Stacked flower pots

Fairmont, WV

this is a picture taken back in June, it has really filled out now but I just loved them. I got the post that fit in a 12 in pot than all the others just fed down on the post and you just lean pot and fill with dirt. The pots I put in my yard were just a piece of rebar hammered into the ground than the pot put on. Here is some other pictures on my blog of them...
http://lusarytole.blogspot.com/2008/06/good-morning-gardning-friends-rain-is.html

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(Karen) Frankston, TX(Zone 8a)

Thank you for posting the instructions for that on your blog....I've seen the tipsy pots mentioned alot of places but couldn't see any instructions

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

I love your tipsy pots...
But I have to tell you I took a huge double take...maybe a triple take...when I enlarged your photo. Back in the laste 90's I painted bricks like yours and sold dozens of them...and at first I thought it was one I painted...that someone sent you one. But it's similar...not one of mine!

Your garden is beautiful...loved reading about it on your blog.

(Karen) Frankston, TX(Zone 8a)

what size rebar rod did you use? Did you have to cut it or did it come in that size? Thanks :)

Fairmont, WV

Booplants,
I was a Tole Painting Teacher for 27 years and the brick was a project we did back in the 90"s. On the back side is a winter scene. The pattern packet had several different pictures to put on the bricks. Glad to have another painter on here...

Fairmont, WV

darkmoondreamer,
The rebar was 1/2 x maybe 5 foot it is just a straight piece, no cutting. Depending on how high you want your pots and what kind of soil you have, you may need to drive the rebar in more to stablize it. I have 2- 12 in. pots 2- 8 in. pots and 2- 6 in. pots. The holes in bottom of pots had plenty of room to go over rebar and tilt. They were a conversation piece this summer. No one had seen them before, I had 4 of them in different gardens...

Phoenix, AZ(Zone 9b)

lusary tole,
I was a tole painter years ago and also taught. Now I am a muralist full time! See what a little paint leads to?

Fleming Island, FL(Zone 9a)

Very nice!!!! I've had one of these for a few years. I bought an inexpensive plastic pot, filled it 1/2 full with concrete, and set my rebar in that. Now I can move the pole around.

Winterville, GA(Zone 7b)

lusarytole,
I don't know whether it was your post or someone else's, but I got the idea for mine from here on DG. Mine, however, is for my herbs. :-) This picture was taken a while ago and is a bit fuller now, not by much because of the drought.

Yours is just beautiful!

JoAnn

This message was edited Aug 30, 2008 2:10 PM

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Paxton, FL(Zone 8a)

Got the pots and some rebar, not sure it's long enough though. Just got to get around to putting it together. Love it!

Fairmont, WV

I never thought about herbs in one, I may have to start one in my herb garden next year. The one flower on the right top in an Oregano Kents Beauty. They are great in the pots because they hang over so pretty.

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Fairmont, WV

You'll love it gingerlily.. They just need lots of water if you use clay pots...

Goodyear, AZ(Zone 9a)

Here's the one I posted a long time ago.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/611446/

(Pegi) Norwalk, CA(Zone 10b)

I went to your link KactusKathi and enjoyed all the pictures. I posted there, guess I should have waited to tell you I enjoyed it. Going to Lowe's today, I think rebar is on my list so I can say I started my next project. I've been wanting to make tipsy pots for a long time, just never got started.

Fairmont, WV

Here is a picture of the same group of pots I just took today. The first picture was probably taken in June. You can't even see most of the pots now. I just took the Kents Beauty Oregano out of the pot next to the top to bring inside yesterday to winter it . I think I will do one in my herb garden with herbs and one in my succlent garden next year. I had 4 of these this year with mainly annuals and they were beautiful. People would stop along the road to see how they were made. I think I am going to bring on inside this winter and line the pots with plastic so water doesn't run through. It will be a good place for some things I'm going to winter, and save on some space.

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(Pegi) Norwalk, CA(Zone 10b)

Great picture! I bought one rebar rod today and the gal kind of looked at me with a questioning look. These two gals we kid around with from time to time and she never heard about the tipsy pots so when I do get mine put together I'll have to share a photo with them. Have to share this with my sister in Mn. because she is such a garden person. I'll bet next year she will have one.

Fairmont, WV

This is what started my tipsy pot craze!! I saw a picture of pots stacked and went crazy, and like any plant crazed lady I had to know how they did it and how I COULD GET IT!!! Of course I Googled it. I finally found a web site that had what I needed. This is great if you want to put on a porch or steps. But I soon found out I could do it my way with rebar in the ground. But this is nice I am going to bring it inside and winter some plants in it. I just went looking for the website and it is no longer there! Sorry!! It fit perfect inside a 12 inch pot then just fill with dirt and start adding pots.

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Goodyear, AZ(Zone 9a)

Cool

Fairmont, WV

Here we go pots for fall. I just put the rebar down through the stray and into dirt. Didn't really plant flowers in pots just sat them in, with existing pots and added some other stuff in them. I think they will be ok for fall.. The scarcrow will take care of them... LOL

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South Bloomingville, OH

Here is the new tippy pot that I did up this Summer. I love the idea to do one up for Fall with Mums and Fall decor. Great Idea!

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(Pegi) Norwalk, CA(Zone 10b)

Love all those tipsy pots, I'm going to have some............soon I hope. Love the yellow watering can on top. My old faded out green one needs a new paint job and a place in my garden. So many ideas for them here. Thanks for sharing.

Fairmont, WV

Great idea with the watering can!!! Luv It!!!

NORTH CENTRAL, PA(Zone 5a)

Shoot..........missed a picture opportunity. Just had my helper dump the tippy stack today.
.............I like them and yours are no exception. It's get ready for winter time here. My tippy one was about done anyway so it went first.

Lilburn, GA

I have just made one and planted it with blue and orange pansies.:o)

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

What no picture....got to see a picture!!

Paxton, FL(Zone 8a)

Finally made one and have pansies and dusty miller in it right now. Later I'll probably put marigolds and lobelia in it. I love the look of the tipsy pots.

Cliff Dweller, WA(Zone 8b)

I'M SOOOOO STOKED! I'm going to make mine alllllllll herbs...lol

It was snowing today...so I have to wait a bit!!!

NICE JOB Gingerlily!!

small town, MN(Zone 4b)

lusarytole love your tipsy pots and the way you have them planted they are lovely. You have a beautiful sheltie we also have a sheltie who owns us. LOL

NORTH CENTRAL, PA(Zone 5a)

Attn. all stacked pot users....................Spring onions stuck in around the edges act like spikes and are eaten out while the other flowers of plants develop.

(Pegi) Norwalk, CA(Zone 10b)

Wonderful idea docgipe.

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

If I didn't already have a flower bed full that would be a great idea!

Paxton, FL(Zone 8a)

I will tell you guys my mistake. I decided I wanted to use really big pots because the small ones dry out to fast. So I bought 3 fourteen and a half inch clay pots. They were too big to tilt well or I just didn't spend enough time playing with it. What I did then was use a large one for the bottom pot and used four 8 inch pots tilted above it. I like it just fine, so I think I will buy some more 8 inch pots and make a couple more stacked pots in different locations. Think I'll do an herb one too, cause I started lots of herb seeds this year.

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

I think what I am going to try is tying a dryer sheet around the rod near the hole before filling this year. I lost a lot of soil and moisture from it draining so quickly.

Cliff Dweller, WA(Zone 8b)

You could try a coffee filter too. You can seal the pot to slow down moisture loss. My favorite is to just plant with hydration crystals mixed in the soil. They are GREAT!

(Pegi) Norwalk, CA(Zone 10b)

I have been using used coffee filters for a long time now to keep soil from coming out of bottom of pot. Every day after brewing a pot of coffee I take the filter out and either put grounds in compost (if I'm too lazy the trash) rinse it out and in no time at all it dries out. I have a nice supply on hand now. I even used them in a colinder (sp) when I filled it up with soil and planted a cactus in it. Have a couple more containers on hand with lots of holes that I am going to use the filters to keep soil from washing out.

I don't know much about the crystals.

Cliff Dweller, WA(Zone 8b)

Here's a little reading material -

How Water Crystals Work.

Water Crystals absorb and hold water, storing it for an intended application.

In gardening, horticulture and agriculture, hydrated crystals become reservoirs of moisture for thirsty plants. They capture excess irrigation in any type of gardening or farming, helping keep the soil moist and creating a healthier growing environment.

They will hold the water for extended periods of time until drained through transpiration. At that time or anytime prior, hydration can be replenished to their water holding capacity, which is 400-500 times their dry size.

When mixed or tilled into soil, Water Crystals will absorb and retain excess water for periods lots longer than untreated soil is capable of doing. The extent of time depends on ambient temperature, humidity and the thirst of the plant(s) the soil feeds.
Increase Water Availability For Plants

In all cases, Water Crystals increase the availability of water to plants. And they actually conserve water.

If you squeeze a hydrated crystal, the polymer won't leak moisture as does a sponge. Instead, the hydrated polymer gel will break into smaller pieces or crystals. A water crystal will dehydrate back to granules smaller than their original size, but replenish as full as its maximum.

Within several minutes after immersion or contact with water, a Water Crystal the size of a sunflower seed begins to grow to the size of an acorn.

With these water polymer crystals, you won't have to wait overnight or use distilled water to see the crystals swell.

In soil, the environmentally-safe polymers absorb and hold excess moisture, conserving water in the soil before it runs off so that plants can drink it. Feeder roots of plants seek these small reservoirs, penetrating the crystals' membranes to give its plant life-sustaining hydrogen and oxygen.
Nutritive Source

The crystals absorb and store dissolved nutrients from the surrounding soil soil. When hydrated, they supply water to plants. They do not drain water from plants or compete with them for moisture.

Instead, hydrated crystals are gradually drained of water from the drinking plants and from ambient temperature.

Then, when it rains or when the soil is irrigated, or the container plant watered, the Water Crystals will again absorb excess moisture. They are capable of continuing the process thousands of times. Agricultural testing ceased on the sodium crystals after a dozen years. A percentage of annual replenishment in crop fields is called for not because of product degradation, but because of soil disturbance. A hydrated crystal must not be exposed to direct sunlight.

I find them at Walmart every year, but if they don't have them any decent nursery will. I used them in ALL my container planting.

Canyon Lake, TX(Zone 8b)

JASCO makes a great water repellent for grout or unglazed tile that works well on (not for food) pottery. It's called "Silicone Grout Sealer". I've used it on pottery I make and it works great...easy to apply.

Jerry

NORTH CENTRAL, PA(Zone 5a)

I paint the body of my clay pots and sometimes the plastic ones too. This brings them into the same artistic color combinations that agree and look nice on the patio. Any paint or sealer will reduce water loss in the pot.

To reduce soil loss I use Dollar Store sponges with a cut in them to go around the re-bar and cover the bottom hole.

(Pegi) Norwalk, CA(Zone 10b)

Thanks Highmtn for info about water crystals. I'm going to have to try them. I do have a tendency to overwater at times and then lose my plant.

Palm Coast, FL(Zone 9a)

as if I didnt have enough garden projects going on, this just inspired me to add yet another (easy enough to do in one weekend tho). Im going to attempt the tipsy pot idea using Chakra colors. yup yup... gonna have that whole 'enlightened garden' thing going, but on a bread and water budget. WOOT! lol

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