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Article: The Invaders: Rudbeckia: Great Point

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Forum: Article: The Invaders: RudbeckiaReplies: 15, Views: 204
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rvnsbrk
Leesburg, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 29, 2008
11:31 AM

Post #4880936

I agree wholeheartedly Lois. As a maintenance gardener that makes a living doing weeding and planting, I have come to despise Rudbeckia. Every time someone wants me to plant these I cringe. Little do they know that soon they will be poking up everywhere lending to a general sense of disorder and messiness in their garden. Once you have them it seems like you cannot get rid of them either. One client has been trying to get them out of her garden for years now. I keep digging them up, but somehow the little buggers keep escaping to rule another day!

Great article!
Juanita

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2008
12:08 PM

Post #4881028

I bought the 'Goldstrum' myself and love their late blooming habit. I have noticed the spreading tendencies and have started digging early in the spring those I don't want. But I wouldn't get rid of all of them, I love them. They love our hot summers here and thrive, sometimes there is not much that does!
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

April 29, 2008
12:11 PM

Post #4881043

I love them, I have had them for years, my grandmother had them for years and to me they are a stunning and wonderful part of the garden.
pagardener61

(Zone 6a)

April 29, 2008
12:34 PM

Post #4881146

While they may spread for some, others like me do not have a problem. Mine stay put, I can't call them invasive in my garden. They are a lovely addition, put out if I am lucky a few seedlings which do go in another garden. I have found though that the plants do get massive over time and will need a normal dividing soon.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2008
3:10 PM

Post #4881888

My nemesis are oak trees, pecan trees, four o'clocks, hackberry trees...sure wish there was a market for tree seedlings.

LouC
LTilton
Glen Ellyn, IL
(Zone 5b)

April 29, 2008
3:59 PM

Post #4882102

Mulberries, honeysuckle and - worst of the worst - buckthorn!

broncbuster
Waxahachie, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2008
4:08 PM

Post #4882140

I'm OK with the Rudbeckia, too! My problem plants are nodding thistle, hackberry seedlings, and, lately, Texas Bindweed. I see no end in sight!
MitchF
Lindsay, OK
(Zone 7a)

April 29, 2008
4:31 PM

Post #4882249

Bindweed... ugh I hate that one ...

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2008
5:25 PM

Post #4882475

I have noticed that whatever BigBox Store has in abundance, if I buy it, I will have it an overabundance before too long myself. That part is a very good point. (Not that your neighbor is a BigBox Store, but ... you know.) xx, Carrie
Colquhoun
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

April 29, 2008
7:21 PM

Post #4882859

When I planted my Goldstrum, I cut a large hole in the landscape fabric and planted it in the center. The entire bed was done this way, because some of its bed companions are dotted mint, bergamont, and queen of the prairie. I think it would be a major wrestling match out there if I hadn't enforced some boundaries.

I must say that the birds love this bed because the entire thing is enclosed by a 6 foot chain link fence. We call it the DMZ (demilitarized zone). We created it because our dogs and the neighbor's dogs fought constantly through the single fence. So we placed a second fence on the inside with a space of 5 feet between them. No more dog fights and a nice safe haven for the birds.
pagardener61

(Zone 6a)

April 29, 2008
7:25 PM

Post #4882901

Oh mulberries and locust (the ones with pricky things on them) are the worst. I will be pulling them by the dozens and dozens all summer.
reenygarden
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 29, 2008
7:25 PM

Post #4882904

Oh my, some of the seeds I "obtained" at work are Rudbeckia. I have them only in containers right now. Our winters are so mild, perhaps they should stay in containers? I'd love to see some Florida experience on this one.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2008
7:29 PM

Post #4882922

Whenever I have questions about a plant, it stays in a container for a year (unless DH has planted it without permission, lol). xx, Carrie
reenygarden
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 29, 2008
9:39 PM

Post #4883473

Thanks Carrie, that is my usual rule of thumb too. Although I have broken it a few times this year. I think I'll go back to my gut and keep my containers flowing!
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

April 30, 2008
12:44 AM

Post #4884286

I like the Indian Summer variety as the petals are long lasting.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 9, 2010
1:14 PM

Post #8029347

Sigh . . . we finally planted some black-eyed Susan . . . I couldn't remember EXACTLY why I had hesitations . . now I remember . . . and now it is all over my yard! Oh well, it can fight it out with the coreopsis 'Moonbeam'!

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Other Article: The Invaders: Rudbeckia Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
ROFL @ your last line! critterologist 0 Apr 29, 2008 12:52 PM
I love rudbeckias gessiegail 3 May 7, 2008 4:29 AM
Rudbeckias are indispensible! (-: tabasco 7 Aug 9, 2010 6:06 PM
black eyed susans 1Kimmer 1 Jul 10, 2009 2:56 AM
You are right cheerpeople 1 Nov 24, 2009 12:21 AM


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