Isn't P. Incarnata supposed to be fragrant?

Mount Vernon, MO(Zone 6b)

I started what I think is P. Incarnata from seed last year and overwintered it. This year I got the first blooms. I thought P. Incarnata was very fragrant. I am wondering if someone sold me P. Incense by mistake. I got the seeds from a place here in MO. Is P. Incense fragrant? This one seems to be doing very well but fragrance would be great. It is already putting out new plants from runners, I don't know that that will be good.

Lee's Summit, MO(Zone 6a)

When I grew P. incarnata, the blooms smelled like peanut butter - not really 'fragrant' but they definently had an 'odor'.

Sour Lake, TX

I have maypops all over my yard and I think the fragrance is great. Especially
when alot of flowers are open at once and it is a nice warm day.
To me it is a soft, powdery smell. It didn't remind me of peanut butter.
And the fruit are small but very tasty. Alot of seeds so I just suck the juice and
pulp from them as best I can.

Sour Lake, TX

P. "Incense" is fragrant, similar to incarnata but to me it is stronger.

Mount Vernon, MO(Zone 6b)

Mine has the peanut butter smell. The one that grew outside the Veterinary clinic where I work last year was so sweet smelling. I may have to try a cutting from that one. That is why I fell in love with Passifloras to start with is that wonderful fragrance. I wonder if the soil is the difference? I may move it to better soil next year. Where it is planted is a thin layer of black dirt and then red clay. Where I may move it to is 6-8" of really good black dirt.

Whites Creek, TN(Zone 6b)

P. 'Incense' smells like...hmm...incense! You definitely did not grow P. 'Incense' from seed.

The abundant wild maypops here are very fragrant, and the smell is strong in the the evening and in the morning, or at least it was before they were mowed with the hay. The smell is strong, but not really that pleasant. To me, they smell nothing like peanut butter. Maypops are highly variable, so the scent will likely vary as much as the appearance.

Mount Vernon, MO(Zone 6b)

Maybe it is P. Incarnata then. I just wish it smelled better.

How hard are cuttings to do for Passifloras?

Pawleys Island, SC

I have the native maypops here and I don't find them very pleasant either. The fruits have an odor that is almost indescribable and the flowers aren't real strong. Maybe the fragrance and flavor is affected by the growing conditions.

Some passiflora root very easily for me and others don't root well at all. I am always on the lookout for different methods and/ or new suggestions.

Mount Vernon, MO(Zone 6b)

If I can get seed off of the plant by the vet clinic where I work, I will try this one. The one at the clinic has its feet in the shade and part of it grows in the sun but not much of it. It came up in a fence row and has to fight honeysuckle and trees for the light. It smells so good though.

Whites Creek, TN(Zone 6b)

Maypops are difficult to root from stem cuttings, but really easy to propagate from root cuttings. Just dig up a piece of root and plant it. You can also plant the seeds this fall, and you should get many seedlings next spring. The seeds from the ones here need a cold stratification in order to germinate, so I suspect the ones in MO will be similar. If you want to start them early indoors, you can place the seeds in moist peat or potting soil, and keep them in a refrigerator for a couple of months, then move to room temp.

I have also seen the smell of P. incarnata flowers described as "bacon-like".

Mount Vernon, MO(Zone 6b)

The non-fragrant one is already putting up seedlings everywhere. I found the roots of one of the plants at the clinic so I may have to transplant it.

Somerset, NJ

Can anyone tell me what a ripe maypop fruit is supposed to look like?? This year the vines (which popped in early june in my zone 6) went nuts and now I have a lot of green rounded fruits about the size of a small apple, but I dont know what color they are when ripe ( and ARE they edible??) thanks, eleavell

Mount Vernon, MO(Zone 6b)

I think they are yellow when ripe.

Sour Lake, TX

they will turn a yellowish color and yes they are edible, but it is
mostly seeds covered in a thick gel. I love the flavor and just suck
the pulp (if you can call it that) from the seeds. If any one knows
a better way to get the juice I would love to know.
pb

Pawleys Island, SC

The fruits that grow here have such an odor that I don't think I could eat them. I remember my grandmother telling me that they would make jelly from them though.

Mount Vernon, MO(Zone 6b)

I read somewhere that the environment has an impact on the plant. I live about 200 yards from I-44 so that may have something to do with the lack of fragrance. My fruit are only about small kiwi size this year.

Pinellas Park, FL(Zone 9b)

I have a solid white one that is either an edulis or incarnata cross that is solid white and free flowering all summer. It is self fertile also and currently has over 100 fruit. When it is in bloom, you can smell it as least 20 feet away and has a great perfumy smell. Not invasive either.

Mount Vernon, MO(Zone 6b)

We need to work out a trade for a cutting. This one seems to be invasive, I have sprouts coming up everywhere.

Pinellas Park, FL(Zone 9b)

This is the one I have and it has a mass trunk and probably root system also but has never sent up a shoot in the 3-4 yrs it's been in the ground. Vines get think and can reach 30 ft or more if not trimmed back but I have found that it nearly always puts out a large flush whenever it is severly trimmed back.


http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/902589/

Mount Vernon, MO(Zone 6b)

I have several P. edulis flavicarpa and they seem to grow well. They have to come in for the winter here though.

The neighbor told me not to plant this one because I would never get rid of it, I believe it. The one that grows at the vet clinic where I work never gets invasive like this one I planted at home.

I'm pretty sure it is coming out in the spring.

Post a Reply to this Thread

You cannot post until you , sign up and subscribe. to post.
BACK TO TOP