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Article: The Story of Queen Anne's Lace: Apiaceae = Umbelliferae

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LariAnn
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 11, 2008
2:17 PM

Post #5399021

Great article, Carrie! Being the anal botanist that I am, I want to add that the family Apiaceae is also known as the Umbelliferae. The latter is the older family name and refers to the fact that the flowers are borne in umbels. Both family names are allowed by the ICBN (International Code of Botanical Nomenclature).

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2008
2:29 PM

Post #5399068

Thanks, LariAnn. Should it be italicized too? Umbelliferae is a little more descriptive, at least for me! I looked at Apiaceae and thought apian - does that have to do with bees? The Appian way? Apes? What? So I didn't say anything (avoidance), but I like Umbelliferae better. Next you can write an article about which is the family and which is the nuclear family and which the clan!
LariAnn
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 11, 2008
2:42 PM

Post #5399139

Carrie, the family name Apiaceae was derived from "apium", the Latin word for parsley. The new name came about in order to conform to the botanical standard of family names ending in -aceae. How anal is that?

I usually italicize genus/species names and family names in my articles, as I see it done that way in botanical journals and other writings. If a name is not a correct scientific or botanical name, I'll put it in quotes, as I did in today's article with the name "Philodendron selloum".

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2008
2:44 PM

Post #5399144

Thanks again, LariAnn, I should have asked you to begin with!

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2008
1:43 AM

Post #5401854

was somebody in the corner arguing for Umbellaceae/Umbelliferaceae?
way to go Carrie- great article

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 12, 2008
1:46 AM

Post #5401867

Thanks, Sally! I'm arguing for Umbrellas, myself. (goes off to the corner, puzzled.)
Potagere

July 29, 2009
6:47 PM

Post #6880820

Does it really matter?
Why anyone would WANT this plant in their garden remains a mystery to me. Maybe you don't like your garden. Or it's really your spouse's garden, and you suspect said spouse of being too close to your neighbour.
I'd say that the USDA has a point, since the plant can only be considered as an invasive weed here in its homeland.
It would be wonderful if it were, itself, a bit more anal. Perhpas then it would retain some of the seeds it spreads so prolifically.
Terrible plant!
One worth eradicating from childhood if it appears in your garden (unless, of course, you are into "monocultures").

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2009
11:19 PM

Post #6882047

Oh, Jim, it smells WONDERFUL, and I find it quite pretty. I did, however, end up not keeping it in my garden.
Potagere

July 30, 2009
9:42 AM

Post #6883777

Does it? I must confess that I spend so much time PULLING it that I have never taken the time to "stop and smell the flowers"! There is a HUGE colony down at the edge of my old dog's garden that I've not yet gotten to; I'll try to remember to give them a sniff before I give them the boot!

As for "pretty", I prefer the numerous Achilleas, which I now discover (see below) are NOT part of the same family. Could have fooled me! In fact, fooled me for decades now!

As for the family name, I have to agree with both you and LariAnn : arbitrarily making all family names end in -aceae is definitely anal (and, IMO, makes the scientific community that will go to such extremes, overturning Linnean names accepted for centuries, just a bit ridiculous and pretentious); and Umbelliferae, with its root lying in the Latin umbel[la], a sunshade parasol, the same root that gives us "umbrella", is much more descriptive, meaningful and memorable.

In fact, up until now, I was blissfully unaware that I was going to have to start thinking of my carrots, celery, coriander, dill, fennel and parsnips (parsnips?!?) as "celery-like". I will continue to think of them all as "my little umbrellas" (along with the Yarrows, which I've never figured out why they are Asters and not Umbrellas : LariAnn?). I'm just too old to change horses just as I am about to reach the far side of the stream!

The International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (see : http://www.bgbm.fu-berlin.de/iapt/nomenclature/code/tokyo-e/Contents.htm) actually makes fascinating reading for those of us who are in love with both plants and scholarship. It also contains numerous absurdities such as this, from Article 20.3 : " "Uva ursi", as originally published by Miller (1754), consisted of two separate words unconnected by a hyphen, and is therefore not validly published (Art. 32.1(b)); the name is correctly attributed to Duhamel (1755) as Uva-ursi (hyphenated when published)." Miller disappears into obscurity for lack of a hyphen, while Duhamel is remembered in every scientific reference to "Bearberry" or, in my childhood home, "kinnikinnick". Am I the only one who detects just a sniff of academic rivalry here?

I also think that, buried in there [the Code] somewhere, although I cannot find it at the moment, are all the nifty "rules" on when to italicize and when to "quotate". It really is fun to read! I recommend it.

I also donate this to the conversation : a poem by William Carlos Williams (ca. 1921)

Queen Anne's Lace

Her body is not so white as
anemone petals nor so smooth--nor
so remote a thing. It is a field
of the wild carrot taking
the field by force; the grass
does not raise above it.
Here is no question of whiteness,
white as can be, with a purple mole
at the center of each flower.
Each flower is a hand's span
of her whiteness. Wherever
his hand has lain there is
a tiny purple blemish. Each part
is a blossom under his touch
to which the fibres of her being
stem one by one, each to its end,
until the whole field is a
white desire, empty, a single stem,
a cluster, flower by flower,
a pious wish to whiteness gone over--
or nothing.

Jim

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2009
1:41 PM

Post #6884295

Yes, I am familiar with that poem. Somehow William Carlos William did not seem enough "about gardening" for an article. I am sure you can tell as about the symbolism, too. :-)

Seriously, though, you should smell an armful sometime! The stems and foliage are deliciously fragrant, the flowers wonderfully sweet. You're perfectly entitled not to want them in your garden; I don't want them in mine anymore either!
Potagere

July 30, 2009
4:33 PM

Post #6885030

I'm gonna do it! Tomorrow!

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