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Article: Bloom Sequence for Perennials: Almost all year

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Forum: Article: Bloom Sequence for PerennialsReplies: 11, Views: 132
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jimneyj
Kansas City, MO

June 2, 2008
3:20 PM

Post #5040633

In our garden we have something blooming all year long. I live in Zone 5. We use bulbs ( corcus, daffadils, tulips) to create lots of early spring blooms planted around our perennials. For a early start to the year we have lenten roses which usually bloom in January or any time the temperature rises above freezing for a couple of days. One of variety of plants I like due to their early blooming in late spring and continue until frost is dianthus. Their are some many different varieties of them, different colours, heights and width. From sweet willams to carnations. One of the things, we like about dianthus like sweet william they make great cut flowers and when you cut them where there was one bloom soon there will be 2 or more. It seems like the more you cut them the more blooms they have. We also have roses including shurb and climbing which do not require the normal cutting and protecting like other roses. We have almost all of the plants you have on your list as well. Some of the new varieties of Campanula are great as well for different colors of foliage and lots of long living blooms. Just though I would add a few other ideas to create more bloom which is why we all grew flowers.

Yes I agree textures is important as well. I like penestemon "Mystic" for its purple floiage. Ours stayed pruple all winter long and really never dies back until it starts new growth in spring. Campanula Dickson,s gold is a short growing plant with golden yellow foliage. These 2 planted together create a beautiful color even when they are not blooming.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2008
3:31 PM

Post #5040691

Thanks for you ideas, too. I was hoping that folks would take my list and add it to their own, because so many will work in one zone and not another. And finally after all these years, I figured out a way to catalog them that works for me.

I will keep adding to my list, with zone indicator. Are you in 6a, or maybe 5b. Can't remember where your town is.
darlindeb
Claremore, OK

June 2, 2008
4:00 PM

Post #5040875

Good job! What a wonderful idea.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2008
4:15 PM

Post #5040936

Hi Deb...thank you!!
Your seeds are sprouting in my gardens!!!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 2, 2008
5:15 PM

Post #5041219

Ever since I first read about that idea in the first "so, you've bought a house" book I ever bought, a succession of blooms has been my goal too, Sharon, although it sounds as though you're much closer than I am! Congratulations, and thanks for all the great ideas! I try to take pictures regularly, too. Good article.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2008
5:28 PM

Post #5041280

Thanks, Carrie. I just went outside and photographed this morning. I have some blooms, but could have planned better for this long wait between iris and daylilies...thank goodness for the roses I now have, because they are almost all my blooms at this time. Oh, and spiderwort, that is in bloom as well. Ahhhhh, maybe next year.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 2, 2008
5:36 PM

Post #5041324

LOL my irises fell over! Roses ABOUT to bloom. (Such as they are.) Coralbells (that I didn't plant) are every where. Bulbs may be the answer. Best of luck, and, happy gardening!
Pagancat
(Sheryl) Gainesboro, TN
(Zone 6b)

June 2, 2008
8:31 PM

Post #5042083

"Maybe next year" LOL - my gardening mantra!

Thanks for the article - now I'm going to be thinking about as I go about...
MegOntario
Dundas, Ontario
Canada

June 3, 2008
2:32 AM

Post #5043972

I have peonies to fill in the gap between irises and daylilies. Some are early blooming, mid, and late so they last a while. I know they get heavy and droop if not supported, and a rain/hail storm can rip the petals, but I love them. I also like the foliage mid summer.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2008
3:40 AM

Post #5044363

You know, this was the first year I ever planted poppies, and not being familiar with them, I direct planted them too late to bloom yet. I know better now, so again...maybe next year. My uncle always had poppies, and I have no idea why I never thought of them. One of those Duh moments, I guess.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

June 4, 2008
4:18 PM

Post #5052259

Thanks for another great article! I'm trying to renovate my yard this summer and will print off the list of plants for reference. You saved me a lot of research and probably additional work!!!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 4, 2008
4:38 PM

Post #5052366

Glad it helped, and so good to hear from you!

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Other Article: Bloom Sequence for Perennials Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Plants from American Meadows Nursery Jonstone 8 Aug 23, 2011 6:46 PM
Foliage Sharran 1 Jun 3, 2008 12:32 AM
More foliage Sharran 9 Aug 25, 2008 1:40 AM
This is for Shawna.....a rose story... Sharran 3 Jun 3, 2008 1:17 AM
Purple leaf plant roosterboots 4 Jun 4, 2008 2:31 AM


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