the plant just the name. Kind of like I know the difference between a gadwall and widgeon, yet I can't get over flip flopping them even though I know what they are!

I strongly beleive it is Enemion (Isopyrum) biternatum. All of the databases and herbariums I have been searching seem to verify that, Yes, it could have a local variance from what is found in your area. Could you be more specific as to why you think it is not?
Leftwood
Saint Bonifacius, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 29, 2008
12:12 AM

Post #4879229

Don't have a clue as to what that is cpartschick, but it is definitely not Rue anemone. This is Rue anemone: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thalictrum_thalictroides
As far as I know, there are no hairy thalictrums at all, and none have a prominent leaf midrib.

Trillium, the Enemion that grow here are always taller(up to a foot), and mounding. Always more than one set of leaves per stem, and each set at a different node on the stem (and making the stem taller). In fact, I don't think I have ever seen one grow so low to the ground. This mounding is part of the description of the species, but I sure don't see depictions of it via a quick google. All the google pics I see are just like yours. So I have to backtrack, and concede my fault. It is biternatum.

trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

April 29, 2008
2:30 AM

Post #4880039

Do you think they can create hybrids? We have all three of those species growing here sometimes even mixed together. I grouped quinquefolia in with them for the longest time because they would all be together. Hmm maybe I have discovered a new variant!!! lol

cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 29, 2008
10:03 AM

Post #4880810

Trill, I think we both have mysteries!
How fun!
wholyhosta
Lula, GA

April 29, 2008
5:13 PM

Post #4882420

I already shared this woodland treasure photo on a SARU thread (southern appalachian Round Up) yesterday.

My son found this in the woods on Saturday and took me and his wife back on Sunday. I was awestruck!

(sorry if you're on dial-up)

Thumbnail by wholyhosta
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crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 29, 2008
5:19 PM

Post #4882447

That is just lovely.
Thanks for posting so many great pictures guys.
It's nice to see what grows in north america. Wowzers!
wholyhosta
Lula, GA

April 29, 2008
5:19 PM

Post #4882450

All the above photos you have shared on this thread are found in the NE Georgia Mountain- many are done blooming, like our Trout Lilies, which were over by mid March.

Currently blooming are Showy Orchis and Pink Lady Slippers- my son is especially taken with the native orchids and roams most weekends looking for them. This time it really paid off!!!

We spent about 30 minutes with this clump of Large Yellow Lady Slippers, taking lots of photos and them left them as we found them, 14 plants and 16 blossoms. There were several other "colonies" in the area of 3-7 plants.

Brenda B

Thumbnail by wholyhosta
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frostweed

frostweed
Josephine, Arlington, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2008
5:35 PM

Post #4882518

Those are really neat, I had not seen them before.

cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 29, 2008
5:51 PM

Post #4882566

Oh, what a treasure. We have had 4 of them blooming at once, but the last couple years only the plants. I think the yellow lady slippers are lovely! Aren't they amazing!
How can something like that grow wild in the swamp???
enya_34
Madison, WI

April 30, 2008
4:35 PM

Post #4887268

Unbelievable! These yellow slippers are breathtaking. Thank you for sharing this terrific photo.
Isn't it a miracle that such places still exist and people can get to them to enjoy the incredible beauty of nature?

cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2008
5:50 PM

Post #4887618

I remember going fishing with my husband in Canada. We parked and he handed me the fishing poles and a bucket and he dragged the canoe through the swamp to the stream (for about a half mile) to get to a lake.

Well, I cannot manage walking through all that with a couple of long fishing poles as fast as he can jump around all the water and muck and drag the canoe full of supplies, so he was way ahead.

I came to a knoll and saw hundreds of pink lady slippers. I had to stop, I was in such awe. (of course he had the camera in the canoe and was NOT coming back) I was just floored by how these were hidden back in the bush. We have a spot of an acre or so that has 50 on it here in our woods at home. But to see solid pink for about a half acre was the most amazing scene. I sure wish I would have gotten that picture.
crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 30, 2008
6:30 PM

Post #4887764

Wow, I bet that was amazing.
enya_34
Madison, WI

April 30, 2008
6:40 PM

Post #4887821

Cinnamon fern (Osmunda cinnamomea)

Thumbnail by enya_34
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enya_34
Madison, WI

April 30, 2008
6:45 PM

Post #4887849

Toad tirilliums, little greens picking through the leaves are showing ochids (Orchis spectabilis) and the line up of spikes are the great Solomon's seals. The blur of green at the back is wild ginger.

Thumbnail by enya_34
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enya_34
Madison, WI

April 30, 2008
6:46 PM

Post #4887859

Uvularia grandiflora - I love them.

Thumbnail by enya_34
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enya_34
Madison, WI

April 30, 2008
6:48 PM

Post #4887864

ramps

Thumbnail by enya_34
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enya_34
Madison, WI

April 30, 2008
6:49 PM

Post #4887873

Sambucus nigra - American elder

Thumbnail by enya_34
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crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 1, 2008
12:29 AM

Post #4889336

So THATS what that tree is!
I always wondered.
This is such a great forum, you learn SO much from everyone.
Thanks for all the pictures and names guys!
Kathleen
Panama, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 1, 2008
10:11 AM

Post #4890736

enya, we have a bunch of that back in the woods. It spread itself around after the former owners logged us out. I took a cutting yesterday - thought it would be nice to have up near the house.
enya_34
Madison, WI

May 1, 2008
9:42 PM

Post #4893225

North American elderberry is a pioneer tree/shrub to recolonize area.
It will be pushed out by trees as they grow to the edges where there's more sun.
If you plant it in too deep shade, it won't die but you won't get as many flowers/berries.
If you are planning on using the berries/flowers, you want to make sure you got
Sumbucus nigra or Sumbucus nigra ssp americana (black berries) not
Sumbucus racemosa (red berries).

In any event I love this shrub in the natural setting. Mind you it's shape is not regular
and it has die back so you may want to look at a number of them in native setting and
see if that's the look you are going for.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

May 1, 2008
11:05 PM

Post #4893531

Great photos on this thread!

I'm hoping today's article on "wildflower walks" will get more folks out walking and looking and taking photos... and checking out this forum! http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1089/

(I added a link to this thread) :-)
bigcityal
Menasha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2008
2:25 AM

Post #4894500

What do you make of this one? taken on a hill under mature trees.

Thumbnail by bigcityal
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claypa
West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 2, 2008
2:50 AM

Post #4894618

That's exactly the kind of place I found toothwort this spring - Cardamine concatenata, or maybe another species.
That reminds me, thanks for the Helenium seeds! I forgot to mention that they arrived.
Mike

Thumbnail by claypa
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bigcityal
Menasha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2008
2:55 AM

Post #4894642

You're welcome Mike - those are easy to work with.


Marsh marigold in a marsh

Thumbnail by bigcityal
Click the image for an enlarged view.

cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2008
11:21 AM

Post #4895482

Aren't those marsh marigolds amazing. They just look like they should be in a pot on the deck or something.

I moved some to another marshy area where I frequently walk. They are really, really hard to transplant. I did have some success though.
(had acres of the plants, so if I lost a couple, I thought no big deal)
The plant seems to have a root that goes down to China and grows into many tree roots. Very hard to dig up and not break off at the root.
crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2008
11:24 AM

Post #4895489

Ill keep that tip in mind if I ever find some cchick!
They are gorgeous arent they.

cpartschick

cpartschick
Gladwin, MI
(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2008
11:32 AM

Post #4895511

Most wildflowers in the woods stay there. And I leave them where they are found. But moving plants from your own property another spot on your own property is legal and I do it sometimes during certian conditions.
one,
There has to be many of the plants in case the move does not take.
or two,
The plant is in an area where it will be killed due to the DH riding over it with a quad. (on the trail)
(sometimes I will block a trail until the plant can no longer be harmed)
I otherwise do not recommend moving wildflowers.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2008
6:43 PM

Post #4901678

I think I have Trillium erectum. Any opinions?

Thumbnail by billyporter
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billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2008
6:47 PM

Post #4901688

Another view.

Thumbnail by billyporter
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Kathleen
Panama, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2008
7:29 PM

Post #4901812

Nope, you have Trillium sessile - toadshade, a very cool plant. I love the mottling on the leaves.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2008
7:43 PM

Post #4901843

Oh good! I was hoping toadshade, but my book said it the bloom didn't open. I'll change that in my plant list now that I know for sure.

Thanks!
Kathleen
Panama, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 6, 2008
3:15 PM

Post #4914088

Here's a trillium that we have. I suspect it is closely related to T. erectum, but is either a sport or an uncommon color.

Oh, and here is a link to the article I did on ephemerals Sunday:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1080/?utm_source=nl_2008-05-05&utm_medium=email

which links to this thread and the one on Natives In the Wild

This message was edited May 6, 2008 11:16 AM

Thumbnail by Kathleen
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enya_34
Madison, WI

May 6, 2008
5:16 PM

Post #4914575

Interesting trillium with nodding habit. Here's mine that just opened

Thumbnail by enya_34
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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

May 8, 2008
5:21 PM

Post #4924380

Phlox divaricata just starting to open

Thumbnail by trillium612
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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

May 8, 2008
5:23 PM

Post #4924392

prairie smoke Geum triflorum

Thumbnail by trillium612
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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

May 8, 2008
5:25 PM

Post #4924400

Wild geraniums are just starting. One thing I am noticing this spring is the huge variance in how fast plants of the same species are growing. Like these, some are starting, and others are weeks away. Not that I mind if it will extend the bloom time!
trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

May 8, 2008
5:26 PM

Post #4924407

pic would help doh

Thumbnail by trillium612
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trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

May 8, 2008
5:31 PM

Post #4924430

I think I already posted a pic of these, labrador violets, but this year is the best I have ever seen them bloom. I've seen nursery specimens covered in blooms, but mine never looked that way. Ths year they are just loaded with blossoms. I have some of these mixed in with wild stone crop ( S. ternatum) and it really makes a striking combo of color.

Thumbnail by trillium612
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crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 8, 2008
5:52 PM

Post #4924519

They probably fertilize theirs.
Try using a violet fert?
That wild sedum is a really nice plant, I found some on my bluff.
enya_34
Madison, WI

May 8, 2008
7:30 PM

Post #4924889

Beautiful violets! I love that phlox, what I lovely compact specimen. How much shade you have it in?
trillium612
Portage, WI
(Zone 4b)

May 8, 2008
7:46 PM

Post #4924937

That particular one is in almost 100% shade. I have them in almost full sun as well and they are doing fine. I have some in lighter. sandier soil, and they seem to be smaller. I think they favor a rich shadier spot, but they seem to be pretty adaptable. I planted about 100 last year and I have been anxiously awaiting their bloom!!

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 11, 2008
6:43 PM

Post #4937292

Kathleen, I read your article before I logged on today. What a neat assortment of wildflowers!

Enya, those are beautiful!!

Trillium, the violets are gorgeous! We have a good crop of them this year. There's a wild area across the road and everyone has an assortment of colors in their yards this year.

Bluebells

Thumbnail by billyporter
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Nedhudson1
Thorne Bay, AK
(Zone 6b)

May 12, 2008
4:09 AM

Post #4939347

The early spring blooming skunk cabbage(Lysichiton americanum) is finally starting to bloom here.Things are late greening up here this year.VERY cold & wet spring.

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crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
7:30 AM

Post #4939628

is the wet and cold weather keeping my blue eyed grass from blooming?
Kathleen
Panama, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 12, 2008
11:06 AM

Post #4939759

That's the prettiest skunk cabbage I've ever seen

crimson, ours doesn't bloom until haying time here - very late May and into June - so it could be slow because of the weather.
crimsontsavo
Crossville, TN
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
1:47 PM

Post #4940278

Thanks, now i have a better understanding of bloom time thanks to ya'll. :-)
enya_34
Madison, WI

May 12, 2008
4:23 PM

Post #4940981

This year everything but tulips are very late for me.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 13, 2008
1:25 AM

Post #4943014

Nedhudson1, I love the skunk cabbage!

For me, it's all blooming on time.

Golden Fumewort.

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Nedhudson1
Thorne Bay, AK
(Zone 6b)

May 13, 2008
1:33 AM

Post #4943060

It's really interesting to see what wild flowers grow around the country.I have followed this thread closely & enjoy it.

billyporter

billyporter
Nichols, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 13, 2008
2:52 AM

Post #4943525

Another favorite, Dutchman's Breeches.

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pfn
Harwood, MD

April 10, 2012
1:04 PM

Post #9077253

frostweed wrote:I hear that trout lilies take seven years from seed to bloom and they dye after they bloom and make seed, so if you want them blooming continuous years you have to plant seed seven years in a row.


They transpalt easily and will bloom the following year. They seem to spread fairly quickly as well.

samthehavanese
Mohrsville, PA
(Zone 6a)

April 10, 2012
4:58 PM

Post #9077534

I have literally dozens of Trout Lilies growing in my woods, along with Mayapples. This is this first spring I've been here. Very exciting.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

April 11, 2012
7:10 AM

Post #9078182

Heya! Saw some PA & MD sigs and wanted to be sure you both took a swing past the mid-atlantic gardening forum http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/f/region_mida/all/ Check out the "events" thread at the top of the page for spring swaps!

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Other Native Plants and Wild Plants Threads you might be interested in:

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