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Antiques and Collectibles: Rocker, possible repair...

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bigbubbles
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 27, 2008
3:09 AM

Post #4869663

Granny's rocker...arm is spliting...don't want her haunting me. Can it be repaired?

Thumbnail by bigbubbles
Click the image for an enlarged view.

bigbubbles
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 27, 2008
3:12 AM

Post #4869681

Close up of break ( on right arm near stove)...we've taken it to lakehouse where it won't get much wear and tear...but I'd sure like to have it repaired if possible.

Thumbnail by bigbubbles
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

April 27, 2008
3:20 AM

Post #4869718

Yes it can be repaired, if you are handy you can do it at home with wood workinig tools if not call around and find a place that knows a lot about all ths.
bigbubbles
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 27, 2008
3:23 AM

Post #4869729

Really? No one in Austin will touch it. How would you go about repairing it?
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

April 27, 2008
3:30 AM

Post #4869767

When I fixed my families rocker I built a brace, set it in and moved the clamps until it was in the right place. Then I untightened it a little and added special wood glue. retighten and let itit for 36 hours at least, then sand, varnish touch up and you are ready to go.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2008
11:06 PM

Post #4906218

Turn it upside down. From the bottom of the arm rest set up your power saw to half or a little more the debth of the arm rest. Put two clamps and two pieces of wood on the arm rest to hold it while you make the restoration. Run the saw and make three cuts right through the cracked area. Make the cuts run with the arm rest not accross the arm rest. Use two part epoxy and fill the cuts. Sand off to remove any spill or rough you created. Sand lightly on the top crack to remove the rough. Hardware stores have hot wax fillers to drop into the crack and hide the crack. A restoration person would likely get $75.00 for this job but the bottom would be stained out to match as well as the top crack. A restoration person would make and install three wooden splines and glue them in. I'll bet my last buck the epoxy fix will be stronger.
Don't let anyone place undo value on invisable repair. First broke is broke.That can not be changed. Any repair no matter how good can be seen by a skilled person who knows wood finishes. You are putting your bucks here on your emotions and to make the chair functional as well as stronger after the repair. It is a nice chair with family interest. If it were mine I would have it fixed or fix it myself.
bigbubbles
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 5, 2008
3:46 PM

Post #4909468

dogpipe..
I copied your reply and showed it to DH last night. He said the arm won't come off...and there's no way to hoist it onto a table saw (it's huge). Are you saying we should use a table saw to make the cuts? I re-read your reply this morning and it seems like we could use a circular saw. Is that so? If the reg. one is too big, we also have a battery one that's smaller.

I've already called around Austin and couldn't find anyone who wanted to attempt to fix it. And I was prepared to pay much more than $75. The rocker has been at the lake for three yrs because we didn't want the break to get any worse.
I'm so grateful for your explanation of how to repair it. Please let me know if you meant a circular saw...so I can begin to "whine" to get him to repair it!!!! Appreciate your response...
Sandi
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

May 5, 2008
3:55 PM

Post #4909497

That is why I used a brace for mine with wood glue and screws - much eaiser and rock soild.
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

May 6, 2008
1:22 AM

Post #4911827

I would not remmove the arm. Yes I would use a power hand saw to make the slots. You could practice on the edge of a 2 X 4. That would be close to the width of the arm. You could practice your fill that way too.
bigbubbles
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 6, 2008
2:42 PM

Post #4913962

That makes sense...although I won't try it! I'll pass this info along to DH and get him to do it. Hopefully I can post the finished project soon...
Thanks so much!

patrob

patrob
Goldthwaite, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 12, 2008
2:02 AM

Post #4938865

Doc, I have a rocker very similar to the one pictured that I inherited from an elderly aunt. I believe I was told that the chair came from a family member in an older generation. Could you give any estimate of the time period when it might have been built? None of the family still living know anything about where or when it came into Aunts possession. Just really curious about possible age of the chair, since I can remember it in the house for at least 65 years.
Robert
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

May 12, 2008
1:41 PM

Post #4940255

Send me a Dmail or post the pix here. I think you may have it figured out. In this time period families gave the newly weds hand me downs. We continued this to both of our kids as they set up housekeeping. Kids at that time married younger so a few years difference of opinion might pop up...however figuring roughly thirty years in each generations care is a reasonable way to back up the time clock. Three generations of use by young families is often about all the holdup the chairs would have. The third generation puts it on display and calls it a family heirloom. Officially it is a collectable until the piece is a hundred years old.
bigbubbles
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 12, 2008
1:56 PM

Post #4940326

Please post the pic here. I've never seen one similar to my grandmother's. Would love to compare!
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

May 12, 2008
2:43 PM

Post #4940538

The rocker in the first post is a pretty good quality chair. I appears to have a leather seat and back rest. Overall it looks very nice. It is in it's third known generation of use. Rule of thumb would indicated it to be made between 1920 and 1940.

patrob

patrob
Goldthwaite, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2008
1:32 PM

Post #4949555

Here is my rocker. I remember it in the aunts living room before WW2, andwas told who gave it to her, (or her mother as she lived with her parents in that house until they passed away.) But what 9 or 10 year old boy paid much attention to the story of a rocking chair!
My brother had the chair after the aunt passed away, and his wife reupholstered it. It did not have leather cover.

Thumbnail by patrob
Click the image for an enlarged view.

docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

May 14, 2008
1:44 PM

Post #4949602

You have a rocker of the same time period or one reproduced to look like the same time period. This too is a pleasing design based on solid design of yesteryear. Your known history would indicate that this is some makers original chair circa. 1920 -1940. I have seen these chairs sell in small estate auctions for $35.00 - $75.00.I have seen the same priced at twice that in the antique and collectable resale centers.
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

May 15, 2008
12:02 PM

Post #4953937

Saddly from the selling we have done at Flea Markets and such Rockers have just about the least value of any of the old seating things... most folks save their mothers or grandmothers for all the childhood memories it holds so there are a lot of them out there.

patrob

patrob
Goldthwaite, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 15, 2008
12:35 PM

Post #4954122

I am not in the least worried about the value of the chair . I was only interested in knowing when it might have been made, since it came from a generation back in a long lived family.
I was also interested in origination, since Bubbles is in Austin, and my family were in the Bastrop area when they came to Texas in the 1850s.
I thought it interesting that the only two chairs I had seen of that style might have come from the same area.
Robert
docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

May 15, 2008
2:05 PM

Post #4954614

Texas in the 1850's would have most likely been shipped furniture, in from the Northeast or Europe.

It is allways important to know the aproximate values. We bought a hunting camp years ago. In it was a chair that most would have taken the axe to and burned. Later we learned it was a treasure that when sold in Boston literally paid for the cabin.
bigbubbles
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 15, 2008
2:27 PM

Post #4954713

Robert...my grandmother was from Mississippi. The chair had upholstery before. My daughter took a class and learned to re-tie the springs and then recovered it in leather (pleather). Next time we're at the lake, I'll measure it, but it sure looks taller and wider than yours. That's why it's not in our house...it's huge and takes up too much room. Our DD had a perfect spot for it, but returned it when the arm began to crack! Like you, we aren't interested in the value as we'd never sell it...it's in so many old family photos.
I'm so grateful to docgipe for repair instructions. DH thinks he'll be able to tackle project...just didn't know there was a way to possibly save it.
bigbubbles
Austin, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 6, 2008
2:51 AM

Post #5060747

Finally made it back to lake. The rocker is about 46'' tall, from top of back to bottom of rocker...and the back is about 24" wide. Is that about the same dimensions as yours, Robert?

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