Growing Japanese Maples in Hot & Humid NE Texas

(Maggi) Big Sandy, TX(Zone 8a)

I have visited this forum occasionally in the past. I would like to try a few more Japanese Maples here in the Piney Woods of NE Texas, but would like some with green or gold/green leaf color.

We have 2 Bloodgoods, one that is 9 years in the ground and one transplanted from another landscape (in the heat of August) two years ago. We have a seedling from a friend's laceleaf (she moved it to Texas from Maryland) and another seedling I bought about 5 years ago at the Stephen F Austin State University MAST Arboretum Plant Gala sale.

We have very large old oaks around the garden and the Japanese Maples seem to like the environment.

I'd like to know if other folks here in the South have had success growing either Sango (Sangu??) Kaku or Snake Bark Maple, or, even more better would be a Fern-Leaf Full Moon Maple.

This first pic is of the 9 year-in-the-ground tree

This message was edited Apr 23, 2008 8:19 PM

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(Maggi) Big Sandy, TX(Zone 8a)

Here's the seedling form SFASU MAST Arboretum. I like the bright green color, especially with all the shade around here, it really brightens up the garden.

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Walhalla, SC

I would not recommend a snake bark maple because I think the heat might be a bit too much for that one, and I would be cautious about a sango kaku but more because of psuedomonas (don't buy it if it has any signs of black bark). If you are looking for something like japonicum 'aconitifolium' it should do fine, but it will not be a very bright green. I would look into something more like palmatum 'orange dream' or a similar variety. It stays bright yellow green for most of the summer, and is bright yellow orange in spring.

Dahlonega, GA

i have an orange dream and it's the most beautiful color i've ever seen .have a coupla full moon and they are too small to tell anything about yet altho i hear a lot of people think they are special

Walhalla, SC

The golden full moon (shirasawanum 'aureum') is indeed quite spectacular, but it is touchy in good climates and almost impossible in our southern heat I would imagine (except maybe in deep shade where the color wouldn't develop). The fern leaf (japonicum 'aconitifolium') is not particularly colorful except in fall, but the leaf shape is interesting and I've found that it holds up pretty well if given a little afternoon shade in my area.

Dahlonega, GA

well,you got me again matt ,i don''t know which ones i have,but don't think either is fern leaf,just broad,little fat leaves. only about 10" tall

Okeechobee, FL(Zone 10a)

Here's my 'Orangeola'.
This is the first year it lost all leaves.
This new 'robe' is stunning.
Sidney

Okeechobee, FL(Zone 10a)

Opps I forgot the picture.
;)

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Dahlonega, GA

sugarweed , that is beautiful! my orange dream is bright ,lime green with red outline on leaves.

Okeechobee, FL(Zone 10a)

I know this isn't Texas, but we are hot and humid, though not sultry as I remember all of Texas except El Paso and the High Plains.
I do remember even the plains were stiflingly hot between 10 and 3
during the summer in Amarillo.
I was so concerned as it had the same leaves for 3 years.
I am rather proud of her.
All of the planters along Michigan Avenue in Chicago had almost everything I had in my yard including Orangeola and Coleus.
Many flowers are very pretty but they all have a 'bloom time'.
I love foliage because it has a long display life.
Sidney

(Maggi) Big Sandy, TX(Zone 8a)

Thanks for the tips! I will look for both 'Orangeola' and 'Orange Dream'. Both have leaf forms and colors that appeal to me.

I am doing a search now for a reliable seller of both!

Okeechobee, FL(Zone 10a)

I also forgot to say mine is in the shade of Live Oaks, gets protection from them.

(Maggi) Big Sandy, TX(Zone 8a)

I found this place in the Dallas area. Googled Japanese Maples Texas and found a Dallas Morning News article that directed me to Metro Maples http://www.metromaples.com/search.htm

They carry both 'Orangeola' and 'Orange Dream' :~)

Garland, TX(Zone 8a)

I went to MetroMaples this past weekend. Now I am Japanese maple obsessed! There are so many cool ones I want to buy them all. on impulse I bought two Fire Glows. Now I am trying to plan out my next purchases more strategically.

Springfield, IL(Zone 6a)

yes you will find out quickly as most JM addicts do never buy two of any one JM ...even the largest yards can run out of space or at least JM friendly space .. always best to not be impulsive.... two of any one cultivar neans one less of the hundreds available that you will be able to have ..David

Garland, TX(Zone 8a)

Good point David. I was taken by so many of the maples at the Metromaple nursery. But when i went past the Fireglow section the light was hitting them in such a way that they truly looked like their name.

Springfield, IL(Zone 6a)

Fireglow is an outstanding maple... for those in the north it is very hardy...and leafs out later than even the emperor 1 . one caviat ,as with most any JM it will burn in summer with mostly sun ...at least when young...best well site it down there with plenty of aft. shade.. David

Garland, TX(Zone 8a)

All I have is shade. The nursery where I bought them is in an oak forest. If full sun would damage it where you are it would totally fry it here.

Springfield, IL(Zone 6a)

Yes although I havbe a theory humidity plays a part and I know in certain parts of TX humidity is high others not so much ...but you are correct it would fry there ... one consideration you should be aware of when you site in shade or mostly shade you sacrifice color ... If that nusery has total shade but the trees are that bright red i would guess ...and it's purly that ...that they just either got them in or have just moved them from a more sunny spot to shade ...there's nothing wrong with that pr say but be aware if you are in full shade you may get more of a bronze color...not bright red over time ... thats the red JM cronundrum too much sun you get burn ...to little you get no or little color or differnt color...depending on the cultivar. Down there it is probably more tricky to get the right amout ...you may want to put it (them) in a pot(s) and see what happens this summer move them around ...unless you have no sun. and plant out next spring or late winter in your sweet spot...David

Garland, TX(Zone 8a)

Good idea. I will try them out in containers first.

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