Can I root hydrangea cuttings

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

I am really new to rooting cuttings, and I really want to do some hydrangeas.
Someone told me they couldn't be rooted, others said they could. HELP!!

Figured you guys would know

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

They can be rooted--I've never done it myself so I don't know when the right time of year is or what sort of cuttings you're supposed to do, but I do know they can be propagated that way. Unless they're patented hydrangeas, in which case you're not supposed to propagate them that way without the permission of the patent holder.

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

These are just some I"ve had for years, got them from Wal mart I'm sure. I just wanted to put some in another bed. jk Can't hurt to try!!! I really didn't even know you had to do it a certain time of year. uh oh.!!! lol

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

I really don't do cuttings so for hydrangeas I don't know if it matters at all what time of year you take the cuttings. Some plants will root better at certain times of year but I think it has to do with whether they root best from softwood cuttings vs hardwood, and for hydrangeas I just don't know which ones work best. I'm sure someone else around here does though, hopefully you'll have some more details soon!

Edgartown, MA(Zone 7a)

Lorraine,
Hydrangeas will root quickly and easily from softwood cuttings but generally layering is considered a better method as you will have a larger more sustantle new young plant. I am not familar with the challenges of wintering over plants in Texas but in my zone I would still feel confident that I could winter over a softwood cutting that you started now and of course there would be no concern with wintering over a layered cutting that you removed from the parent plant in the spring of 09. kt

Saint Louis, MO

I agree with runktrun wih the layering method. Last december, my yard had a major make over and the majority of my hydrangeas were transplanted to new location. Quite a few branches got layered accidentally during the transplant process when the workers mulched the plants. To much of my surprise, I've found many young hydrangeas, some even with tiny booms from the accidental layering.
I've also obtained what I believe are rooted cuttings of hydrangeas from a local nursery. They appear to be one year old and the roots are very fine. I can't tell you how the rooting was done however.
Try both methods and tell us about it! :)

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

Ok, let me show you all my ignorance. How do you layer? Yes, there are still people like me out there!!! lol

Hurst, TX(Zone 7b)

Check the rooting/layering instructions on this website's propagation webpage:

http://www.hydrangeashydrangeas.com/propagation.html

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

Thank you very much for the link!!!

Wayland, MA(Zone 6a)

lorraine,
I have rooted cuttings of hydrangea quite a few times and they are really easy . what I would do is take a cutting of a non flowering branch that is green. strip the leaves off of the lower leaf nodes ( thats where the roots will grow from) . fill small ( 4 inch?) pots with potting soil and water the soil. when the soil has settled poke a hole in it with a pencil . you can dip the cuttings in rooting hormone which you should be able to get at any garden center place the cutting into the hole trying not to knock off the rooting hormone powder then press the soil to firm it around the cutting. keep the cuttings moist and in light shade they should root fairly quickly . the picture is of a hydrangea I rooted last summer
good luck laura

Thumbnail by laurawege
Saint Louis, MO

So cool laurawege!
If you pick a taller branch, would you expect a larger plant? Or is it better to pick a shorter branch so the new plant can bush out and not be too leggy?

Chalfont, PA(Zone 6b)

When you do the layering method, how long should it take to develop roots?

Wayland, MA(Zone 6a)

I think you should do a shorter cuttings, they will wilt if they have to much responsibility so I also cut some of the larger leaves in half so that the cutting will not have too much to keep hydrated . the cutting in the photo was a single tip cutting and it grew into three branches this year
laura

Saint Louis, MO

Thanks for the advice. I'll have to try it out. It looks like you planted your cutting directly into the soil. Is this better than doing it into pots as the nurseries do?

Wayland, MA(Zone 6a)

I actually rooted it in a small pot then in late summer planted it in the ground , it had only one branch last year
laura

Pawleys Island, SC

I root them quite often. sometimes I just stick the cuttings in the sand in a shady place and keep them moist, other times I actually stick them in pots.
Right now I have some started in a 6 cell pack in a ziplock baggie as an experiment. So far the cuttings haven't even wilted.
I have been told you could root them in water, but I haven't been successful that way.
Hope this helps, Ibartoo

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

So you put them in a baggie like you would a seed? I noticed the other day I was lifting the limbs of one and there was a new one underthere where the branch was touching the ground.

I'[ve heard about putting them in small pots, what's the difference in the small and the ground around the big plant. Always wondered about that.

I've got some in little pots now. To me the little pots are about 3" pots, right?

Pawleys Island, SC

Lorraine,
my small pots are 3-4 inches, and the only difference I see is that if the small pot drys out, then the cutting has no hope of finding any water at all. If it is in the ground the cutting has a chance of being able to attract the water it needs.
My biggest problem is that i tend to forget putting them in the ground. I am starting a few cuttings today, I will let you know how they root.
Ibartoo

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

Cool, please do. I went out today and was going to take some low hanging stems and put it on top of the ground like ya'll said to do. Underneath, I guess it did it by itself, cause there were 4 little babies under there.
Only way I can grow something is by accident!!!!

Pawleys Island, SC

Hey, Accidents still count. LOL, just don't tell anyone they were accidents.....

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

Yeah, I;ll just act like I'm an expert !!! Been doing it all my life!

North of Atlanta, GA(Zone 8a)

I have never done it myself but my neighbor just cut a few of his and stick it in the ground and they always root for him. However, he does it in the spring as it's too hot here in the summer to try to root them. I notice some of them wilt with the heat we've been having. They do better in shaded area.

Starkville, MS

I have rooted hydrangeas for years-----and didn't know until recently that it was recommended that you use a non-blooming stem. In fact, I always looked for one with a bloom----but immediately cut it off. Then I remove the lower leaves, leaving just a few at the top. The ones that are left are then cut down to half their original size. When it is not hot summer time in Mississippi, I place a large plastic drink bottle over it (with the bottom sliced off and top cap removed). The soil that I use is usually some bagged dirt with some sand mixed in. Then, it is put under a tree, watered to keep it from drying out-----and then, I wait and watch. Actually I use the same method for rooting roses, fig trees, salvias, etc.

Shirleyd
zone 7b

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

Thanks, ya'll. I think I have a couple rooted, but don't want to mess with them. I'm going to try the bottle method. I found another one under a bush that had rooted. Maybe I should just leave them to their own devices.!!! lol

Cincinnati, OH(Zone 6a)

I hve only 3 hydrangeas, so I'm far from being an expert. I started one last year by layering. This takes no real knowledge or gardening expertise; otherwise, I would not have succeeded.

In fall of 2006, I took the lowest branch on my Endless Summer, made a trench in the soil about 2 or 3" deep with my weed digger, and stuck the center of a branch down into the shallow trench. I left the last several inches above ground. Pushed dirt with my hands over the branch center, and mulched with fall leaves. In early summer the following year (2007) I severed that branch from the mother plant with pruning sheers, dug it up and transplanted to another spot, and kept moist. This was that little branch by late summer. It's a nice healthy little hydrangea now.

This method takes next to no talent or effort. Worked well for me.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

I like that method!! I guess I had branches get heavy, cause they rooted themselves. They rooted this year. When can I seperate them from mommy?

Cincinnati, OH(Zone 6a)

Sorry, Lorraine, I can't help you there. For me, it's something of a crap shoot. I just guessed at some point the it must have rooted and then separated it. Hey, I told you I don't know anything!

I found a picture of that plant this year. This was a few weeks ago.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Longboat Key, FL

Good luck. No problem.

I started with four Nikko Blues, and now have a forest.

Pick the stockier stems, preferably those without a blossom head. Cut off the tops, about 18 inches long. Strip the leaves, leaving only the top two or four. Use Rootone -- if you have it. Drill a hole into the ground, I use a crowbar. Stick the cuttings as far into the hole as you can. Tamp in the ground around the top. Water it. Go away. Wait.

You can follow the posts I've made of my Nikkos.

Be well

: )

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

Again, thank you. Glad to know I can put it in the ground!! I guess if they rooted themselves these should root.!!! lol

Ninety Six, SC

Can you root cuttings from other types such as the paniculatas?

Jeanie

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

Ok , now Karen. You have to know more than me. !!! I didn't know what a bubbler is. When I heard the word, I thought it had to be a plant..

Here's what I heard and I know ya'll will know the answer. I decided once I needed blue hydrangeas and a neighbor who had one, told me to put rusty nails around the plant. I did and voila, I had bllue.

Does the soil make the flower the color it is? I have some white ones, gave one to a friend, she planted it and it is pink now. , I have to know!!!

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

White ones stay white, except there are some H. paniculata cultivars that are pale pink or age to pink, but the soil doesn't have any effect on that, they'd do it regardless.

As far as the rusty nail--that's more of an urban legend, there's no way a couple nails would not be enough to significantly change the pH of your soil. So if you have alkaline soil your blooms are still going to be pink, and if your soil is acidic your blooms most likely would have been blue anyway (unless your soil was deficient in aluminum). Had your blooms been pink before, and if so did you do any other amendments?

North of Atlanta, GA(Zone 8a)

Also, if you have trouble with the (connected) stem staying in the ground, put a brick on top of it, after you dig a small hole to put part of the stem in the ground.

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

Hi, I know it would take more than a couple nails, I put a whole whole bunch around them. Had a box of nails that had rusted, so just dug around it and put probably 30, 40 there. It turned blue. Do you think it was just going to do that anyway? It was pink.

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

if you had a whole bunch and your pH wasn't too far off from where it needed to be then it's possible they dropped the pH just enough, although there are probably better (and safer) ways to amend the soil next time. The reason I made the comment I did is that a lot of people who hear about the nails seem to think they could take a nail or two and stick those in the soil and magically have their hydrangeas turn blue and that's not going to work.

Longboat Key, FL

There was a great show a couple of years ago on tv, where the hero detective found where the killer had hidden the gun -- he noted that one of the hydrangeas in a hedge had turned blue.

Believe it or not.

: )

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

I believe you, flyboy!!! One good detective!! mUst have grown them himself. That gun must have been rusted really good.!

Also, I agree Ecrane, takes more than that. I told a friend that once, she went home found a couple roofing nails and then wondered why it didn't turn blue. lol

What else can you do? What can you add to the soil? I've got really good composted soil and all but this year seems like the 3 I have aren't blooming like they shoud and one is white and the other is a pale pink. Both are supposed to be pink. They did good last year.

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

Aluminum sulfate. There is no rushing the color changes and using too much can kill the plant so proceed with caution. From hydrangeashydrangeas.com:


To obtain a blue hydrangea, aluminum must be present in the soil. To ensure that aluminum is present, aluminum sulfate may be added to the soil around the hydrangeas.

Authorities recommend that a solution of 1/2 oz (1 Tbsp) aluminum sulfate per gallon of water be applied to plants (which are at least 2-3 years old) throughout the growing season. Important: Water plants well in advance of application and put solution on cautiously, as too much can burn the roots.

To make the aluminum available to the plant, the pH of the soil should be low (5.2-5.5). Adding aluminum sulfate will tend to lower the pH of the soil. Another method for lowering the pH is to add organic matter to the soil such as coffee grounds, fruit and vegetable peels, grass clippings etc.

If the soil naturally contains aluminum and is acid (low pH) the color of the hydrangea will automatically tend toward shades of blue and/or purple.

The choice of fertilzer will also affect the color change. A fertilizer low in phosphorus and high in potassium is helpful in producing a good blue color(25/5/30 is good. Potassium is the last number). Superphosphates and bone meal should be avoided when trying to produce blue.

There's more information on the site.

Gilmer, TX(Zone 8a)

Ok, My head hurts. I think I love pink and white. lol. I'll goback and read it sentence at a time and take it all in. Gotta test the soil, but somewhere my son has a soil testing kit. Thanks, I just can't believe ya'll carry all that knowledge around. My head would explode!

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

It's not in my head but directly from the site!

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