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Weather: TS Kyle

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darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 26, 2008
1:53 PM

Post #5601563

Just a TS... but looks like it will visit New England in a couple of days.
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

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AngelSong
Victoria, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 26, 2008
3:15 PM

Post #5601929

I was *just* getting ready to do this...

Sorry East Coasters - Us Gulf Coast ppls are just spreading the love around... ;) You can have the TS ... We'll pass on this one. '

stay safe
1cros3nails4gvn
Bluffton, SC
(Zone 9a)

September 27, 2008
3:13 AM

Post #5604504

argh! tomorrow was supposed to be perfect beach weather! high 80's with sun. now we'll have to worry about the rip currents. at least everything else will be good... its been soooooooo cold this week with lows reaching all the way to the upper 50's and highs in the high 60's-70's. thats how it is in november, not september. so yeah, i want my nice weather that is still rightfully mine! lol
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 27, 2008
12:24 PM

Post #5605210

Apologies to the New England coast for this unwelcomed guest. Thoughts and prayers for it to be a painless visit.
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 27, 2008
12:36 PM

Post #5605226

All of us here are with you as you get ready for the TS. Don't relish the idea of 50 something temps this early in the fall, either. Luck to you!

Ann

Lilypon

Lilypon
Moose Jaw, SK
(Zone 3b)

September 27, 2008
9:22 PM

Post #5606733

Now a hurricane.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 28, 2008
12:23 AM

Post #5607411

Wow, that escalation was fast! Looks like almost everyone on the east coast will be spared the worst, excepting the maritime provinces... at least for now.

Lilypon

Lilypon
Moose Jaw, SK
(Zone 3b)

September 28, 2008
1:46 PM

Post #5608843

WOCN31 CWHX 281200 CCA
HURRICANE KYLE INFORMATION STATEMENT ISSUED BY THE CANADIAN
HURRICANE CENTRE OF ENVIRONMENT CANADA AT 9.00 AM ADT SUNDAY
28 SEPTEMBER 2008.

THE NEXT STATEMENT WILL BE ISSUED BY 3.00 PM ADT

...HURRICANE KYLE TRACKS TOWARD THE BAY OF FUNDY ...

1. CURRENT POSITION, STRENGTH, CENTRAL PRESSURE AND MOTION

AT 9.00 AM ADT... HURRICANE KYLE WAS LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 39.3 N
AND LONGITUDE 68.4 W... ABOUT 140 NAUTICAL MILES OR 255 KM
SOUTHEAST OF CAPE COD. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE ESTIMATED
AT 70 KNOTS... 130 KM/H... AND CENTRAL PRESSURE AT 983 MB. KYLE IS
MOVING NORTH AT 20 KNOTS... 37 KM/H.

2. FORECAST POSITION, CENTRAL PRESSURE AND STRENGTH

DATE TIME LAT LON MSLP MAX WIND
ADT MB KTS KMH
SEP 28 9.00 AM 39.3N 68.4W 983 70 130
SEP 28 3.00 PM 41.3N 68.0W 995 65 120
SEP 28 9.00 PM 43.1N 67.4W 996 65 120
SEP 29 3.00 AM 45.0N 66.5W 997 60 111
SEP 29 9.00 AM 46.6N 65.7W 998 50 93 POST-TROPICAL
SEP 29 3.00 PM 48.0N 65.0W 1000 45 83 POST-TROPICAL
SEP 29 9.00 PM 49.3N 64.3W 1002 45 83 POST-TROPICAL
SEP 30 3.00 AM 50.3N 63.5W 1005 40 74 POST-TROPICAL
SEP 30 9.00 AM 51.2N 62.7W 1007 35 65 POST-TROPICAL
SEP 30 3.00 PM 51.9N 61.9W 1012 30 56 POST-TROPICAL
SEP 30 9.00 PM 52.6N 61.1W 1017 25 46 POST-TROPICAL

3. PUBLIC WEATHER IMPACTS AND WARNINGS SUMMARY

HURRICANE WATCHES ARE POSTED FOR YARMOUTH SHELBURNE AND
DIGBY COUNTIES IN NOVA SCOTIA. A TROPICAL STORM WARNING
IS IN EFFECT FOR THESE SAME THREE COUNTIES AND HAS BEEN
EXTENDED TO SAINT JOHN AND COUNTY AND GRAND MANAN AND
COASTAL CHARLOTTE COUNTYIN NEW BRUNSWICK. WIND GUSTS OF
90 TO 120 KM/H CAN BE EXPECTED IN THESE REGIONS BEGINNING
THIS AFTERNOON OR EVENING.

IT SHOULD BE EMPHASIZED THAT PORTIONS OF SOUTHWESTERN NOVA SCOTIA
AND SOUTHWESTERN NEW BRUNSWICK WILL LIKELY ENCOUNTER SIGNIFICANT
TREE DAMAGE DURING THE STRONGEST WINDS OF KYLE EITHER THIS
EVENING OR OVERNIGHT. DURING SIMILAR EVENTS IN THE PAST THESE
WINDS HAVE RESULTED IN DOWNED POWER LINES AND DAMAGE TO STRUCTURES
DUE TO FALLEN TREES. ALL PREPARATIONS TO SECURE ANY LOOSE OBJECTS
SHOULD BE RUSHED TO COMPLETION BY THIS AFTERNOON.


OVER REGIONS ADJACENT OR NEAR THOSE UNDER A HURRICANE WATCH
IN NOVA SCOTIA.. THE HALIFAX OFFICE HAS ISSUED WIND WARNINGS
FOR GUSTS TO 90 KM/H.

RAINFALL WARNINGS ARE IN EFFECT FOR ALL OF NEW BRUNSWICK
WHERE 50 TO 100 MILLIMETRES OF RAIN ARE EXPECTED WITH KYLE. THIS
IS IN ADDITION TO SIGNIFICANT RAINFALL AMOUNTS THAT FELL ON SATURDAY.
THE HEAVIEST RAINFALL WILL BE CONFINED WEST OF WHERE KYLE
EVENTUALLY MAKES LANDFALL. EMO NEW BRUNSWICK REMINDS THE PUBLIC
THAT RAINFALL IN THESE AMOUNTS OVER A SHORT PERIOD OF TIME CAN
RESULT IN A RAPID WATER LEVEL INCREASE IN STREAMS AND RIVERS
PLUS LOCALIZED FLASH FLOODING.

RAINFALL WARNINGS ARE ALSO IN EFFECT FOR MUCH OF THE GASPÉ
PENINSULA AND SOUTHEASTERN SHORE OF THE ST LAWRENCE RIVER VALLEY
REGIONS OF QUÉBEC. THIS AREA WILL SEE RAINFALL AMOUNTS NEAR OR
EXCEEDING 50 MILLIMETRES AS POST TROPICAL STORM KYLE INTERACTS
WITH A FRONTAL ZONE OVERNIGHT AND INTO MONDAY.

ON ITS CURRENT TRACK KYLE WILL BE PASSING BY YARMOUTH NOVA SCOTIA
AT THE TIME OF HIGH TIDE IN YARMOUTH. THE RESULTING STORM SURGE
ON TOP OF THE DANGEROUS ROUGH SURF FROM KYLE MAY LEAD TO
SHORELINE EROSION AND DAMAGE TO THE COASTAL INFRASTRUCTURE
MAINLY IN YARMOUTH AND DIGBY COUNTIES.


4. MARINE WEATHER IMPACTS AND WARNINGS SUMMARY

HURRICANE FORCE WIND WARNINGS ARE CONTINUED
FOR GEORGES AND BROWNS BANK AND FOR THE LURCHER MARINE AREA.
STORM WARNINGS ARE POSTED FOR FUNDY GRAND MANAN AND THE
SOUTHWESTERN SHORE MARINE AREA. GALE WARNINGS ARE IN EFFECT
FOR MUCH OF EASTERN NOVA SCOTIA WATERS AND GULF OF ST LAWRENCE
WATERS.

SIGNIFICANT WAVES ON THE ORDER OF 6 TO 9 METRES WILL BEGIN
MOVING INTO THE WESTERN MARINE AREAS THIS AFTERNOON AND
REACH THE COAST OF SOUTHWESTERN NOVA SCOTIA THIS EVENING.

5. TECHNICAL DISCUSSION FOR METEOROLOGISTS

A. ANALYSIS

A REMARKABLE TRANSFORMATION OCCURED IN KYLE DURING THE
ECLIPSE PHASE. THE CIRCULATION CAN BE SEEN IN THE LOW LEVEL
CLOUD IN THE IR
BAND TO THE WEST OF THE MAIN MASS OF CONVECTION INDICATIVE
OF DECOUPLING. A COMINATION OF AIRCRAFT DATA
AND FORECASTER EXPERIENCE WITH SEVERELY TILTED TROPICAL SYSTEMS
HAVE A MAXIMUM SURFACE WIND SPEED OF 65 KNOTS AND CENTRAL
PRESSURE OF 1001 MB.

B. PROGNOSTIC

KYLE IS ACCELERATING SLOWLY BETWEEN AN UPPER
TROUGH ON THE EAST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES AND AN UPPER RIDGE
OVER THE ATLANTIC.

THE ENSEMBLE OF THE VARIOUS MODELS FAVOUR OUR CURRECT TRACK.
LIKEWISE.. THE TRACK FROM MIAMI IS MUCH THE SAME ALBEIT ABOUT
TWO HOURS FASTER. WE STILL FAVOUR A 65 KNOT SYSTEM AT 29/00Z
JUST WEST SOUTHWEST OF YARMOUTH. IT IS LIKELY THAT THE COLD
SSTS WILL DAMPEN THE WINDS SO MIAMI'S 60 KNOT SPEED IS ALSO
REASONABLE. BUT A 5 KNOTS DIFFERENCE MAKES LITTLE DIFFERENCE IN
THE IMPACT ON MARINE INTERESTS OR THE SHORELINE. HOWEVER
AS KYLE APPROACHES THE SHORELINE OF NEW BRUNSWICK.. COLD WATERS
WILL CERTAINLY WEAKEN KYLE BELOW HURRICANE STRENGTH.

WE KEEP KYLE ON PATH FOR LANDFALL IN SOUTHWESTERN NEW BRUNSWICK
IN THE EARLY MORNING HOURS MONDAY. IT WILL COMPLETE
ITS TRANSITION TO EXTRA TROPICAL STATUS RIGHT AFTER LANDFALL
SO THIS NECCESSITATES THE EXTENSION OF TROPICAL STORM WARNINGS
TO THE NEW BRUNSNWICK REGIONS ADJACENT TO THE BAY OF FUNDAY.
THEREAFTER THE FORECAST TRACK TAKES KYLE AS A WEAKENING POST
TROPICAL STORM THROUGH NEW BRUNSWICK AND INTO THE GULF OF
ST LAWRENCE MONDAY EVENING.

BEYOND MONDAY EVENING.. KYLE'S EXTRATROPICAL NATURE MANIFESTS
ITSELF AS AN UPPER LOW AND WEAK SURFACE TROUGH WHICH SLOWLY
MOVES TOWARD SOUTHEASTERN LABRADOR. AT THIS POINT THE GLOBAL
MODELS HANDLE THE SYSTEM IN A BELIEVABLE WAY AND THE TRACK IS
THEREAFTER DROPPED ON OUR PLOTS.

C. PUBLIC WEATHER

TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS ARE EXPECTED IN
EXTREME SOUTHWESTERN NOVA SCOTIA AND SOUTHWESTERN NEW
BRUNSWICK BY THIS AFTERNOON HENCE A TROPICAL STORM WARNING
IS IN EFFECT THERE. IT
REMAINS TO BE SEEN HOW FAST KYLE WILL WEAKEN OVER THE COLD
WATERS SOUTHWEST OF NOVA SCOTIA. WE ARE RELUCTANT TO PUT
SOUTHWESTERN NOVA SCOTIA COUNTIES UNDER A HURRICANE WARNING
AT THIS TIME AND WILL LEAVE IT AS A HURRICANE WATCH.

THE HEAVIEST RAINFALL WILL STILL BE WEST OF THE STORM PATH
AND WITH THE FORWARD TRANSLATIONAL SPEED AMOUNTS COULD BE
UPWARDS TO 100 MM. THIS HEAVIEST RAIN COULD FALL IN A BRIEF
PERIOD OF TIME INCREASING THE THREAT OF LOCALIZED FLOODING.
THIS RAIN IS ON TOP OF ANY AMOUNTS THAT FELL SATURDAY IN
ASSOCIATION WITH A FRONTAL ZONE MOVING THROUGH NEW ENGLAND.

AS A RESULT OF KEEPING KYLE A HURRICANE UP TO THE POINT IT
REACHES BROWNS BANK.. AND THE FACT THAT THE TRACK IS
WEST OF SAINT JOHN NEW BRUNSWICK.. WIND WARNINGS ARE
EXTENDED TO THE SOUTHWESTERN AREAS OF NEW BRUNSWICK ANYWHERE
NEAR AND EAST OF THE TRACK OF KYLE. WE HAVE RAISED THE
WIND SPEED GUSTS TO 120 KM/H OVER SOUTHWESTERN NOVA SCOTIA
TO MATCH THE HURRICANE STRENGTH OF THE SYSTEM AS IT PASSES
BY WEST OF YARMOUTH AT 29/0300Z.

WE MAY BE SPLITTING HAIRS ABOUT ISSUING WIND WARNINGS AS
OPPOSED TO TROPICAL STORM WARNINGS FOR AREAS CLOSE TO THE
HURRICANE WATCH. WE REASON THAT KYLE WILL COMPLETE ITS PHASE
TRANSITION VERY QUICKLY HENCE THOSE AREAS UNDER A WIND WARNING
WILL BE MORE OR LESS SYNOPTIC AS OPPOSED TO TROPICAL.

DISCUSSIONS WITH THE GANDER OFFICE LEAD TO AN AGREEMENT THAT
SOUTHEASTERN LABRADOR WILL BE UNDER RAINFALL WARNING CRITERIA.

D. MARINE WEATHER

TRAPPED FETCH WAVE MODEL GUIDANCE INDICATES THAT SIGNIFICANT
WAVE HEIGHTS COULD BE ON THE ORDER OF 6 TO 8 METRES ON THE
SOUTHWESTERN COAST OF NOVA SCOTIA TONIGHT. THE MAIN CONCERN
IS FOR YARMOUTH AND DIGBY COUNTIES AS KYLE PASSES JUST AT THE
TIME OF HIGH TIDE. A SURGE PLUS WAVE SET UP COULD LEAD TO
THE COASTAL FLOODING BY THE SEA. IF THE TRACK CHANGES THEN
OTHER AREAS MAY BE OF CONCERN AS WELL.

IN NEW BRUNSWICK KYLE WILL ARRIVE AS THE TIDE IS EBBING
HENCE STORM SURGE SHOULD NOT BE A MAJOR CONCERN AT THIS
TIME. HOWEVER THERE COULD BE MINOR SHORELINE EROSION
DUE TO THE POUNDING SURF.

PREDICTED WIND RADII (NM)
TIME GALES STORMS HURRICANE
NE SE SW NW NE SE SW NW NE SE SW NW
28/12Z 180 150 60 120 90 90 30 45 30 30 0 0
28/18Z 210 180 60 120 90 90 15 60 30 30 0 0
29/00Z 210 180 60 120 90 90 15 60 30 30 0 0
29/06Z 210 210 60 60 90 90 15 45 0 0 0 0
29/12Z 210 210 60 60 30 30 0 0 0 0 0 0
29/18Z 180 180 30 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
30/00Z 120 150 10 45 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
30/06Z 120 150 30 45 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
30/12Z 120 150 60 40 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
30/18Z 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
01/00Z 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


END CAMPBELL/ROUSSEL

http://www.atl.ec.gc.ca/weather/hurricane/bulletins/20080928130308.Kyle.txt.en

Members here that live in Nova Scotia: http://davesgarden.com/community/memberlist/viewby.php?area=state&arg1=ns&showonlysubbers=1

Members here that live in New Brunswick: http://davesgarden.com/community/memberlist/viewby.php?area=state&arg1=nb&showonlysubbers=1



This message was edited Sep 28, 2008 8:14 AM

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AngelSong
Victoria, TX
(Zone 9b)

September 28, 2008
3:43 PM

Post #5609254

On a blog at work, somebody Up North said, "Those Hurricanes are a risk you take for living on the Gulf. You're asking for it by living there."

Um... uh... yeah.. so what's ya'ls excuse?

If they say board up, do it! If they say "Run", don't ask... just do it! Stay safe!!!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 28, 2008
4:31 PM

Post #5609402

Thanks, Pam. It's ironic, as AngelSong said, that we only associate hurricanes with the Gulf and the southeastern coast of the U.S.

I'm intrigued by this part of the discussion above
Quoting:A REMARKABLE TRANSFORMATION OCCURED IN KYLE DURING THE ECLIPSE PHASE.
We scoff at astrology (especially the effects on our gardens), yet things like this occur over and over...
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 28, 2008
4:35 PM

Post #5609423

I have visited Nova Scotia and PEI on a couple of occasions for several days each and I thought the whole area was heaven on earth! I hope that nothing - including Kyle - hurts anything very much and that the most they all get out of this is wind and some rain. It's a shame to ruin someplace so absolutely beautiful. Galveston and thereabouts are "used to hurricanes" - haha - and I blame someone - don't know who - for letting things get too permanent around there. But up there in the Atlantic things have been there for ages. That's life, I guess, but it seems a shame. I guess that's what someone said when Rome burned and the like...

Ann

Lilypon

Lilypon
Moose Jaw, SK
(Zone 3b)

September 28, 2008
6:23 PM

Post #5609730

Angelsong whoever posted that obviously doesn't know Eastern Canada well:



Some of the Hurricanes that hit Canada and stand out in my mind (either from history classes or recent news) are:


* September 9, 1775: The Newfoundland Hurricane of 1775 killed over 4,000 in Newfoundland. Not only is it the earliest recorded Canadian hurricane, it is also by far the deadliest.

The Nova Scotia Hurricane of 1873, also known as the Great Nova Scotia Cyclone, was a hurricane that caused heavy damage and killed 500 people in Nova Scotia and 100 in Newfoundland in August of the 1873 Atlantic hurricane season. The hurricane actually remained offshore of Nova Scotia and made landfall in Newfoundland.

The 1927 Nova Scotia Hurricane (also known as the 1927 Great August Gale or the Great Gale of August 24) was a powerful category 3 hurricane that struck the Canadian province of Nova Scotia in mid-August 1927. The first major hurricane of the 1927 Atlantic hurricane season, the storm struck Atlantic Canada as a powerful extratropical storm with winds at 100 mph (161 km/h) where it caused severe damage and left 184 fatalities (mostly at sea). [1]

****************************************************

Hurricane Juan was a significant hurricane that struck the southern part of Atlantic Canada in late September 2003. It was the tenth named storm and the sixth hurricane of the 2003 Atlantic hurricane season.

Juan formed southeast of Bermuda on September 24, 2003 out of a tropical wave that tracked into the subtropical Atlantic Ocean. It strengthened gradually in the warm waters of the Gulf Stream, reaching Category 2 strength on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale on September 27 while continuing to track northward. It peaked at 105 mph (165 km/h) as it rapidly approached the coast of Nova Scotia, losing little intensity over the cooler waters. Juan made landfall between Shad Bay and Prospect in the Halifax Regional Municipality early on September 29 while still a Category 2 hurricane. Juan retained hurricane strength as it crossed Nova Scotia from south to north before weakening to a tropical storm as it crossed Prince Edward Island. It was absorbed by another extratropical low later on September 29 near Anticosti Island in the northern Gulf of Saint Lawrence.

The storm left extensive damage across central Nova Scotia and into Prince Edward Island, with lesser damage east and west of the storm centre. Most of the damage was as a result of the high winds that whipped across the region. Juan resulted in eight fatalities and over $200 million (2003 CAD, $150 million 2003 USD) in damage. It was described as the worst storm to hit Halifax since 1893.[1][2]

September 29, 2003: Hurricane Juan is sometimes considered Atlantic Canada's most widely destructive hurricane in over a century. Juan killed 8 and caused over $200 million in damage. Power outages in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island left over 300,000 Canadians without power for two weeks. Many marinas were destroyed and many small fish craft were damaged or sank. Hurricane force gusts were reported as far out as 100 miles (160 km) on either side of Juan at landfall with an astounding peak gust of 144 mph (229 km/h) (equivalent to a category 4 hurricane) recorded in Halifax Harbour, although it was a Category 2 at landfall with 100 mph (160 km/h) sustained winds.[12]

***********************************************************

Hurricane Hazel was the worst hurricane of the 1954 Atlantic hurricane season and one of the worst hurricanes of the 20th century. Hazel killed as many as 1,000 people in Haiti before striking the United States just north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and south of Wilmington, North Carolina as a Category 4 hurricane. Nineteen people were killed in North Carolina, and 81 people were killed when it subsequently hit Toronto, Ontario. It is the strongest hurricane ever recorded to strike so far inland.

Moving very rapidly, the storm ran into a cold air mass over Toronto, Ontario and gave up its moisture — 210 mm (8.5 in) of rain. Wind gusts were estimated to be over 150 km/h (90 mph) and sustained winds were as high as 124 km/h (77 mph), meaning it was still a hurricane-strength storm – after over 600 miles (960 km) on land. 81 people were killed in Toronto where entire neighborhoods were washed away. It weakened below hurricane strength after about 18 hours on land about 120 miles (200 km) north of Toronto, at around 45°N latitude. [1]

********************************************************


Personally I've seen Americans and Canadians (and a number of others people from all over the world) post something like what you stated (re why live on the shore and personally I wouldn't but then you probably wouldn't want to face one of our blizzards or our -60 degree F temperatures winter temperatures;). One will often see *statements* out there that are distasteful...I've seen some much worse ie. Americans posting we are coming (to Canada) and will use force to get your oil, gas, uranium, potash, etc. I keep in mind there are all kinds of idiots everywhere (plus y'all will have to survive our prairie/arctic winters first ;).



These cyclones have either made a direct landfall in Canada, or made a notable approach as a tropical cyclone.

Pre 1900

Many tropical storms and hurricanes struck Canada during this time. The most damaging one struck Newfoundland in September 1775, killing thousands. To shorten this particular list, insignificant tropical storms and depressions are omitted.

* September 9, 1775: The Newfoundland Hurricane of 1775 killed over 4,000 in Newfoundland. Not only is it the earliest recorded Canadian hurricane, it is also by far the deadliest.

* October 10-11, 1804: The Storm of October 1804 unusually blanketed parts of Canada with snow after striking New England.

* August 23, 1863: A category one hit Nova Scotia just before losing tropical characteristics, killing at least 80.

* September 23-24, 1866: A hurricane hit Newfoundland after weakening from a category 2.

* October 5, 1869: The 1869 Saxby Gale struck Canada's Bay of Fundy region damaging parts of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

* October 13, 1871: A hurricane hit Nova Scotia.

* August 26, 1873: The Nova Scotia Hurricane of 1873 drifted south of Nova Scotia as a category 3. It weakened to a category one before slowly making landfall in Newfoundland. It was a devastating hurricane that killed over 600. Damage in Nova Scotia was severe. It destroyed over 1,200 boats and over 900 homes and businesses. This is one of Nova Scotia's worst cyclones.

* August 23, 1886: A major hurricane weakened to a category 1 before crossing Newfoundland as a hurricane.

* September 8, 1891: A hurricane struck both Nova Scotia and Newfoundland as a category 1.

* August 18, 1893: A hurricane struck Newfoundland with 90 mph (145 km/h) winds.
1900-1949

A very long lull period occurred during this time, It wasn't officially broken by a tropical hurricane until 1939. Only two tropical hurricanes struck Canada, as well as one damaging extratropical storm.

* September 26, 1937: The extratropical remnant of a hurricane caused damage in Nova Scotia. The storm was moving swiftly, so most of the damage was strictly wind related.

* October 18, 1939: After a long lull for Canadian hurricanes, a hurricane struck Newfoundland as a category 1. No one died, but considerable damage was done to trees, boats, and buildings.

* September 17, 1940: A hurricane struck Nova Scotia before weakening.

1950 - 1994

A list detailing the damage that has occured here (in this list tropical storms are included but extratropical remnants aren't unless they were notable).

* August 21, 1950: Hurricane Able struck Nova Scotia as a strong tropical storm, causing only minor damage.

* October 5, 1950: Hurricane George passed a few miles south as a tropical/extratropical storm.

* February 5, 1952: The 1952 Groundhog Day Tropical Storm, the earliest tropical storm ever recorded, affected New Brunswick before dissapating.

* September 7, 1953: Hurricane Carol struck the New Brunswick/Nova Scotia border. It caused about $1 million in damage, mainly to boats and fish craft.

* October 16, 1954: Hurricane Hazel, arguably one of the most notable hurricanes in history, moved into Ontario as a powerful extratropical storm (still of hurricane intensity) after having struck the Carolinas. Flash flooding from Hazel in Canada destroyed twenty bridges, killed 81 people, and left over 2,000 families homeless. In all, Hazel killed nearly 100 people and caused almost $630 million (2005 CAD) in damages (on top of over 500 other deaths and billions in damage in the US and Caribbean). No other recent natural disaster on Canadian soil has been so deadly. Floods killed 35 people on a single street in Toronto.[1]

* September 29, 1958: Hurricane Helene struck Newfoundland as a hurricane. Although not very damaging in Canada, Helene did destroy a 50 metre (160 foot) wharf carrying many lobsters out to sea.

* June 19, 1959: The 1959 Escuminac Hurricane was a devastating hurricane that hit Nova Scotia. 22 boats were lost during the storm. In all the hurricane killed 35. The hurricane was so devastating, a monument was erected on Escuminac Harbour in memory of those lost.

* July 12, 1959: Tropical Storm Cindy struck north of Nova Scotia.

* October 8, 1962: Hurricane Daisy struck Nova Scotia as a hurricane, near the same area as Frances a year earlier, which struck the area while extratropical.

* October 29, 1963: Hurricane Ginny struck Nova Scotia as a Category 2 hurricane. Ginny was unusual in the fact that the hurricane was able to produce snow.

* October 24, 1964: Hurricane Gladys dissapated near the coast of Newfoundland just after making landfall.

* August 16, 1971: Hurricane Beth struck Nova Scotia as a minimal hurricane, bringing over 11 inches (275 mm) of rainfall.[2]

* July 7, 1973: Hurricane Alice side-swiped the entire western coast of Newfoundland as a tropical storm before dissapating over Newfoundland.

* July 28, 1975: Hurricane Blanche struck Nova Scotia as a tropical storm, dropping over 3 inches (75 mm) of rainfall.[3]

* October 25, 1979: Subtropical storm 1 (known as a subtropical "storm" but was actually a subtropical "hurricane" having reached 75 mph (120 km/h) winds while subtropical) struck Newfoundland as a subtropical storm after losing hurricane strength.

* August 7-8, 1988: Tropical Storm Alberto, the furthest north forming tropical storm ever recorded in the Atlantic, struck the Canadian Maritimes and became extratropical over Newfoundland. Alberto was the first storm with a masculine name to directly strike Canada.
* August 8, 1989: Hurricane Dean passed over Newfoundland before losing tropical characteristics.

* August 2, 1990: Hurricane Bertha's extratropical remnants damaged crops and a suspension bridge in Prince Edward Island.

* November 2, 1991: The 1991 Halloween Nor’easter, although staying mostly out to sea, made landfall in Nova Scotia as a tropical storm. The storm was not very damaging in Canada, but caused horrendous damage elsewhere.

1995 - present

All landfalling tropical systems are included in the following list. Storms that transisted from the U.S. to Canada overland are excluded unless notable. Extratropical storms are also excluded unless notable.

* July 9, 1995: Tropical Storm Barry hit Nova Scotia while tropical with no known damage.[4]

* September 11, 1995: Hurricane Luis, after raging through the Leeward Islands, turned towards Newfoundland on September 8. The Canadian Hurricane Centre issued bulletins on the powerful hurricane as it neared the province. Luis struck a sparsely populated area in eastern Newfoundland on September 11, dropping 2 to 4 inches (60-120 mm) of rain in the Avalon Peninsula without causing much damage. One was reported killed in Canada from Luis.[5]

* July 14, 1996: Hurricane Bertha struck Newfoundland before dissapating, but passed from Maine to New Brunswick earlier in its life, dropping over 3 inches (75 mm) of rain in New Brunswick. [6]

* September 15, 1996: Hurricane Hortense, the first hurricane to directly strike Nova Scotia while at hurricane strength since Blanche in 1975, struck the Nova Scotian coast as a category 1 hurricane. $3 million were inflicted to Nova Scotia by Hortense after strong winds, heavy rain, and power outages.[7]

* September 18, 1999: Hurricane Floyd struck the Canadian Maritimes after losing tropical characteristics. Despite high interest in Floyd by the CHC, little damage was inflicted in Canada. Floyd did, however, bring winds of 51 mph (82 km/h) and high seas. [8]

* October 20, 2000: Hurricane Michael struck Harbour Breton, Newfoundland as a category 1 hurricane. A peak gust was recorded of nearly 107 mph (171 km/h), as well as a peak wave height of over 55 feet (16.7 m) that was recorded off the coast by Buoy 44193. Overall damage by Michael was light.[9]

* October 15, 2001: Hurricane Karen brought beneficial rain after striking Liverpool, Nova Scotia. Winds there only gusted to about 64 mph (102 km/h), and little damage was reported.[10]

* September 12, 2002: Hurricane Gustav struck Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, both as a category 1 hurricane. Gustav brought hurricane force winds to Nova Scotia and dropped at least two inches (50 mm) of rain across all Nova Scotian sites. The highest rainfall amount was 4 inches (100 mm) in Ashdale.[11]

* September 29, 2003: Hurricane Juan is sometimes considered Atlantic Canada's most widely destructive hurricane in over a century. Juan killed 8 and caused over $200 million in damage. Power outages in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island left over 300,000 Canadians without power for two weeks. Many marinas were destroyed and many small fish craft were damaged or sank. Hurricane force gusts were reported as far out as 100 miles (160 km) on either side of Juan at landfall with an astounding peak gust of 144 mph (229 km/h) (equivalent to a category 4 hurricane) recorded in Halifax Harbour, although it was a Category 2 at landfall with 100 mph (160 km/h) sustained winds.[12]

* September 17, 2005: Hurricane Ophelia, after stalling for several days off the coast of the southeastern states, raced up the Atlantic coast. On the 17th, Ophelia became extratropical and moved parallel to the Nova Scotian coast, never making landfall. Ophelia later struck Newfoundland. Although strong winds were forecast, they did not occur and overall damage was less than expected. One indirect death was reported from Ophelia in Canada.

Courtesy of Wikipedia.

Canadian history alone makes me think when a higher category Hurricane is in one's near future it's time to bug out.

This message was edited Sep 28, 2008 1:31 PM

This message was edited Sep 28, 2008 1:58 PM

Lilypon

Lilypon
Moose Jaw, SK
(Zone 3b)

September 29, 2008
2:35 AM

Post #5611377

==DISCUSSION==
AT 9PM ADT KYLE WENT ASHORE JUST NORTH OF YARMOUTH AS A
MARGINAL CATEGORY 1 HURRICANE. REPORTS HAVE BEEN RECEIVED SO
FAR OF SOME TREES DOWNED AND ALONG WITH POWER OUTAGES.


WTCN31 CWHX 290205
SEVERE WEATHER BULLETIN
ISSUED BY THE CANADIAN HURRICANE CENTRE
OF ENVIRONMENT CANADA
AT 11:05 PM ADT SUNDAY 28 SEPTEMBER 2008.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
TROPICAL STORM WARNING FOR:
=NEW= SHELBURNE COUNTY
=NEW= YARMOUTH COUNTY
=NEW= DIGBY COUNTY
LUNENBURG COUNTY
QUEENS COUNTY NOVA SCOTIA
ANNAPOLIS COUNTY
SAINT JOHN AND COUNTY
GRAND MANAN AND COASTAL CHARLOTTE COUNTY
MONCTON AND SOUTHEAST NEW BRUNSWICK
FUNDY NATIONAL PARK.

TROPICAL STORM KYLE IS MOVING NORTHWARD TOWARD NEW BRUNSWICK.

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS THAT SUSTAINED GALES...WINDS OF
63 KM/H OR MORE. BY NATURE A TROPICAL STORM ALSO IMPLIES THE
THREAT OF LOCAL FLOODING FROM HEAVY RAINFALL.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
==DISCUSSION==
AT 9PM ADT KYLE WENT ASHORE JUST NORTH OF YARMOUTH AS A
MARGINAL CATEGORY 1 HURRICANE. REPORTS HAVE BEEN RECEIVED SO
FAR OF SOME TREES DOWNED AND ALONG WITH POWER OUTAGES.

WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH TROPICAL STORM KYLE CAN STILL CAUSE DAMAGE
WITH WIND GUSTS UP TO 110 KM/H OVER EXPOSED AREAS.

KYLE WILL CONTINUE TO BRING SIGNIFICANT RAINFALL TO MOST OF NEW
BRUNSWICK WHERE RAINFALL WARNINGS HAVE BEEN POSTED. 50 TO 100
MILLIMETRES OF RAIN COULD FALL IN A SHORT PERIOD OF TIME. EMO NEW
BRUNSWICK REMINDS THE PUBLIC THAT RAINFALL IN THESE AMOUNTS IN A
SHORT PERIOD OF TIME CAN RESULT IN RAPID INCREASE IN WATER LEVELS IN
STREAMS AND RIVERS AND LOCALIZED FLASH FLOODING.

PLEASE REFER TO THE LATEST FORECASTS FOR FURTHER DETAILS.

END/CHC
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 29, 2008
12:23 PM

Post #5612299

Here we are in the aftermath of Ike watching Kyle up there in the northeast and I feel torn. Why? Because I have a birthday coming up this week and I usually order live lobsters from Maine to cook for DDH and me. Now that is really self centered! And I should feel ashamed of myself but I don't, really. Hopefully I will have a couple more birthdays before I kick off so I can have lobster for my birthday. Funny how the mind works or fails to...

Ann

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