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Voting Booth: The garden decor in my neighborhood is mostly...

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Forum: Voting BoothReplies: 202, Views: 1,691
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dave

September 22, 2008
9:50 AM

Post #5583738

There are a total of 462 votes:


fun, flamboyant and funky
(8 votes, 1%)
Red dot


tasteful and refined
(61 votes, 13%)
Red dot


charming and adds personality to each garden
(68 votes, 14%)
Red dot


out of scale (too small or too big?)
(9 votes, 1%)
Red dot


tacky or gawdy (or...?)
(15 votes, 3%)
Red dot


nonexistent
(259 votes, 56%)
Red dot


other?
(42 votes, 9%)
Red dot


Previous Polls

SongsofJoy
New Hampshire, NH
(Zone 5b)

September 22, 2008
10:13 AM

Post #5583763

A few of my neighbors put some thought into their landscaping, but the majority just leave it natural (with a lawn thrown in here and there). I do have one neighbor who uses a little bit of garden art, but I didn't want to rate it because I'm not a fan of most garden art - what I might consider tacky, another will consider charming.
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

September 22, 2008
10:22 AM

Post #5583770

We're in an estate with 1 hectare blocks, all under 10 years built. Most of the gardens are tidy and quite lovely, big green lawns and large trees. A few are letting the team down, but I like to think they have a life! LOL
WNYwillieB
Buffalo, NY
(Zone 6a)

September 22, 2008
10:58 AM

Post #5583808

EVERYone has those STINKING yews and aborvitae! Not that they aren't good evergreens, but come on you landscapers and construction folk!!! Think outside the CHEAP box! Cedars and Junipers aren't THAT much more.

OK ... so, there is one house that attempted to do something different...

:-)
dmdula
Morganton, NC

September 22, 2008
11:03 AM

Post #5583818

I'm the only one in my neighbohood who uses garden art. I've been trying to change that, but no luck so far. LOL
gk1153
Paris, IL
(Zone 6a)

September 22, 2008
11:54 AM

Post #5583941

Like always, Dave, this poll is difficult to answer with one vote. Personally I would go for something fun, flamboyant and funky like a hand on a spring the wind would wave as it blows. "Hi, from Gary and Judy" would be written on the hand as it waves to passersby. Something to get attention and hopefully cause a smile. Judy won't let me.

Judy would prefer something tasteful and refined or nonexistant letting the flowers speak for themselves. We've settled on charming and adds personality; an old well pump in one, large rocks in another and a small statue in a third of our nine beds.

We live in a rural area so most neighbor's houses are too far from the road to see the decor, if any. The ones I can see tend to be charming and adds personality or nonexistant.
valrita

September 22, 2008
11:55 AM

Post #5583943

I live in a large city. If you put anything nice out it tends to walk away. I've even had a planter walk away from the front of my house.

I voted nonexistent but my neighbor has a rock and another neighbor farther away has a heavy bench. I only have a heavy birdbath in my back yard and a planter that I hide among plants---if it were more visible I'm sure it would walk away.
PullTab
Beautiful Brazoria C, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 22, 2008
12:13 PM

Post #5583988

This week the hood is festive and varied with fallen branches, down or dangling power, phone or cable lines with accents of the neighbor's roof bits sprinkled about. Skeeters are in a happy mood as are roofers and brush-haulers. The local birds have had their harmony disrupted having lost many a home. I am grateful even for the boat on the neighbor's front lawn...none lost their home. All that said, "charming, just plain charming."
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 22, 2008
12:50 PM

Post #5584111

Humor in light of adversity... LOL PullTab!

Our "hood" is in the woods. Decor? Green right now. The distance between us and town is mixed. Some yards are lucky to get mowed... others decorated with every car they ever owned. One place screams A GARDENER LIVES HERE! Always fun to see what is in bloom in their yard.

Looking toward the neighbors...

Thumbnail by podster
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Kathleen
Panama, NY
(Zone 5a)

September 22, 2008
1:25 PM

Post #5584259

Most of my neighbors aer Amish. They have tidy gardens, relatively small yards and well kept homes.

My yard is the wild one - overgrown rose fences, very full farm house gardens (nothing 'cottage' about this place). Sometimes I think the hay fields get mown more often than the yard.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

September 22, 2008
1:33 PM

Post #5584287

I voted "OTHER" because ours is mostly "tired". Our neighborhood is 30 years old, I think folks/builder put in shrubs back then and they are still the same ones today. We also have lots of trees which I love but it makes it harder for folks to want to garden (non-gardening types) because we have a lot of shade, at least in front yards.
grampapa
Wheatfield, NY
(Zone 6a)

September 22, 2008
1:35 PM

Post #5584297

I chose 'tasteful and refined'. I live in a relatively new development and the landscapers have very little imagination. They tell you they will give you something out of the ordinary, but everybody hires the same guy, so they all get variations on a theme. I'm working very hard to punch my way 'out of the box'. But so far all my endeavors are in the back yard. It can be seen from across the retention pond that centers our section of the development, though. I've seen people stop and look across. My next door neighbor has very much the same tastes as me and has some lovely plantings as well.
bgrumbin
Barstow, CA
(Zone 9a)

September 22, 2008
1:40 PM

Post #5584321

I voted "other" because of the wide variances among the Early Desert Desperation gardens in my neighborhood. One house has a nicely defended (from the wind) set of mostly potted plants with well maintained lawn. The next hasn't been developed above the original rocky gravelly sandy concrete like original ground. Another shows efforts to grow "some" lawn largely defeated by the hostility of the native ground. Up the street is a practical conversion of the ground into a decorative gravel arrangement.

My own was entirely raw land with a few lovely old creosote bushes at one end of the property when I bought it nearly a year ago. A Pretty Flowers Row defended from the wind was eaten to the ground by invading rabbits, as was a large cantaloupe patch. The chain link fence is in process of being underlain with pretty brick and concrete block where needed to keep the rabbits out. A pair of young apricot trees have yet to add any height despite instructions that they need to be pruned to no more than two feet of growth per year. Only success this year has been a Bird Landing Strip where I provide wild bird seed for the flocks of mostly doves and sparrow sized birds, typically three dozen or more individuals at each of the breakfast club and evening supper club feeding times of choice for the birds who visit me. Definitely an "other" kind of neighborhood.
mgarr
Hanover Twp., PA
(Zone 6a)

September 22, 2008
1:57 PM

Post #5584380

Yews for hedges instead of the trees they should be. Landscaping isn't complete until the red geraniums are planted. It doesn't matter what you plant never consider sun or shade and always use a lot of grass, fertilizers and weed killers. That sums up my neighborhood.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

September 22, 2008
1:58 PM

Post #5584390

lol mgarr!
fleursdefouquet
Ferndale, AR
(Zone 7b)

September 22, 2008
2:09 PM

Post #5584434

No neighborhood theme here - there's no neighborhood. We live in the country down a gravel road. Most of us live too far off the road for anyone to see our gardens.
twinkielee
Minden, LA

September 22, 2008
2:18 PM

Post #5584465

Our neighborhood is mostly heavily wooded area. The lawns are neat but there are few actual garden areas. There are about 12 houses on the "loop" with half inhabited by retired folks and half by those of us approaching retirement. I'm doing my best to get some garden areas started so that I can enjoy them when I get there.
ic_conifers
Iowa City, IA
(Zone 5a)

September 22, 2008
2:20 PM

Post #5584471

Wow, I can't believe that most voted "nonexistant". I voted charming, because we are in an older neighborhood and most try hard to maintain tasteful yards. Some houses are rental and they are not kept up very well (yard-wise), but the owner-occupied houses really make an effort. My yard and the house immediately to our west have great front yards. That neighbor is pretty famous in the area for her yard, it is just stunning. I'm so lucky to live next to her!

Elizabeth
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 22, 2008
2:22 PM

Post #5584482

My neighborhood is a combination of sort of English garden style and gravel with xeriscaping. Lots of junipers, too. Too many. I include myself in the too many junipers department and too much gravel department. I didn't do the original landscaping and am now adding flowers and flowering shrubs and fruit trees. It is very slow getting rid of the huge quantity of gravel which I will convert to paths.
Most of the landscaping is very tidy. No weeds. I take a beating for my vacant lot which is nearly entirely native plants. To much of the neighborhood, the native plants are weeds. Some neighbors like it and some do not.
I use the vacant lot also for growing veggies and composting. They **really** don't like the compost -- but I don't care and when one neighbor complained to the county they told her that they welcomed composting as long as it didn't create a nuisance.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

September 22, 2008
2:45 PM

Post #5584567

That sounds like a victory, Pajaritomt.

My neighborhood consists of 3 historic houses on one side of street (one of which is mine) and a restaurant, a church, and some 1980s brick houses on the other side of the street. On the right is a project.

Before I bought my house the people in the project used part of my back yard to grow vegetables. (I have 2-1/2 acres) In spite of their tiny parcels of land, some people in the project have huge pots of flowers and vegetables and shrubs in their yards like roses, camellias, and crape myrtles.

Between the project and me there is a city "maintained" strip of weedy trees like mimosa, chinaberry, elm, etc. These become missiles in hurricane weather and a lot of them are down in my yard.

So my "landscaping" is mainly defending my property against invasives.

There are some people who don't believe in invasive plants - but i can tell you that if your clear your land within a year these unwanted plants will be back. I would call that invasive.
CapeCodGardener
Mid-Cape, MA
(Zone 7a)

September 22, 2008
2:51 PM

Post #5584592

What an interesting thread! My development of 30 homes on 1-acre lots is about 15 years old and the landscaping is tasteful, refined, and so boring that I find myself LONGING for a really huge inflatable pumpkin this time of year, to be succeeded by a giant inflatable Santa. Instead, it's as though everyone got together and voted: white Christmas outside-lights ONLY. I don't know if the home owners association actually polices this, but it's amazing the dampening-effect of peer-pressure.

Anyway, the landscaping is uniformly tidy and pleasant and oh-so-restrained. (Maybe this is a Cape Cod characteristic? I'm from California and we just moved here.) Guess I should be grateful, except I long for some fun and charm. I am pushing the envelope in my garden by slowly converting my front lawn into cottage-garden beds with some seasonal decorations.
Next year: A giant waving hand springing from the mailbox!

dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 22, 2008
3:08 PM

Post #5584664

I voted tasteful and refined because I'm in a 50 year old inner city neighbourhood with mostly retirees. Alot of big trees and neat, low maintenance gardens with lots of lawn, with a couple of tacky efforts thrown in for interest. Of course I break the mould :-) but it gives everyone something to talk about don't ya think? 'I wonder what the poor dear in the pjs is doing now?'
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 22, 2008
3:12 PM

Post #5584682

It is fun stirring up this entirely too proper neighborhoods. I didn't start out with that as a mission, but now I like it. All I wanted was enough land for a really good veggie garden. Didn't realize I was a radical.
LindaCA
Concord, CA
(Zone 9a)

September 22, 2008
3:20 PM

Post #5584713

I voted other because my neighborhood has mostly boring. Neat trimmed meatball plants with grass and a tree in the yard. Yes it is boring. The houses are even painted the same boring colors . This is not a housing tract so kind of interesting that my neighbors chose to paint and landscape the same. I have a very different look to my yards with lots of large trees and lots of tropical and semi tropical plants. EEs, cannas, brugs ect and very little grass.
My house is a two story painted white with black trim to the horror of some of my neighbors. pretty funny actually. One of the neighbors asked why we didn't paint our house to match the neighborhood. Geesh you would think it was purple or something.
Linda
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 22, 2008
3:43 PM

Post #5584822

Actually, painting your house white with black trim sounds pretty conservative. What colors are their houses?? Purple and puce? Just curious.

beebonnet

beebonnet
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 9a)

September 22, 2008
3:48 PM

Post #5584843

Wow---I could have written Podsters comment. Sounds like we live on the same road. Except, we live in a valley with woods on the hills. The road winds along one side of the valley and there you can witness many different moods, styles and highs and lows in income and resources. It's the valley itself that is lovely, with cows, horses, and burros, a few veg. gardens, grass at all stages, haying in summer, etc. Love it even with the old car yard art next door. At least I can't see them from my yard. LOL

cececoogan

cececoogan
Waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 22, 2008
4:12 PM

Post #5584974

My street is boring. I'm about the only one with colors and whimsies in the yard. I like to be different though so it doesn't bother me.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

September 22, 2008
4:26 PM

Post #5585031

I have one word to explain the lack of garden art in my neighborhood: HOA! They take exception to anything that prevents our 'Stepford' houses from all looking identical and so overly manicured as to be foreboding, like those living rooms where you are afraid to walk on the floor much less sit on anything.
randbponder
Hornick, IA
(Zone 4b)

September 22, 2008
4:44 PM

Post #5585106

I went for other! Mostly nonexistent. Only two or three that put thought into a garden plan.
I am trying to but I'm not that good at planing a garden. I go more into veggies. Now that I can do. But as for arranging flower beds, I'm at a loss. I seem to have a campaign taste but a beer budget. LOL

cececoogan

cececoogan
Waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 22, 2008
5:10 PM

Post #5585213

When I arrange a flower bed I pick what I like and start planting The first pot goes in first then nest to it. Hodge podge at best but I just plant where they fall.
ladybarber101
Lancaster, OH
(Zone 6a)

September 22, 2008
5:29 PM

Post #5585300

I voted non existant.. We live in a neighborhood that ost of the homes werer built 40 years ago but have huge lots (thankfully most are hidden my fences). A few neighbors try to do something every now and again with marigolds but for the most part its either not there at all or overgrown. I have 2 neighbors who have huge azaleas in no proper place just growing in the centers of their front yards. No real rhyme or reason or care of trimming (EVER). My neighbor next door who I love has some garden art nd roses with rubber mulch n varying colors and the one across the street has some very nice palms but wont treat his sagos even though I explained how so it always looks like snow all over them with scale and he never trimms his other palms. All this and of course cars on blocks throughout the nieghborhood with lawns being neglected. Even the school is in need of help which I offered and was refused (I didnt realize people would turn down free plants and labor!)
Zanymuse
Scotia, CA
(Zone 9b)

September 22, 2008
6:27 PM

Post #5585478

My neighborhood has a bit of everything. One has a dragon sculpture, many have bird houses and there are even some with whirligigs. We also have one that thinks their old tire rims make an attractive display...He stacked them up on the front lawn and his wife, the gardener, got tired of hearing him say he'd haul them away and set a huge potted plant on top of them. There are even some that use those life sized deer they make for target practice as year round garden art. One house with a pristine yard and perfectly edged borders plants huge sunflowers randomly about his lawn each year as his form of garden art. I enjoy them all as they depict different personalities and keep the area from looking like a cookie cutter community full of follow the leader drones.
MySharona
Amelia Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 22, 2008
8:43 PM

Post #5585997

Nonexistent. I'm the only only that has any decor. My front lawn is low key, but has one small whimsical frog and 4 small concrete bunny decorations all by the front porch. Impatiens, and pink flame jacobina are my flowering plants along the front walkway, some vines at the front porch as well. I have a seasonal flag and switch it out with a Stars & Stripes on appropriate days. The back lawn is where I have the majority of my plants and feeders.

Everyone else has the basic lawn, requisite pampas grass and lugustrum hedges. Most keep their lawn tidy, one is a constant eyesore. I think he does that just to be cantankerous.
Yuska
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 22, 2008
8:44 PM

Post #5586002

Had to choose other - the front yards are the same - manicured in regimented fashion - very strict HOA. Viewed as a whole the area does remind me of a park, however. Thank goodness for solid fencing that keeps prying eyes away from my side and back yards. I must be the only veggie gardener in the whole complex...thankfully I have tolerant neighbors on both sides. Yuska
gessiegail
Taft, TX
(Zone 9a)

September 22, 2008
8:50 PM

Post #5586034

When you live out in the country with the winds of south Texas, you mainly grow outside something to either eat, block the wind or just grow close to the house. Here is what I see on one side. I wouldn't have life any other way.

I can't find my pictures...be back later. I just know you want to see the cattle 30 feet from my back door! (LOL)
Kelli
L.A. (Canoga Park), CA
(Zone 10a)

September 22, 2008
9:25 PM

Post #5586152

I chose nonexistant, because for the most part it is. Everyone's yard is different and for the most part, well-cared-for, but there isn't much in the way of non-plant decor, at least in the front yards. A few people have fountains and there might be a cast iron bench or two, but that's about it. There is a Vietnamese family that always flies the American flag. (God bless 'em.) A couple houses have metal fences and driveway gates that in themselves are not unattractive, but I think it looks strange in this low-crime, middle-income, low-traffic neighborhood. To me, it makes it look like drug dealers live there.
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

September 22, 2008
9:37 PM

Post #5586198

Interesting - I voted other because there is a mix of garden styles but only one house down the road with notable 'decor' a large shabby chic birdbath .
My place - well I am working on it but the lawns really need cutting again - spring growth is rampant right now!
Neighbour on my north boundary (the sunny side for us down under) has a wonderful garden, well tended & stocked with gorgeous rhodies & camellias.
On the South side the garden was interestingly overgrown - the new owner is in the midst of slash & burn style clearing of foliage.
I can understand him wanting more air & light but sadly he has knocked over a small but perfectly formed magnolia (nigra?).
He probably didn't realise what a desirable tree it is - I have certainly been highly desirous of it...
every time I walked past it in flower I would wish it was the other side of the fence in my yard.
I do have some decor...
consisting of one plastic frog - a house warming gift that no longer croaks as you walk past it,
a concrete dragon ( a house warming gift to myself)
& some interesting rocks strategically placed (that's my story & I am sticking to it) as accents in the garden.
And my pots of herbs and a very ugly plastic container with a rose awaiting transplant (only been here a year) on my front terrace.
cheers - Dalfyre
NZ

Thumbnail by dalfyre
Click the image for an enlarged view.

roybird
Santa Fe, NM

September 22, 2008
10:02 PM

Post #5586244

I chose nonexistant but then realized that is not exactly true. There are some very pretty roses, iris, sunflowers, lilacs, etc. grown in front yards around the 'hood. The most interesting stuff is usually behind a wall or a fence and you have to know the people to see it. There is not much "garden art" in front yards though because things that aren't heavy get stolen. Heavy things get tagged. My front garden is full of roses, day lilies, sunflowers, etc. and looks like a tangled mini-meadow when things are good! I'm surprised that so many people have answered the same. My neighborhood is about 30 - 40 years old but mostly consists of artists, drug dealers and state government employees; in other words, the working poor, Santa Fe style!
Katlian
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6b)

September 22, 2008
10:45 PM

Post #5586375

I voted tacky. My neighborhood has a mix of weedy gravel lots and tacky plastic decorations. The people who live next door tend to put a bit more effort into their yards but it's mostly pretty grim. There is a family across the park who has the typical lawn, but no bushes or flowers, and an enormous concrete fountian that never has water in it. The people who bought our old house replaced the few plants we left behind with icky plastic statues and filled the raised beds in the back yard with gravel. I'm glad we took all the plants we could move.

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

September 23, 2008
1:33 AM

Post #5587009

I voted other...I live in a small town established in the late 1800's. Most of the old houses here have no landscaping. I am one of only two homes in town with any landscaping at all.
SW_gardener

(Zone 6a)

September 23, 2008
3:13 AM

Post #5587613

I chose other because my neighbors don't seem to know what they're doing when it comes to landscaping. My neighbor waters 3 yards and my patio and my backdoor when he turns on the sprinkler.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 23, 2008
4:00 AM

Post #5587758

Voted other. On a mountain in a Natonal Forest,God is the landscaper and i like what he's done. But it's kinda undescribable in human terms.
My nook in the woods is as natural as i could make it and have what i wanted.One half acre cleared area for veggies,tho unused these last few years. My various flower beds in heavy to little shade are a mix of everything from roses to wildflowers and weeds i like. Had to go to town to get some dandelion seeds. LOL

I've several angels scattered in nooks and crannys around the house. fairly small stone realistic looking animals,turtles,frogs,squirrells, and rabbits around.Three park benches in nooks and crannys. Took awhile to collect these but i love them.
Have muscadines, Wild grapes, Virginia creeper, climbing trees. Have local neighbors coming through frequently. Deer,squirrel,rabbits, turkey,and bear are the usual flow of traffic. I pretend snakes and poison ivy don't really exist even if i have to watch for them. I may be a little partial, but i think i have the best of landscaped neighborhoods.: )
Vickie
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 23, 2008
4:36 AM

Post #5587888

You know Vicki, I have to agree with you. You have the best landscape I have heard of, though I would have skipped the dandelions. Congratulations on having found paradise.
Sofonisba
Beacon, NY
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2008
4:49 AM

Post #5587912

I voted "nonexistant", but then realized that it's not true. My neighborhood has a large variety of yard art. There's the two young boys who bought the house across the street. They have a giant eagle shaped, painted totem pole in the center of their front yard. The neighbor next to them on the north has never had anything in his yard, not even a leaf until just this past summer, he bought a small fountain for the front walk. The neighbor to the south of the boys has whirligigs and things. The neighbor to my east decorates her yard with fake flowers and little signs that have faded in the sun. Up the hill a little ways from me, I'd say the yards look less interesting - more cookie cutter - except for the few renegade gardeners here and there.
leeflea51
Golden, MS
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2008
6:37 AM

Post #5587995

i voted other as we live in a rural area where what ever grows grows. lee

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 23, 2008
11:29 AM

Post #5588182

At this time it is "nonexistent". I am in a neighborhood where the houses were built in the mid 50's and still have a lot of the bushes the developers put in and now are overgrown and invasive types.
There are a few of us that are changing the minds of some people by ripping out the old straight lines and adding natives and blooming plants like we did. I got yard of the month last year and so did another person in my neighborhood that had changed his look! People are noticing and making a few changes. As younger people move into the area, they bring new ideas and energy to the area also.
I am taking a stack of books on 'Nonnative Invasive Plants of Southern Forests' to my next neighborhood assn. meeting. I got them FREE from the USDA through the Native Plant Society in my area!! Hoping they will make a difference in the future.


This message was edited Sep 24, 2008 6:53 AM
posyblossom
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

September 23, 2008
12:38 PM

Post #5588373

Everyone on our street has a unique look,all their very own☺It is a wonder I don't have a wreck when I drive on our street. I am always gawking to see who has new and interesting plantings,wonderful street to live on,most of the time. Some of the newer neighbors are feuding over property lines right now,but it will blow over and everything will get back to normal, I hope☺
fernman23
HENDERSON, NV
(Zone 9a)

September 23, 2008
4:03 PM

Post #5589143

mine is so desolate as it is hard to work the desert ground into soil.
D:

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

September 23, 2008
4:49 PM

Post #5589312

I voted non-existent, no one really has any garden decor. They may have flowers and shrubs but no decor that is noticable.
Pamgarden
Central, VA
(Zone 7b)

September 23, 2008
5:20 PM

Post #5589422

This may be one of the most amusing vote threads Dave has had. I have honestly laughed out loud at some of the comments (love the waving hand) and read them aloud to my husband. While I have an item or two that I consider yard art, they are unintentionally hidden, the gargoyle (Dido the little guy with his toes crossed from the Notre Dame buttresses) is behind a morning glory that has grown to eight feet, and the Winged Angel bird feeder (Amen or AHEM...as you choose) is behind a holly bush that overtook her this past summer. I never thought of myself as antyhing buy tasteful and refined, but look, I have two strange pieces of YARD ART. Shocking!
Sofonisba
Beacon, NY
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2008
5:48 PM

Post #5589498

Pam, I agree. It's a very funny thread!
Hemhostaholic
Scranton, PA
(Zone 5b)

September 23, 2008
7:52 PM

Post #5589930

Beside myself, the neighbor across the street from me has a car up on cinderblocks (has had them there for over 7 years now) he has a few pots of sun bleached plastic flowers, a squirrel feeder that hasn't fed anything in about 7 years, and a few pumpkins that are growing on to his sidewalks.

Not sure if the above counts or not? Other than that, my neighborhood is pretty much void of any landscaping/plantings.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 23, 2008
8:22 PM

Post #5590052

There is no neighborhood Ass. thank goodness in our area. Afew developments in town have them & are very uninteresting. Our property was under30 yr. conservation restriction & then houses were allowed to be built. Keep our garden "art" out of sight as it would leave if people saw it. For awhile the teens ideas of fun was smashing pumpkins & destroying rural mailboses.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 23, 2008
8:41 PM

Post #5590125

Its very sad to hear how many can't have things in plain view because they might/will get stolen. Very sad.
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 23, 2008
8:54 PM

Post #5590178

Our neighborhood was established in the late '70's by and for people who wanted an old fashioned type neighborhood w/trees and bushes and order. We have no sidewalks and don't need them as everyone always walks in the streets and their dogs in their neighbors' yards, if you get my drift. Each house is different and by todays standards look spacious and well taken care of. The plantings are all different and many of the owners do their own yards which is certainly not the norm in the newer neighborhoods. This is not to say that the owners don't have the say so when it comes to how things are done and what is planted. We seem to have gardeners - 3-4 per company - rather than a couple of guys who mow, weedeat and blow and are gone in 20-25 minutes. The neighborhood looks good and well cared for as a whole w/the occasional weedy lawn. The big trees are an asset.

Ann

ves522

ves522
Jim Falls, WI
(Zone 4a)

September 23, 2008
9:42 PM

Post #5590393

Haven't read the others yet.

Voted other as I live in the country.

A couple have tried but don't keep up with it much past june.

A couple just have grass. But keep it mowed nice.

We probably have the most extensive yard around here.

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

September 23, 2008
11:30 PM

Post #5590809

Just took a walk around part of the neighborhood and I guess I can now say there is more garden decor than the rest of the year since a lot of people have Halloween decorations up.
bigcityal
Menasha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 24, 2008
12:19 AM

Post #5590977

I said a bit out of scale - some older homes not kept up and a few just starting, but mostly nonexistent.
got2Bgreen
Coast range of, OR
(Zone 8b)

September 24, 2008
12:38 AM

Post #5591062

I've only got two neighbors one on either side of my house. I can't see their yards from my yard though so I am saying non-existent.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 24, 2008
1:49 AM

Post #5591445

o I can match Hallowe'en decor! Dahlia protection for f*r*o*s*t tonight

Thumbnail by dahlianut
Click the image for an enlarged view.

dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 24, 2008
1:52 AM

Post #5591467

LOL this thread came to mind tonight as I was doing the covering thing. NO one else in my neighbourhood does it so you can see why the chatter will start tomorrow. I give you what I have named the driveway movie screen right smuck in the front yard :-) Want to be my neighbour LOL?

Thumbnail by dahlianut
Click the image for an enlarged view.

valrita

September 24, 2008
3:20 AM

Post #5591803

With all of your pretty dahlias, sure, I'd be your neighbor! But your zone looks very chilly...

I had answered "nonexistent". Last night I showed my hubby the question and asked him what he thought. He answered "nonexistent".

We were both wrong. Tonight we went out for a slow stroll around the neighborhood. We discovered much more garden decor than either of us realized. Normally we drive everywhere so we don't notice things as much. There are homes with benches, arbors, signs, bird baths, planters, globes, and we even saw fairies and gnomes! We never realized. So now I need to change my answer to "charming and adds personality to each garden".

Thanks for asking this question and giving us the idea to explore our neighborhood more. We've made a date to take another long walk this weekend.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 24, 2008
3:47 AM

Post #5591910

What a delightful discovery, Velnita. Probably all of us would do well to walk around our neighborhoods and notice what is going on there. Congratulations for your discovery. Congratulations, DG, for asking such a provocative question. Many of us have learned from the answers to it.
WeedLady
Weatherford, TX
(Zone 7b)

September 24, 2008
4:12 AM

Post #5591970

I have a six foot long kinda Horn Toad guy sitting on a hill by my drive. My DH is a TCU Horn Frog guy and so is daughter, it was given to him from the Museum of Science and History in Ft Worth years ago as they were redoing a display. Now what are the chances of him being there that day? He told the guy that asked him if he wanted it that Yes, I want to give it to my wife for our anniversary. The guy laughed and said he would not be married much longer. LOL He takes 6 guys to move him and our puppy has chewed some horns off and yes we have a HOA but live in the country and people stop and walk the kids up to see this beast. He made the newspaper once. He is looking very worn and Hubby got some things to fix him up. I told him if he does not get his horns back by winter he will be in the burn pit! Uh I dont know how I would get him in the pit as I think it would break my 4-wheeler and my DH heart if I did. So we stay married and Toadie gets a new do come winter.I Hope! Was not real sure how to vote on this one. LOL I forgot to say he came with a volcano as in life size volcano. I used those out of site of the front! Thank Jesus he did NOT bring the whole volcano home to me. They are cool as they are huge boulders. All I can say is you will never see another one on the block.
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

September 24, 2008
5:23 AM

Post #5592138

I forgot my garden Gnome - Gnorman...
& my house used to have balls;)
They were on the gate posts but before I bought the house someone got the bright idea to remove one & put a revoltingly ugly mail box on there.
Some young adults having a party decided to kick my stone wall down one night - the other concrete ball is now in the garden out of sight.
It is pretty heavy but a determined person could do some damage with it so I figured better safe than sorry.
It cost $2000.00 to repair the stone work on the front wall, thank goodness for insurance!
Cheers - Dalfyre
NZ

Thumbnail by dalfyre
Click the image for an enlarged view.

roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 24, 2008
10:16 AM

Post #5592272

I voted nonexistent because most people in this part of Ireland don't enjoy gardening FULL STOP! In a way it's a relief though because the alternative and my SIL and most of her friends idea of garden art is these really naff miniature windmills or wheelbarrows (which come free with most home garden shopping catalogues), stuffed with spring bulbs or seasonal flowers - all their gardens look exactly the same. Shudder!! It's like a scene from the Stepford wives.

I haven't seen any gnomes though which is very conforting.
Fairy1004
(bestest fairy)Tempe, MI
(Zone 5b)

September 24, 2008
11:29 AM

Post #5592387

My neighbors do tasteful and reserved-I on the other hand-not so much!!LOL I like to be different:)

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

September 24, 2008
11:55 AM

Post #5592440

Very simple here. Most of neighbors either are large farmers or work in town. The only "Yard Art" here are on 4 wheels. The trick is to outdo one another on the enormous size & price of your lawn mower. The bigger, the better. A "neat" yard here consists of acres of grass. Even cattle yards are mowed, since these farmers ceased working years ago.
Once in a while a yard may have a bush growing if it don't get in the way of the monster grass eaters!
Favorite past time of these people is discussing their mower & complaining about how high priced they are getting.
Bernie
wandygirl
Brookfield, CT

September 24, 2008
12:41 PM

Post #5592555

Most of what I see on my street falls into the more or less tasteful but not terribly imaginative category. Cherubs, cute animal statuary, that sort of thing. I'm trying to break out into something differnt by training a chance juniper seedling into a standing rabbit topiary. By far the best garden art belongs to an elderly couple on whose former farmland my house now sits. He has something that looks like an attempt at "found art" made from large metal hoops. Wagon wheel rims, maybe? There is a large piece of swirling grape vine that was painted to look like a snake. It resides in the rock wall, looking like a stern warning to chipmunks and voles. There is the requisite four wheeled garden art, complete with empty plastic bucket over the exhaust pipe. My favorite piece is a giant yellow smiley face that was painted on a huge circular saw blade. The blade is mounted on the side of a small storage shed and greets me every time I go in and out of the neighborhood. It will be a sad day when these two sweet people are no longer part of the local scene.
irisloverdee
Lebanon, OR

September 24, 2008
1:28 PM

Post #5592735

but it is nonexisitant because we live out in farm country and many times you never see the home from the road
D
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 24, 2008
4:14 PM

Post #5593469

I voted charming. Funky would be my second choice. I live in the Hawthorne/Sunnyside neighborhood of Portland, Oregon and the gardens are wonderful. A lot of English type charm and LOTS of vegetables. Some folks have vegetables in their front yards - eating organic and local is very big here, including in the grocery stores. We do have well used and friendly sidewalks and people take great care planting the strips between the sidewalk and the street - mostly very full of waist high flowers, wild flowers, and trees. There are groups of neighbors standing around and chatting everywhere. The trees are old and large and the houses are circa 1900 - 1920. Large front porches with swings and rocking chairs are the norm. One very cool thing that is not exactly garden but contributes greatly to the neighborhood feel is the giant sunflower painted on an intersection. Years ago the neighbors decided to slow down traffic moving through the area and they all got together and painted the street. It is repainted often to maintain the fresh look. There are benches and pieces of art on the corners, as well as a message board for all to use. I, like most people here, bought my home because of the neighborhood. Even the elementary school, which is designated an environmental school, has an extensive vegetable garden that the children take care of with help from the neighbors during the summer break. When the lilacs and hydrangeas bloom it is heaven!
MySharona
Amelia Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 24, 2008
4:28 PM

Post #5593512

Portland1 - Wow - that sounds really nice! Post of picture of the street!
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 24, 2008
5:04 PM

Post #5593641

For a really cool aerial view go to Google Earth and type in SE 33rd Ave and SE Yamhill Portland Oregon
If you are not familiar with Google Earth it is fun, amazing and free!
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 24, 2008
7:13 PM

Post #5594109

I would like to recommend a book on gardening written by Michael Pollen, who wrote the very widely read "Omnivore's Dilemma". It is titled "Second Nature" and is very insightful and so well written.
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 24, 2008
7:16 PM

Post #5594119

Sounds like my idea of heaven Portland.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 24, 2008
7:30 PM

Post #5594175

Ok I'm moving to Portland. Do your neighbours like dahlias? The tubers are edible so they could be in a veggie garden too :-)
Nan
SW, WI
(Zone 4b)

September 24, 2008
7:35 PM

Post #5594191

Absolutely OTHER, as it's a little bit of everything, and does, indeed, add personality and charm to each owners' garden...completely a personal choice that I have no business judging...as I'm a bit 'eclectic', myself!
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 24, 2008
7:43 PM

Post #5594209

Dahlianut are dahlia tubers really edible? I must tell my OH cos he thinks plants arn't worth growing unless you can eat them. There's another to add to my list. Tell me more. Where (what country) do peeps eat them LOL.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 24, 2008
7:54 PM

Post #5594246

Yupper roseimp although I think it's just plain funky weirdness.
Dahlia Bread
Preheat oven to 350*
3 eggs
1 cup veg. oil
2 cups sugar
2 cups grated dahlia tuber
2 tsp vanilla
3 cups flour
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. soda
2+ tsp cinnamon (I piled it up!)
Beat eggs until light & foamy. Add oil, sugar, grated dahlia tuber & vanilla. Mix lightly but well. Sift dry ingred. together. Add to wet ingred. Mix only until blended. Put into greased loaf pans.
Bake in 350* oven for 1 hour.
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 24, 2008
7:59 PM

Post #5594265

OH wicked! Guess who's veggie mad partner is going to try this dish ?LOL. This is weird and wonderful!
figaro52
Oak Lawn, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 24, 2008
8:06 PM

Post #5594295

Podster, I'd give anything for neighbors like yours! :-)

Edited to clarify (based on your photo): Neighbors you can't see!!

This message was edited Sep 24, 2008 3:28 PM
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 24, 2008
8:10 PM

Post #5594308

Here's link to the Dahlia Forum thread which discusses eating dahlias (wince). http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/882178/
chicochi3
Fayetteville, AR
(Zone 6b)

September 24, 2008
8:24 PM

Post #5594347

I voted nonexistent. Most of the houses in my neighborhood are rented and most of the renters can't even be bothered to mow their lawns.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 24, 2008
8:33 PM

Post #5594395

I would hate to eat a dahlia tuber if it could grow a dahlia flower!
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 24, 2008
8:38 PM

Post #5594422

Exactamundo paj. It's probably cannabalistic too if you're a dahlianut.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 24, 2008
8:44 PM

Post #5594447

Hadn't thought of that, but you are right.
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 24, 2008
10:17 PM

Post #5594795

LOL I always put my stomach first.
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 25, 2008
12:13 AM

Post #5595352

Dahlianut - there are dahlias in the flower gardens here. I had no idea they were edible. Portland is a wonderful city. The Willamette River runs through the center of the city and joins the Columbia River before going to the Pacific Ocean. There are many cool bridges across the Willamette and are full of bicycles. Portland has more bicycle commuters that any other city in the US. I ride my bike everywhere and I'm 61. It is one of those old fashioned bikes like we had as kids.

pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 25, 2008
12:17 AM

Post #5595374

I have heard the Portland is one of the most progressive cities in the US. I am proud to say that one of my former students is a City Planner there.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 25, 2008
12:21 AM

Post #5595399

I've through Portland many a time on my way south on I5 to CA (my parents were snowbirds). Unfortunately never stopped to see the city. Oregon is one beautiful state but then I've never been to a state that wasn't. (only have a few more states left to see).
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 25, 2008
12:50 AM

Post #5595520

I am always trying to talk people into visiting me in Mississippi when I am there, which I will be around the end of October. Bet you have never been to Mississippi. It really is a beauty -- lush beyond belief.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 25, 2008
1:13 AM

Post #5595628

Yupper been there. Lower 48 I'm missing: Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Kentucky, Mass., Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. Also never been to Washington DC although it's not a state I still count it as not seen. Outside the lower 48 I've been to Hawaii and Alaska but not US Virgin Islands or Puerta Rico (a US territory). Any others outside the lower 48? WOW I'm missing alot!!! I better get travelling!!!!
GardenHannes
Eagle, CO

September 25, 2008
3:03 AM

Post #5596231

I don't have a real garden, just a three pot stand, now with mums, "red salsa" plus unknown (for me) plants and an "orange salsa) which is suffering from the cold night in this altitude (~ 6,600 feet). I really would like to know the name of the plants near (in the same pot) of the "red salsa", I will provide a close-up photo . . . thank you for looking on this and the coming ...

Thumbnail by GardenHannes
Click the image for an enlarged view.

roybird
Santa Fe, NM

September 25, 2008
3:12 AM

Post #5596271

Dahlias are edible! Now, my D.H. will be excited to remove the concrete driveway for them. Uh Huh. Portland sounds very nice but not enough sun for me. We do have a couple of murals on walls in my neighborhood. Does that count as garden decoration?
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 25, 2008
3:41 AM

Post #5596395

Well, you are right about the left hand plant being a mum. The right hand plant is clearly a pepper -- probably an ornamental one. Peppers don't like cold and at 6,600 ft. they might get a little cold, but I suspect that whatever problems it is having might be something else. I live at 7,300 ft. and grow peppers which are typically happy. Maybe it has some aphids or something? It actually looks quite nice -- are you sure that there is anything wrong with it? What symptoms do you see.
I cannot figure out what the middle plant is. Will need a closeup for that.
Anyhow, two out of 3 flourishing is pretty good. You seem to be doing mostly the right thing. When we see a closer picture of the middle plant, we will, hopefully, be able to tell you more.
The mums and the peppers look great!
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 25, 2008
3:43 AM

Post #5596400

Murals are definitely garden decoration. Excellent ones. Better than most of us have.
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 25, 2008
7:37 AM

Post #5596779

Someone threw an old bicycle into my front garden once.
gk1153
Paris, IL
(Zone 6a)

September 25, 2008
11:11 AM

Post #5596961

There is a couple in town who placed an old iron bed; head and foot frames and rails in their yard and planted flowers inside it. She claimed no one needed to ask where her flower bed is. They could come by and see it.
valrita

September 25, 2008
12:43 PM

Post #5597193

Dahlianut, you'll love Kentucky--and Maryland too. They're both beautiful. But my very favorite city is Washington DC. Oh, I just love it. The museums, history, architecture, and international culture are great! Every time I go it's never long enough.
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

September 25, 2008
2:43 PM

Post #5597750

Mother Nature style - 24/7 - for miles and miles around
Nan
SW, WI
(Zone 4b)

September 25, 2008
4:11 PM

Post #5598054

lol...I've seen a few of those 'literal' garden 'beds' around here, too.
I
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 25, 2008
4:51 PM

Post #5598201

Roseimp - you are very funny!
figaro52
Oak Lawn, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 25, 2008
7:40 PM

Post #5598846

I've seen an occasional mattress on the curb, but unfortunately no flowers and no headboard. Turns out it was garbage day! (thank goodness!)
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 25, 2008
8:02 PM

Post #5598914

Don't want you to get the wrong idea - I'm not in a rough area, just on the way back from several pubs LOL
roybird
Santa Fe, NM

September 25, 2008
8:35 PM

Post #5599000

Roseimp, you might be in my neighborhood, sounds like! The bed bed reminds me that I have seen people use old toilets as planters. Kind of inelegant but utilitarian.
gardengus
Flora, IN
(Zone 5a)

September 25, 2008
10:47 PM

Post #5599465

Garden decor in my neighborhood is mostly corn and beans. Some years it is beans and corn.
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

September 25, 2008
11:29 PM

Post #5599633

Roybird - next to the toilet planter should be one of the old rotary dial phones - with a sign "To be used when Mother Nature calls" ... arrrrrgggggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Sofonisba
Beacon, NY
(Zone 7a)

September 26, 2008
12:09 AM

Post #5599795

Har har har!!!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 26, 2008
12:47 AM

Post #5599945

Hey... hey watch it! Nuf toilet humor!

I am guilty but in the backyard where only the privileged get to enter... http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=3953934
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 26, 2008
1:16 AM

Post #5600071

You guys are :-) Roybird is there a magazine stand beside it? just for realism of course... cuz some people do do that.
figaro52
Oak Lawn, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 26, 2008
2:50 AM

Post #5600461

do do?
roybird
Santa Fe, NM

September 26, 2008
3:18 AM

Post #5600563

Ha!Ha!Ha! Now, seriously. There is a gardener down the street and 3 blocks over, Not technically my neighborhood (or is it?) and this fella has more than one toilet planter. He also displays a large American flag. He has blue morning glories, red roses, and very nice iris in the spring. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, right? There is no accounting for taste. And so forth.
roybird
Santa Fe, NM

September 26, 2008
3:21 AM

Post #5600574

Oh, Pod, I gotta say your planter looks o.k. to me! I have also seen old tires used as planters. It is a way of re-using things that would otherwise go in a landfill.

Samigal

Samigal
(Pegi) Norwalk, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 26, 2008
6:33 AM

Post #5600962

I voted nonexistant, but neighbors do have roses along side their garage, but no one has any garden art which I think is a shame. I have a set of gnomes which will go out in front in the spring, and my back yard is going to be full of garden art. In front I'm also going to have tipsy pots so all who walk by can see (hoping they will ask about them). Have a few neighbors who have nothing growing, I think they do need some help.:-)
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 26, 2008
2:08 PM

Post #5601622

my yard is a big slope down to the house ,so i've done a lot of rock beds to hold the soil back , and will be doing a bunch more . have e e's and azaleas and so much other stuff to hide the road . hate having to lift my hand a dozen times a day to two neighbors that are in and out a dozen times a day . so will screen the road off . i've planted loropetulem ,e e's nine bark , three varieties, jap maple( four), hemlock , bald cypress (two)native dogwood (six or eight )gardenia ,several viburnum (scented ) ,red wigelius , six or eight , magnolias,sweet bay and so far , two pink stardust and two white ceder i brought back in a suitcase on the plane from oregan . it has been a seven year project so far . i think i'm doing a pretty good job of screening it off . 1 birdbath , 2 hummingbird feeders , frogs , a gazing ball . it's fifty foot to the road and two hundred foot wide. sally
Sofonisba
Beacon, NY
(Zone 7a)

September 26, 2008
2:09 PM

Post #5601623

Roy, my DH has his morning glory every day on the pot like clockwork!
brigidlily
Lumberton, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 26, 2008
3:04 PM

Post #5601852

A sad but telling conclusion! "Nonexistent" it is. Hurricane Ike took down a lot of fence around my 'hood, and peeking into backyards has never been easier. I'm apparently the only person, at least in this section of Lumberton, to have a garden at all! I was truly astounded at the yards. Just great big green areas with the occasional shed!
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 26, 2008
3:18 PM

Post #5601943

What is with the grass thing I wonder. Who started the 'lawn' concept anyhoo and why? It totally doesn't make any sense IMHO as its such high maintenance and requires so much water. Anybody know the history of lawns?
brigidlily
Lumberton, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 26, 2008
3:33 PM

Post #5601998

I think people like them because you have control over them. You mow them down and edge them and there aren't all those messy flowers and things you have to keep up with. Nature abhors a straight line. People prefer them. (Except gardeners!)

I suppose it started with the village green, maybe? A place to gather. It's a nice interruption for a garden, I guess. Contrast.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 26, 2008
3:52 PM

Post #5602062

The old manor house lawns in Eng. were for grazing sheep (with a wet climate). I prefer the "cottage garden" concept from the same place.
Sofonisba
Beacon, NY
(Zone 7a)

September 26, 2008
4:31 PM

Post #5602210

I thought the British brought the grass idea over here.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 26, 2008
4:36 PM

Post #5602224

it does help keep out tracked in georgia red mud . shoes off at the door doesn't help all that much. sally
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 26, 2008
4:50 PM

Post #5602277

Dahlianut - you MUST read Second Nature by Pollen. He has a great theory about lawns.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 26, 2008
5:08 PM

Post #5602342

I have always thought that every lawn should come with a real live sheep to mow and fertilize it.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 26, 2008
5:20 PM

Post #5602392

or a zebra :-) I've always wanted a zebra.
valrita

September 26, 2008
5:48 PM

Post #5602478

I want a hippopotamus for Christmas...only a hippopotamus will do...
Maybe a zebra would be a bit more practical though.
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 26, 2008
6:00 PM

Post #5602517

I want a cute little goat. But I have no lawn so it would eat all of my vegetables. When one of my sons was in college his fraternity saw a thing on TV about a pig that was going to be destroyed if no one claimed it so of course the boys claimed it and took it back to the frat house. They fed it everything and named it Chorizo and it got so fat that his belly dragged on the ground. When the pig savers graduated they could not find anyone to take Chorizo so they left the gate open in hopes he would wander away - no luck. So they put him on a big sling and into a pick-up truck and drove to the agriculture building (Cal-Ploy is an ag school) on campus and hoisted him over the fence and that's the last we heard of Chorizo.
CapeCodGardener
Mid-Cape, MA
(Zone 7a)

September 26, 2008
6:29 PM

Post #5602640

Here's a link that gives a short cultural history of lawn-ship (or whatever it would be called.)


http://www.allaboutlawns.com/lawn-maintenance-care/landscaping-and-gardening/the-history-behind-lawns.php
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 26, 2008
6:43 PM

Post #5602686

Great ideas all! I would love a zebra. They are even cuter than sheep. I watched a program about a lady who rescues them on animal planet. They are sweet and shy.
A hippo! For a hippo you really need a big deep swimming pool. I think a hippo would make a great pond ornament, rather than a lawn ornament.
I love the story of Chorizo who probably is chorizo by now. On the other hand I knew a Portuguese kid who found a Vietnamese pot-bellied pig and wanted to keep it but his father wanted to make linguica out of it ( pretend there is a little tail on the c of linguica). Luckily the pig was pregnant and produced at least 2 piglets. The boy got to keep the pig who is alive today and named Smudge and his dad mad linguica out of the rest.
brigidlily
Lumberton, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 26, 2008
6:45 PM

Post #5602699

There's a guy here in Texas who is on trial for setting 30 pigs out into the wild. They went feral and are incredibly destructive. I can't remember which critters "mow" the grass and which ones pull it up by the roots. I think cows and horses mow, and sheep and goats tug but I'm not sure.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 26, 2008
6:47 PM

Post #5602708

ahhhhhhhhh now I get it. Thanks CCG. I now look forward to lots of rousing games of cricket and croquet in my neighbourhood ;-
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 26, 2008
7:15 PM

Post #5602811

Well, I know they say that sheep and goats pull up grass plants whereas horses and cows mow, but I have long thought that this is propaganda put out by cattlemen who can be pretty snooty toward shepherds. If you look at a picture of an English castle it is very often sheep browsing on the lawn there.
Now goats, I think they eat everything in sight. I know they use them around here to kill salt cedar which is one of the toughest plants of all. Goats mow it right down to the soil and would pull it up if the roots didn't reach down 100 feet or so.
My mother never let my father forget a blemish in his history. He once dated the daughter of a sheep farmer. He doesn't say much about it, but my mother said she was from one of the richest families in Wyoming, but he never lived it down.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 26, 2008
7:21 PM

Post #5602826

So the feud between the Hatfield Sheeps vs. the McCoys Cows was really about pulling vs. mowing paj? Cool. I did not know that. I never really understood that dispute. We only have a few sheeps here so maybe our cows and horses ran them off during that war. We do have some llamas too which is really bizarre IMHO.
CapeCodGardener
Mid-Cape, MA
(Zone 7a)

September 26, 2008
7:53 PM

Post #5602915

Quoting:Now goats, I think they eat everything in sight. I know they use them around here to kill salt cedar which is one of the toughest plants of all.

Where I used to live (in California) our community hired Basque shepherds annually from Modoc County to bring their herds of goats in to eat the poison oak near the golf courses. They would clear a hill in about three days.

roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 26, 2008
8:08 PM

Post #5602966

Paj - I totally agree. Grass is for animals. Goats eat everything including laundry BUT if you ever had a field of grass which only ever had goats on it for several years you would know - they eat only herbage, the grass they don't touch so not a weed in sight and long lush grass - just waiting for er...cattle or something. I kept milking nannies once but decided it wasn't worth the aggro of trying to keep them out of the garden so I did away with the garden. I'll never forget what they did to my globe artichokes!

This message was edited Sep 26, 2008 7:09 PM
gardener09
San Antonio, TX

September 26, 2008
8:53 PM

Post #5603118

Without planning.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 26, 2008
9:24 PM

Post #5603247

Thanks for the info on goats! I didn't know they could weed your field for you. I do know that the U.S. Navy used to use them to keep the weeds down on their ammo depots. Now I will try to remember this fact, in case I ever have a weedy field, I should get some goats.

As for the shepherds vs. the cattlemen, I am not exactly sure what the beef (so to speak) was between them. I think the catllemen were mostly English, Irish, extraction and the Shepherds were mostly Basque and Portuguese, so I think it was kind of an ethnic clash. Frankly, it is hard to understand these days because they could have swaped some cows for some sheep and have a lot more variety in their diet, but on the whole, I think the cattlemen got to the open ranges first and wanted to slam the door after themselves. They preferred not to have competition.

LLamas -- I love them-- as far as I know, everyone likes them. They are soft and sweet, but I guess they do spit on you -- I think I have heard that. So you shouldn't annoy them. I once got some llama poop out at the horse stables and put it on my garden. My tomatoes and squash really grew that year without composting. I have to say the first time I saw llamas used as pack animals on the hiking trails of the Pecos Wilderness, I thought I was seeing things, but now they are fairly common.

The animal that is truly hated in the cattleland of Southern New Mexico is the buffalo or rather bison. Again, it is hard to know why. One reason probably is that they don't worry about fences, they just walk right through them and I guess their hide is tough enough that they don't even respect barbed wire. They have to be trained with electric fences to avoid fences.
Ted Turner introduced them in Southern New Mexico and all the cowboys claim that raising buffalo is no better than raising earthworms. Yes, I saw it in the newspaper. On the other hand, I really like earthworms, so I don't know what the problem is. I just think it is funny that they can get so upset over someone else's kind of animals.

dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 26, 2008
10:27 PM

Post #5603465

Good to know about llama poop for the garden. Thanks paj.
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 26, 2008
10:32 PM

Post #5603481

Yeah really funny Paj especially since diversification would probably help with things like parasites and as you mentioned - diet. A sort of macho thing I guess. I can't think of anything more dull than going out onto the field and having to decide..."now do I have beef or...er...beef for supper tonight?"
How about bunnies? - they taste pretty good and don't eat your washing. Sorry, I got caught up on a food fest on another thred and now can't seem to get off the topic:-)) Anything is fair game.

Samigal

Samigal
(Pegi) Norwalk, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 26, 2008
10:38 PM

Post #5603505

Since I am a city gal and don't much about goats etc. I think I do need a couple to clear out my back yard. I have enough weeds to keep them feed for a few days.:-)
roybird
Santa Fe, NM

September 26, 2008
11:24 PM

Post #5603631

This has become quite silly, I must say! The best survey yet.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 27, 2008
1:46 AM

Post #5604192

Maybe roybird and I will need to expand our proposed rent-a-chicken business to include a rent-a-goat business. Then we could have something to eat your bugs, fertilize your property, and eliminate the weeds in your lawn. Maybe we will make two million, not one!
motherhen4
Sweetwater, TN

September 27, 2008
2:04 AM

Post #5604277

My neighbors don't do anything to their yards but mow. I'm the only one in the area who landscapes, flowerbeds, arbors,trees, shrubs, etc. I enjoy it and wish everyone did. Most say to much work. To me, it's a beautiful way to spend my time (and money).
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 27, 2008
2:47 AM

Post #5604413

Whoo hooo I'm going to know rich people (paj and roybird). You two realize of course then you will have to turn your gardens into lawns and play cricket and croquet (snort).
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 27, 2008
3:01 AM

Post #5604460

Woo Hoo! I do hope roybird and I will be rich. But I doubt if we will spend our wealth on lawns and croquet. We will more likely buy so many plants that we don't know what to do with them all! But we will be happy!
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 27, 2008
3:05 AM

Post #5604481

Perhaps your neighbours (yup getting back to the poll topic at last) will be inspired and your neighbourhood decor will improve. I did notice a neighbour this year grew sweat peas up the fence where before there was just lawns and shrubs and nothing on the fence so I think I'm wearing them down.
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 27, 2008
4:36 AM

Post #5604767

Wow - I just realized you live in Calgary, dahlianut. I once went to the Stampede - years ago. It was great!
I know we are not supposed to talk about politics but I would love to get opinions from people other than Americans. Can you use some code?
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 27, 2008
7:19 AM

Post #5604947

Should have a politics forum on DG - It couldn't get any more heated than the pets forum of late. LOL way off topic AGAIN!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 27, 2008
9:26 AM

Post #5604980

There's dmail , or email for opinions . on a forum , someone would make a crappy remark and the public answer , or crappy remark , would really offend someone . sally

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 27, 2008
11:46 AM

Post #5605127

I talked to a young person (in his 20s) some yrs ago & asked about his landlady's garden. He said that she didn't have a garden. I had seen shrubs & bittersweet on a trellis. "Oh flowers" he said. evidently only veggies counted.
amuckey
Robinson, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 27, 2008
12:22 PM

Post #5605209

Good morning,

I had to go with nonexistent. We live in a small town of approximately 350 people. The majority of people just mow and leave it at that. There's a few who do a beautiful job of landscaping and have those "nicely manicured" looking lawns, but for the most part there's not a lot of "YARD ART" or garden decor.

We just moved into this house a little over 2 1/2 years ago and I really just started this summer trying to make the yard more appealing to the eye. We have approximately and acre and a quarter with our house on the acre plot and a trailer on the quarter acre (just bought it a little over a year ago). The yards are joined, so we basically have one BIG yard. I've never had much yard in the past so I never really got into landscaping etc.. I have always loved roses and have tried to grow several in the past: without much success. I planted 5 new ones this year and we transplanted some OLD ones from my Great Grandmothers yard, she has been gone for years and they decided to bulldoze the house as the people who bought it didn't take care of it. I wish I knew for certain what kind the roses are. I think everyone of them bloomed red this spring. Very pretty and very fragrant.

I just keep plugging away and hope to have a BEAUTIFUL (envy of the neighborhood) yard in the future... LOL

Here is a picture of part of our yard... Hope this isn't TOO BIG,,, I didn't size it before posting. We have some beautiful old trees, but unfortunately we had a horrible ice storm this past December. It just tore up our trees. We are still trying to get them back in shape. We hope that eventually the broken branches that we couldn't get to will stop falling and littering the yard.

Thumbnail by amuckey
Click the image for an enlarged view.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 27, 2008
2:34 PM

Post #5605594

Tough about the trees. However some of the broken branches may attract woodpeckers--hope so.
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 27, 2008
2:35 PM

Post #5605600

amuckey - the photo is beautiful. What a nice thing to have your Great Grandmother's roses. It must be very different to look at them and know they belonged to someone you knew and loved. It sounds like your garden is or will soon be the envy of the neighborhood!
amuckey
Robinson, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 27, 2008
3:28 PM

Post #5605784

irisMA,

We do have a few Downy Woodpeckers around. They are fun to watch. My favorite birds are the Orioles (not sure what race they are). They are the most beautiful sounding birds. I always get excited in the spring when I hear the first one. I've tried, with no luck to attract them to various types of feeders. They just don't seem interested.

Portland1

Thank you! I do love our yard. I'd love to have a little wooden bridge over the small (runoff creek) where our yard adjoins the trailer yard. You can see it in the picture, it runs just behind the weeping willow and the bridge would be at the far right of the picture. In time... :-)

This spring I discovered a bush at the trailer yard. It's a Deutzia Ruebra... Don't think I spelled that right.. It is a gorgeous OLD bush that has the most beautiful flowers in the spring. I'd like to plant more of them around our property. We are also trying to think of something to plant along the front of the property line that would bloom most of the spring summer season. I would like a hardy ground cover of sorts. Have looked at a few online, but would gladly welcome any suggestions. The front property line is right next to the MAIN road coming into our little town, so I can't have anything that will get tall or I feel it would block peoples view and possibly be dangerous.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 27, 2008
4:11 PM

Post #5605923

Amuckey I'm greeeeeeeeeeeeen over your luvly setting. The trees are beautiful and you have a creek too! You must have alot of birds as well. Sorry Portland1 I don't talk politics. I just find it too stressing. Not one for the news either for that reason. I do read up before I go to the polls. Speaking of which I better get on it. Our federal election is October 14. I will say VOTE!!!! Hope its ok to say that.
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 27, 2008
4:55 PM

Post #5606031

That is so beautiful amuckey - it's just so natural looking. And land not garden too. I would love a bit of land.
:-)) Rosie
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 27, 2008
5:52 PM

Post #5606206

Non existant vote here. The neighborhood I live in is really just a "drive through" along a major street. Lower middle class and rental properties (apts.) and a couple of small locally owned businesses. Of the 32 units in my townhome complex, 2 of us garden and although I have the most flowering plants my neighbor's gardening style is more refined and structured.
The rest of the neighborhood is remarkably unremarkable:lol: Many people here in NC tend to just nestle their homes in with the existing trees and just keep their lawn mowed. I think as far as "garden art" goes--there is me with my celtic knot patterned square birdbath and a lady down the road with artificial spring flowers in the spring and fake fall leaves spiked in the ground in the fall:LOL:

Oooh, there is another home a couple of miles from me that is crazy. They have a small arched footbridge over a shallow ditch, a huge bandstand type gazebo, a fake city street lamp and the one that brings it all home...a 6 ft tall Statue of Liberty with lighted torch all in their front yard!!
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 27, 2008
6:05 PM

Post #5606261

Yeuuk! Give me a wood and a bit of grass any day. Hate that false thing more than anything. Fake windmills and wishing wells here dmac - want to swap LOL
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

September 27, 2008
6:37 PM

Post #5606339

There was a lady on a busy city street in Calgary who filled her front yard with plastic flowers all year long. Maybe she got too much truck and bus pollution for real plants? The Statue of Liberty is too funny!!! Now where on earth would someone get something like that? The Statue of Liberty gift shop?
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 27, 2008
7:07 PM

Post #5606421

I moved here in 1994 and I think I almost ran off the road trying to look at her yard:lol:
They even had a house fire, had to have the home rebuilt but that SoL was there the whole time:) What can you say...you love what you love:) Reminds me of the parents home in My Big Fat Greek Wedding with all the Grecian "yard art" =)

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

September 27, 2008
7:57 PM

Post #5606528

Tir_Na_Nog - I agree with you - my neighbourhood is 40 yo, and Tired! I live in a trailer park, and the front gardens are pretty tiny. The builders put in lilacs, fir trees and Cottonwood poplars between each trailer, and between each row (where the back yards meet). Now the poplars are "self-pruners" and shed their branches all over the place, the fir trees spread sap, and the lilacs are (in the main) are not producing as many buds as they used to.
When I moved in, the front berm had 1/2 wildflowers and 1/2 dead/dying veggies. Not what I would choose for a front garden...
We're not allowed to have firepits, or water features (although some do, anyway), and a lot of the people are seniors who can't look after their gardens anymore.
But there are a few pockets of able-bodied gardeners and it shows in their gardens! I plant a few self-seeding plants that are a little more exotic (like daturas) and have pruned Heavily on the lilacs hoping they'll bloom better next year. I wish they'd get rid of the poplars, cuz they get infested with bugs, and are a really rotten hazard (some branches have fallen on sheds, and homes, so they should be cut down) much as I love the privacy & shade they provide...

Hey - was I just ranting? Oh well - guess that's why the topic was brought up lol

-Susan-

Thumbnail by Tallulah_B
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 27, 2008
8:12 PM

Post #5606545

Love those Daturas Tallulah_B. They are a truly elegant looking flower. Feel free to rant about the Cottonwoods. They are too big for a small yard and don't live forever either.

roseimp,
I am very interested in politics but don't think DG needs it. I used to post on a political forum that was related to the Washington Post. I can't tell you how nasty it got -- I think that politics gets really bad when the participants don't have to face each other on the street.

Gardeners on the other hand are generally lovely to each other even if they never plan to see each other again. I have heard that the Pet forum can be pretty rough. Haven't tried it myself. Can't fathom what it is about pets that makes people nasty! My pets make me mellow.

roybird
Santa Fe, NM

September 27, 2008
9:54 PM

Post #5606829

Very pretty garden, amuckey! Dmac, I love those wacky gardens full of interesting folk art. There is one not far from me that is a small yard full of roses, Christmas tree lights all year, flags, whirly-gigs, plastic flowers and all manner of stuff! I should go over there and get pictures. To be honest, I'm a little shy. I'd sort of like to meet the artist/gardener but...I just don't know. I have friends who live on that street so maybe I could just sneak over from their house disguised as a shrubbery! Or a fire hydrant. By the way, no politics from me on Dave's (unless something just slips out by mistake), no religion and most definitely No Pets! L.O.L.
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 27, 2008
10:58 PM

Post #5607052

It's too bad that people can't discuss things without being disrespectful of others' opinions. OK no politics here.
Re the SoL: I went to ucla in the 60s and at homecoming time it was tradition to go to the usc campus across town and steal the Trojan Horse statue. It is large and heavy so it would take a lot of drunk kids but it was loaded on a truck and taken to a lawn on the ucla campus. The usc kids would come looking for it and get all pissed off because they had to drag it back to usc. This happened every year. Maybe you could start something like that with the Statue of Liberty - it could be a neighborhood tradition.
CapeCodGardener
Mid-Cape, MA
(Zone 7a)

September 27, 2008
11:10 PM

Post #5607092

Quoting:I went to ucla in the 60s and at homecoming time it was tradition to go to the usc campus across town and steal the Trojan Horse statue. It is large and heavy so it would take a lot of drunk kids but it was loaded on a truck and taken to a lawn on the ucla campus

Portland, I forgot about this greatest-of-all garden statuary! Fun memory!
CCG, UCLA '66, '70, '75 (a Bruin for sure)

amuckey
Robinson, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 27, 2008
11:11 PM

Post #5607097

Thank you all for the nice comments. I love our huge yard although it can be a bugger to weed eat around everything. I got lazy a few times this summer and only used the weedeater every other time I mowed. :-) We really are fortunate to have such a beautiful setting. It's just on the edge of town and there is the old elementary school building straight across the road, and no one close to the north, then we own the trailer and land to the south, so it's actually like being out in the country. We have 20+ chickens (some bantams) and helmeted guinea. It's fun when we let them out and they run all around the yard. LOL Kind of like a zoo around here at times, but I wouldn't trade it for anything.

Thanks again for the great comments.

Angie

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 27, 2008
11:29 PM

Post #5607163

Hope ypur fowl friends can take care of crickets and grasshoppers.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 28, 2008
12:53 AM

Post #5607507

What! No pink flamingos? Or is no one admitting to it!!?!

Now, Christmas lights? I'll have to count the houses with year around (to lazy to take down) Christmas lights. Ugh!!!
amuckey
Robinson, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 28, 2008
1:08 AM

Post #5607548

Posdster... I surely wouldn't admit to pink flamingos if I had any.. LOL


yes, irisMA, my fowl friends do a wonderful job on all kinds of little critters around here, as do the chickens. One day my daughter came hollering around the house saying one of the chickens caught a rat... UGH I investigated and we got it away from the chicken. I had NO CLUE what the silly thing was. Come to find out after searching on the web, it was a baby squirrel. I couldn't believe it. Apparently it had fallen out of a tree. I had heard one of the hens throwing a fit down in the creek bed not too long before this all took place. I kind of wondered later if it had fallen near her and probably scared the daylights out of her. Silly animals.
gardener2005
Baton Rouge area, LA
(Zone 8b)

September 28, 2008
2:18 AM

Post #5607786

We have lots of shrubs and plants but no decor except for the occasional trellis or bird bath that gets obliterated by hurricanes once every few years. LOL :)
Portland1
(Judi)Portland, OR

September 28, 2008
4:42 AM

Post #5608172

I would admit to pink flamingos before I'd admit to a Statue of Liberty.
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 28, 2008
8:19 AM

Post #5608322

It was a joke paj - I too think that a politics forum would be a waste here on DG.Especially when you have a pets forum - also a joke.

This message was edited Sep 28, 2008 7:22 AM

This message was edited Sep 28, 2008 7:23 AM

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 28, 2008
11:24 AM

Post #5608456

The plants themselves are 'garden art', although I admit to a concrete turtle & just bought a winged lion. He was on sale so he came here. sitting on a little hill until I decide a permanet place.
SongsofJoy
New Hampshire, NH
(Zone 5b)

September 28, 2008
1:10 PM

Post #5608720

Hmm...I visit the Pets forum regularly and have no idea what a few of you are talking about. It's a very friendly community! I am sure there have been a couple occasions where someone said something to spark an unfriendly debate, but that could probably be said about EVERY forum. I would never apply the word nasty to the people I've seen there, especially the regulars. We should all be careful about making generalizations and calling a community nasty if you've only passed through once at the wrong time and don't really know what the people are like.

Ok - off my soap box now ;o) Just had to defend the Pets folks - they are some of the kindest, most generous people I've ever known!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 28, 2008
1:49 PM

Post #5608853

Songs , i agree , for myself , anyone that cares for a pet is very high on my list of potential friends . where else could i go and get so much sympathy and understanding of pain , for the loss or sickness of a loved companion . sally
roseimp
(Rosie) Belturbet
Ireland

September 28, 2008
2:35 PM

Post #5609030

Hear, hear, songsofjoy :-))
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

September 28, 2008
3:00 PM

Post #5609120

F/F/F

We only have 6 houses in our 'neighborhood' (the main road is gravel and the properties spur off of it) ... The neighbor at the top has llamas ---enclosed barn/shelter is visible and surrounded by a fence decorated with brightly colored birdhouses spaced around the perimeter. One of my neighbors is a commercial landscaper - and that property is very tasteful..lots of flat modern spaces of stone and plantings. The neighbor in front - a young couple - decorates with found objects and do a good job... large split rail fences connected by a wooden high arch/entrance covered with vines...and living with them is a young son that has discovered welding and has made mom all sorts of large metal garden sculpture from found objects... Another neighbor hosts a garden art walk every year with local Chapel Hill/Orange County artists bringing in by truck huge sculpture and windmills etc. and the property the rest of the year has not one 'art' object but the way the property is landscaped is art in itself. And another neighbor works in clay and stone and her torches and totems have been sold in major stores/garden magazines and so... very F/F/F in our neck of the woods.
gardener2005
Baton Rouge area, LA
(Zone 8b)

September 28, 2008
3:21 PM

Post #5609189

The other side of our compassion and love for animals is a passionate defense for their well being and wellfare. I have seen plenty of debates that should strike fear into any abusers of animals or irrresponsible pet owners.

Btw, my son sometimes parks his bike right in the middle of our front yard. Is that garden art? :)

amuckey
Robinson, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 28, 2008
3:41 PM

Post #5609250

LOL

If that is the case, gardener2005, then we have a ton of yard art via our 7 year old... :-)

roybird
Santa Fe, NM

September 28, 2008
6:02 PM

Post #5609688

Songs of Joy, sorry you were offended. We were just kidding around and chose "pets". We could as easily have said "cookies". I am very fond of both of those, as well as garden art. ( Back to the Rockies! )
SongsofJoy
New Hampshire, NH
(Zone 5b)

September 28, 2008
6:38 PM

Post #5609774

I wasn't offended. I don't post much on Pets these days; I mostly lurk so I didn't take the comments personally. But I do visit often enough to know that the regulars are a great bunch of people so I felt a little compelled to say so. :o)

A few years ago, a neighbor created a HUGE mulch bed in the front yard and planted one tiny tree smack in the middle. Then they surrounded the tree by a ring of small stones. (I'm sure it's a work in progress). One night, my husband and I took a walk around the neighborhood and, being the prankster he is, my husband ran up to the tree and rearranged the stones in the shape of a heart. That was 2 or 3 years ago...they haven't changed it. So that's about the extent of garden decor in my neighborhood. (We like to imagine the conversations that took place after they discovered it and often wonder why they didn't rearrange it.)
rampbrat
Abilene, TX
(Zone 7b)

September 28, 2008
7:15 PM

Post #5609886

I said non existent. The most common yard art in my neighborhood are those signs indicating what your kids are involved in. You know : "My child is a proud member of the Eagle Band" or " An Abilene Eagle lives here. # 71." Folks around here do decorate for Halloween and Christmas. Most folks keep their yards simple; birdbath, garden flag, etc.
gardener2005
Baton Rouge area, LA
(Zone 8b)

September 28, 2008
8:48 PM

Post #5610179

Our neighbor likes to do the hay bales,mums and scarecrow get up for fall and while I wouldn`t want it in my yard I get a kick out of driving past it. We do the mums and a few pumpkins on the porch for fall and a wreath on the door for Christmas. Maybe this year I`ll shock my neighbors by buying some Christmas lights. :)

seemama
Kissimmee, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 28, 2008
10:10 PM

Post #5610415

I voted non existent, because I think they are all too busy trying to earn a living and feed their families - they keep the grass neat and do the best they can - so who can complain.
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

September 28, 2008
11:09 PM

Post #5610660

This really is such an interesting thread!
I love the little diversions along the way:)
And I am furthering my international education too...
so many things considered common place in the US are completely unheard of here in NZ.
The whole flag pole in the yard thing - not done here, until just recently.
There is one a couple of block down my street, they normally fly the NZ flag.
One on my way to work will fly the Canterbury Crusaders flag when the Rugby Super 14 matches are on.
They have an All Black's supporters flag - black with a silver fern leaf, for Test matches.
They also hoisted a red sock during the America's cup campaign.
Halloween decorations are limited -
I put out a glow in the dark skeleton & have spray painted tin cans black, pierced them & put tea lights in them all along the driveway.
But it is a bit of a wasted effort as it is summer here & daylight savings means the candles don't show up until very late at night.
Same for Xmas lights, you have to be out at 11pm or later to get the full effect.
Xmas lighting etc has taken off here over the last few years, I love my twinkling lights but hubby thinks I am nuts.
cheers - Dalfyre
New Zealand

Thumbnail by dalfyre
Click the image for an enlarged view.

docgipe
NORTH CENTRAL, PA
(Zone 5a)

September 28, 2008
11:20 PM

Post #5610698

POORLY DEFINED QUESTON AND WORSE ANSWER CHOICES.

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

September 28, 2008
11:30 PM

Post #5610723

Dalfyre How about Soltice lights? With so many nationalities is the american population, the flag is an unifier.
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 29, 2008
1:12 AM

Post #5611121

Lets see,
I chose other as I live in a neighborhood built in the 1940s.
In 1.4miles of yards side by side there are 5 groomed homes.
Big gangling azaleas were along one side of my yard. When I paid off the house and knew it was all mine I had those dug up.
I have really enjoyed redoing my yard and am ever thankful for the help I got from JaxFlaGardener, He used his mantis to till my streetside plot. 15' wide and over 100' long. He was determined to get it broke up for me.
That has made all the difference in my yard.
I found Dave's when I was looking for a long blooming plant to replace those azaleas.
My yard and life have been gently evolving since then.
I moved to Florida to garden.
This July 5th Georgiagardener3 and her DH, Jordankittyjo and Jeremy all came and helped me get it planted.
This is the first time in years I have 90% actually in the ground.
Life is good in Jacksonville, Florida.
;)

Thumbnail by sugarweed
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dobra1629
Houma, LA

September 29, 2008
1:15 AM

Post #5611130

I said non-existent. My house was a new build when we moved in January 07. There was not even sod. We sodded and I put in a several beds in front and also a mailbox bed. Everyone else just has lawn and trees. I know I have inspired a few people to do some containers. I am hoping next spring they will be inspired to do more to their yards so they could spend less time sniffing around mine.

Dorothy
seemama
Kissimmee, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 29, 2008
8:06 PM

Post #5614119

Sugar, I m down the road a ways from you, but yes life is pretty good around here too.
Dalfyre, I have leanrt since I moved here that the Americans are all extremely patriotic, a lesson a lot of countires including my own could learn - I am a UK national.
Docgipe - that sounds extremely miserable! and no matter what the set answers are we all add our own bits to them.
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

September 29, 2008
9:56 PM

Post #5614504

Seemama - Florida must be a huge change from the UK as far as gardening styles go!
Christchurch is known as the most 'English' city in NZ...
Dunedin is staunchly proud of it's Scottish heritage.
I became quite used to the heat & humidity of Brisbane when I lived there, coming to ChCh was a quite a shock to the system.
I do love the gardening here - no worries about snakes or other venomous critters.
There isn't much difference in yard art between Aussie & NZ, the old tires made into swans painted white can still be seen used as planters in older gardens.
NZ had a thing for huge butterflys on the house when I was growing up.
Aussies had concrete Aboriginals!
Don't see them much now - probably be collectors pieces these days.
cheers - Dalfyre

Yuska
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 29, 2008
11:11 PM

Post #5614747

Christchurch is a beautiful city in a beautiful country. We were so impressed with its elegance.

Yuska
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 30, 2008
3:16 AM

Post #5615815

Pardon my ignorance, but what is the difference in weather between Christchurch, NZ and Brisbane, Australia? I have never been to that part of the world but have been nagging my DH for a family trip there.
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

September 30, 2008
4:48 AM

Post #5616053

lol - the main difference is the average temperatures...
Brisbane is far closer to being tropical, if it gets down to 10C they think it is freezing.
You can grow frangipani (plumeria) there just by sticking a cutting into the ground...
ChCh folk think above 25C is hot in mid summer.
Good hard frosts in winter & the odd snow fall make it ideal for daffodils, azaleas & rhodies like it too.

Thumbnail by dalfyre
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

September 30, 2008
4:03 PM

Post #5617523

Thanks dalfyre. I really have to get over to your part of the world. It sounds lovely and fascinating.
seemama
Kissimmee, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 30, 2008
7:11 PM

Post #5618116

Dalfyre - you know the best thing about NZ - Roast Lamb, not a favourite in USA, but oh do I miss NZ lamb that I used to get in UK,plus my NZ butter, there are some shops that have a little!! I like the remark about the difference betwen NZ & OZ - I have been getting the jokes for years! My girlfriend has just returned home from here to Oz - Sydney and I think half my school went over there, I still try to keep in touch with them. You cannot compare UK gardening to Florida garening. both have their different charms.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

October 1, 2008
1:02 AM

Post #5619499

I get NZ lamb in New Mexico. Luscious.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

October 1, 2008
1:24 AM

Post #5619617

Alberta lamb is very tasty too. Can't compete with Alberta beef (beef is a HUGE thing here) but our lamb is pretty good. Seemama, NZ butter? What's that all about? Thanks.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

October 1, 2008
3:24 AM

Post #5620102

I wouldn't mind trying Alberta lamb and beef. I wonder if we don't get that in the US but not labeled as being from Canada. NZ butter? I have never seen butter that I didn't love.
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

October 1, 2008
4:33 AM

Post #5620281

I think from chatting to a friend who was raising sheep in Indiana that our definition of lamb is younger than that served in the USA.
I commented about preferring hogget & she had no idea what that was.
Older than lamb, younger than mutton...
more flavour but still tender enough not to need slow cooking.
Very versatile, Yummy grilled or casseroled, or even as a Sunday Roast.
I am making myself hungry!
Almost all NZ beef & sheep is grass fed - a small amount of grain fed beef is farmed for export to Japan.
Dragging this back to yard art - many lifestyle blocks here are adorned by a decorative sheep or two.
There used to be a paddock full of spotted sheep just down the road form my last house.
When I win lotto & buy a big enough property I will have spotted horses, sheep & chickens to match my spotted dogs ;)
I draw the line at painting the house with spots.
Cheers - Dalfyre

pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

October 1, 2008
2:11 PM

Post #5621146

I love spotted horses and chickens and dogs but have never heard of spotted sheep. Keep thinking there is a lot for me to learn and see in New Zealand.
seemama
Kissimmee, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 3, 2008
9:28 PM

Post #5630215

Dahlianut - In Uk we used to get all sorts of NZ produce including butter - I prefer that to the creamy stuff I get here.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

October 3, 2008
9:42 PM

Post #5630248

Thanks seemama. I wondered what the difference was and I finally got some help from googleguy and apparently the great NZ butter is made from cows that are grass feed while NA dairy cows are mostly grain fed. Cool. I learn so much from DGers.

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