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Article: Plant Perennials in the Fall, Instead of the Spring: Gladiolus bulbs

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Forum: Article: Plant Perennials in the Fall, Instead of the SpringReplies: 11, Views: 109
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Gisforgran
Dyersburg, TN

September 8, 2008
2:07 PM

Post #5524202

My husband brought home about 30 bulbs of the large (60" height so the package says) and I have never experienced growing Glads at all. Can you plant them in the fall, where do you plant them (do they need something to support them)? This is coming from a woman who can grow home pineapples or most anything else once taught the right methods. Thank you for your input. Gisforgran 9/8/08
sunflower61
Bristol, PA

September 8, 2008
2:44 PM

Post #5524369

i have always grown glads and i had always planted in the spring or so i was always told. i was always told as well to make sure to "lift" them before the first frost. well one season i got too busy and left them in all winter and guess what!,thay came back as well as countless bulblets. they survived and i haven't lifted any glads since. the only thing i do suggest from personal experience is that you plant them in higher ground for if you get a lot of rain or snow the bulbs will get saturated and rot away. when planting i usually plant in trios to ad fullness. and, if you don't cut them for cut flowers they will get heavy and drop down to the ground therefore making supporting them a necessity.i also add a little bonemeal(tulip food) and they like that.good luck and enjoy. they are a rewarding flower.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 8, 2008
3:00 PM

Post #5524434

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/864/
See if that's useful. Glads are typically not hardy up here where I live, but they may be for you, or the salesperson may have convinced your husband that they were! Unless they're marked "hardy glads" or it doesn't freeze in your specific area, you might want to store them until spring next year. I experimented with "hardy" glads this summer and yes, they did fall over. (We'll have to wait until next summer to see if they were really hardy.)

Thanks for stopping by! You would like it here.
scicciarella
Mona in Metcalfe, ON
(Zone 5a)

September 10, 2008
1:11 PM

Post #5533210

glads are only hardy if you are in zone 8 or higher in the northern US or canada they have to come out unless they are hardy and if so then you are good to about zone 6 Im in zone 5 and they do not survive the winter, make sure you plant them at the right dept and much good draining and no standing water is a must for any bulb

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 10, 2008
2:42 PM

Post #5533577

Thanks for your comments!
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

September 10, 2008
3:09 PM

Post #5533693

I'm in zone 5a and I've been leaving my glad bulbs in the ground for a few years now. It all began one year, while doing the fall chore of digging them all up, I noticed a zillion baby bulblets(?). Well, I wasn't about to dig THEM all up and find a place for them to overwinter. I left them in the ground and guess what? They came back the following year and have continued to do so, reaching blooming age and blooming beautifully. Now I leave my glads in the ground, just like any other perennial.

My soil is exceptionally sandy, which helps with drainage. These were not bought as "hardy glads" either.

Hope this helps!!

Thumbnail by threegardeners
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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 10, 2008
3:13 PM

Post #5533703

Do you stake yours?
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

September 10, 2008
3:15 PM

Post #5533715

No, now that they're in the ground full time I find they are stronger and don't need staking. Mind you, if we get a really, really bad storm with high winds they will occasionally break. Gives me another excuse to cut them and bring them inside though. Even with a stake, a high wind will snap them anyways.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 10, 2008
6:43 PM

Post #5534662

Interesting...hmmm...I have some "hardy" glads to plant this fall (or transplant) and I just know they won't be hardy enough.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/486/
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 12, 2014
8:19 PM

Post #9916779

I have a couple packs of gladiolus corms I didn't manage to get into the ground (usually late July is about the latest to give them their 90 days before hard freeze)...

Did anybody in this discussion actually try fall planting of glads? It doesn't seem like it should be much different than leaving baby corms in the ground over winter, which works more often than it "should" LOL.

I suppose I can follow my usual advice in such situations -- if I don't plant them, then they definitely won't grow. Since they have small sprouts, I don't think I can "hold" them inside over winter and successfully plant them next spring.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 13, 2014
1:27 PM

Post #9917292

Hi Jill! I think mostly people have been saying that THEIR gladiolus overwinter without problems.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 13, 2014
9:48 PM

Post #9917503

Yep, I'm just wondering whether leaving glads in the ground over fall/winter is really that different from PLANTING them in fall... Maybe fall planting could work? I guess I'll let you know next spring!

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Other Article: Plant Perennials in the Fall, Instead of the Spring Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Fall is for planting, fer sure vossner 7 Sep 8, 2008 4:35 PM
Fall is for planting CHOOD 7 Sep 9, 2008 9:09 AM
Platycodon in Zone 6 Patches001 2 Oct 1, 2009 2:04 PM
thank you Carrie! JacalynFromCanada 1 Sep 9, 2008 9:22 AM
Fall planting TreeSteward 3 Sep 10, 2008 8:28 AM


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