Photo by Melody

High Yield Gardening: PICTURES or DIAGRAMS of raised bed veggie gardens please!!!

Communities > Forums > High Yield Gardening
bookmark
Forum: High Yield GardeningReplies: 52, Views: 1,303
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
raebeags
Dighton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2008
2:06 AM

Post #5090479

I love the idea of companion gardening but don't know much about it with the exception of all the charts on the internet. Does anyone have any pictures or diagrams of their veggie/berry/herb gardens? I am planning on having Two 3X10 feet raised beds. How and what should I plant? This year I think we are just building up the soil and making it rich and ready for next year but I want to learn all I can before I start. I would also like it to be as organic as possible! Is this a tall order????

Thanks everyone!!
TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 12, 2008
12:17 PM

Post #5091879

This is my garden early this season. My wife and I try to companion plant as much as possible because of the limited space we have. We try to plant short season crops with long season crops so the long season crops eventually get more room as the short season crops get harvested. Plant "bush" or compact varieties of plants and use trellises for vining plants so they take up less room. Plant things that get along well with each other or benefit each other in some way such as a tall leafy plant that can shade a plant that likes cooler soil temps or not as much sun. Use "earthboxes" if your into that kind of planting. A person could put a lot of time and evergy into planning, sometimes too much planning and not enough planting:)

Thumbnail by TMaple
Click the image for an enlarged view.

TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 12, 2008
12:19 PM

Post #5091885

This is another picture showing the gateway trellis I built for scarlet runner beans.

Thumbnail by TMaple
Click the image for an enlarged view.

TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 12, 2008
12:22 PM

Post #5091892

And this is one more showing a new cucumber trellis I just put up last weekend. You can see my homemade earthboxes along the fence.

Thumbnail by TMaple
Click the image for an enlarged view.

fourks
Evergreen, CO

June 12, 2008
2:44 PM

Post #5092521

Beautiful job TMaple!
raebeags
Dighton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2008
3:24 PM

Post #5092712

tmaple that is awesome!! What is in the middle of the stone...chives??? and what is on the outside of the stone. Very pretty! Repost when it's lush! I'd love to see it.
TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 12, 2008
3:47 PM

Post #5092803

Yes, that is chives surrounded by some old broken bricks. That chive is about 15 years old. The center rectagular box with the chives is the herb garden. It also has marigolds planted in it. I love the chive. When it blooms it is really beautiful, and the blooms are very tasty. The garden is slowly but surly starting to fill in a little. I take photos every couple of days so I will post more as the season goes on.

Thumbnail by TMaple
Click the image for an enlarged view.

TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 12, 2008
3:51 PM

Post #5092819

I forgot to say thank your for the nice compiments, so, thank you! I am proud of my little garden.

Mrs_Ed

Mrs_Ed
Whiteside County, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 14, 2008
1:14 AM

Post #5100730

I opted for pretty tall raised beds to discourage the dogs from jumping in them. I have one for perennials, one for mostly herbs, one for vegetables like lettuce, radishes, etc. Then I have two others along the fence built differently than the big ones. Those have tomatoes in one and beans/cukes in the other.

Thumbnail by Mrs_Ed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Mrs_Ed

Mrs_Ed
Whiteside County, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 14, 2008
1:17 AM

Post #5100750

The big beds are with 4" x 6" x 8' landscape wood. the beds are approximately 4' x 8'.

Here is the Herb bed closer up.

Thumbnail by Mrs_Ed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Mrs_Ed

Mrs_Ed
Whiteside County, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 14, 2008
1:33 AM

Post #5100850

Then we added these fences to keep the cat and dogs out when I planted seeds. The cat rarely gets to go outside anymore (he discovered he was INDEED a cat and could hop the fence), but I still keep the panels up.

I also have one other raised bed out of 4 x4s. It is a 4 foot square bed. Those pieces of wood were much easier to lift and deal with.

Thumbnail by Mrs_Ed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 14, 2008
2:29 AM

Post #5101100

I like your garden Mrs_Ed. I would like to have my beds made out of timbers like yours but I am too cheap to put any kind of money into it. All the wood you see in my garden is stuff I got for free, old cut up pallets. It looks like you have a "city garden" too. I would like to have more space, but I like the challenge of making stuff grow in a limited amount of room. Plus its less to weed and maintain:)
jlp222
Hammond, LA
(Zone 8b)

June 14, 2008
2:31 AM

Post #5101112

TMaple, did you build the trellis yourself? It's beautiful!
DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 14, 2008
2:40 AM

Post #5101146

My raised beds are 4 by 8 feet. We used corner brackets purchased from Lee Valley Tools. We filled with some clay soil from when we dug fence post holes, mixed with compost, topsoil, peat, and 1 bag of sand mixed in. We use a small tiller to till them up every year.

They are built with construction timbers and lined with polyethylene. It breaks down over time but they last longer that way and are less costly than cedar or redwood.

Here is my carrot/parsnip bed from last year.

Thumbnail by DrDoolotz
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 14, 2008
2:42 AM

Post #5101151

Here is a slightly narrower but longer bed we made for beans and peas.

Thumbnail by DrDoolotz
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 14, 2008
2:45 AM

Post #5101164

We built a frame up over this bed for growing cantaloupe melons and also for snow peas. It works really well. We drape metal rabbit fence over the top bars and staple it to the bottom sides. The melons go nuts on it.

Thumbnail by DrDoolotz
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 14, 2008
2:50 AM

Post #5101192

And this is what happens with 3 of the 6 beds every year. TOMATOES!!! Hooray!!!

We use rabbit fence again in horizontal panels for support. They grow up through the panels and are supported really well, even in our strong winds here. I think this system is fabulous, if I may say so myself. :-) We use the panels year after year and they work perfectly well. The rabbit fence is "sandwiched" in a frame made from pine 1 x 2 lumber. In a 4 by 8 foot bed, I grow 21 tomato plants, 3 rows of 7 plants.

Claire

Thumbnail by DrDoolotz
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Mrs_Ed

Mrs_Ed
Whiteside County, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 14, 2008
12:39 PM

Post #5102351

Claire, very nice. Those Lee Valley brackets are exactly what I use for my two beds along the fence. I wish I would have used regular boards like you, but instead I used some leftover deck boards. They are just a tad short and don't make as seamless of a side as you have.

Love the tomatoes!

My next raised bed with the brackets will be for Raspberries. I'll be doing some sort of similar support structure within the bed for them.

Tmaple, you are right, each bed is about 125$ in timbers. Good thing I plan on retiring at this home! But I really like the fact that I can sit on the edge. In fact, I wouldn't mind having them a couple of layers taller. I can always add to them though.
DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 14, 2008
2:20 PM

Post #5102774

Thanks Mrs. Ed! I thought your beds looked super. I love the way that you can sit on the edge because you definitely can't do that with mine. A modification for next time! I might make a flat top with triangle shaped supports under it, facing outward, to allow for a spot to sit. I have tried to sit on the edge of mine but it's not comfy for more than about 15 seconds!

Mrs_Ed

Mrs_Ed
Whiteside County, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 14, 2008
3:00 PM

Post #5102926

Here are the ones we put in for my Mom. You can see how you can sit on the edge.

Thumbnail by Mrs_Ed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 14, 2008
3:19 PM

Post #5103017

Very nice CMoxon, I really like the 2bys with the bamboo through them in the beans and peas picture. jlp222-- I did build the trellis myself. It started out as a couple of boards screwed together for my scarlet runner beans to climb up and it morphed into what you see now. I'm very pleased with how it turned out. I like the height of Mrs_Ed's raised beds. I wanted to make mine taller but didn't have the wood or the soil to fill them. Everyone's garden looks very good.
DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 14, 2008
3:24 PM

Post #5103037

Those are great beds Mrs Ed. Your mom looks really comfy! They are really nice deep beds too. I would like to make some that deep.

Thanks TMaple - the 2by with bamboo was Kelly's creation - he is very creative that way. It folds down too, for easy cleanup of old vines, etc. Plus you can replace the bamboo as they deteriorate.

Mrs_Ed

Mrs_Ed
Whiteside County, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 14, 2008
4:22 PM

Post #5103262

thanks everyone! It does make gardening easier. For the most part it stops the dogs, but when they are chasing each other, one will often cut through them. Usually only in the winter and spring though.

fourks
Evergreen, CO

June 14, 2008
5:14 PM

Post #5103534

I built these raised beds in my greenhouse out of 2x6 rough cedar. Little pricey, but sure am happy with how they turned out. I lined the inside with Tyvek home wrap to help prevent rot.

Thumbnail by fourks
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 14, 2008
5:47 PM

Post #5103677

Wow Fourks! Those are fabulous! Nice design. I love the tyvek idea. I might try that because the 5 mil poly I used has sort of become shredded or deteriorated over time.

Mrs_Ed

Mrs_Ed
Whiteside County, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 14, 2008
6:11 PM

Post #5103767

gorgeous
TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 14, 2008
11:30 PM

Post #5104762

Nice going, fourks!!! You've made me TOTALLY jealous. I dream of a greenhouse like what you have, warm, sunny, veggies and flowers happily growing along, relaxing place to have a cup of coffee in the morning with my wife...I'm dreaming about it right now!
fourks
Evergreen, CO

June 15, 2008
1:42 AM

Post #5105232

Thanks everyone. Its been a lot of work, but I can honestly say that it has been the most rewarding thing I've done. Even brought the wife and I closer. I live in the Colorado Rockies at 8600" So a greenhouse is quite a necessity! And yes, I drink my morning coffee right in that seat:-)
fourks
Evergreen, CO

June 15, 2008
2:07 AM

Post #5105339

Also. the thing that appealed to me about the Tyvek is it will allow the fabric to breath both ways. The plastic always bothered me because I was afraid of trapping moisture between. Plus the stuff is almost indestructible!
Dann_L
San Tan Valley, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 15, 2008
2:56 AM

Post #5105561

My thoughts about how to garden in the desert went all over the place when I first moved to Arizona. The soil is incredibly poor and water conservation is a must. To make a long, boring story short, I decided to build raised beds using concrete blocks. I built them 2 rows of blocks high and then topped them with cap blocks. They ended up being about 18/20 inches high which is a very comfortable sitting height. And, because they're made out of blocks, they're basically maintenance free and should last longer than me.

Thumbnail by Dann_L
Click the image for an enlarged view.

raebeags
Dighton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 15, 2008
3:01 AM

Post #5105576

THANK YOU... THANK YOU... THANK YOU!!! You have all made such impressive and beautiful gardens!!! I can only wish that over time I will have 1/2 the talent that all of you have!! Thank you for taking the time and sharing. I know once I get started I am going to have a TON of questions!!
Dann_L
San Tan Valley, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 15, 2008
3:02 AM

Post #5105584

This picture from last year shows a little more detail of the blocks.

Thumbnail by Dann_L
Click the image for an enlarged view.

fourks
Evergreen, CO

June 15, 2008
3:20 AM

Post #5105669

Dann,
What beautiful workmanship! Are you a mason by trade? I had wanted to use block, but where I live the footer would of had to be 36" down. Plus, the good chance of running into rock. Good job!!!
Gardenia731
(Arlene) Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2008
3:33 AM

Post #5105722

All I can say is AMAZING JOB EVERYONE!!! Those bed are absolutely wonderful. You have all given me so many fabulos ideas. I was looking for something similiar but now I have plenty of choices. Wow, Blown away!
Dann_L
San Tan Valley, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 15, 2008
3:43 AM

Post #5105757

Thank You! I'm not a mason. Around here block fences are pretty common in the new housing developments so I just watched the guys that build them to learn what I could. It's not that complicated but those masons could do in a couple of hours what took me 3 or 4 weekends. :o)
TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 15, 2008
2:13 PM

Post #5106923

Great ideas, everyone. Lots of good ideas that may be incorporated into the garden next year, depending on what building materials I can scrounge ;) Half the fun for me is seeing how cheap a really good improvement can be. I put some mulch down in my garden yesterday and my wife put mulch in her perennial garden. What a difference a little mulch can make in the overall appearance!

Thumbnail by TMaple
Click the image for an enlarged view.

TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 15, 2008
2:15 PM

Post #5106933

This my wife's perennial garden. Its been a work in progress for a few years now and it is really starting to look good. She's done a great job.

Thumbnail by TMaple
Click the image for an enlarged view.

jlp222
Hammond, LA
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2008
3:41 PM

Post #5107323

TMaple, do you mind if I steal one of your arbor pictures to show my husband? Did you have construction plans for it or did you make it on your own?
DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 15, 2008
4:06 PM

Post #5107436

TMaple - you and your wife make a great garden team! Everything looks superb!
TMaple
Saint Paul, MN

June 15, 2008
9:49 PM

Post #5108645

jlp222--I don't mind at all, actually I'm flattered. I posted another picture of it to give a little different perspective. I have no plan for it, it came to me as I put boards together. When I started I only had 2 criteria, It had to be something scarlet runner beans could climb and it had to be at least 7 feet tall (for the beans and so you can easily walk through it). It is 5 feet wide by 2 feet deep by a little over 7 feet tall (walk through height) I just hope it is tall enough for the beans, they can get pretty crazy. I have plans to hang some of those solar powered accent lights from from it on some decorative hooks that I have. If you build one remember to stake it or tie it down. I haven't done that yet and the whole thing blew over in a storm last night! Luckily it survived and all the veggies survived. Post a picture when you get it built.

CMoxon--Thank you. My wife and I make a pretty good team in everything, that's why I love her so much.

Thumbnail by TMaple
Click the image for an enlarged view.

sgriffith
Beaver, WV
(Zone 5b)

June 18, 2008
1:40 AM

Post #5119865

I'm using the square foot gardening method. Here is my small garden - that does not have cheap dirt. I'd have a bigger garden, but I can't afford the soil all at once.

I have 3 - 4x4' beds, 2 - 3x9' beds, 32 tomatoes in pots and planters, 4 tomatoes in homemade earthboxes, 3 - 2x3 beds with squash (not pictured).

The potted tomatoes are watered with a drip irrigation system. I'm still working on the rest and watering by hand.

The four white buckets have concrete and T-post holding up lite-weight deer screen. ( always works for me )

I do not use companion planting, but I do replant a square as soon as it is harvested. Here is a list of what I grow - I have a pdf of what's in my beds (diagram) but I'm not sure how to post it here.

Crops Planted:

German Pink Tomato
Peru Tomato
Mr. Stripey Tomato (the yellow sweet ones)
Red Brandywine Tomato
Yellow Pear Tomato
Early Girl Tomato
Patio Tomato
Big Boy Tomato
Better Boy Tomato
Rutgers Tomato
A Local Beefsteak Tomato - Not named from local grower.

2 Varieties Cucumber
Summer Squash
Zucchini
Cantaloupe
Strawberries
Beets
Carrots
Cabbage
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Onions
Corn
White Half Runner Bean
Yellow Bell Pepper
Two type of hot peppers
Two types radish
Salad Mix
Sweet Potato
Herbs
Egg Plant

I list all this to demonstrate the variety and quantity you can do in a small garden. If you count the pots as one square foot each, I have around 160 square feet of growing space. (walk ways not included)

Thumbnail by sgriffith
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 18, 2008
2:01 AM

Post #5120003

Wow Sgriffith - what a fabulous variety for a relatively small space! Kudos to you for being so organized and managing to keep it all straight. It looks like a very productive system.
raebeags
Dighton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 18, 2008
2:20 AM

Post #5120111

That is soo impressive sgriffith!!! I love the square foot garden method!! I can't wait to try it out!!
DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 18, 2008
2:26 AM

Post #5120141

I just re-read what you said about the light weight deer screen, because I was looking at that photo, and the proximity of the woods, and saying to myself "How on earth does sgriffith stop the deer from eating everything?"

Where do you get that light weight deer screen? I can't even SEE it in the photo! I would love to use that. It seems incredibly invisible!

sgriffith
Beaver, WV
(Zone 5b)

June 18, 2008
10:42 AM

Post #5121236

The deer screen is 7' tall. It is nothing more than really thin plastic netting. They could easily knock it down or rip it, but for some reason they have not yet. I get it at Lowes for 12 bucks. Its in the same section as the landscape cloth and bird netting. The reason I have the t-post in cement buckets is that my garden is on a solid rock with only 2 to 3 inches of top soil where there's any.

I plan to buy stone and build a 2 to 3 ft high stone fence and top it with some type of metal fence. Our whole area has a tremendous problem with the tops of everything being razed off by the deer. Its obviously not fool proof, but it is a very strong deterrent.

LOOK at the front left bucket and you can see the screen or netting.

This message was edited Jun 18, 2008 5:44 AM
DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 18, 2008
12:05 PM

Post #5121468

Thanks - I have to go to Lowe's anyway for some more drip irrigation supplies, so I will check out the netting. I see it now, against the bucket, but the nice thing is that it doesn't interfere with your view to the woods. It's very unobtrusive. I like that.

Iowa is inundated with deer, so I am always looking for good solutions.
nanniepb
Cumberland Mtns, TN
(Zone 6b)

June 18, 2008
12:50 PM

Post #5121663

I've loved seeing all the pictures and ideas.

CMoxon, one of the DG Ubers told me that bloodmeal worked well. He said to sprinkle some at the corners of your garden and then repeat after rains. your netting is probably more cost effective, but I'd have a problem with the concrete buckets.

I usually see 5 to 8 at a time in my yard/fields.
DrDoolotz
Oxford, NS
(Zone 5b)

June 18, 2008
2:18 PM

Post #5122109

I think I'd have Kelly put some 4x4 timbers into the ground at the corners of my veg bed, which I think I would prefer to the buckets, but then sgriffith is only using that as a temporary situation until the wall goes in. We have a power auger that he uses to install posts for me. Right now, I have tree stakes in the ground with 6 foot wire mesh all the way around my veg garden. I think the timbers with the netting would be better. I could even make the timbers into the posts for a large pergola type of structure, and wrap the netting around it. My veggie bed now is about 80 feet long and about 15 feet wide, so I need a good, permanent solution.

I see groups of 5 to about 20 in the winter, but this time of year, I often see single wandering deer, or groups of 2 or 3. It is less frequent for me to see a larger group again until fall.

Claire

Crick22
Asheville, NC

June 19, 2008
3:30 AM

Post #5125891

Here is a not very pretty 4x4 raised bed made according to Mel (peat, vermiculite, compost). I have about 4 or 5 different kinds of tomato plants (several with tomatoes on them), 2 cayenne peppers, 4 bell peppers. The rear tomato plants are quite large today and I am experimenting to see if you really can have one plant per square foot. Time will tell. I did add bone meal at planting and some high phosphate vegie fertilizer though Mel Bartholomew (sp?) says you don't need to fertilize his mix. The planks are 1 x 10 inches. Two sides have a 4 inch ht plank resting on top of the bottom one. They are not really serving any purpose though.

Thumbnail by Crick22
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 11, 2009
5:50 PM

Post #6934977

Crick22,
I happen to think it's a very PRETTY raised bed!

So, tell me how your square foot gardening in it turned out, please. I'm dying to see more progress photos of what you got!

Linda

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 13, 2009
3:28 PM

Post #6942309

Okay, I'm going to pretend my garden looks as neat as all those in the above photos. In actuality my beds are crooked, and because we garden on a slope, each one has one side higher than the other!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 13, 2009
4:59 PM

Post #6942627

Uh uh. You gotta post a pic...crooked sides and all! ^_^

Sujo16
Smyrna, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 7, 2009
6:39 PM

Post #7036807

Here is a grainy shot. You can see the herbs and some flowers. Most of the veggies in the center beds have been pulled. Planting fall seed TODAY!

Thumbnail by Sujo16
Click the image for an enlarged view.

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other High Yield Gardening Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Plant spacing jkehl 25 Apr 26, 2011 11:01 AM
How can you tell if you have enough space? sowersjoy 12 Mar 5, 2007 2:32 PM
Designing Raised Beds for Veggies CultivatingKate 24 Mar 25, 2013 1:20 PM
Container growing vs. raised bed growing yields silverglow 63 Dec 1, 2011 7:34 PM
Square Foot Gardening (SFG) construction pics 1_Lucky_Texan 55 May 20, 2013 7:02 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America