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Article: Introduction to Aloes: Southern Californian Climate

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Forum: Article: Introduction to AloesReplies: 5, Views: 37
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Zigur
Thousand Oaks, CA

July 7, 2008
6:37 AM

Post #5216169

How many of the Aloes in your article are adapted to the Southern California climate?

palmbob

palmbob
Acton, CA
(Zone 8b)


July 7, 2008
2:23 PM

Post #5217202

can't say yet as I haven't had them all for more than a few years... but I suspect all, if not nearly all, can live in southern California to flowering size as long as they don't get killed by a freeze or fried by excessive heat (for those, just planting them in some afternoon should will probably keep them going). There is an aloe grower in San Marcos (a MUCH better climate- no freezes and soil is perfect) that had about 600 species of aloe growing for many many years on his property
Zigur
Thousand Oaks, CA

July 7, 2008
6:05 PM

Post #5218554

I would have thought only those from the winter-rainfall areas of the Cape were adapted.

palmbob

palmbob
Acton, CA
(Zone 8b)


July 8, 2008
3:34 AM

Post #5221641

seems aloes are pretty adaptable.. .but Madagascans in general are the toughest as they hate the winters and super hot summers.
Zigur
Thousand Oaks, CA

July 8, 2008
4:13 AM

Post #5221798

You miss the point. You are modifying the Southern California climate by providing water in summer. The plants are not adapting to the climate.

palmbob

palmbob
Acton, CA
(Zone 8b)


July 8, 2008
4:47 AM

Post #5221901

perhaps, but I find that watering almost any succulents in the summers makes them happier.. sure I could let them dry up and go through severe leaf tip necrosis like they do at some botanical gardens, but i prefer them to look good. Same goes for a lot of palms and cycads that could probably survive without additional watering... but not look or be as healthy. Guess what you mean by 'adapted'... few tropicals or succulents from anywhere 'adapt' to our climate unless they come from identical climates.. but even native plants seem to appreciate the water I given them over the summer (there are a few exceptions that rebel and simply up and die when they get unexpected summer water, but these are not that common... at least not in my garden anymore).

I have not tried to let any aloes go unwatered the entire summer, even those from winter rainfall areas... heat here in the valley is not like heat even in most areas in South Africa... it gets blistering hot here! It's more like Arizona (though not quite that harsh... there are many of aloes that do great here that can't grow in Arizona). There are a few that seem a bit less than thrilled about summer water (the pale blue species, like claviflroa, pachygaster, falcata and pillansii)... but even those look better if given some summer water. I have lost far too many plants from underwatering, and the watering is not a huge expense for me as I still water relatively little compared to how most of my neighbors water their lawns (lawn does not 'adapt' to our climate, either, that's for sure!).

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Other Article: Introduction to Aloes Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
I had no idea onewish1 0 Jul 6, 2008 10:35 AM
Wow! tommyr2006 0 Jul 6, 2008 1:33 PM
so many....! pejiduta8 0 Jul 6, 2008 2:36 PM
Aloe fievettii Zigur 1 Jul 7, 2008 2:25 PM
Excellent article, soive2000 0 Jul 7, 2008 4:21 PM


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