Where can I find dwarf azaleas? and cultivar ideas please!

Jamaica Plain, MA(Zone 6a)

I just made a small raised bed (live in the city) and planted a deciduous azalea (flame orange-red) in the back. I have room for only 2 dwarfs or short varieties in front of it (preferably evergreen) - at least one that won't grow to more than 2 or so ft tall -a 2nd that could be a bit taller if necessary, but haven't had any luck in my search for dwarf varieties of rhodo/azalea that will go well with it. I'm looking for a nice peach (more orange than pink) and maybe a white or white to yellow variety.(zone 6a). Can anyone suggest a good rhodo nursery where I might look - or any cultivars that I might want? Thanks.

West Pottsgrove, PA(Zone 6b)

There are lots of azaleas that won't get much higher than two feet. Satsuki hybrids come to mind, but I'm sure there are lots of others. Try searching "low mounding azaleas" instead of dwarf. I could be wrong, but I don't think the term dwarf is applied to azaleas.

On a side note, if you ever get to Baxter state park in Maine, a huge plain near the top of Mt. Katahdin is covered with R. lapponicum, about an inch high. It blooms in June. It looks like a micro azalea...Thanks for reminding me!

southern willamette , OR(Zone 7a)

what zone do you live in? then do you have any particular flower color in mind?

West Pottsgrove, PA(Zone 6b)

oops, I see lots of azaleas and rhodies are considered "dwarf".

southern willamette , OR(Zone 7a)

lol... just a few ;-p

Cincinnati, OH

You can select here by height color bloom time etc.
Mark 'Evergreen'
http://www.rhododendron.org/search_multi_azalea.htm

Lepidotes are very similar to Evergreen Azaleas, but have tiny scales on the bottom of the leaves

http://www.rhododendron.org/search_multi.htm

Jamaica Plain, MA(Zone 6a)

Thanks for your help everyone. And UUallace, what a fabulous database at the American Rhododendron Society!!!! It will be hours of pleasure searching! Thanks so much for the link. - Does anyone know if you have to take wind chill into account when determining lowest survival temperature?

southern willamette , OR(Zone 7a)

I must have been really tired when I wrote before to not have realized that you did mention your zone and colors. :-p Guess that I had been out in the garden too long!

These are some of my favority dwarf/small rhody's and azaleas:

One that I like that is sort of a peachy pink is Rhodo Mary Fleming... quite a tough little plant.

Rhody Dora Amateis Is a profusely blooming, low growing, white one that I love because their are just flowers everywhere.

Patty Bee and Shamrock are my two favorite dwarf yellow's

Glen's Orange is sort of a "corally orangish" colors in an evergreen azalea

most of the true oranges are Either deciduous azaleas or Rhody's that are not dwarfs. However their is a Rhody that is called "Medusa" that is a 3' orange and the "Whitney's late orange" that is a 4' rhody that could easily be kept shorter. Both are -5 deg. ... barely not hardy enough.

Cincinnati, OH

The North Tisbury Azaleas are hybrids af R. nakaharae and Satsukis (Fifth lunar month) Bonsai Azaleas. They are low and bloom late. Pink Pancake grows to 4". Generally they are 8" to 12". Mostly they are red to orange in color. There are no yellow Evergreen Azaleas, you will have to cross the line for those. "Patty Bee and Shamrock are my two favorite dwarf yellow's." Virtually all Rhodies are evergreen.

http://www.paghat.com/azaleanakaharae.html
http://rosebay.org/chapterweb/specnak.htm

Jamaica Plain, MA(Zone 6a)

Thanks again redchic and UUallace. Patty Bee and Shamrock are only hardy to -5, which may be enough, but I'm not sure. Couldn't find the orange one, but I'm going to look into North Tisbury, which beside being a good size, apparently were bred in Massachusetts, so I don't think I have to worry about hardiness. Between all of you and the fabulous Rhododendron Society database, at least I have some good leads. Thanks again all!!!

Winnetka, IL

Here are some suggestions which are not all peachy pink or white, but might appeal to you. My fave dwarfs are: 'Joseph Hill' and "Michael Hill', which is a light pink. They are low and spreading. 'Mary Fleming' is wonderful as well. One of the smallest I've seen is 'Golfer', which is a yakushimanum hybrid. Large, glossy leaves, white flowers, and it grows to about 12" x 12"! Great fuzzy indumentum on the new leaves as well. There's also R. impeditum, although I have a really tough time keeping those alive, and I can grow a lot of z6 plants.
There are many that can be sheared, as well. I've hacked at my R. yeodense var. poukhanense and 'Karen', and they do just dandy.
You might want to check out Plant Delights nursery online: they have a great selection.
Happy shopping!

Jamaica Plain, MA(Zone 6a)

Thanks so much, plantaholic! I'll definitely look into your suggestions. And yes- shopping for plants is a much happier experience than shopping for anything else!

Cincinnati, OH

"There's also R. impeditum, although I have a really tough time keeping those alive, and I can grow a lot of z6 plants."

Jamaica Plain, MA(Zone 6a)

Thanks UU, but I think I'll try to find easy to keep alive varieties, esp as I have very little experience with rhodos.

Winnetka, IL

A good caution, then, about the R. impeditum. Maybe it would thrive for you, but I would suggest a $5 box store sale if you're brave!
Happy shopping.


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