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Beginner Flowers: Can this be divided?

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QuoiMerrie
Bay Village, OH

June 16, 2008
2:03 PM

Post #5111185

I have this 2 year old mound of daisies (white w/ yellow centers). It's a strong plant and very full.

Can it be divided so that I can "share the love" to other beds...or is it best left alone?

Zone 5 on national maps..zone 6 on local maps. Plant is in a full sun raised bed.

If yes..then how. Just dig out a single..or wait til fall and dig the mound and split?

Thumbnail by QuoiMerrie
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crashbandiscoot
Springfield, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 16, 2008
2:24 PM

Post #5111311

Wow, what a wonderful , plush mound of daisies! I'm sure you can divide it, but I would wait til after bloom at least. All it's stenght is going for bloom right now. Then seed. I would wait til it's done "doing it's thing"
kls_01
Champaign, IL
(Zone 5b)

June 16, 2008
4:52 PM

Post #5112003

You probably should wait until they're done flowering. That being said, I just moved mine not too long ago...right before they were going to bloom. They've been a little wilty, so I've been watering them, and they seem to have perked up and are beginning to open. So, if you absolutely CAN'T wait to move them, there is hope. But, you're best bet is probably waiting!

Kristie
QuoiMerrie
Bay Village, OH

June 17, 2008
12:08 AM

Post #5113901

Thanks for the advice.

Not critical to move asap so I'll take your advice and wait til after blooms.

Thanks..

WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

June 17, 2008
11:34 PM

Post #5119151

Is these daisies a shrub, an anneal or something like perennials that come up year after year, Asters are like this as are Shasta daisies, if a bush, then you need to take cuttings and prune your plant after flowering, use the pruning for cuttings, if an Anneal, then no, dont divide it as it will only grow the one season, so you need to sew the seeds it makes, if it is a Perennial, then you divide them end of season after the foliage has started to show signs of drying or dying down, you would lift the whole plant out the ground, look for new plants it has made at the roots and either cut these off with a root attached or cut the whole root up into smaller clumps and replant them in the growing position, do any of these jobs either end of summer when the weather is cooling down or early spring when you see new growth just starting, hope this is of some further help. good luck. WeeNel.
QuoiMerrie
Bay Village, OH

June 21, 2008
2:32 PM

Post #5137409

So many questions...let's see annual vs. perennial...definitely perennial. Shrub...no..a closely packed mound of plants. The plants are very sturdy though...not "airy" like other daisies. The bud/opening flowers are close to the foliage...not on long stems.

I'll try a "side" shot but I am on a beginner's learning curve with this camera too.

*hurrah for "auto" on this camera...the leaves are about "thumbwidth" waxy and serrated.

Thanks for the help folks!

This message was edited Jun 21, 2008 9:35 AM

Thumbnail by QuoiMerrie
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NatureLover1950
Vicksburg, MS
(Zone 8a)

June 21, 2008
3:46 PM

Post #5137706

I agree with you QuoiMerrie, I'd try just taking a piece from the outer edge of the plant first (later in the year after it's done blooming of course) and see what happens. I wouldn't risk the entire plant. If I only have one of a plant, I always do it like this--I'm not much of a gambler.
QuoiMerrie
Bay Village, OH

June 21, 2008
4:18 PM

Post #5137816

Oh Thank you! NatureLover1950! My transplanting knowledge is "little to none"..and they are so healthy now.

Thanks again.!
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

June 21, 2008
10:33 PM

Post #5139340

The second picture is coming up better on my screen, thanks for that, the daisies look like what we in UK call Shasta Daisies and you can divide the clumps, but do wait till end of season or the start of spring before there is too much heat in the soil, all you need do is put your spade into the soil close to the clump of either dying foliage in Autumn or new shoots in spring and dig up a clump, lift as much soil as you can and replant this new bit of plant, they have quite tough roots so you might need to use your spade to slice the clump away from the parent plant, in the new planting hole, add some nice fresh compost to help retain the moisture and make sure you water this new plant regularly to give it a good chance, it might look a bit wilted for a day or so, but that is called transplant shock and most new cuttings do this, it will perk up again, good luck. Weenel.
QuoiMerrie
Bay Village, OH

June 22, 2008
6:08 PM

Post #5143017

Thanks WeeNel. I will certainly try that once summer passes.

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