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Article: Canít Grow Bell Peppers? Hereís a Ringing Endorsement for Some Alternative Sweet Pepper Varieties: Critterologist I have a question for you

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Forum: Article: Canít Grow Bell Peppers? Hereís a Ringing Endorsement for Some Alternative Sweet Pepper VarietiesReplies: 12, Views: 66
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mylillie
New Britain, CT

April 25, 2008
2:56 PM

Post #4862214

Do you know what companion plants peppers like?
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

April 25, 2008
3:04 PM

Post #4862242

Not offhand, sorry. I know that when you "rotate" your veggie garden, you should consider peppers, eggplants, and tomatoes as part of the same "rotation." Maybe that means that peppers like the same companions as tomatoes? I've put peppers in front of a row of tomatoes (so that the tomatoes don't shade the peppers).

I'd suggest searching the forums for "companion planting" or "companion planting peppers" -- a lot of threads will pop up, and hopefully you'll find some good tips. :-)
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

July 16, 2010
7:31 AM

Post #7972611

http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/mettot81.html

Here is an article on companion planting. I don't see any companion plants for peppers but according to this they should not be planted in proximity to eggplants, potatoes, or tomatoes.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2010
9:21 AM

Post #7972885

Thanks for the link, Gloria!

For what it's worth, my pepper plants are right next to my tomatoes, and I haven't noticed either suffering from it... I think they may have some pests & diseases in common, so maybe that's the reason for that recommendation. I know that when you rotate crops, peppers and tomatoes are part of the same rotation (you'd rotate beans to a place where either peppers or tomatoes had been, but it doesn't help to grow peppers in a spot one year and tomatoes there the next).
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

July 16, 2010
9:26 AM

Post #7972894

Companion planting is one topic that just doesn't get the scientific attention it needs. So a lot of the recommendations are posted like 'folk remedies' and who is to say why and whether it is effective.

I think 'alleopathy' is so exciting--but its so hard to find the documentation you really need to implement it in the garden. Im doing my own experiment this year: Im planting sunflowers to see if they will do in ground ivy.

Maybe we need a members experimental thread here to share results!
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2010
9:36 AM

Post #7972923

Seems to me there have been some companion planting threads in the veggie gardening forum.. might be worth a search.. or start a members' experiment thread there!
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

July 16, 2010
1:25 PM

Post #7973415

Nice article. Seems to me most companion planting ideas are indeed folk lure. I know of no scientific study that deals with this. Why would they? The mere thought of companion planting is folk lure not really very relilable.

I planted carrots under tomatoes for years. The carrots did well there. The groundhogs liked the carrot tops and the tomatoes. That fact more or less sucked them in where I could feed the groudhogs a little lead.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

July 16, 2010
7:23 PM

Post #7974253

I think companion planting is more than folk lore--in fact the idea is the basis of permaculture guilds.

There probably is a scientific basis for the fact that some plants do tend to occur together in nature -- in ecological niches. And of course plants can attract each other by attracting mutually beneficial mycorhhizae. And some plants kill mycorhhizae and therefore repel other plants--e.g. garlic mustard.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

July 17, 2010
4:41 AM

Post #7974870

Some years ago I read an elaborate article which had as a main point that leaf lettuce and onions do not like each other and therefore should not be planted together.

The following year I planted a monocultural one type plant lettuce patch of sixteen square feet and some ten feet away the same sized patch of row lettuce and onions exactly the same as the other patch. All things were equal. There was no noticable difference in the growth of either patch, the flavor, the texture or the length of time the plants held up. That article was in Organic Gardening Magazine.

The article made good reading and motivated me to one more time test a companion planting. That companion planting was fun to pick because the spring onions were right there with the leaf lettuce.

Over the fifty years of my gardening fun and experience I have found companion planting to be little more than writer's fodder. Those articles are paid for in giggles of those who continue to read them and know better.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

July 17, 2010
5:57 AM

Post #7974989

docpipe:

companion planting usually refers to interplanting of two or more different plants in relatively close proximity, not to monoculture plantings several feet apart.

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:lGGs-AJOCjUJ:www.bhu.co.nz/workshops/Manuals/Companion%2520Planting%2520Biodiversity%2520Workshop%2520Notes.doc+scientific+basis+for+companion+planting&cd=10&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

July 17, 2010
6:04 AM

Post #7975005

Right, and doc planted lettuce and onions in close proximity, comparing the lettuce in that planting to a monoculture lettuce planting in another area.

I have yet to see compelling evidence for the positive effects of companion planting, but it does make for a more visually interesting garden, and in some cases I think it may let you squeeze in more veggies per square foot (as when you plant lettuce or carrots between rows, in the shade of other plants).
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

July 17, 2010
10:12 AM

Post #7975681

Gloria...Thank you for the reference to the Lincoln University study. It stands as one more prime example showing clearly the reason I left higher education in 1965. This report that follows some workshop study time only has three questionable statements one absolutely incorrect statement and one major omission which would not support the assumed goals this course of study had. I am so glad I am no longer tempted to invest my hard earned money for this kind of education. I left teaching for many of the same reasons. Teachers in my day were flat out scared to challenge their teachers even in an educated sense. This was wrong then as it is to this day. My comment today bares some consideration, " I know there is higher education but how good and accurate really is higher education"?
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

July 17, 2010
10:43 AM

Post #7975738

It also bears considering that not every research project will produce a major advance -- but every once in a while, one will. :-)

It may be that some of the benefits of intercropping discussed in that report are seen more at the commercial grower level than at the home garden level. Rabbits that might not be put off by 3 marigold plants might choose to hop along elsewhere when faced with a wide border of marigolds around a field planting.

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