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Article: Marigold: Flower of the Aztecs: Great article

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Forum: Article: Marigold: Flower of the AztecsReplies: 24, Views: 99
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Lenjo
Mount Angel, OR
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2008
1:05 PM

Post #4935920

Gloria , wonderful, great article. The lowly marigold is really an awesome plant; so easy and reliable, rain doesn't spoil them like a petunia.Thanks.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2008
1:54 PM

Post #4936151

Kudos to you, Gloria, for a wonderful article. I have always loved the ease of marigolds but had no idea what kind I was growing or why. Now I know! Thank you!!!
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

May 11, 2008
2:13 PM

Post #4936212

"lowly marigold". I guess sometimes people do equate it with the dandelion. It is probably the first flower seed that many people plant as soon as baby fingers can hold the seeds.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2008
2:44 PM

Post #4936312

Never like a dandelion, no. Most people don't plant dandelions. I don't think Burpee has a Dandelion research division! (Except for the Get Rid of Dandelions division.)
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

May 11, 2008
2:57 PM

Post #4936366

Carrie; by referring to dandelion, I meant 'common yellow flower'.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 11, 2008
3:38 PM

Post #4936525

You always paint a picture with your words. I love your description of your 70 mile drive.
And marigolds, well, I was the marigold seed planter when I was a child, sometimes it was the most successful crop in the veggie garden. Summer just isn't complete without marigolds.

Thank you for another great article.
Lenjo
Mount Angel, OR
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2008
8:07 PM

Post #4937510

Lowly , Gloria, in the sense it is so common and nothing exotic , humble might be a better word. Humble but yet such glorious color that lasts and lasts. I 'rediscovered' marigolds again a couple of years ago. After trying so many other exotic things I have returned to growing marigolds because of their reliability.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

May 11, 2008
8:18 PM

Post #4937544

I haven't tried the striped ones, and I haven't tried the signets which are supposed to be more delicate. If not for their beauty, they are still good to plant to get rid of nematodes.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
12:23 AM

Post #4938406

Loved the article and more importantly it makes me want to give marigolds another try. I don't care for the stuff you find at the garden centers so I'm going to looks at Seed Savers and Seeds of Change for some of the other varieties. Thanks:)
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

May 12, 2008
12:29 AM

Post #4938444

dmac. you might find some right here on DG among the seed swappers. Burpee is always a good source since they really started the marigold business. But the old OP species are the kind you want for getting rid of nematodes although the little "French" ones work also.
Works best to plant where marigolds were the previous season for nematode control.
thanks for your comments.

gloria
Lenjo
Mount Angel, OR
(Zone 8a)

May 12, 2008
12:46 AM

Post #4938530

I have done the disco red and it was stunning. Stokes has great inexpensive seed too. This year I am doing Tangerine Gem.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

May 12, 2008
1:49 AM

Post #4938826

My favorite is Queen Sophia.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
2:14 AM

Post #4938909

Thanks:) I sort of got into the plant co-op whirlwind this year so I forgot about the seed trading! Thanks for reminding me.

I think I do have Tangerine Gem and Disco Red...I should get some started this week:)
davis1676
Disputanta, VA
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2008
3:15 AM

Post #4939152

I had no idea of the variety or uses of this perfect little flower, I've loved for years. I can't wait to try some different types & colors in my garden this season. Thanks for all the detail & effort you went to, in creating such a great article.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

May 12, 2008
3:28 AM

Post #4939181

I love marigolds! I enjoyed your article and learned much. Thanks!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 1, 2012
10:15 AM

Post #8950017

This time I especially enjoyed Senator Dirkson's speech in favor of the marigold! What a lovely article, and nice to revisit.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

January 1, 2012
6:30 PM

Post #8950632

Thanks, Carrie. Happy New Year to you and your family.

gloria
vidyasudhi
Phoenix, AZ

June 3, 2013
8:55 AM

Post #9544460

Lovely article! I had pleasure learning so much about the marigolds which I have admired all my life for their eye catching blooms! Thank you! Marigolds in my language ( one of the Indian language, Kannada) are called ' Chend hoo' which literally means, flower looks like ball. 'Hoo' means flower and 'Chendu' means a ball. Just thought of sharing.:))
It is interesting how the things take their names!
Look forward for more of such articles.
Vidya
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

June 3, 2013
10:57 AM

Post #9544626

In India marigolds became the symbolic flower used in religious ceremonies, weddings, and festivals. Temples are draped with marigolds strung into garlands [5] and the demand is so great, marigold production has become a major commercial enterprise in that country [6]

Read more: http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1015/#ixzz2VB1GK6Fk

UNQUOTE.

I was so surprised to find how universal our native marigold has become---almost like the tomato! In what part of India is the Kannada language? I am learning about India now. I have been a vegetarian for some 30 years--but I am only learning now if you want to be vegetarian you need to learn to cook and eat Indian food.

Thanks so much for your note, Vidya.
vidyasudhi
Phoenix, AZ

June 6, 2013
10:28 AM

Post #9548599

Thank you Gloria for your sweet reply. The language Kannada is the official language of the state Karnataka, which is one of four southern states. The state has very diverse nature of flora because it has coastal line, desert region and rain forest.
Yea, if you are trying to be vegetarian, it really helps if you can adapt your diet to Indian.
Let me know if you need any help there, I would be glad to share whatever I know.
Have a nice day,
Vidya
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

June 6, 2013
3:45 PM

Post #9548954

O.K. since you offered, I will ask! I find some of the ingredients strange and Im wondering what I could substitute. I mostly have a stash of Madhur Jaffrey's cookbooks. Apparently in India, the term "vegetarian" does not exclude eggs and dairy?

Curry powder -- refers both to a mixture of spices and to a small tree called the "curry tree". Do you need curry tree leaves to make curry?

Mustard seed. This is not usually available where Im at. If I get some from Amazon and plant the seed, can I get a plant that will grow me some mustard seed?

tamarind. What is it? According to M. Jaffrey, you have to find this in an Indian store?

asefetida. The description of this, 'as a foul-smelling resin' doesn't sound like a cooking ingredient. What is it?

Thanks for the offer of information, Vidya.
vidyasudhi
Phoenix, AZ

June 7, 2013
5:09 PM

Post #9550352

Okay, I am glad you asked. Let me take your question one at a time. In India vegetarian means no eggs, no fish and no meat. But traditionally dairy is considered part of vegetarian diet. The cookery book you are mentioning, I have
heard about it but I myself have not seen it.
2. Curry powder.
Yes, the curry powder is basically a blended mixture of differant spices, usually they are all toasted separately on a pan and then blended to make a uniform powder. Though there is a basic recipe to make this powder, you will find each family has come up with it's own formula according to their own taste. So the curry tastes differently in each family.
Now the curry plant, yes there is a tree, native to India and Shrilanka, called curry tree. The scientific name is; 'Murraya koenigii'. Many people grow that tree in US, some keep it indoors and where the weather permits they grow that tree in the backyard. I have seen lots of them in Arizona. You don't have to have them in the curry but if you have them they add a flavor to the dish. More than that, people want to use it in the cooking because of it's great medicinal value.
If you don't get it there, don't worry, you can still prepare curry without it.
This reply is getting longer than I expected, I will answer your other questions tomorrow. Hope this information is useful for you.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

June 8, 2013
5:03 AM

Post #9550755

Very useful. Thanks so much, Vidya. Madhur Jaffrey mentions mainly using the curry leaf and that the dried leaf does not retain the flavor of the fresh leaf.
There is another book, Great Curries of India, Camellia Punjabi. It has a whole chapter on the different spices used in curry, which is how I confused myself. In the USA as you probably know you can go to the spice rack in the store and there is a little container labeled "curry powder". Probably a poor replica of what Indians perceive as "curry spices" (!). That each family has its own mixture would explain the complexity described in the Camellia Punjabi book. Are the curry formulas passed down through the generations of different families (as are kim chi recipes in Korea)?
vidyasudhi
Phoenix, AZ

June 8, 2013
8:46 AM

Post #9551004

Yes Gloria, usually the girls learn to make the curry powders and in general cooking by helping moms in the kitchen, they are not very rigidly secretively kept recipes, but just everybody makes their own according to their own tastes.
I want to ask you how far away you live from Birmingham AL? Because I am sure you will find an Indian grocery store near by there.You will find everything whatever it is mentioned in the book if you find one store there.
Mustered seeds.--they are tiny, round shaped black seeds, are used in almost all the dishes except sweet dishes. The mustered paste you use on hot dogs and burgers etc. is nothing but grounded paste of these seeds with some added other in gradients. You can grow these ( if you find the seeds) and you can also use their greens in cooked form. I wouldn't use the greens in raw form since they have a pretty strong taste. They are easy to grow.But if you want them for getting seeds it will be very tedious since the pods are very tiny ones.But you can try though! Tiny yellow flowers are pretty to look at. They have their medicinal value too. All these spices and herbs are loaded with medicinal properties, definitely a good idea to add them in our diet. You will also find mustered oil, extracted from these seeds is used in cooking too, has it's own distinct aroma and flavor. The mustered I am talking about is, the Sci. Name is ' Brassica nigra', black mustered,used in Indian cooking. Hope I am able to provide the information you were looking for. Don't hesitate Gloria,if you need to ask anything else, I will be glad to help. Have a wonderful day and I will write abt. Next question tomorrow.
Vidya
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

June 8, 2013
3:42 PM

Post #9551351

Thanks, Vidya. Birmingham is about 100 mi east of where I am. I don't go there often. I found some mustard seed at the store, but they are light colored, not black. I suspect if I look hard enough I will find them online.

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