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Shady Gardens: Deep Shade II

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 25, 2008
5:15 AM

Post #5156143

We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/725218/

This is the continuation of our discussion of the challenge of successful gardening in deep shade. If you have questions or answers on this topic, this is a great place to be!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 25, 2008
9:16 AM

Post #5156382

Weerobin: I like both your epimedium wushanense and the thalictrum (no id). Let me know if you ever id it!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 25, 2008
5:58 PM

Post #5158206

I'm trying to decide, should I plant Heuchera behind hosta, or visa versa? Or maybe mix them throughout? I'm going to look up and label the mature height and width on each one to help decide. Any thoughts? They will be at the front of my bed.

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

June 25, 2008
6:26 PM

Post #5158317

I like them mixed but have all mine arround a tree. I have a hosta strip garden and will put some coral bells in with them. BEV

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 25, 2008
6:35 PM

Post #5158363

Very nice, dragonfly! Love the birdhouse, too!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 25, 2008
7:40 PM

Post #5158578

There's a wide range of size of hosta, and to a lesser extent, heuchera. And both can take a long time to reach mature size. So my answer is "it depends!" I'm faced with the same question right now on a new bed I am (slowly) putting in.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 25, 2008
9:49 PM

Post #5159135

Goodness, and then we also have to consider color!! Dragonfly, I also like your bird house. What is that tree with the giant leaves?

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

June 25, 2008
9:53 PM

Post #5159151

Where is the tree in the pics that you are talking about Storm?
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 25, 2008
10:01 PM

Post #5159181

Not the evergreen.

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

June 25, 2008
11:14 PM

Post #5159456

I think I see what you think you see! I am standing on the porch. To the left is a soft maple limb hanging down and it looks like it is on the hybred poplar on the other side of the drive. Is that what it is?? I will give you a closer look at the HP at this time there was another spruce there too. The poplar is on the left. Bev

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stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 26, 2008
12:20 AM

Post #5159753

It was the closeup of the maple. beautiful pink shrub there!!!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2008
2:00 AM

Post #5160191

Since hostas vary from 10 inches or less to 3 feet or more it really does depend on the hosta. Heucheras are more low growing and I think do better towards the front of the border.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 26, 2008
2:13 AM

Post #5160279

Thanks, Doss. Maybe the delicate texture of the heuchera Leaves vs those of the Hosta also make the Heuchera better if placed in front. I Guess the mini hostas might do well to be mixed in with the Heuchera.

Doss the picture of your lovely shade garden stays in my mind. What is that pretty green and white plant along the top of your wall?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2008
2:19 AM

Post #5160310

That is hosta Golden Tiara if it's what I think you mean. I would buy Grand Tiara though because Golden Tiara has a reputation for carrying the virus HVX. It multiplies rapidly so you can make a border in not too many years. These started out as six plants. It's one of the easiest hostas to grow - not that there are hard hostas, just that these multiply rapidly.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 26, 2008
2:26 AM

Post #5160347

Thank you, I thought it was a hosta, but it seemed to be laying down almost hanging.

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

June 26, 2008
2:38 AM

Post #5160423

That is a red ornimental crab tree that is in the pic. BEV

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doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2008
2:39 AM

Post #5160427

That could be the creeping jenny that you saw. It does hang down over the edge of the wall. It will be happy in full sun to mostly shade. In some places it can get a little greedy and take over so you have to keep after it.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2008
2:39 AM

Post #5160430

Wow is that tree stunning. I've never seen a crabapple tree that color!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2008
2:41 AM

Post #5160445

I agree, it's gorgeous! Any idea what the name of it is?

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

June 26, 2008
2:42 AM

Post #5160453

That is in full bloom. Here it is just when it started.

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dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

June 26, 2008
2:43 AM

Post #5160458

Sorry don't know the name.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 26, 2008
5:36 AM

Post #5161072

Doss, No it was the hosta. I think that you should repost that photo to this new thread. It will be an inspiration for those new to the thread.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2008
7:46 PM

Post #5163944

OK here it is:

Thumbnail by doss
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SongsofJoy
New Hampshire, NH
(Zone 5b)

June 26, 2008
7:51 PM

Post #5163969

Doss, that's stunning as usual. What is the variegated plant in front of the ligularia? Is that also ligularia - the leaves look similar?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2008
7:59 PM

Post #5163997

The variegated plant in front of the ligularia is farfugium 'Argentea'. It's really a beautiful plant.
SongsofJoy
New Hampshire, NH
(Zone 5b)

June 26, 2008
8:03 PM

Post #5164018

So it is a ligularia? It looks like it's not hardy in my zone though :-(

doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2008
8:10 PM

Post #5164051

Farfugium and ligularia used to be the same family (or whatever) but several years ago they broke them down into two groups. Farfugium need less water and are evergreen here whereas the ligularias droop without a lot of water and are definitely deciduous.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 26, 2008
10:22 PM

Post #5164677

Georgeous as always doss. I see my faves the ligularias. Dragonfly I love all your photos also. Nice. Stormyla... My dragons tail is doing great. I really like this little plant. Im glad I got it. The colors just shine don't they? Ronna
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 27, 2008
12:33 AM

Post #5165226

Doss, do you give tours of your gardens? Sheesh, and I just left no. CA a couple weeks ago!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 27, 2008
12:37 AM

Post #5165232

Yep, you should have dropped by! We could have tea in the gazebo. :-)
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 27, 2008
12:39 AM

Post #5165241

Thanks, Doss. Not wanting to seem piggy, but could you also please add the shot where the Ligularia is blooming? It makes such a statement.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 27, 2008
12:39 AM

Post #5165245

Maybe next year? I lived in your area for a short time--Sunnyvale. Loved it there!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 27, 2008
12:44 AM

Post #5165265

Dragonfly, I'm totally jealous of your trees!!!!! Did you plant them? How old are they?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 27, 2008
12:54 AM

Post #5165310

Sure, see you next year!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 27, 2008
1:20 AM

Post #5165531

Cool, thanks!

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

June 27, 2008
1:24 AM

Post #5165559

The trees are about 15 years old. A nieghbor gave them to me. Her son worked for a landscaper and they were going to throw them away because they were not perfect so look how pretty!! lucky me. BEV
Here is a yoshino cherry tree

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 27, 2008
2:25 AM

Post #5165876

Gee, I'd love to have such "not perfect" trees! Boy, they were dummies, huh? Good for you!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 27, 2008
2:48 AM

Post #5165998

We are such a throw away society!

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 27, 2008
10:43 PM

Post #5169893

It is so true. Oh just throw it away... how is the dragons tail doing??? Mine is great. It got a nother new leaf and the color is so golden!! I even see there are a few new flowers coming on. I really like this little plant I kinda wish I wouldve planted it in a different place... :{. So I could see it better. Very nice little plant looks very happy. Ronna
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 27, 2008
10:46 PM

Post #5169910

Ronna, I haven't received it yet. Right now I'm buried under a pile of Heucheras, literally.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 27, 2008
11:05 PM

Post #5169998

Oh I see I thought you have that baby in the ground!!! You will really enjoy it. So cute. I love the coloring of this plant. Ronna
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 28, 2008
6:30 AM

Post #5171660

Today, I received in the mail some plants that I ordered from Wayside Gardens. The one that I'm most intrigued with is a Tiarella called Heronswood Mist. It has pink stems and leaves that are cream colored and speckled with pink and green. It should look wonderful in shade. It's rated for shade to partial shade. Blooms in Summer. 16 to 18" tall.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 29, 2008
10:54 PM

Post #5179232

Im going to look it up:)

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 29, 2008
11:04 PM

Post #5179276

Nice I do have several foam flowers but do not have that one... But in the spring they are really neat. I have stargazer mercury. Nice I love the leaf shape and color. Ronna
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 30, 2008
2:08 AM

Post #5180079

Wow, Ronna, that's a pretty one. I like the leaves. How big do the leaves get?

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 1, 2008
10:54 PM

Post #5189692

Stormyla the leaves are around 5 inche long and 4 inches wide. The plant its self is only 10 inches high but boy does it ever blossom in the spring. Very pretty. Here is a photo of mine. I really like this plant a whole lot. Ronna

Thumbnail by gardenlady123
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stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 2, 2008
12:55 AM

Post #5190170

Gee Ronna, I might have to get one of those!!!!! How old is yours and how big around or wide is it?
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 2, 2008
2:17 AM

Post #5190698

Ooo, love the leaves on that!

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 2, 2008
11:31 AM

Post #5191920

Mine is now two years old and has really grown since I've planted them I have two. They are now about 18 inches around. They have really filled out nicely... They blossomed really nice this year full of flowers!!!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 6, 2008
6:23 AM

Post #5210992

Ronna, I'm hoping the Tiarella Heronswood thrives here. I've planted other Tiarella, in dormant form, but so far nothings emerged. The wildlife could have gotten them, or maybe they just weren't viable. There are so many pretty Tiarellas.

I'm thinking that when ordering plants, I may start doing some of it over the phone and not on the web, because it seems that more dormant plants die than others. Does anyone have similar experience?
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 6, 2008
11:49 AM

Post #5211223

I also have had frustrating experiences with dormant plants never coming up.
But I wouldnt think it would be different whether ordered by phone or on line.
I guess the only sure-fire way to do it is to buy them directly from the nursery in person.

Ive ordered lots of tiarellas on line and I dont recall any of them arriving dormant.
They do beautifully here.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 6, 2008
5:09 PM

Post #5212654

Hey Weerobin! I meant that on the phone, I could ask if they would be shipped in dormant form. I could send emails to the websites, but that seems like a lot of work. Usually, I work later than what most Nurseries stay open and weekends need to be spent working in the garden and not out shopping. Most of my plant purchases are made online. It's a rare and great treat for me to get to a nursery!

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 6, 2008
11:44 PM

Post #5214486

Now Tiarella are of the same family as the dragon tails correct??? Sorry Im not really good with all the sci-fi names.. To hard most days for me to remember my own name... LOL. But I really love the dragon tails!! Good luck. Im going to look up the rest of the family. Im in love. Have a great week. Ronna
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 7, 2008
12:07 PM

Post #5216657

Ronna, My Dragon Tails is a Hosta.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 7, 2008
7:56 PM

Post #5219112

Oh well then thats a different story!!! LOL. This is my dragon tail its a tarella!!! It get really neat "flowers" on it they kinda look like a small jack in the pulip flower. Really a neat looking little plant. I do not know if you can see the flower or not. Its really wet we just had a t-storm... Ronna

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 8, 2008
12:26 AM

Post #5220597

Ronna, sorry to break the news, but your plant isn't a tiarella.
But it is a dragon tails!
It's a pinellia tripartita 'Dragon Tails'.
It's a very charming plant, so I understand why you like it.
I have one also, which is pretty darn cute.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 8, 2008
12:37 AM

Post #5220660

LOL, Are we the blind leading the blind????? Sometimes I feel so clueless...
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 8, 2008
1:20 AM

Post #5220902

Hey, we're all here to learn! I learn so much from everyone here, and have fun doing it!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 8, 2008
2:01 AM

Post #5221147

Ronna, that's a pinellia not a tiarella.
http://www.gardencrossings.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/plants.plantDetail/plant_id/606/index.htm
Pretty all the same.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 9, 2008
12:19 PM

Post #5228508

Oh my mistake. LOL. But your right I still really like this plant. Pin...Tia... its all so confusing!!! Who really cares as long as you like the plants correct? Have a great day... Ronna
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 9, 2008
4:49 PM

Post #5229899

It's a great plant but it was sure the strangest looking tiarella I'd ever seen! LOL Very pretty foliage.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 14, 2008
10:24 PM

Post #5259273

I wanted everyone to see my clematis,,, "Rooguchii". I absolutly love this plant. Wow it has been blossoming for about 6 weeks.!!!! Absotuly georgeous, the bells are so elegant. The shade of blue is beautiful. Its the most perfect clematis Ive ever seen. The best thing is that its for shade to part shade and let me tell you it blossoms profusely. So if you have shade they are very nice. I have had to tie it up on the trellis but thats fine I like seeing all of the flowers. Ronna

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 14, 2008
10:31 PM

Post #5259299

Beautiful, thanks for sharing this, Ronna!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 14, 2008
10:32 PM

Post #5259304

Ronna: Thank you! I had never heard of that one!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 14, 2008
10:39 PM

Post #5259324

Ronna: Thank you! I had never heard of that one! I now read that it can get mildew when in shady locations. Has that been your experience?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 14, 2008
10:56 PM

Post #5259408

I grow Rooguchi in the shade too and it does beautifully. I've never had problem with mildew and believe me it mildew is possible, I'll get it. I do get some mildew on other clematis even in full sun but not this one.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 14, 2008
10:57 PM

Post #5259410

No not at all. Mine is in dappled shade until about 3:00 pm. Then it gets some full sun. So mine is not in full shade all the time. Thanks for the info and I will keep a watchful eye. But isnt it beautiful??? There are three plants there. Now I have to find out about pruning when to do it. I think it blossoms on new wood so probably in the spring huh? Thanks, Ronna
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 14, 2008
11:01 PM

Post #5259426

Rooguchi is type 3. Prune to approximately 12" to a pair of leaf buds in the early spring. I don't know how early for you because I'm low zone impaired! LOL
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 15, 2008
1:17 AM

Post #5260097

It's a beautiful plant, Ronna!
Can it sprawl on the ground or does it need to be staked?
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2008
1:49 AM

Post #5260309

That's pretty funny Doss! Do you live in a humid part of California? I'm surprised that you get Mildew. Yesterday, I tried to get a friend to visit my garden, but she was staying home to scrub the mold off of her house. I suppose we shady gardeners are the only folks with that fun chore!!!

Today, it finally stopped raining around 10AM, and I was so glad because I took the day off to pot & plant. I worked in my semi-shade garden all day. I planted 3 Trollius Globe flower, 15 Yellow trillium, 8 Asiatic Lilies "Fangio", 2 Heuchera Southern Comfort, & 2 Heuchera Autumn Bride, 2 Hydrangea "Unique", 1 Hydrangea "Limelight" & 1 Hydrangea "Little Lamb".

I also built cages to go around the Hydrangeas to keep out the critters!!! In the winter, I'll fill the cages with leaves to try to prevent some of the bud loss we had this year when the late March freeze followed an unusually warm winter. I sprayed everything with fungicide before planting, because it's been "duck soup" here in the east for weeks. My best garden crop this year is mushrooms!!!!

Plus I dug out over 40 Volunteer Black Walnut seedlings!!!!! I also dug out 4 large Elm seedlings & potted them up for a friend whom lost hers last month in a thunder storm.. Of course, I also did another 5 or 6 misc. garden chores. Whew, am I wiped out!!!!

Some gals in another forum told me that they always keep really small shrubs in pots until they are at least 18" tall. So, I also potted up 3 Buddleia "Sungold", 2 White Lilacs and 5 Kalmia, "Olympic Fire". I also have some other small shrubs that might get this treatment. I don't want to have to bring these into the garage, so I'm thinking, I might dig a trench and bury them all in peat & Mulch or maybe set them all outside inside a rectangle of straw bales. Does anyone have any suggestions?

Tonight I gassed another ground hog. I still can't plant in my deep shade garden, because I'm still battling an unbelievable vole infestation there. I have a lot of plants waiting to go in there and caring for them all both bare root and in pots in this unbelievably rainy season has not been easy. If it's still not resolved by next week, I may go buy 3 large troughs and plant everything in there to hold them over. Well, now you all know what I've been up to!!!

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 15, 2008
2:35 AM

Post #5260603

I have an incredible vole infestation, or maybe chipmunks. There are 1" holes in the dirt all over my yard. Drives me nuts.

I am losing my Kerria, that another DGer gave me last year. It is supposed to be disease and pest free, but mine looks awful. I wish I knew what I could do to rescue it -- I think it is a goner.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2008
2:45 AM

Post #5260669

Happy, What are it's symptoms?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 15, 2008
4:29 AM

Post #5261102

You are busy storm!

We have warm dry days and very cool nights and the combination of the two is perfect for powdery mildew on plants. We don't have humid weather though.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2008
5:11 AM

Post #5261238

Doss, I would have never thought that those conditions would case powdery mildew. Do you get morning dew?
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 15, 2008
6:11 AM

Post #5261341

Stormyla: The reason I think my Kerria is in trouble is that each plant (there are 2) is down to one what I will call "healthy" branch. The plants were from small rooted divisions last year, so the size alone wouldn't be determinative, but the leaves on the "healthy" branches are spotted with brown and in one case, the leaves are actually white. The "unhealthy" branches are basically dead. There is no sign of new growth. The plants are in two very different locations in my yard, so I can't figure out what the problem is. I've really been watching these babies because I really want them to make it, so I can't figure out what I am doing wrong. I googled Kerria, and can't find anything it requires that I'm not providing. It is not supposed to be fussy.
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 15, 2008
8:18 AM

Post #5261484

I can't believe I haven't found this thread sooner! You're all posting lovely photos of some of my favorite plants :) Dragon Tails is one I love! When we purchased ours years ago it was sold as Pinellia 'Golden Dragon' but I think basically it's the same plant - in the photo it's on the lower right. This one is in deep, deep shade but we've found that in brighter shade it's much more "golden".

gardenlady, your Rooguchi is stunning! We have an area along the house that needs a complete overhaul and I've been considering adding a few Clematis to cover the foundation wall. This might just have to be added to my list :) Your Stargazer Mercury is lovely as well - I've found this Tiarella to be a real vigorous plant in the gardens and great bloomer! Although we've got a lot of Heucheras and Heucherellas, I tend to favor the Tiarellas, they're usually better growers for us and I like their habit and flowers better :)

Happy, sorry to hear that your Kerria isn't doing well :( If you ever have the chance to visit us, you can pull as many suckers of our Kerria (http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/54605/) as you want! My "trimming" back of our shrub hasn't worked, I think it actually stimulated the darn thing and it's creeping even farther into my Hosta bed :( Someone gave us a couple pieces of the variegated Kerria http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/76639/ and I'm going to be careful where I plant it - the monster bordering our Hostas is turning into a nightmare!

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stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2008
9:19 AM

Post #5261530

Happy, It sound like they have a fungus. Have you used a fungicide? When I get that, if it's not a large shrub, I dig it up and hose off the dirt completely exposing the roots. I remove all spotted leaves and cut off branches back to the healthy part. I throw away the used mulch and remove the old soil. I spray the hole and the entire plant with fungicide. On non-evergreen ones, I use Neem. Then replant as usual. Most of the time, on non-evergreens, the improvement is immediate. Sometimes I think the poor things get such wet feet they're just happy to get the fresh air.

It's important to leave no diseased debris near the plant floor. Also, I keep dipping the pruners in bleach between cuts. I've had a lot of fungus this year what with all of the rain. So far, this treatment has saved everything. The owner of my local nursery normally only stocks organic products, but he told me that fungii have been so bad this year, he's had to use and sell chemicals.

RCN, Thanks to KYWoods and all this has been a wonderful thread. If you have the time, go back and read the predecessor thread. There's lots of great stuff in it.
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 15, 2008
9:41 AM

Post #5261561

Already been there, done that! LOL Found Thalictrum kiusianum there, another sweet plant I adore :) Too many plants I want - Vancouveria (sp?), more Epimediums, etc., etc.

stormy, I got the new Wayside catalog a few days ago - that Epimedium and Thalictrum you mentioned are gorgeous but EXPENSIVE - I'll have to wait until I can find them cheaper :(

stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2008
9:52 AM

Post #5261576

RCN, I thought so too, so they're still on my wish list! I've recently seen those types of plants for sale for $50 each. Who buys them???? I lose too many to spend that.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 15, 2008
10:17 AM

Post #5261615

RCN, I have tried Vancouveria several times without success.
I don't think it enjoys heat and humidity, but who knows.
My epimediums and thalictrums do great, however.

I also have found Kerria to be awfully rambunctious.
It's suckering is difficult to keep in check.
Mine is particularly bad, because a nearby calycanthus is suckering just as determinedly.
They're duking it out, it seems. Quite a mess.
You really can't afford to turn your back on either one of them for very long!

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 15, 2008
11:17 AM

Post #5261743

Weerobin... The clematis can crawl along the ground. In fact thats what doss does. She has it crawling along her shrubs its been posted in photos before. Very pretty!! So either way you would like is great. The stalks are a nice shade of red also. I just like the height that the trellis added to that garden. ;) You do have to tie it in some places because it doesnt cling like other clematis'.

rcn48... I like the photo of your dragons tail!!! Mine is doing great. It looks like yours is pretty much in shade huh? Is it still the pretty rich yellow color? Looks very happy!! I noticed there are some new leaves coming on mine. You are right about the stargazer mercury they do blossom profusly in the spring. For a long time too. I have the same luck as you with all the foam flowers. They do really well for me also.

I also have a Kerria but its still pretty small so havent experienced the invasive part yet. Should I be scared? Are the like the Forsithias? With the suckers everywhere? Ronna
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 15, 2008
11:43 AM

Post #5261830

Stormyla: I could try your technique (I have Captan -- would that be ok for the fungicide? -- and then you spray Neem oil after replanting?), except there are no healthy leaves, and the plants are very small as it is. So I'd have to cut back every stem. If it would vigorous it would grow back from the roots, but these plants are anything but. I can try that this weekend, I suppose.

RCN: I'm so glad to see you here. And as if I were not already eager to come see your gorgeous gardens, to dangle yet another incentive! Every photo you post is so inspiring.

This message was edited Jul 15, 2008 7:46 AM
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2008
2:24 PM

Post #5262495

happy, I'm have no experience using Captan and don't know if it will burn the roots. The 2 products that I alternately use are Fungus Pharm fungicide which is soybean oil and rosemary or Organica K+Neem, insecticde-fungicide. Whichever product I use, I spray the entire plant before returning it to the hole.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 15, 2008
4:36 PM

Post #5263151

If I have a bad problem with fungus I spray with Safer fungicide or Bayer Rose Complete. I also spray Messenger every three weeks and that helps a whole lot.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2008
8:24 PM

Post #5264247

Doss, I've heard good things about Messenger.

Ronna, Who's to say if it will be invasive for you? RCN lives in a milder area than you.
If she had it planted in a different spot, it might not be a problem.

On RCN's advise, I ripped out a bunch of Artemisia Limelight. Would it have become invasive? I don't know, but it's centers were declining so I tossed it even though it's beautiful color brightened up the shade garden.

I happen to be the only person who couldn't get Chameleon plant to grow!!!

I've been looking for some silver leafed plants for the shade garden. Big Dipper Farms has some nice Pulmonarias that are silver. Does anyone have any experience with them? Big Dipper Farms seems to be expensive on Perennials and very reasonable on shrubs. Does anyone else think so?

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 15, 2008
8:35 PM

Post #5264305

stormyla, you are right I'm not going to do anything yet... I like the growth its made so far. I love the Chameleon plant and have been looking for some more. Mine are beautiful this year. Takes quit a while for it to really spread though. But the colors are so great in the part sun. Ronna
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2008
9:27 PM

Post #5264548

Ronna, I bet if you'd post a want for it, you'd get lots of offers!!!!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 15, 2008
9:55 PM

Post #5264674

The key about Big Dipper Farms is to actually call them and see about availability. Sometimes they will send an order without something and that's very disappointing. Just don't rely on their availability status on their website.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2008
10:02 PM

Post #5264703

Thanks, Doss. That will help wittle down my order!!!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2008
12:29 AM

Post #5265424

Yikes, it gives me goosebumps to think of letting another Chameleon plant loose in my yard.
Been there, done that. I'm still pulling remnants years later ...
But I definitely plan to let a clematis Roguchi loose in my shade garden this year.

Stormy, have you considered Chinese asarum (asarum splendens)?
It's a pretty variegated asarum which isn't too fussy. Clump-forming.
Or ainslea, or the pewter-leafed heucheras, or variegated disporums?
Lots of weird stuff out there, but unfortunately can be expensive.
But asarum splendens is pretty inexpensive.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2008
12:46 AM

Post #5265515

Thanks Weerobin, I was looking for something taller than 12". I couldn't find any info on ainslea. Are you sure that's how it is spelled?
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2008
12:55 AM

Post #5265562

Maybe it's ainslaea... But it's not a tall plant, so may not fit the bill.
You can see a picture at Asiatica nursery website (under their woodland perennials section).
It's very silvery, but pretty much ground-hugging. I don't think I've seen any flowers.
Mine is doing fine after a few years without special care.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2008
1:05 AM

Post #5265635

Thanks, Weerobin. Did you get your Skimmia yet?
BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 16, 2008
1:14 AM

Post #5265687

you have some of the most unique shade plants I have ever seem. I absolutely love and now want one of those georgeous blue bell flowwer Clematis and that ??ferfugeum argentius (I feel sure I slaughtered that name from memory)--I believe it was the pink flowering shrub..er tree. are you in the plant exchange info? Does that Clematis seed? If so I desparately would love ? I am 7 in NC. I have a naturalized woodland wildflower shade grden with many May apple, Trilium, Soloman's Seal and other typical woodland plants. a couple years after getting this property...one spring I saw a good size patch of blue off i the woods..there was a rather large patch of Dwarf Crested Iris! They have been fun.
Hsappy gardening ;-))...Birdie.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2008
1:32 AM

Post #5265811

Hi Birdi, Welcome! I grow both the Iris Cristata and the Dward Iris Reticulata. They are so wonderful. I love how they keep spreading and now they need to be divided and moved all over the garden. It's great that they bloom so early. I may look for some of the white ones.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2008
1:39 AM

Post #5265873

Stormy, no I don't have my Skimmia yet. But it's on my list for sure.
I really need to call it a season and quit buying plants for this year!
Enough, is enough.
I think I'm at the point, I'd better devote some time to maintaining the plants I have, rather than continuing to add more.
I'll soon be brousing catalogues through the winter doldrums.
Oops, I forgot all the plants I've already ordered to be delivered this fall.
Oh, well...

doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 16, 2008
2:01 AM

Post #5266015

birdie,It's farfugium Argentea. Can't buy it if you can't spell it. LOL
Clematis are reproduced by cuttings in general I believe.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2008
2:14 AM

Post #5266102

Weerobin, I haven't done that!! But, I would like to put in some double snowdrops, yellow aconite, fritillaria, some more white daffodils and red tulips this year. Oh and my Hyacinths need replenishing. Also want to get some Double Bloodroot! Windflowers are another one of those bare root plantings that never materialized.

It is never ending. My edging is virtually non-existant and is to be my fall project. My other project is a surface for the large path in the corner of my garden. I'll be lucky if I get the edging completed.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2008
4:35 AM

Post #5266720

I just looked up dwarf crested iris in PF...must have some! What's "double" bloodroot, stormy?
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2008
5:11 AM

Post #5266814

It's just bloodroot that has flowers that are doubles.
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2008
9:28 AM

Post #5267134

I knew I was going to like this thread, but you may get me in trouble -found Ainsliaea cordifolia http://www.asiaticanursery.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=plants.plantDetail&plant_id=1204 - what a beauty!

Weerobin, I have always wanted to try Vancouveria. Somewhere I have photos taken at Asticou gardens in Maine where it created a beautiful groundcover in their Japanese garden. I suspect though you're right, it would hate our heat and humidity :(

Ronna, I should try to get a picture of our Kerria - suckers? Everywhere!!! This photo will give you an idea of the size and this was after I pulled suckers out in a 2' perimeter. The photo was taken in the fall of 2006 when I planted this area with Hostas and Ferns. You can barely make out a couple of Hostas in the back where they are growing next to the Kerria. Two years later the Kerria has almost swallowed the Hostas and is rapidly covering the trunk of the River Birch that I had exposed :( I also have the same problem with Calycanthus, again made the mistake of planting Hostas at the base and they're getting swallowed :(

Happy, I'll gladly "dangle more incentives" if it will help get you here faster :) When I told Rick what you said, he said OMG, tell her to come, we've got lots of things we could send you home with! I'm still hanging on to a few pots of Chrysogonum just in case :)

stormyla, I'm so glad you took my advice and ripped out the Artemesia - you won't be sorry! I just ripped out some more last week when weeding, going on 6 years now that I've been trying to get rid of it :(





Thumbnail by rcn48
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2008
10:05 AM

Post #5267154

KyWoods, here's a post of my double bloodroot.
One of my favorite woodland treasures. Blooms early spring.
Dormant later in summer, though mine still have bushy foliage now.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2008
10:07 AM

Post #5267156

Here's a post of the common (single) variety.
They pop up everywhere in my yard.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 16, 2008
10:32 AM

Post #5267179

RCN: Now you know I can kill a Chrysogonum just by looking at it -- I've proved it on what you gave me before! Tell Rick a million thanks, and one of these days I'll be on your doorstop. I promise I'll call first!!!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2008
12:35 PM

Post #5267546

Both bloodroots are lovely! We have the single ones out here in the woods.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2008
4:43 PM

Post #5268835

Weerobin, How long did it take for that Bloodroot to colonize so nicely? I planted some last year in my one tree line and they came up so nicely. I love how they close up at night. They seem to bloom right as the Narcissa are ending. What is the spread on that Ainsliaea?

RCN, you should set your voles to work on that Kerria. The bark on that birch is really neat (not so)! The voles just love my river birch. Why can't they eat the poison ivy that's growing all inside of it??? Do you grow any Pulmonarias?

Doss, Last year I put in some Ligularias. I'm not sure if they were Britt Marie or The Rocket. They have beautiful bronze and purple foliage. I put them towards the back of the bed, but now think they should be moved closer to the front so the nice foliage is visible. I have some Ligularia Osiris to plant and could put them further back in the bed. Do you know if they transplant well?

I have some nice silver leafed Heuchera, but need something to put further back into the bed with greater height to break up all of the green. This section of the bed is about 20' deep. There are Rose of Sharons at the very back with tall Hydrangeas in front of them. These are all under plantings of large trees. There are also two Stachyurus Praecox back there. I love the February blooms.

I don't want to add too many varigated plants as the limited dappled sunlight gives some of the plants a varigated appearance. Every year, I thin the canopy some, trying to let a little light in. I saw a beautiful Scarlet Itea like Little Henry at Big Dipper farms and might add 2 of those. Chartreuse plants would help also. There is one dark green mid size Daphne Mezueum there, but I'm going to read up on the light requirements of some of the others. I have a beautiful Chartreuse Daphne Mezureum Bowles White growing in another bed, but it might not take to the shade. Maybe Daphne Brigg's Moonlight will.

The Dicentra Gold Heart will go somewhere in there. For closer to the front, there's semishade and I love these little shrubs, Hypericum Brigadoon. They just glow. I've put in 4 of these. This section of the bed is about 50' wide, so there's lots of room for more wonderful goodies. Hosta Sunpower is doing a great job of brightening things up. I have some small blue Hostas that are getting crispy in another bed, so I'm going to plant them between the Brigadoons.

I tried Painted Japanese Fern, but they didn't survive. Last month I added two Ghost Ferns, but the Ground Hog ate them, roots and all within two days!!! Yestderday, I added 2 varigated Jacob's Ladders and some more Trollius Globe flowers. I also underplanted the Hypericum "Albury Purple" with more yellow Trillium. Around one of the large trees I added 2 Heuchera Southern Comfort. These get quite large as do the Heuchera Brownies that are in the middle of them. Those 2 Brownies are taking up almost 6' of space!!! There are Trollius planted in among them with Aruncus behind them.

No planting today and lunch hour is almost over!!!!

Thumbnail by stormyla
Click the image for an enlarged view.

doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 16, 2008
5:05 PM

Post #5268958

Ligularias transplant just fine.
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 17, 2008
9:20 AM

Post #5272374

stormyla, a few Pulmonarias here and there in the garden and they do fine :) One of my favorites was 'Raspberry Ice' (from Terra Nova) with lighter green speckled foliage, white margin and "raspberry" flowers. Alas, most of them have reverted and although still nice don't have the striking foliage that they used to. Some of my favorites are 'Trevi Fountain' http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/59648/ (one of the best deep blues I've seen) and 'Majeste' has done well for us http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/69703/. Getting ready to plant 'Diana Clare' http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/126142/ - it's growing rapidly in the pot, let's hope it does as well in the garden! Usually we have better luck with any of the P. longifolia or cevennensis types and I like the long narrow leaves of P. cevennensis :) I had brought P. rubra with me when I moved from Maine but over the past 8 years it has slowly been decreasing from the vigorous clump it used to be :( I'll try to remember to get a few pictures next time I'm in the garden with my camera. I see there are no photos in PF for 'Raspberry Ice' and maybe I can find one that hasn't reverted!

I'll also try to get a picture of Hypericum 'Brigadoon'. I have it planted in two different locations with Eucomis 'Sparkling Burgundy' and the one spot where it gets the most sun is really taking off :) It looks a little shabby after a long winter but the new foliage quickly covers up the older foliage if I don't have a chance to give it a 'haircut'.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 17, 2008
10:32 AM

Post #5272415

Stormy, you can always count on me for some weird suggestions.
There's a chartreuse foliaged 2-3ft tall perennial called leucoseptrum japonicum 'Golden Angel'.
I got mine at a plant sale at our botanical garden.
It is nicely chartreuse and stands out in the shade.
But the only place I saw it on line was expensive (Asiatica).
I have had it in the ground a few years and it's a good grower for me.
The flowers are nothing special, so the foliage is the feature.

The other idea - have you considered Disporum cantoniense Night Heron?
It's not silver or chartreuse, it's purple. And it's certainly tall for back of the shade garden.
It would add different color and certainly provide contrasting structure.
Just a couple thoughts.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 17, 2008
10:34 AM

Post #5272420

And my double bloodroot clump has been in the ground about 3 yrs.
It has really expanded.
The plants are initially so little! But they aren't fussy and grow well.
I have a few other smaller ones scattered around, but the one posted is my best clump.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 17, 2008
12:53 PM

Post #5272933

Reading this thread is intoxicating.

Does anyone know if Claytonia sibirica (Western Spring Beauty) does ok in our area?

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 17, 2008
7:39 PM

Post #5274825

I just got some blood root for postage on the trding forum... Cant wait for it to blossom its in the pring correct??? I just may post a looking for chameleon ad. I love the stuff. Weerobin sound like you dint like it huh? It grows really slow here in my yard for some reason. Mine has been in the ground for about three years and I have a very small patch of it. Enough to sread around a little bit. But anyway. No new plants around here for a while. My son is coming home from the Army. He is getting deployed in the middle of August. We are very sad. But it will be great to have him home. Happy mom in Plainwell!!! Have a great rest of the week. Ronna
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 17, 2008
10:56 PM

Post #5275683

I bet that it will be lovely to see your son again Ronna, even if it's for a short time. I can't imagine how wrenching it must be to see them go back. There are a lot of brave souls out there.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 17, 2008
10:59 PM

Post #5275702

Ronna, that's great that you will have your son home. I will pray for his safety.
What kind of bloodroot did you get, the single or double blooms? I guess if the single ones grow wild here, the double would likely do well. I may look for some.
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2008
8:43 AM

Post #5278270

Ouch! Asiatica's prices seem to be getting higher all the time and that Leucosceptrum is no exception http://www.asiaticanursery.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=plants.plantDetail&plant_id=1187 I wouldn't have a problem if he sent vigorous, well-rooted plants, but I usually have to baby them for a year and at those prices I just can't justify it, unless of course it's something I just HAVE to have! LOL

I would love to try the double Bloodroot in the gardens, if I'm ever able to find it. Weerobin, your clump is just beautiful :) I remember the first time I saw it years ago - I was standing at the check out at one of my favorite nurseries and the owner had the plant sitting on the counter in full bloom. It was absolutely gorgeous and I asked if they had any for sale - he quickly gestured "hands off", that's mine! LOL He had picked it up at a seminar somewhere and paid $75.00 for it!!

Weerobin, do you have Night Heron Disporum growing in your gardens? I've had it here for two years and although it's definitely "different", it's never shown the dark foliage that I've seen in the photos of the plant? Maybe a little dark when it first comes up in the spring, but by the time it flowers, it's just another pretty dark green plant!

Happy, have never grown that Claytonia - but from what I've read, sounds like even though it will reseed and spread, it's short-lived and does go summer dormant by mid summer once the heat kicks in.

stormyla, I absolutely love Dicentra 'Gold Heart' but was always frustrated with the 'blank' spot it left in the gardens by mid summer. Wracked my brain several years ago to find a combo with something that came up later and would hide the 'blank'. Ended up trying hardy Begonia (B. grandis) and it's made the perfect companion for Gold Heart - always late to show in the spring and by the time Gold Heart is finally winding down the Begonia completely covers the area and is blooming by August :)

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 18, 2008
12:23 PM

Post #5278654

RCN: I love hardy Begonia, and I have a lot of it. My problem with it, though, it that it reseeds prolifically. It is easy to pull out, so I don't find it a problem per se, but I don't always notice what it is shading, and I also have a hard time bringing myself to pull it out. RIght now I have some hardy Begonia shading some daylilies and I really should pull it out, but I know if I don't I'll get beautiful flowers in a few weeks, so I'm torn. . . . . so the problem in this case is with the gardener, not the plant.

This message was edited Jul 18, 2008 8:25 AM
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2008
6:12 PM

Post #5280558

Yikes, $75 for double bloodroot? I'll stick with the single ones that grow wild--I like the price a lot better, lol. Weerobin, you didn't pay that for yours, did you? If you got it at a decent price, where'd you find it? Or was it growing there when you moved there?
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2008
9:39 PM

Post #5281574

KyWoods, I couldn't believe the $75 price either.
I checked my standard on-line nursery list and found at Munchkin Gardens for $18, PlantDelights for $28 and Asiatica for $26.
I realize even these are pricey, but not in the $75 range.
I don't remember where I got mine, as it was several years ago.
DanceyTx
Midway, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 19, 2008
12:18 AM

Post #5282307

I just came to this forum to see what was happening over here. lol

Wow! Ya'll are growing some beautiful shade plants. ;)

Does the bloodroot plants grow in full/dappled shade? I do love those plants. My backyard is very shady and I don't have much of anything back there yet. We do have some very hot and humid summers even in the shade. Do you think any of the Bloodroot plants would survive in my zone? I would love to have some of those back there.

Lin
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2008
12:53 AM

Post #5282508

DanceyTx: Mine thrive in hot humid shade.
But I don't know for sure about your zone.
They tolerative root competition quite well, at least here.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 19, 2008
1:45 AM

Post #5282750

Hi Guys! Weerobin $18 is a great price on the double bloodroot. Cheapest I've seen was about $24. I'm going to look into those 2 plants you suggested.

You can't believe the buys I got yesterday. I went to Produce Junction, which is a chain produce store for some berries. On the way in I spied some perennials off to the far side of the parking lot. I came home with a pair of 3 gallon Heuchera Purple Palace for $6 each and a 5' tall Hydrangea Quickfire with about 15 stems for $12. Don't you just love a bargain????

RCN, Thanks for the tip about the Begonia, I'll look it up. Where's the photo of your Brigadoon???? The Eucomis sounds nice too, I'll look for a couple. Are you finding that all of the Pulmonarias revert?

Ronna, I hope that you have a lovely weekend with your son. Hold him close.

I'm off to a weekend In Atlantic City, NJ to see Elton John!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2008
2:56 AM

Post #5283093

Oooo, have fun, Stormy! What a great concert that will be!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 19, 2008
5:48 AM

Post #5283652

RCN, I really like that Eucomis. Does it multiply?
BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 19, 2008
6:30 AM

Post #5283747

Cranesbill geranium from front wildflower garden

Thumbnail by BirdieBlue
Click the image for an enlarged view.

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 19, 2008
6:34 AM

Post #5283757

Wild geranium from my front wildflower garden

Thumbnail by BirdieBlue
Click the image for an enlarged view.

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 19, 2008
6:41 AM

Post #5283774

this is a lavender that I have had for many years. Can someone specifically identify it for me. It's flower is very different from most others

Thumbnail by BirdieBlue
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DanceyTx
Midway, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 19, 2008
12:18 PM

Post #5284198

Thanks Weerobin! I might try some first in a pot and see how it does.

Lin

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 19, 2008
12:19 PM

Post #5284202

BirdieBlud, don't you just love the cranes bills? They are so vibrant in the spring to early summer. I have several. And keep spreading it around the yard. They are such nice companion plants. The way they spread out. You can see the flowers here and there. I like the wild geranims also. Very cute.
My son is on his way home. Should be here late tonight. Can't wait to see him! Ronna
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2008
3:21 PM

Post #5284916

BirdieBlue, I'm no lavender specialist, but it looks like a type of Spanish lavender to me.
There a lot of individual cultivars, so I'm not sure which one.
Unfortunately, it's not as hardy as the English lavenders, so I can't grow it in my zone.
It's beautiful!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2008
3:23 PM

Post #5284925

And, Dancey, I'm not sure how well bloodroot would do in a pot.
I think I'd just stick it in the ground.
It loves our hot / humid summers.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 19, 2008
7:18 PM

Post #5286167

Just checked Munchkin's website--they're sold out of the double bloodroot! Will keep checking.
DanceyTx
Midway, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 19, 2008
9:30 PM

Post #5286756

Weerobin if/when I buy the bloodroot I will just plant it in the garden and see what happens. I bet it will be okay.


Lin

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 19, 2008
11:33 PM

Post #5287317

I just got some bloodroot from a daves gardener. Does it spread really fast??? Does it grow in morning sun? Or just shade? All this talk of makes me anxious to see it! LOL. Ronna
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 20, 2008
1:28 AM

Post #5287848

Ronna, most of my bloodroot isn't planted, just volunteers.
They tend to pop up in woodland settings with no direct sun at all.
When we first moved to our property, it was overgrown w/ invasive eurasian honeysuckle.
Once I removed all the honesuckle smothering the woodland, it was amazing to see that all the
underlying woodland perennials popped b back to life, including lots of bloodroot. It's everywhere.
It doesn't spread densely. And it goes dormant late summer. Thrives without any special care.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 20, 2008
1:48 AM

Post #5287970

Weerobin, that's what I've been doing--removing japanese honeysuckle! It's choking this entire 30 acre hillside. Wanna come help, sinc you're experienced? lol
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 20, 2008
9:46 AM

Post #5289469

stormyla sounds like you'll be busy this weekend too, hope you enjoy the concert! I've been busy with my daughter and her husband who are visiting from Maine so haven't had time to get the photo of the Brigadoon and Eucomis combo but will try to get it posted soon. The Eucomis is slow to multiply but another DGer who I sent seeds to try last year has been successful and has new babies :) As for the Pulmonaria, I'm not sure they "all" revert but the Raspberry Ice had such unique variegation and was disappointed to lose it. Same thing with variegated Brunnera, tends to revert for me :(

I'll be watching to see if anyone finds the double bloodroot available - after seeing Weerobin's clump, I'd really like to get one! As for the $75 price tag on the one I saw, that was maybe 15 years ago and I think it had just been introduced plus I think he picked it up at an auction at a rock garden society meeting so it was a "charitable contribution" :)

I've always been fond of the Cranesbill geraniums, some do better for me than others but I really like the foliage of these - Geranium renardii http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/54605/) This is an old picture from about 3 years ago of Terra Franche which has the same 'crinkled' foliage.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 20, 2008
1:11 PM

Post #5289881

KyWoods, thanks for the offer! My heart always beats a little faster with the prospect of yanking another honeysuckle! I was MapQuesting the best route to Melbourne when the thought of clearing 30 acres popped into my brain ... it's a little sobering. I'm pretty exhausted after clearing just 2. Maybe I'll just cheer you on! The frustration is of course ongoing, as it continually reseeds and grows so fast - you can't turn your back for a second! But I really am continually amazed at the resurgence of beautiful woodland perennials lurking under the honeysuckle ready to emerge on their own. It makes all the hard work worthwhile. Good luck with it!

RCN, I also love the textured foliage of the renardii geraniums, but I haven't had much success with them. I always blamed it on our humidity, since fuzzy leafed plants in our humidity tend to mildew. Then you show off your beautiful plant which has ruined my theory. What's the secret?
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 20, 2008
1:21 PM

Post #5289922

Eminence Nurseries has the double bloodroot. They charge a flat $15 shipping for up to 5 plants. They also have a lot of Epimediums. Some I already have. They list the following. Any notion which are the best -- and vigorous too?

E. diphyllum 'Variegatum': z 5-8 8". A clump forming variegated form with lung-shaped, grey-green leaves, heavily speckled white and topped in early spring with clusters of tiny white bells. $15
E. grandiflorum 'Dark Beauty': 12". The new foliage which emerges chocolate-purple is topped with large purple and white bicolor flowers in the spring. $15
E. grandiflorum 'Lillafee': 12-14". A vigorous and floriferous cultivar with large, lillac-purple flowers. $15 This item is SOLD OUT, please check back.
E. grandiflorum 'Macranthum': 12". This clump forming fairywings produces silver brushed with pink colored flowers in late spring with slightly toothed foliage edged in red. $15
E. grandiflorm 'Purple Prince': 16". A deep, rich purple flowered variety that emerges with 8" heart shaped, rose colored leaves with a second flush of 16" tall foliage. $15
E. grandiflorum 'Red Queen': 14". Large, vividly rose-red colored flowers grow out from under the huge leaflets of this choice perennial. $15
E. grandiflorum 'Saxons Purple': 14". Exceptional beautiful with large lavender flowers held high above the foliage. Small new leaflets have a copper overlay on this select perennial plant. $15
E. grandiflorum var. higonese 'Bandit': 12". Exceptional and eye-catching with a striking 1/2" dark purple margin around the edge of each leaf and clusters of large white flowers held above. $20
E. grandiflorum 'Yubae': 18". A very attractive and vigorous tight-clumping form with cranberry-red flowers that have a darker cranberry cup and tiny white-tipped spurs held above the bronze colored emerging new foliage. $15
E. x rubrum 'Sweetheart': 16". Beautiful and evergreen, the new leaves are flushed red and topped with clusters of beautiful bright-pink flowers. $15
X Perralchicum 'Frohnleiten': 15". Spiney, evergreen leaves with a reddish tinge, robust species that tolerates dry conditions. $9
pubigerum 'Orange King': 18". Beautiful orange and yellow flowers are held above mid-green foliage that has a thin red edge in the spring. $12
youngianum 'Niveum': 6". Clear white flowers in May are held above serrated foliage suffused with crimson in spring and fall. $15 This item is SOLD OUT, please check back.
youngianum 'Roseum': 6". A beautiful groundcover with light green foliage and lovely lavender-pink flowers. $15
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 20, 2008
1:34 PM

Post #5289957

Happy, epimediums have been my addiction for the past couple years.
I have almost every one on the above list, except the variegated diphyllum.
I suspect the variegated diphyllum won't be as vigorous as the others.
But all the others listed are reliable growers.
And most do well in dry shade, which can help fill a difficult spot.
Among the distinguishing features is that some are clump-forming and some spread,
so the latter may be better for groundcover situations.
The grandiflorum cultivars and youngianum cultivars are all clump-forming.
X rubrum and x perralchicum cultivars are spreading.
X versicolor cultivars are also commonly available and are very vigorous and spread well also.
Flowers can be very beautiful, but I love the foliage also.
Many of them have beautifully mottled foliage in spring.
I have many on-line sources for more exotic varieties, if anyone is interested.
(One nursery is offering an epimedium for $500! Better get yours quick, before they run out!!)
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 20, 2008
6:51 PM

Post #5291217

Weerobin -- thanks!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 20, 2008
10:47 PM

Post #5292307

No way, 500 bucks for a plant? Sheesh, you'd better buy life insurance for it!

Weerobin, I can use all the cheering on I can get, lol. The honeysuckles that are too big to yank, I saw off at the ground, then use a small paintbrush to cover the stump with brushkiller. It's a tedious process, but at least I've got some nice trails cut!
I love to go hiking here, and it's great exercise, since it's a hillside. I have certain large, flat rocks here and there that make good resting places, too. This is my exercise and weight loss program, see--only thing is, I gotta get rid of the late night snacking habit!

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 21, 2008
2:10 PM

Post #5295459

If you pay $500 for a plant you better be able to smoke it!!!

KyWoods I am going back to Munchkin Nursery this fall for another tour so I'll keep an eye out for the double bloodroot for you! If you are ever up this way they are only about 40 minutes north of Louisville and well worth the visit. Gene is a very entertaining host.

Doug
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 21, 2008
6:26 PM

Post #5296827

Thanks, Doug, I appreciate it!

Renee
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2008
12:41 AM

Post #5298814

Renee, I did most of my honeysuckle clearing 3-4 years ago.
I also had to cut the big ones at the base. I didn't bother painting w/ brush killer.
The stumps of course resprout vigorously, but I just kept clipping them back to the base.
Within just a year or two, they quit putting out new shoots and victory is at hand.
But it really is astonishing how quickly a neglected corner of the yard becomes colonized again.
I'm always on guard! But the effort was well worth it!
My suburb of St Louis (Kirkwood) launches a volunteer honeysuckle clearing effort periodically.
All of our green spaces are overwhelmed w/ honeysuckle.
It can be a little disheartening. So I have to be content with my 2-acre victory. Ever vigilant!

KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2008
1:28 AM

Post #5299147

That's a great idea, a community honeysuckle removal! I don't know that it would work in a rural area like this, though, as so many have several acres. It would take a whole team working full time to clear such parcels. Sheesh, if only I could hit the lottery, I could hire a team. LOL
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 22, 2008
2:49 AM

Post #5299599

Just thought that I'd mention that Naylor Creek has a good selection of epimedium and they are a great nursery with good customer service..
http://www.naylorcreek.com/main/per4.html
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2008
10:43 AM

Post #5300617

I have also had excellent experience w/ Naylor Creek.
Primarily Hostas and epimediums.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 22, 2008
3:19 PM

Post #5301599

Happy, I couldn't find Eminence. Do you have a URL?

Doss, thanks, their selection is great and I thought the prices were reasonable.

KY, you're right about the life insurance!! I only had one honeysuckle. I hacked it up and dug the roots out with an ax. So far, it hasn't come back in 2 years. Wish I could say the same for the wild grapes and poison ivy!!!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2008
3:51 PM

Post #5301750

Stormyla: Here you go: http://www.eminencemeadows.com/peren.htm#Sanguinaria

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 22, 2008
11:12 PM

Post #5303866

Oh its so hard not to look at the links to these great nursuries... Please stop it!!! LOL> I want to buy, buy, buy!!!! I have a dughter getting married next sept... I have to save, save, save!!! Wow beautiful plants . Love Naylors site.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 22, 2008
11:41 PM

Post #5303992

Happy, Thanks for the link. They must have sold out, because I couldn't find any bloodroot listed.

Ronna, I can't buy anymore before I plant the ones I already have!!!!

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 22, 2008
11:45 PM

Post #5304011

Its just so hard to resist... You know we want to peek. and wish.
BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 23, 2008
3:31 AM

Post #5305339

I transplanted some Dwarf Crested Iris from a huge patch in my woods to my front woodland wildflower shade garden. They came up for a couple years and gradually decreased in # until this spring, I didnt see a single bloom. I think the leaves are still coming up, just no blooms.
My Trillium, May apple,Maltese cross, lily of the valley, Valerian, Soloman's seal, lemon blm (@ afar corner), Viburnum Bush, etc all bloom, so I am a little baffled. Coral bells are not blooming much either
Any ideas??




KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 23, 2008
4:03 AM

Post #5305442

I dunno, is it hotter than usual for this time of year there?
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 23, 2008
4:42 AM

Post #5305619

Birdie, Do you have voles? They eat bulbs. My cristata increase in size so much they need to be divided. Mine are planted in sun, part shade & deep shade. Dig & see if you have any bulbs. They also could have rotted if they were too wet.

One of my giant Heuchera Brownies just collapsed. Guess I should have divided it sooner.
BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 23, 2008
4:53 AM

Post #5305661

I have voles in my back yard, but have not seen any sign of them in front. **Last week, Elvis (my 12 yo, going blind min Poodle) was jumping around like a puppy in one area in the back yd...I heard a high pitched screaming (quuiet type)...he caught a vole!! LOL he was so proud of that thing carried it around for about 15 munutes...I had to trick him into dropping it so i could discard...ugh
Ky - Heck yes it's hotter - got up to 97 today - that's like august heat ...whew!!
I think maybe the iris' are not getting enough sun to bloom, cause they are growing well, just not blooming

ANY ideas about my SOIL issue??

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2008
1:03 PM

Post #5306462

My shade garden is starting to fill out. BEV

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stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 23, 2008
1:49 PM

Post #5306620

It looks wonderful, Bev! Is the entire garden a raised bed? What is the vine in the center? It must be so nice to sit at your bench and enjoy the fruits of such loving labor.

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2008
4:54 PM

Post #5307599

Thankyou stormyla. No just the strip with the hostas is raised. I don't have time to sit on the bench grrrr! That is a Fall Clematis. On the other side of it is the fish ponds and then across the drive is the home. Bev

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postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 23, 2008
5:32 PM

Post #5307771

I want to take about a three week vacation and visit everone's shady gardens!!! Currently accepting donations for gas money...

Doug

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2008
5:35 PM

Post #5307788

You are welcome but mine has a long way to go to look neat. BEV

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postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 23, 2008
5:41 PM

Post #5307810

Bev you know gardens are always a work in progress and never truly "finished".

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2008
5:46 PM

Post #5307828

Thanks Dug.

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 23, 2008
7:57 PM

Post #5308339

Very nice gardens, Bev--and great shot of that lily! That would be a good one to put in Plant Files, if they need pics of that one--what is it?

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2008
8:01 PM

Post #5308351

those are my tiger lilies.cannot use capitals have baby kitten in other arm. powder. thanks bev

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dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2008
8:02 PM

Post #5308360

i have more

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dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2008
8:04 PM

Post #5308372

dont want to bore you. but

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gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2008
11:51 PM

Post #5309421

Bev I also love the tiger lilies!!! Have orange (which have blossomed already) I have white and yellow. The yellow are open now. So pretty... Love the height of them. I did give some of them on a trade once. But still ahve a few of each!. Does any one want some bublets??? Still have some for last year and will have more from this year. JLMK> Kitties huh? What color are they Bev? Awwww I bet they are adorable. Shade gardens are looking very lovely everyone.. Have a great evening. Ronna

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 24, 2008
12:19 AM

Post #5309527

Are the bulblets the little one leaf things that grew and will take three years to flower? If they take less time I would love some. BEV

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 24, 2008
12:22 AM

Post #5309535

The bublets are the tings that grow under each leaf and fall off when the plant gets done flowering. Then they spead every where. I try to pick them all off before they fall off!!! But you are welcome to some. I am not sure how long they take to flower. All I know is I get babies all over the place. Ronna

dragonfly62

dragonfly62
Nilwood, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 24, 2008
2:24 AM

Post #5310161

Thanks Ronna, But no thankyou dear. Those are what I call seeds and it does take three years before flowering. I am sorry but I will have to buy bulbs so as to see them next year. Thanks again anyway. BEV

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 24, 2008
11:57 AM

Post #5311318

You are so welcome Bev. Here is a photo of my Turks Caps. So pretty. They are pretty long lived also. I always have to stake mine cause its so tall. Im sure others stand up straight??? This one only gets dappled sun but does quit well with that. They must not spread. This one has been here for around, 8-9 years I believe. No "little ones". Never understood that.? Ronna

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doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 24, 2008
8:43 PM

Post #5313772

My asiatics "White Butterfly" and "Pink Butterfly" both stand up on their own but of course they don't have that incredible color going for them. Same shape though. The pink ones bloom earlier than the white ones.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 25, 2008
12:07 AM

Post #5314817

Are the asiatic lilies as tall as the Turks Cap? They are so neat. I like how they curl back so tightly.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 25, 2008
2:17 AM

Post #5315647

The Butterfly asiatics curl back like the turk caps ones do. They are about 3 feet tall.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 25, 2008
11:57 PM

Post #5319839

My turks cap is probably about 5 ft tall. So pretty.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 26, 2008
2:57 AM

Post #5320753

I just got the October 2008 (why do they deliver magazines so early?) Fine Gardening. It includes an article on underused perennials for shade. Do you have comments on any of these?

Spigelia marilandica (I'd already planned to get this)
Delphinium exaltatum
Hakonechloa macra 'Beni Kaze'
Arisaema kishidae 'Jack Frost'
Deinanthe caerulea
Cyclamen hederifolium (I've been hoping to get this)
Rabdosia longituba
Hellborus 'Ivory Prince' (syn. H. 'Wallhelivor')

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 26, 2008
3:02 AM

Post #5320765

And what about Delphinium tricorne?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 26, 2008
3:03 AM

Post #5320771

I have helleborus Ivory Prince. It's in a very dark part of my garden so it's very slow to grow but the foliage is beautiful. I looked up the hakone grass and it says that it's green most of the year but turns red in fall. Sounds very pretty - I'm a big fan of Hakone grass though.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 26, 2008
3:15 AM

Post #5320817

I agree about Hakone. I wonder, though, if the red tint might not stand out. I love the Hakone with gold or white edging -- they positively sparkle!
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 26, 2008
5:22 AM

Post #5321284

Ronna, I can never figure out this Lily staking. I can have 10 of the same lily growing in a group in 3 square feet. Half of them will need staking. The other half won't. I find this true whether they're growing in sun or shade. Lillies make great shade plants. I grew 5 or 6 varieties in shade this year. The perfumes have been heavenly. This is a 6' tall Asiatic "Fangio"

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stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 26, 2008
5:25 AM

Post #5321289

And this is my latest love, 4 to 5' tall, Orienpet "American Journey"

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rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 26, 2008
9:40 AM

Post #5321574

Yikes, lots going on here since I last visited!

Weerobin, don't know that I have any secret for the renardii Geraniums. It's been about five years since we planted Terra Franche and last year planted 'Philippe Vapelle' which has the same textured foliage. Both seem to be suffering from too much shade and will have to be moved soon - keeping my fingers crossed that I don't lose them!

Happy - that's a tremendous list of Epimediums! I have a few of those on the list and I have to say that youngianum 'Niveum' is my favorite. A vigorous plant and the little white flowers are so sweet :) X Perralchicum 'Frohnleiten' is a bear in the garden! Rick keeps threatening to rip some of it out and I have to admit that it has completely covered the rock steps where it was planted on either side and needs to be thinned out but I'm not going to deliberately kill it - I just need to find a few spots to transfer it to. I also love the delicate pink flowers of 'Lilafee' and the unique color of 'Orange Queen'. Both are currently waiting for their spot in the gardens :) All are slow growing when first planted but in just a few years they form wonderful groundcovers and easily one of the best plants I've found for dry shade. The only one I've ever lost was E. epsteinii http://www.pbase.com/glazemaker/image/58085329 - bloomed the second year and the third year it was gone :( Weerobin, I would definitely be interested in your online sources but I'll pass on the one for $500! LOL

BirdieBlue, you may have answered your own question about the Dwarf Crested Iris - not enough sun. Although it's usually described as a shade plant, it prefers a spot that provides "light shade" or at least morning sun exposure. Not sure about your soil, you've probably got the same nasty red clay soil we've got here and the only thing I've found is not to plant them deep.

Happy, still waiting for my October issue of Fine Gardening, sounds like a terrific article - I can't wait! I'll give you my two cents on those I've grown :)

Spigelia - slow to get established but after a couple of years forms an incredible clump and the flowers are beautiful. Doesn't seem too particular about its placement, although where it's planted in the deep shade the clump gets leggy and isn't as handsome as the one planted under a high canopy of pine trees.

Delphinium exaltatum - the first year I absolutely loved it - rebloomed when we had a mild fall the first week in December! This year, I'm not so happy with it - it's growing way too tall - almost 5' and falling over. Next year I'm going to try to control it by pruning it back when it gets about 2' tall. It will delay the beautiful blooms, but there will be more of them!

Hakonechloa macra 'Beni Kaze' - just got this planted. I've always loved the form of these grasses and the photos of the red looked intriguing. Unlike the gold forms, which are painfully slow to establish themselves here, 'Beni Kaze' is a fast grower! We just planted some in the area we've been working on for the past few weeks - it's still all green but anxiously waiting to see the red in the foliage. In the photo we planted a border of 'Aureola' with 'Beni Kaze' behind it to edge the right side of the path. Lots of work still to be done here, but what a difference if you saw what it looked like before!

Arisaema kishidae 'Jack Frost', another painfully slow plant :( We've had these in pots for two years and they're STILL too small to plant in the garden. I will say that the silvered foliage is very attractive, I'm just hoping they hurry up and grow!

Cyclamen hederifolium - my only complaint with this plant is you have to wait so long to see it! The flowers are pretty but the foliage is why we planted it - incredible! I'm trying to be patient waiting for ours to spread - it's been about 3 years and still not as vigorous as I had hoped :(

Delphinium tricorne - absolutely incredible, although I think we may have lost ours :( It's considered one of the spring ephemerals, blooms early and then usually disappears by June which probably explains what happened to it - we forgot it was there :( I remember reading somewhere to plant it with ferns, just as the Delphinium starts to wither away the fronds of the ferns are unfurling and quickly cover the bare spot left.

stormyla, beautiful Lilies! You'll appreciate this :( The voles have found the new gardens in the photo! Rick was working there yesterday, stomped on the tunnel once, twice - the third time the tunnel appeared he was out there watching for the tunnel to move so he could kill the little buggar! By 5 PM he was so frustrated he was armed with the hose and spray I told you about and completely covered the area - we'll see what happens today!










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stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 26, 2008
3:16 PM

Post #5322467

Happy & RCN, you've got me starting a list for next year!!!!! I don't suscribe to Fine Gardening. Do you find it to be one of the better publications? In trying to cut down on my incoming reading material, I've stopped a lot of subscriptions. Maybe I should try this one.

RCN, Poor Rick! Those creatures can drive anybody nuts!! Yesterday, I even planted the Brunnera inside of those metal pots we've made. Their roots looked similar to a hosta's to me, so maybe they'd appeal to the voles. I wasn't taking the chance. Weerobin has been buying ready made cages for underground planting. Our fingers are getting so wrecked from making them, I'm ready to start buying some. I'm still too handicapped to stomp!!

My shade garden is so wet right now from all of the rain, that I'm worried about plants drowning. Quite a few are looking oxygen starved. Fungus is another worry in this weather.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 26, 2008
6:41 PM

Post #5323198

RCN: Thanks for your comments -- I always love to read your descriptions of how plants grow for you.

Stormyla: I do like Fine Gardening -- it is probably my current favorite. Which you do like?
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 26, 2008
9:52 PM

Post #5324107

Happy, I've got several of your list growing in my garden.

Deinanthe caerulea grows well for me, but I really don't like it that much.
The flowers are pretty, but they face down. I find the overall texture of the plant to be coarse.
I have deinanthe bifida (the white flowered version) - same complaint.

I don't have cyclamen hederifolium, but I love my cyclamen coum.
It's planted right outside our front porch, since it's leaves come up in fall and stay all winter.
The leaves are beautifully variegated, so it's nice to have garden interest all winter.
I can't post of pix of the leaves, since it's summer dormant.
But coincidentally, I have a bloom today (see post below).
The blossoms are more often pink than white, but the one today is white.

My rabdosia longituba grows well. It's not super showy, but I think it's a nice plant. Not fussy at all.

And I've got lots of spigelia. It does really well here.

RCN - I like Naylor Creek and Garden Vision for epimediums.
The latter is the nursery run by Darrell Probst, who's usually referred to as the guru of epimediums.
His annual offering is amazing. Unfortunately, their catalog isn't on line.
Heronswood used to have a lot also, but alas, their catalog isn't what it once was.

And Stormy, I still promise to find you the source for the gopher cages!
Organizational skill isn't my finest attribute.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 26, 2008
9:58 PM

Post #5324139

And since I ran out to get a picture of my cyclamen, I couldn't resist getting a shot of my bottlebrush buckeye.
They are indispensable in my shady yard for mid-summer bloom, despite the heat..

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gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 26, 2008
10:00 PM

Post #5324144

Bottlebrush buckeye? Pretty cool looking. Shade? I will have to look that one up!! Thanks, Ronna
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 26, 2008
10:08 PM

Post #5324178

Ronna, that wasn't a very good picture to give you an idea of the overall plant habit.
This one shows it a little better.
It's a pretty big shrub, so it needs lots of room.
But it flowers right now, which is definitely a plus.
I have several of them and I really like them.

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gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 26, 2008
10:21 PM

Post #5324226

weerobin I really like those. Awsome, I wish I had a bigger yard. Plant files says part shade to sun. The part shade is great for me. Pretty large huh? I love the white flowers that would be great for the shady side of my house! Im sorry did you say they were fragrant. Cool as the flowers are they probably are. Just guessing. Ronna
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 27, 2008
1:42 AM

Post #5324943

Weerobin: Thanks for the comments. I'm glad to hear that about Deinanthe caerulea. I was a little dubious about it.

I've wanted to succeed with Cyclamen! I have some seed working now, and some corm from Parks (second attempt; neither ever came up), and some plants that are now dormant. I am praying they return. I read they need it bone dry when dormant. But I lose all plants that need to be dry in the winter, so I am doubtful that I'll find a good spot for them. I'll keep trying!
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2008
9:09 AM

Post #5326063

Better late than never - I promised stormyla a photo of the Eucomis and Brigadoon combo. This is the original planting.

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rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2008
9:21 AM

Post #5326069

I liked the combination so much I planted it again in another area. Right now the 'Summer Chocolate' Albizia is small, but I'm hoping once it grows taller it will form a burgundy canopy over this combo. This is an area of the gardens that was started in the fall of '06 and I've just started digging more holes in the area getting ready to expand the border. I've got a few more of the Eucomis that were planted years ago in the front of the house that have turned all green because they don't get enough sun. I'm thinking of moving them here and expanding this planting with a mixture of the Eucomis and several Yuccas ('Sapphire Blue' and 'Bright Edge') along the edge of the border to add some blue foliage and more gold.

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rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2008
9:31 AM

Post #5326071

Weerobin, thank you for the sources! I haven't received Darrell Probst's catalog in a few years, guess I'm going to have to get back on his mailing list :) I love Bottlebrush Buckeye! Ours is done blooming now but this is what it looked like a month ago - caught the late afternoon sun on the blooms.

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rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2008
9:34 AM

Post #5326072

Happy, while I was grabbing photos of the Eucomis, had to take a couple pictures of the Epimedium for you :) This is the clump of Frohnleiten I was talking about, planted about 4 years ago. I separated the plants with stone steps so our dog could get to the water behind them, but now they're completely covered. Hard to tell from the picture, but this mound spreads about 4'-5' now!

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rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2008
9:38 AM

Post #5326074

Figured if Epimedium does so well in this area, I might as well have more - so planted E. x rubrum around the base of the Japanese Maple directly across the path and it's finally starting to fill in.

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stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2008
10:36 AM

Post #5326119

RCN, That Ecomis/Brigadoon/Abelia combo is just spectacular. Do you recall approximatley how many Brigadoons were used? How much sun does that area get?
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2008
11:21 AM

Post #5326225

Sorry, I realize that I got the name wrong, Albizia. I still like Doss's comment: Can't buy it if you can't spell it!!!

Happy, I'm really only reading back issues of Magazines that I never got too. I seem to only find about 20 minutes a day, if I'm lucky to read any. But it would be nice to have a good one or two for the winter. I used to have breakfast on the deck and read, but DG has eclipsed that time. The heat seems to bother me more this year. When it's really hot, it's nice to take my later breaks indoors, and use the computer.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2008
1:04 PM

Post #5326517

RCN, your eucomis / hypericum combo is fabulous! I can see why you replicated it.
Is the eucomis hardy for you? Or do you lift it for winter?
I would never imagine it would be hardy here, but I see you're same zone as me...
Part shade or blazing sun?
My mind is already racing to find a spot for it in my yard!
(Though Stormy has cautioned me against the hazards of zone denial in the past.)

Happy, I don't keep my cyclamen coum dry in summer nor winter.
The foliage is summer dormant, yet they're being watered regularly all summer,
either by mother nature or my sprinklers.
And our winters aren't particularly dry.
They're planted in a bed right next to the front door which certainly isn't sharply draining.
I'd call it moisture-retentive soil. But there is a lot of tree root competition, which my keep them dry?
Anyway, mine aren't fussy at all. I definitely recommend to keep trying them.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2008
1:25 PM

Post #5326574

Weerobin, You just can't help yourself!!!! When RCN first started talking about the Eucomis, I read up on them. Everything seems to indicate that they would be fine here. I don't know how much colder you are there. We get down to single digits usually for about 10 days to 2 weeks in the winter. This is true even in warm winters like we had this year. Most other days were in the high 30"s and 40's. Lots of high winds in the last few years, but not much snow. Yesterday, I dug out and threw away 3 zone 7 rated azaleas that I had inadvertantly purchased last year.

Happy, I have some cyclamen growing in a very damp spot. I keep thinking that they should rot, but they keep coming back every year. It's also a very dark spot with no sun.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2008
1:39 PM

Post #5326642

OK, I'm going for it!
Thanks for the inspiration, Rick!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 27, 2008
2:46 PM

Post #5327033

Rcn: Thanks for the photos! Re "Sparking Burgundy", http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/61931/, is it your experience it needs full sun (of which I have none) as indicated in PlantFiles?
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2008
3:42 PM

Post #5327280

One of our local nurseries has a buyers reward program where they give you vouchers for buying plants in July. So, yesterday, I aquired 4 new shrubs and 5 perennials. Two were more Hydrangea Limelights and one is this Leucothoe Rainbow. It's for part shade and will grow to 3' x 3'.
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2008
3:44 PM

Post #5327284

Forgot the photo.

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 27, 2008
3:44 PM

Post #5327286

Lovely.

This message was edited Jul 27, 2008 11:44 AM
stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2008
3:47 PM

Post #5327295

The other is Clethra Hummingbird for part shade in the same size range. The smell of it is so devine, I don't know how I'll get the bees off to plant it.

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stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2008
3:54 PM

Post #5327331

One of the Limelights just starting to open.

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stormyla
Norristown, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 27, 2008
3:57 PM

Post #5327347

Who says you can't grow Crocosmia in the shade? This is Emily McKenzie.

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2008
12:40 AM

Post #5329650

Beautiful, inspiring gardens, all!
I can't believe we've gotten past 200 posts already! How's about a new thread?





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