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Roses: Please, show us your favorite underplantings for roses =)

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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

October 18, 2008
4:40 AM

Post #5685976

I'm sooo inspired by all the lovely pictures I see from the Cali gals of their mixed plantings. I love the look of plants intertwining. The only snafu is that here in humid Louisiana, we've got to keep the airflow going pretty freely around our roses or we'd have nothing but a pile of fungus and blackspot! The trick is to find a happy medium between what I want (Cali!) and simply rows of rose bushes. How do all of you keep your gardens interesting in other regions? Do you have a favorite underplanting that works well for you? Please share! =)
iris28
(dana)Owensboro, KY
(Zone 6a)

October 18, 2008
4:47 AM

Post #5685989

ive been putting daylilies around my roses to hide the naked legs of the ht . no pics though , i also just put a bunch of tulips and daffodils under my big ones . i also have asiatic lilies under 2 of them , oh and louisiana iris and siberians under my climbers
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 18, 2008
5:04 PM

Post #5687203

Bliss, I keep space around my roses for the reasons you pointed and also because I want clear view in case there are snakes slithering around. It's not a problem for me but I'm obsessed scared of them, no matter how harmless. I do make exceptions and I have lilies growing thru some roses and I grow tropicals with roses. This is a dangerous combo as you run the risk of overwatering your roses to keep tropicals happy, but so far I've managed to create a balance.

I also grow some clusters of daffs and amaryllises but that's near roses, not really as underplanting. Finally, I intend to grow some salvias as filler, but I haven't gotten around to that project yet

Richmond is SW of Houston, and very humid.. You and I likely share similar weather conditions.
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 18, 2008
5:11 PM

Post #5687220

I forgot I grow Euphorbia Diamond Frost w/ my FloraDora. I love it

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/208915/
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

October 18, 2008
5:11 PM

Post #5687221

Vossner, if you're by Houston, then we have identical weather. My best friend lives in Baytown, basically a suburb of Houston, and whatever weather she has one day, we typically have it the next day. With the exception of tropical storms and hurricanes blowing in from the Gulf, calling Aileen to see how her weather looks is a more reliable weather forecast than the local meteorologists! We're on the same Gulf stream. Unfortunately, that's how we get Houston's pollution too... it travels to us after any chemical mishaps.

Ev
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

October 18, 2008
5:12 PM

Post #5687224

Ohhhh, I love that combination too! Must have... must have! =)
tusseemussee
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

October 20, 2008
6:26 AM

Post #5693475

Ev, my main rose garden is laid out in a formal setting with informal plantings. To achieve the softness I wanted to all edges I planted Tunica. The plant grows to around 5" tall, maybe less, then foams out in all directions making soft mounds. Soft pink blooms start around the first of June and continue until fall. The blooms are similar to baby's breath so they do not steal the show from the roses. I read somewhere recently the plant has been renamed, but I do not remember the new name. A google search of Tunica should bring it up. The attached photo was taken today of a section I planted this spring. Next year it will foam its way well into the rose bed and I will trim away excessive growth on the blue stone.

Tussee

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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

October 20, 2008
6:41 AM

Post #5693484

What a pretty effect! I'll have to see if it's rated for our zone. I've always loved Sweet Alyssum, but it dies out in our heat by the end of May. Hopefully, Tunica is a bit hardier! Thanks for the suggestion.

Ev =)
milesf1
Woodstock Valley, CT
(Zone 5b)

October 20, 2008
8:10 AM

Post #5693567

BG:

Along my garage, I have a Julia Child, Harlekin and Louis Clements spaced out along about 20' of wall. I have them underplanted with Nepeta 'Walkers Low', Munstead Lavender, 'Brookside' cranesbill, and 'Butterfly Blue' scabiosa. I wanted all blueish tones to offset the roses. Of course the "underplantings" were taller than my first year roses...but once the roses get to full size, should look great.

This is from July...you can't even see the roses...and my SO stuck some tomatos in the clematis cages we built...but you get the idea ;-)

Miles

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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

October 20, 2008
8:35 AM

Post #5693589

Miles, thanks for sharing! I think perhaps the lavender won't survive, but the shorter blue salvias would give me a similar look and they do fine here. I'll have to look the others up to see which ones can make it here. =)
milesf1
Woodstock Valley, CT
(Zone 5b)

October 20, 2008
12:10 PM

Post #5693836

I put some dwarf blue veronica around my crysal fairy...not sure if you can do those in your area. They are pretty new so I don't have photos in bloom..
100cyclist
Newport Beach, CA
(Zone 10b)

January 11, 2009
9:08 PM

Post #5993423

my absolute favorite plant for underneath the roses is cranesbill...just winds its way around the bottom, and easy to clip back when you want to---plus it is happy just about anywhere. Love the blue-purple flowers, too. Another thing I use if you want something that can be more like a very low hedge is false heather. It has a teeny pink or white flower. You can just "haircut" it to the height you want---basically, it spreads sideways when you do that. Everygreen (here in southern CA) Hope this helps.
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

January 12, 2009
12:06 AM

Post #5994075

Thanks, cyclist! I'll look those up to see if they'll grow here. =)
WigglyPaw
Hastings, MI
(Zone 5b)

January 12, 2009
9:43 PM

Post #5997621

I grow Dianthus which is a perennial and an evergreen all over the zones,
under my roses. they spread to clumping and provide complete
weed protection and non competing underplants and I don't have to
clip them either.
The best is Ipswich Pinks.

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
12:47 AM

Post #5998461

I have a real mix of perennials, annuals and shrubs. Front yard

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
12:48 AM

Post #5998464

Front yard

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
12:50 AM

Post #5998476

other side in front

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
12:51 AM

Post #5998487

All containers

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
12:52 AM

Post #5998493

Back yard

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
12:54 AM

Post #5998500

Better pic

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
12:55 AM

Post #5998505

Another backyard bed

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Zuzu
Sebastopol, CA
(Zone 9a)

January 13, 2009
2:05 AM

Post #5998833

Very, very nice, Joanna. That's just the kind of garden I love.
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
4:02 AM

Post #5999358

Thanks Zuzu. I really like to mix everything. Lots of bulbs too.

Here another flower bed in the backyard in front of the garage

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
4:04 AM

Post #5999361

Here's my veggie garden with roses in there too

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
4:05 AM

Post #5999365

One of my John Cabot Climber

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
4:07 AM

Post #5999370

My one bed with no roses, not enough sun or room. Maybe I will put some minis next year.

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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

January 13, 2009
5:03 AM

Post #5999494

Thanks for sharing all the pics, everyone! You've given me some inspiration for the underplantings. Our new puppy has shown such an exuberance for digging in the flower beds... she was out there helping me in the garden this morning. I'd plant something, she'd sniff it, test it with her tongue or teeth, decide it would look better on the other side of the garden, and move it for me. Soooo helpful! So yep, the invisible fence installation started this afternoon! With our Shelties, it only took a day for them to respect the flower bed boundaries with the fence and then we didn't need the collars anymore. I hope our Aussie is as quick a learner, but I suspect her enthusiasm will overwhelm her too much to ever truly stop digging. I'm leaving a couple of areas free so that she can still have fun without ruining the entire yard!
Zuzu
Sebastopol, CA
(Zone 9a)

January 13, 2009
6:23 AM

Post #5999588

Just super, Joanna. I like the whole package -- the house, the plants, the garden art, the fence... Even the pile of rocks near the garage looks artful. A truly lovely and romantic garden.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


January 13, 2009
6:51 AM

Post #5999606

Oh Joanna, you have such a great garden. Imagine all that work in zone 3. How long is your growing season? You love color as I do. Just so pretty. I had to laugh at your potted garden. I have one too! My whole courtyard is all potted plants. A different kind of gardening for sure.

On your picture http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=5998505
you have a pink lavatera in the center. It is one I grew a few years back and loved it. I have been looking for it since. I want to grow it again. Do you recall the name? I think it is easy from seed and want to find some online. Thanks
Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 13, 2009
7:20 AM

Post #5999618

VOSSNER, you sent a link to the Euphorbia Diamond Frost with your flori's. Is that the airy little plant with the white blossoms? What an awesome effect!!! My 120+ foot bed with various roses is barren of anything but rose bushes. Weeds are a problem, especially the bermuda grass moving under the concrete border, which of course is a different problem entirely. The effect is very formal and not so much to my liking today as when first planted.

I would like to try such an underplanting in my beds. Hmmm, remember that our temps can be quite hot during summer. And 100 feet of that bed is in total sun, except for what shade the rose bush would provide, the entire day, as it runs East/West.

I have, BTW, planted Sweet Alyssum in the past and while it struggled during our hot summers, it survived. It did not, however, survive the winter as a rule.


MILESF1!! You have roses in that bed {GASP}!! {Laughing}

Linda and The MopTops


joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
2:16 PM

Post #6000111

Kell,

The lavatera is Silver cup. Very easy, direct sowing or wintersowing (a great way to start all kinds of stuff). The white lavatera in the same picture is Mont Blanc. I also start all the petunias from seed.

Our typical last spring frost is May 23. Every year is a little different, but I usually start uncovering my roses in the beginning of April. Last year it was May though. Usually we get a killing frost by Mid September. This year we had a very warm, long fall, so it was the daylight hours that affected the fall blooms. By mid Oct we have less than 10-1/2 hours of daylight. Nov is 8-1/2 hours, so a little difficult to keep the flowers even if the temps are mild.

I added window boxes on every window of the house in late fall. I'm really excited for next spring to plant up now.

This message was edited Jan 13, 2009 7:17 AM
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 13, 2009
4:06 PM

Post #6000528

joanna, your property is beautiful and cheerful.

twincol, I don't know if Fresno is warmer than Houston area, but the plants in that pic are in full brutal sun. I think the euphorbia likes that.

Evie, your comments about your dog remind me of my little pooch. When we first got him and I would be digging in the garden, he would watch me with those intense, loving eyes and proceed to dig. I always wondered if his little brain told him if it was OK for momma to dig, then it was OK for him to dig! lol
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 13, 2009
4:11 PM

Post #6000555

joanna, in pic titled back yard, is that crazy daisy? I love that plant. I don't think that particular one is hardy to my zone, only Miss Becky and Alaska.

I see you have acidanthera, can't remember its new name, but anyway, yours blooms in summer, mine blooms in Dec. Isn't that nutty? Frag. is delish.
iris28
(dana)Owensboro, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2009
4:17 PM

Post #6000584

i love acidanthera . infact im gonna put a bunch more this year . its also called Abyssinian gladioli or peacock flower
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
4:31 PM

Post #6000636

vossner,

Yes, it is a perennial crazy daisy. It's a bit iffy for winter hardiness here, so I would think it would be fine in your area.
I started the acidanthera in May, nothing blooms here in the winter, unless it is indoors.

Here's my little helper. Digs a little and likes to eat carrots & peas. His name is Todd and he's been part of our family for 6 years.


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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

January 13, 2009
4:34 PM

Post #6000645

Joanna, he reminds me of Todd from Disney's "The Fox and the Hound"!!! So cute!
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
4:35 PM

Post #6000651

Here my other helper, who thinks the one flower bed is special for him, since he enjoys smelling the catmint. Smokey has been with us for 10 years.

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joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 13, 2009
4:36 PM

Post #6000658

Yes, that's how he got his name. He loves posing for pictures

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vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 13, 2009
4:41 PM

Post #6000679

hey! those are the adoring eyes I was talking about, lol

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


January 13, 2009
5:31 PM

Post #6000887

Window boxes will look so great Joanna. I noticed your pots on your fence. A very nice touch, to bright and cheery. I bought some of those pot holders but have not used them yet. I love the look.

I have to go back and notice more plants and figure out which ones Nery was referring to.

Thanks for the name. I didn't even notice you had the white one too. I want to get seeds and put them here and there. They flower so much, I love them!

What a great little family you have there. You need all the garden helpers you can get. LOL

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


January 13, 2009
10:52 PM

Post #6002040

Oh my goodness, that face! Todd looks like a mini fox!

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 15, 2009
4:39 PM

Post #6008589

I came to this thread b/c I'm looking too! African daisies are nice most of the year, but they get leggy and stop blooming in late summer. The solid colored Angelonia (similar to snapdragons but hardy in our climate) is kind of nice for the back of a border. It blooms all the time and if it gets too tall you can cut almost to the ground and it springs back. Don't plant the ones with flowers that are both purple and white as it gets huge and will smother smaller roses.

I just planted some dusty miller around some roses. I really like the look. Voss recommended that around Burgundy Iceberg. It's a nice color combo for the pinks though too.

I need something that I can start from seed b/c I planted some bulbs that I don't want to accidentally dig up even though they're not that pretty around the roses. I'm looking at a penta that is only supposed to grow 6-8 inches. I can't really believe that though. Still, they are reliable and hummers and butterflies love them. It would be fun to have something new though.

Did you decide on anything Ev?
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 15, 2009
9:04 PM

Post #6009555

Elphaba, have you thought of perslane or moss rose - nice and low. There are low zinnias - not as low as the other 2. However, there are herbs such as types of basil, parsley and then there is chives. Just thinking outside the box, here. Have the same problem.
Also, there are other ground covers and things such as swt. pot. vines and if you are very daring you can always plant good old mint. I'm sure you will come up w/others and if you do, please post your ideas. Thanks.

Ann
also, think veggies. There are lots of low growing veggies and vines like canteloupe and watermelon.
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 15, 2009
11:24 PM

Post #6010014

how 'bout some trailing verbena? they're so colorful

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 16, 2009
12:56 AM

Post #6010331

Ann, I have wondered about veggies, but I thought they'd be too buggy. I planted mint, but it didn't really take off. It's still alive though. I should try other herbs. I have some lavender and some trailing rosemary, but they just don't look pretty at least not the way I planted them. They're still alive though too and that's something.

As for moss rose, zinnias, and verbena, y'all are going to think that I'm the worst gardener ever! I have tried those many times only to kill them. I know what you're thinking that even a child could grow those. Maybe, but I sure can't! I might try zinnias again b/c I really would like something different!

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 17, 2009
4:07 PM

Post #6016185

I ordered some seeds. I'm going to try zinnias again and I got one called Cherry and Ivory of the Swizzle family. I also got Red Rubin basil and a cosmos that will be too tall but I really liked it Happy Ring. I'm not sure what is going where yet. We'll see if they even germinate let alone survive!

Thanks for all your suggestions and thanks Ev for starting such a great thread.
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

January 18, 2009
3:01 PM

Post #6019443

I've tried zinnia several places in my gardens because my grandmother in Kansas loved them so much. There just seems to be too much moisture here for them. Every cultivar I've tried (and there have been many) have succumbed to fungus.

Moss rose is a good idea. I always think of rock gardens when I see them, but they could add a nice punch of color in other areas too. I think perhaps other succulents combined with moss rose would look nice.

I hesitate about vegetables because of the number of chemicals I have had to use in my rose beds at rare times of the year. We wouldn't be able to eat the crops from those beds, and that would just drive me nuts! Same holds true for herbs there. I don't spray the roses in the secret garden because of the herbs, which is why it's mostly planted with the OGR's that can fight through the tough bugs and diseases on their own. The back rose beds are a different story... too many fragile cultivars to make it in our buggy, muggy environment without a little chemical help. I can't go organic at this house because of all the chemicals our neighbors use... all the good bugs get wiped out.

The Purple Homestead verbena grows quite well here, but it's a HUGE magnet for white flies. They love it! I've tried it several years in a row, in different locations. It puts on a gorgeous show for about a month and then the white flies smother it. Both times I've pulled it up in frustration and the flies have left too. I also grew the pink verbena in a front pot. It's still hanging in there, but there are white flies there as well.

Thanks for all the suggestions everybody!

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 19, 2009
5:18 PM

Post #6024226

Ev, thank you, thank you, thank you! I thought I was the only one who couldn't grow verbena and lantana b/c of whiteflies. I also can't grow salvia b/c of some invisible bug.

I noticed that someone from Houston grew this cherry and ivory zinnia during one of the wettest summers that we have ever had, so that gave me some hope. At least it's just a packet of seeds; if it dies, it's no big whoop!
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

January 20, 2009
6:10 AM

Post #6027172

Phab, your lantana gets smothered by the whiteflies too? Lantana did splendidly at our former home... no white flies at all (our former home is less than a block from this one, so obviously same climate!). I thought the unique odor of the lantana was a deterrent to most bugs... kind of like marigolds. You must have some really aggressive whiteflies!!! Some types of salvia have performed well for me and some have not. The Giant Blue are superb. Some of the shorter varieties seem to just keel over!

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 20, 2009
2:31 PM

Post #6027906

I had some lantana at my old house which was about 6 blocks from here (how funny is that!) It was always ugly, scraggly and just yuck but I didn't know what was wrong with it. The lantana at this house was here when I got here and seemed OK at first and then it was just disgusting. I pulled it all out with whiteflies all around me, but I noticed new lantana has sprung up nearby and so far it seems healthy.

This spring I plan to be all about colloidal phosphate. My Texas Bug Book says that if you add colloidal phosphate to your soil, you won't have a problem with whiteflies any more. I'm so hoping that's true. Last year they attacked the plumbago which I thought was a super plant too. The Wabash Feedstore is supposed to have some. I just haven't made my way there yet.

I planted a new salvia just b/c I couldn't resist its burgundy color. It's already had bug issues and the top froze, so it looks hideous, but I'm still hopeful.

I also thought it was funny that I didn't want to grow veggies with my roses b/c I don't spray my roses and I thought they'd get all buggy, and you didn't want to grow them together b/c you do spray and don't want to eat chemicals. If anybody out there does grow them together, they'll have to tell us how they do it. I ordered seeds for that chocolate cherry tomato. I don't know where I'm going to grow it, but home-grown tomatoes are so much better than store bought and I was so intrigued by the color.
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 20, 2009
2:47 PM

Post #6027946

Elphaba, I am at loss to understand where your folks are getting all your bugs and stuff. I don't seem to have much trouble w/anything except slugs and snails - BIG snails. If I get those licked I'll have it made. I managed to deter the squirrels from getting into my flower beds and digging up my plants looking for their buried nuts. good old hot pepper flakes. They really don't like that stuff. I have the woodpeckers cleaning up the oaks and pines. I think that I'm just going to have to find thin strips of copper to lay down in the beds. I throw the coffee grounds out on the front bed each morning. I think I have the copper figured out and if it works I'll let y'all know about it.

Ann

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 20, 2009
3:12 PM

Post #6028025

Ann, snails and slugs are the one thing that I have figured out how to get rid of! Well, at least this stuff works for me. I go to the organic section of Lowes and get "Worry Free by Lilly Miller / Ferramol Slug & Snail Bait." Here's a link that will tell you where to find the product in your area http://www.lillymiller.com. It's important to skip the regular commercial brands that they have prominently displayed and find your way to the environmentally friendly section which is always hidden because most snail bates will kill your pets and other wildlife. Ask your vet if you have pets, they see it all the time. It's amazing to me that they can still sell that stuff.

Anyway, all you do is sprinkle this stuff around when you see snails and problem solved. It remains effective after rain or sprinkling and it's safe around veggies and flowers.
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

January 20, 2009
3:41 PM

Post #6028157

Elphaba, thank you so much for that information. I don't have pets and if those blasted squirrels happen upon it, tough. We have a mean old cat that comes after the birds and sits under a bush and snarls at me and Jim so that would be a small loss, also. No, I really like animals. Until just recently we had 2 cats and a dog. I have to go out shortly and I will go to Lowe's and get that bait.
Again, thanks so much!

Ann

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


January 20, 2009
4:16 PM

Post #6028281

For slugs and snails, I use Sluggo, safe around pets and wildlife.
http://www.pestproducts.com/sluggo.htm
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

January 20, 2009
4:28 PM

Post #6028329

Sue, I like Sluggo as well.
Phab, I'm now on a quest to find colloidal phosphate!

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 25, 2009
6:27 PM

Post #6049422

Ev, I found Tennessee Brown Phosphate. I'm not sure if it's the best one, but it was all I could find. Seems like most articles favor colloidal phosphates from Florida. The book said that plants grown in soils that are phosphate deficient are prone to whiteflies and that's why it recommended lots of colloidal phosphate which changes your soil over the long haul. I think it takes a while to do its magic though, so I'm also going to add plenty of composted manure this spring for an immediate boost of phosphate. I read that cow manure is the worst. That's too bad b/c it's so easy to get and cheap, darn it. We'll see what I can find.

On to another exciting whitefly discovery. I was checking to see what I could plant with the freebee tomato plant that I got with my new rose. Here is a quote from an online article:

"Basil is the classic tomato companion. Loved by bees, it repels aphids and whitefly. Tomatoes grown near basil take on their flavour. Basil sprays are useful to repel and sometimes kill whitefly, aphids and spider mites."

I'm so excited b/c I also got basil seeds. I bought one that is a dark purple color thinking that I needed more leaf color diversity in the rose beds. Now, it looks like it will have the added bonus of repelling whiteflies and aphids! I think I might need to grow basil everywhere!
mizar5
Merritt Island, FL
(Zone 9b)

January 27, 2009
1:58 PM

Post #6057078

Great thread.

The Good: I'm having success using MARJORAM growing in and around the feet of my 20 or so Antique Roses. I really like the idea of using the Diamond Frost! It grows very well here, so thanks for the idea. Must try.

The Bad: I tried white lantana but it got very out of control and started smothering the roses so I had to take it out. I'm just too lazy to stay on top of keeping lantana under control.

The Ugly: I made another mistake once: planted "purple incense" passion vine (for butterflies) NEAR the roses and it took over in a couple months and I'm still pulling out the babies everywhere in the rose area. Live and learn!

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 27, 2009
3:08 PM

Post #6057351

Mizar, I'm so glad you said that about the passionflower. I bought one to plant with my roses and then thought better of it. It's still in the pot. I'm waiting until warmer weather and then I'm planting it in a different location! I kept wondering though because it would be so pretty next to the house. It's Lady Margaret, a burgundy that would match my trim. It's supposed to be a smaller passiflora, but I have a small pink one in the back and it's still pretty aggressive. Red ones aren't supposed to be good for butterflies though, so I feel kind of badly about that. Oh well.

Kell

Kell
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9b)


February 1, 2009
8:43 AM

Post #6077611

Elphaba, your WorryFree® Slug & Snail Bait is the same as what Sue uses, the Sluggo. They both have iron phosphate in them. I use the Sluggo too. I love it! I used to use Corrys but the snails always seemed to come right back. I had a snail baby factory in my abutilon garden. Thousands of babies devouring them. I used Sluggo a couple of years ago and haven't seen but a handful since. Actually I used whatever brand HD has that has iron phosphate in it. I switched to Sluggo when I found a much bigger bag so it was more economical to use. Once a year I toss a handful of it out all about. No more snail munched leaves!
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 1, 2009
5:15 PM

Post #6078774

Oh wow, Joanna - I may have to drop and see your gardens when we drive through Calgary this summer!
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

February 1, 2009
5:51 PM

Post #6078923

Seandor,

That would be wonderful. When are you planning to be traveling through Calgary? My favorite time or when I think the garden looks it's best is July/August.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 1, 2009
8:59 PM

Post #6079812

We will be travelling through sometime around July 24 (Friday) or July 25 (Saturday) as far as I can tell.

We used to camp at the Olympic Games site - and will probably do so again.

DH and DD will probably take the boyfriend to the Calgary Zoo. Been there many, many times, so I would much rather see a beautiful garden.

Anyway, it's still very early and our plans are not finalized. It is REALLY terrific for you to offer. I will get back to you as plans firm up.

Oh, and please don't feel obligated . . . this is just in case it doesn't inconvenience you or your family. :-)
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

February 1, 2009
9:35 PM

Post #6079960

I enjoy having garden visitors. There are about 1/2 dozen DG Members in Calgary and we often have garden visits, especially if there is an out-of-town guest. That's a great time to travel in this area. Keep me updated as we get closer to summer.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 2, 2009
8:23 PM

Post #6083926

Thanks, Joanna, I will :-)
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 10, 2009
12:55 AM

Post #6389111

Phab, you asked if I decided on anything yet. Well, I wanted the cottage garden feel, so I wanted to mix it up in the new flower beds. I'm going to leave the original rose beds the way they are, with no underplanting, and then underplant in the new ones. That way, I can compare if the bugs and fungus are worse with the underplantings I've selected or if there's not much difference.

I wanted to try the Tunic flower that was suggested by Tusseemussee, but it's only hardy to zone 7:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/963/

I love the Diamond Frost and was able to find it easily in our local nurseries. Apparently, it's become quite popular, so I imagine we will see it in a lot of rose beds down south, similar to the frequent use of sweet alyssum in rose beds up north. I'm also going to use different varieties of mint and basil. I had hesitated at first with these because I know we probably won't go bug or fungus free enough during any given season to use only Neem... so we won't be able to eat the mint or basil. It seems like such a shame to use them as window dressing only, but then I realized that's pretty much what all flowers are! =P I'm also using different colors of chiffon portulaca. Finally, I have some irises and clematis planted nearby. I have no idea if this will turn out pretty or just look like a busy jumble of mess... but time will tell!

I found a few other possibilities that I am also considering:

Laurentia fluviatilis ’Blue’ - about 4" tall and used as a hardy ground cover... evergreen with small blue flowers from spring til frost

Delosperma cooperi - about 4" tall and used as a ground cover... with bright fuchsia flowers from summer til frost

Creeping phlox - lots of colors, but it always reminds me of rock gardens rather than rose gardens

Thanks, everyone, for your suggestions! Ev =)








This message was edited Apr 9, 2009 8:18 PM
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

April 10, 2009
8:48 AM

Post #6390270

Ann, I caught your hint on hot peper flakes, yea!!!!!!!! So glad to read from so many Houstonians here :)

What is the copper for, I missed that somewhere?
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 10, 2009
1:25 PM

Post #6390732

Tir, the copper is for the slugs and snails. A deadly present. They touch that and they are gone.

Ann
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

April 10, 2009
1:42 PM

Post #6390786

Oh thanks!

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 10, 2009
7:38 PM

Post #6392225

I tried growing stuff from seed. Never again. They are so tiny still. I grew dozens of dark purple basil and a dozen zinnias and only a few cosmos even came up. One of the cosmos made it. It's tiny but blooming. The zinnias are looking healthy but they are two inches tall. The basil is even tinier. By the time they fill in as ground cover, it will be fall.

I'm fascinated by Diamond Frost. I always wish that I could have sweet alyssum. I find it hard to grow even in the winter. I planted that gray/white fuzzy plant -- not lambs ear but ???? Shoot, can't remember the name of it. I like how it looks and it's getting bigger and fuller. It's supposed to be drought tolerant which will be a nice plus.
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 10, 2009
7:44 PM

Post #6392249

are u talking about Dusty Miller? anything "silver" is always drought tolerant. Adore Diamond Frost Euph.

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 10, 2009
7:57 PM

Post #6392289

Yes! I think that's it. I kept thinking it had a cowboy name. I guess I just think of the old west as being dusty!
plantladyhou
Katy, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 10, 2009
8:06 PM

Post #6392313

Elphaba, you are having the same trouble I had years ago when I planted seeds. You are "burying" them and maybe not keeping them moist. I have found that most of the common annuals function better if you: 1) rake or somehow scratch the surface of the area you will be planting in 2) sow the seed by broadcasting them in the area. Most of them either need no covering of dirt even tho the packages say to cover w/ X amt. of soil such as 1/4" etc. When you water them gently after planting the loose soil will sink the seeds in far enough. Cosmos, as far as I remember, needs light to germinate and the best way is to scatter as above and then tamp them w/the back of hoe before watering gently. I tend to err on the side of not covering very much if at all and let nature do it for me. I don't water deeply but lightly sprinkle to moisten the top of the soil and don't let the seed bed dry out. It sounds as if the seed companies are their own worst enemies but it's just a way to get you to buy more seed or it's the way that most of the country has to do it because their climate isn't as warm as ours. That is the reason that a lot of the very tiny, almost dust size seeds are "pelleted". This covering nourishes the seed when it is "planted" and is big enough for you to get hold of. Remember, when you thin your seedlings you don't have to throw those pulled seedlings away - just replant them in an available space. The only exception to this is the big seeds like morning glory, moon vine, okra, corn - big seeds like that. They need to be covered and watered well but kept moist also. Prior to planting they probably need to be soaked and maybe nicked to speed germination - i.e. morning glory, moon vine, Pride of Barbados, etc. Still, don't bury them like you would a bulb. Down here, I have found, that even bulbs don't need to be planted as deep as they do up north. Happy planting and gardening!

Ann
Mibus2
(Phyllis) Flint,, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 11, 2009
3:54 PM

Post #6395596

oh thank you thank you lord for letting me find this thread!!!!!
And thank you to everyone already here I am trying to do some companion planting in my rose bed and wasn't sure just what would work the best now i can re rad and add to it.

silverfluter
Fredericksburg, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 11, 2009
4:00 PM

Post #6395612

Blissful garden, I have irises growing around my roses and some day I hope to get them all out of there. They grow very well together, but the problem is that the irises get to be so thick that you can't pull out the grass and weeds. I'm going to put mine in their own bed, so I can dig them up when they get too thick and not disturb my roses.
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 11, 2009
5:14 PM

Post #6395873

Silverfluter, thanks for that input. I actually have the Louisiana iris in their own beds, lower than the other plants to help with moisture retention. For the beardeds, I have them in pots that have the bottoms cut out of them, sunk partially into the garden. That way I can work with the beardeds without disturbing the other plants as much... and it should keep them contained a bit easier. I also needed to have them raised more than the other plants, since they prefer less water than my roses and other plants. They're young enough that I can still move those pots to either end of each bed, though... so that might be the best of both worlds given your experience. I don't want to be trampling my roses every few years to split the iris rhizomes.
Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 11, 2009
5:34 PM

Post #6395948


Hmmm, I have an opportunistic underplanting in my rose beds; bermuda grass [geez]. I have, in the past, planted little clumps of ground covers, but fear that the bermuda became so invasive during the years of my illness and treatments that the bermuda will overwhelm anything I plant these days. I must work on knocking it down as it grows through bark, perhaps, before I attempt to put anything else there.

Frustrating!
Linda

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 11, 2009
5:46 PM

Post #6395988

Wow, Ev, you're always thinking ahead!

This is another possibility. It's a type of ajuga called Black Scallop. I have another dark ajuga but it has the long jagged leaves that look more weedy which is fine for the backyard but not for the roses up front. The rounded leaf on this one has more of a formal look. It only grows maybe 6" tall and so far the flower spikes aren't as tall as other ajuga either. It would be good where you want something low and dark. I have more crammed in a pot from last year that I think I will separate and plant just in case that purple basil never takes off! My other ajuga seeds itself, so that could be a problem or a benefit. For me it's usually a benefit!

Linda, good luck with the Bermuda grass. I do not envy you!

Thumbnail by Elphaba
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Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 11, 2009
6:31 PM

Post #6396129

Elphaba, here's another Ajuga I just found this year. It's called "Chocolate Chip" from Kawahara Nursery. It is very dainty, not sure if it will grow to be weedy looking as you describe the jagged-edged leaf of your other dark one. The tag states that it will grow to 4 inches tall and must be planted 15 inches apart (whew! that's wide!).

There is now a silver ajuga which I must grab some boxes of soon. It was stunning when I first saw it. It has the larger leaves like my green and dark purple/red ones of many years. I have found it to be very hardy here in my zone. Drought tolerant, evergreen in mild winters, perennial.

Thx for the luck wishes.

Linda

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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 11, 2009
6:40 PM

Post #6396167

Twincol, thanks for posting the Chocolate Chip ajuga. Phab, I knew about ajuga, but it's so overplanted around here that I wanted to use some plants that weren't in every other garden! (Silly, I know!) That silver ajuga sounds very interesting too. I think that would be a great addition to the beds, if I can find it!

Off to the nursery! =)

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 11, 2009
7:31 PM

Post #6396328

Ev, I totally get the desire to have something different! I don't think it's silly at all. A lot of times though a plant is common b/c it's so good. I just rooted and planted more pentas for example. True, they are everywhere, but they are so reliable and hummers and butterflies love them. I had a Painted Bunting spend over an hour right next to my patio eating ajuga seeds. That was quite a treat.

Linda, I love that chocolate chip! That leaf is beautiful. A silver one sounds really cool.

I was a bit harsh on my description of the other dark ajuga that I have. I don't know the name of it anyway. This is the one the bunting liked so much.

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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 11, 2009
9:28 PM

Post #6396653

Well, I found the Chocolate Chip ajuga at one of our local nurseries, but it's tagged as partial shade. I'm not sure it could take the heat of a Louisiana summer in the rose beds. I'll have to look for the silver ajuga... hopefully I can find a more concrete name for it!
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 11, 2009
10:19 PM

Post #6396815

Okay, now I'm confused. I found two cultivars of ajuga that have "silver" in the name and neither really looks silver. Then Happenstance had a beautiful photo of a metallic one (seriously, it looks like shiny metal!) that supposedly can take sun. There are a lot of posts for the Chocolate Chip cultivar, with contradictory information posted about whether it can tolerate full sun. So, now I'm at a loss. Does anybody here have experience with ajuga in full sun?
Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 11, 2009
10:20 PM

Post #6396819

Hmmm, my tag says sun or shade, Bliss. And I've got the darker Ajugas growing between my concrete pavers in sun from 12 noon to 6-7 pm during the summer, altho, of course, I understand that ChocChip could nevertheless be a different animal. Linda
Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 11, 2009
10:42 PM

Post #6396882

OK, Bliss, here's a pic of mine. It's the older Ajuga, both dark green and dark purple/pink. It sends out runners, which is why it ends up moving out into "under-foot." Note that it presently rests against a west-facing wall. The photo was taken at 3:30 p.m. on April 11. The north-facing wall and eves are shading it presently in the sun's springtime position. In another month or so it will be in full sun all afternoon and growing between the concrete. Our temps run between 90-95 and 105 throughout the summer. And it doesn't get daily water, like my roses in concrete pots do. I have never lost a single one due to sun/heat/drought. I only lose them when I transplant some of the babies into pots and forget to water them.

HTH,
Linda

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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 11, 2009
10:48 PM

Post #6396900

Thanks, Linda. That definitely helps. With that info, I feel confident that these can survive in my new rose beds. I love the blue flowers, too. Do you only get those in spring, or does it rebloom in fall as well? I'm a big fan of multi-bloomers. I just hate to waste space on something that only blooms annually, though I do have a few things that fall in that category if the foliage is interesting and fits my scheme well (bear's breeches, Petite Pink Scotch rose, some of the jasminoides, etc.). Ev
silverfluter
Fredericksburg, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2009
1:51 AM

Post #6397610

Blissful, thanks for that idea about putting irises in pots in dirt. Interesting option.:)

I never thought of putting ajuga around a rose either. I don't know much about them. My trouble with ground covers is that they don't usually cover the ground enough to keep out the burmuda grass. I even dug a path next to some of my beds and filled with mulch to keep the grass out. So now the grass just travels through the mulched path to the roses. Can't blame it, that's where the water is. I do have ajuga under a live oak, but it's spreading only very slowly.

I tried some St. John's wort for a groundcover once. It didn't come back this spring for some reason.

I tried angelita daisies for a ground cover, but it really didn't appreciate me digging the grass out of it.

Now I'm trying black and blue salvia and victoria phlox around roses. They get shade from Cl Cecile Brunner in the am and shade from the house in the pm, with just a little sun from 1 to 3 or so.
Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 12, 2009
7:45 AM

Post #6398522

Bliss, Bliss, Bliss . . . I actually find the blooms on the Ajuga to be a distraction. It's the colorful leaves in Ajuga which attracts me to these precious groundcover plants. If you mix the colors up on your ground, you'll find that you have a "perpetually colorful" carpet under your roses. If they manage as well as mine have you'll have it pretty much year round. And if it's not year round it should nevertheless be a perennial for you. It will creep, so you'll likely need to manage it as it moves into your rose bowls. Just transplant the little plantlets.

Oh my, Silver, it's been my experience that NOTHING keeps bermuda out and I cannot imagine that there is any plant which will welcome your digging about to pull it out. Someone just outlined a method in one of my threads to eradicate bermuda. I'll go find it and be back to [edit] it 's location into this thread for you to go look at. Bermuda is a questionably popular lawn hereabouts, especially in older homes with established lawns. It tolerates our evil heat in the summer, as well as our clay soils. It fills my backyard area and creeps under the concrete bed boundaries into the beds. I water my roses by canal irrigation and the bermuda just comes a'lookin for moisture nearly 3 feet away, past the dry soil, then grows up into the dry soil. A very invasive grass. I'm not sure if the newer hybrids are similarly invasive or more easily contained.

I'll be back with the thread location for the berrmuda eradication.

Linda

BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 12, 2009
12:47 PM

Post #6398841

Silverfluter posted a photo of dichondra 'Silver Falls' being grown as a groundcover at Antique Rose Emporium. I like it!

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/56847/

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
3:35 PM

Post #6399322

here are my favorite ground covers for the roses. this first one is Mazus reptans. it's evergreen and takes our heat, humidity and watering/rain like a champ. it isn't really rated for zone 9 but it's done remarkably well so far. i think seedpicker told me about it on her groundcover thread last year.

Thumbnail by trackinsand
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trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
3:36 PM

Post #6399323

here is a close up.

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trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
3:38 PM

Post #6399330

another favorite is Acalypha repens or pendula. it's hardy to zone 7 and completely dies down in winter but comes back with a vengeance in early spring. i put in one tiny potted plant last summer and apparently it spent the whole winter putting out underground runners. it just started blooming this week. it looks like strawberry leaves.

Thumbnail by trackinsand
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trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
3:39 PM

Post #6399332

and a close up.

Thumbnail by trackinsand
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trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
3:40 PM

Post #6399337

this is Ajuga 'Burgundy Lace'. i don't know if it's great or not but it stayed evergreen all winter and now it's finally starting to grow. it didn't grow at all last summer, just stayed in a little pile.

Thumbnail by trackinsand
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trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
3:41 PM

Post #6399338

close up.

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trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
3:42 PM

Post #6399340

and then there are the violas. i had them in pots over the winter and they re-seeded like mad. i guess i'll have them forever whether i want them or not! LOL

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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 12, 2009
4:32 PM

Post #6399492

Happy Easter, everyone!

Tracks, I'm encouraged to see the ajuga doing so well in sun for you. I'll have to pick up those Chocolate Chip ajuga plants I saw yesterday, once the nursery reopens tomorrow.

I've grown violas before... at our first house. They do extremely well here... too well. They made their way into every flower bed and potted plant we had, and they were impossible to eradicate from the unwanted areas. I would like something a bit more mannerly this time around! =P

I wonder what cultivar of Mazus reptans you have. I planted some two years ago in two spots of our gardens... one with partial shade and one with full sun. The full sun area died out in a week, but the partial shade thrived. I transplanted some from the partial shade to the full sun area again the next year, but again it died out quickly. Perhaps there's a different cultivar that is more sun-hardy...
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
4:40 PM

Post #6399559

Happy Easter ladies.
acalypha repens, aka Dwarf Chenile plant is an excellent groundcover in my garden. I've had it for years.

ajuga gets ratty for me in the summer, really ratty for me anyway. The hardiest for me has been choc. chip and the wimpiest has been Caitlin's Giant, which I don't even have any more. When I worked hard at creating a huge area of ajuga, any ajuga, it was a constant losing battle. Now that I've given up and replaced w/ other gc or plants have filled up, it is everywhere. I'm OK w/ that. Evie, I think the roses will provide sufficient protection for the ajuga.

dichondra, being a "silver" plant it rots easily if overwatered. I wonder how well it'd do w/ roses, which have to be watered frequently. Such a beautiful, trailing plant. As a gc, it has chocked out other stuff for me.

Mazus, I can't seem to keep it alive, and I don't know why.

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
4:45 PM

Post #6399574

hi bliss and happy easter.

the ajuga is planted around that very large pot so that it gets late afternoon shade from the back side. coupled with the fact that other plants behind it are starting to get taller, it will eventually have at least a little relief from sun. right now it's really beautiful but check back in july! lol

i just have the regular old Mazus from bluestone. i watered it every day when i first put it in but after a couple of weeks it was fine and no wilting to speak of. mine gets pretty much full sun all day.

i'm wondering if these violas are going to end up choking everything out. someone on the viola forum referred to them as living mulch but i hope that's all they are and not a living nightmare! if i was really determined, i guess i could wipe them out but it would take some doing.
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 12, 2009
4:50 PM

Post #6399592

Tracks, seriously, if you don't want them popping up in every pot within bird's distance (which, of course, is your entire yard!), then start pulling before they get out of control. They are beautiful in a naturalized setting... and if my entire back yard was that way, then it would be wonderful. But in any formal setting, they just go too crazy for me. I'd also be thrilled if I had a ton of space that I wanted/needed to cover with a tough as nails plant that would keep going and going. But, as I want more than just mulch and violas by the hundreds, it's not the plant for me.
tusseemussee
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 12, 2009
6:54 PM

Post #6399973

I've been away for some time but was pleasantly surprised to find this thread still active and chucked full of new ideas to me for underplanting roses, etc. There are several I plan to incorporate in my garden this spring so I thank the above contributors.

Ev, I am sorry the Tunica will not work for you as it is one of my garden favorites. Should you be growing any shrub roses, you might consider one of the many varieties of perennial geraniums. The lower growing ones, and there are now a number of choices, are to my eye the perfect uniting elements under my shrubs. Visitors always comment on the effect they give and many go home and copy the idea. This great use of geraniums is not an original idea - I copied from my English gardening books. Lol.

Tussee

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
6:57 PM

Post #6399982

i think they are out of control already...sigh. maybe the heat of summer will wipe them out? that's what i assumed would happen.

Thumbnail by trackinsand
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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 12, 2009
6:59 PM

Post #6399992

Ohhhh, scented geraniums do beautifully in the full sun here! Fab idea, Tussee. Thank you! I will have to root some from the display garden here. It's prep time for the herb area and it's overrun with the scented geraniums well into areas that are designated for other plants... YAY!

I'd go today, but the awful weather from Texas just arrived at our doorstep and we're under a tornado watch at the moment. We get some awful fronts that blow in every year within a week or so of Easter. Everything in the garden comes alive and we get excited and clean up all the winter blahs, and then a storm comes through and flattens it all again! Ah, the joys of Southern living. I guess that (and hurricanes, of course) is the price we pay for having such a wonderfully long growing season.

This message was edited Apr 12, 2009 2:03 PM
Mibus2
(Phyllis) Flint,, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 12, 2009
7:06 PM

Post #6400013

blissful do take care I know my daughter in Houston is under one til 4pm
I pray it all goes goes right on past ya

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
7:10 PM

Post #6400033

Ev and Mibus2, once the storm passes, it will be gorgeous! We have totally clear skies right now.

I'm amazed that y'all grow violas in the summer. I've only been able to grow them in the winter and they've never seeded themselves anywhere! I also can't grow geraniums of any variety in the summer. I can barely keep my Merlot alive until the fall.

Tracks, your underplantings are gorgeous. I'm very impressed and inspired!

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
7:10 PM

Post #6400034

nery, does your mazus get regular water?

hi tussee!

edited to add-stay safe everybody and elph, thanks. i think they are putting out some new strains of heat hardy violas. seems i read on bluestone maybe, that they are offering ones that bloom all year. yikes, i guess i may have gotten that kind although i really wasn't planning on it. i bought a flat of no names from k-mart last fall and now i'm stuck! lol

This message was edited Apr 12, 2009 2:14 PM
Mibus2
(Phyllis) Flint,, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 12, 2009
7:34 PM

Post #6400117

true Elphaba
up here in east Texas the sun is already out and shining after the rain
and it wasn't bad just a nice rain with some thunder so it helped everything outside

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
7:38 PM

Post #6400124

I do hope everyone gets through it safely. It went by fast. We only had an inch and half of rain but it came down so fast that the water backed up anyway. All clear now though and lovely outside and the plants did need the rain.
tusseemussee
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 12, 2009
8:04 PM

Post #6400179

Hi Debi - hope all is well with you - your garden looks as beautiful as always.

I love violas, especially the Johnny Jump-Ups. They reseed around my garden and I welcome them all. Around August they start to shut down, becoming unsightly, but are very easy to remove. When I pull out a spent plant I walk around the garden and give it a good shake in hopes some seeds will fall for the party to continue next year. I grow a variegated one that is supposed to be hardy, which it is not, so I have to search out the seedlings each spring to bring together for a mass effect. Even so, the effect probably is lost to everyone but me as they never grow strong.

Tussee
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 12, 2009
8:07 PM

Post #6400185

Phab, I've only seen two varieties of geraniums that can take our heat through the summer and then still make it through winter as well. The old-fashioned scented geraniums are one. The second is a cultivar called 'Satisfaction'. I posted a pic of it in plant files. I've had mine for three years now, rooted it for lots of friends and relatives. It blooms ALL year... I even had blooms at Christmas time. Crazy, I know. I love that plant! I have the red 'Satisfaction'. I don't know how the other colors perform. Ev
tusseemussee
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 12, 2009
8:34 PM

Post #6400231

Ev, I was ordering more geraniums this morning and thought I remembered seeing a few rated for your area. I checked and found three rated to zone 9: Ankum's Pride, Cheryl's Shadow, and phaeum Samobor.

Tussee

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 12, 2009
8:53 PM

Post #6400276

i checked out your picture in PF...really nice! apparently no one sells it right now so i can't get no Satisfaction! lol
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 12, 2009
10:03 PM

Post #6400501

Tussee, where did you order them? Link, please! I have to admit, I already made a trip over to the public garden and trimmed up the scented geranium there (yes, even in the storm!). I guess that's the sign of a true gardening addict. Once I got it in my mind, I had to go make sure nobody else had done the pruning there already!!! =P I just potted them up with Rootone, so in a few weeks, I'll know what takes. It would be ideal to have a variety of cultivars, so I'm up for ordering more!

Thanks for any info. You're tops! Ev =)
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 13, 2009
12:06 AM

Post #6400976

For the hardy geraniums, I found a company that offers Ankum's Pride, but not the other two. Their minimum order is $35.00 though... and I don't need that many of one cultivar. =( Anyone else know a good source of hardy geraniums?

For the scented geraniums, I found quite a few that are rated for zones 8-10, so they would take our chilliest winters and still withstand the heat of our summers. For those of you over in Texas, here's the list of what I've found:

Scented Geraniums that should grow as perennials in Zones 8-10:
Atomic Snowflake
Beauty - couldn't find source for this one
Countess of Scarborough - couldn't find source for this one
Dean's Delight
Fair Ellen
Giganteum
Godfrey's Pride
Lady Diana - couldn't find source for this one
Pretty Polly
Sharptooth Oak - couldn't find source for this one
Staghorn Oak
Village Hill Oak
Wildwood

I don't have a clue what cultivar I picked up here locally. It's a pass-along plant that's been here for many, many years... It blooms with a solid pale lavender, though... so apparently it's not one of the ones I just found via the search.

If anyone else knows other cultivars that will thrive here, please let me know. Thanks!

Edit: Just found out that 'Countess of Scarborough' is also known as 'Strawberry' Geranium (because of it's strawberry-scented leaves), so it's available on several sites. =)

This message was edited Apr 12, 2009 9:45 PM

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 13, 2009
12:16 AM

Post #6401030

I have killed scented geraniums before, but I guess I have to take the blame now instead of blaming the climate! I went nursery hopping this afternoon. I wanted to see if I could find the chocolate chip ajuga and a silver one. I couldn't find any ajuga at all! I did see lots of scented geraniums. I don't remember seeing any on your list though! I liked one called Gray Lady. I was afraid to try it though.

I did get a plant to try called Flambe Yellow Strawflower (chrysocephalum apiculatum.) I took a lousy sunbleached picture. Also in the lousy sunbleach is the black scallop ajuga that I broke up and planted, and a few of my 2" tall zinnias. Also, if anyone has a great idea on how to cover a soaker hose but still have the capacity to screw your hose onto it, I'd be really excited to hear it!

Thumbnail by Elphaba
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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 13, 2009
12:23 AM

Post #6401061

Phab, the nurseries were open in your area on Easter?! Everything here is closed for the holiday. I could only find the Chocolate Chip ajuga at one nursery here ( yesterday). They had just received it, though, so perhaps the growers haven't sent much of it out yet. I'm going back tomorrow to pick some up.

I mail ordered those scented geraniums. I've seen them sporadically at the nurseries here, but they always seem to get a very limited stock of the scented geraniums. I thought it would be easier to just order what I'm sure will grow here instead of running around to all the nurseries in a mad effort to find them.

I'm always a little skeptical when I see the zone listings for plants at Lowe's and Home Depot because I've frequently seen plants there that I KNOW cannot grow well here, but are still listed as just fine (delphinium is a great example... the nursery manager at one Home Depot tried to convince me it would go through our summers... HAH!).

We still have no sun here. It's been very, very gloomy and rainy.

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

April 13, 2009
12:30 AM

Post #6401098

Yep, they were open and full of people! I think everyone was so surprised that the weather cleared up that they were just looking for a reason to do something outdoors. I did see a lot of little girls in Easter dresses. Sorry to hear you still have the rain. Must have stalled huh? I totally agree with you about Lowes and Home Depot. Lowes was selling apple trees -- ridiculous. I drove by Lowes. They were open too.

I'm glad that I only got one plant b/c unless I give up on the seedlings, I don't really have room. It would be nice if the basil and the zinnias filled out. If they do, the ajuga's not planted very well, but it will find its way.

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 13, 2009
12:52 AM

Post #6401198

bluestone has ajuga. i don't remember now what kinds they offer but they have it and they are pretty cheap.
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 13, 2009
1:27 AM

Post #6401327

Okey doke, Bluestone Perennials had both Chocolate Chip and Silver Beauty. I can get the Chocolate Chip locally, but as Silver Beauty seems to be elusive, that might be a good option. Here's a link to Silver Beauty on their site:

http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/AJSBS.html

The description says it can take full sun, but it's only rated to Zone 9... so I'm a little skeptical that it can survive full sun during our Louisiana summers.

And here is Chocolate Chip:

http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/AJCCS.html

They have a lot of other cultivars too:

http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/search.html?mv_session_id=786LV6aY&co=yes&ma=yes&mc=1&tf=name&to=f&rf=*&sp=results_pics&st=db&fi=products&mv_value=nametype=scientific&ml=45&mv_value=srchtype=key&from_search=1&sf=:code:name:common_name:short_desc:description1&se=ajuga&su=1&op=rm&sf=is_coupon&se=1&su=0&op=ne&sf=disc&se=0&su=0&op=gt&hide=1

Thanks for the heads up, Tracks! =)





Mibus2
(Phyllis) Flint,, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 13, 2009
2:40 AM

Post #6401732

oooo thanks bliss I am going to have to see what I can find around here next pay day to get some ...love geraniums
silverfluter
Fredericksburg, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2009
2:49 AM

Post #6401751

Has anybody tried petunias for gc? There are new ones out that are supposed to be heat tolerant. I planted some Ride the Wave in full sun. We'll see how they do. The snails sure like em though.

How do daylilies do for gc?
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 13, 2009
3:24 AM

Post #6401880

Silverfluter, the Waves die out in our Louisiana heat about June. We've planted ours in the winter to get them well-rooted for two years now. Last year, they showed stress by May, and by June they were too scraggly to tolerate in the garden. We replaced them with Pentas that bloomed through the fall and then replanted with the Wave petunias again for winter. It's gotten into the high 80's quite a few days now and the Waves are already showing stress again. So, I've ordered the Pentas from our local nursery and we're going to change them out before they get scraggly this year. I have to say that the Waves do look great when they are growing well and blooming. Though, they might be a bit too tight for underplanting of roses (they really do form a thick carpet).
silverfluter
Fredericksburg, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2009
4:22 AM

Post #6402076

Hmm. Ok, I planted mine to fill in the space between newly planted daylilies. I've never had pentas. That would be a good one to try.
Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 13, 2009
1:28 PM

Post #6403002

Thanks, Bliss, I ordered some Silver Beauty Ajuga on special @ $6.97 ea bundle of 3 plants. I'm going to insert them into my other Ajuga carpets to add some light and am excited to have them. I haven't found them in town.

Good catch!

Linda

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


April 13, 2009
2:34 PM

Post #6403325

My favorite ajuga is 'Burgundy Glow', growing in almost full day sun but it's gets shaded by late afternoon. I like taller ground covers to camouflage the bare legs of some roses so ajuga is more of a bed edger for me.

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SherryLike
SE Arky
United States
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2009
5:04 PM

Post #6404090

I love ajuga, all types, but the one(s) I have only bloom once a season, not enough for me. Do some bloom more? My fav under planting for roses is Homestead Purple Verbena, perennial, evergreen & we have blooms, just about all year round. This year, we have Homestead Carpet Red Verbena, , which I will plant under the purple crepe myrtles, I love purple, all shades of red pink. Mass plantings of verbena are show stoppers, and I've only seen it at one church and my yard, so easy & an easy keeper. Right now, it's difficult to find a photo of the verbena/roses in the same frame, but everything getting ready to pop...

This message was edited Apr 13, 2009 12:09 PM

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SherryLike
SE Arky
United States
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2009
5:13 PM

Post #6404133

I've also fallen in love with Clematis, and would love suggestions for others that will bloom spring - fall. I love them with the roses and on the fence - in this pic, you can see just a smidgen of a pink/white striped clematis.

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SherryLike
SE Arky
United States
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2009
5:18 PM

Post #6404156

And, one of my very fav under plantings is strawberry plants. They are evergreen, who knew?! Certainly not me, they were a gift and, my goodness, they never stopped giving. Edible landscape is fun! This is Home Run, a wonderful, easy to grow rose that is in bloom, most of the season, without ugly leafs.

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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 13, 2009
5:20 PM

Post #6404162

Sherry, I also loved the purple Homestead verbena... before the whiteflies decided they adored it too! Two years ago, we got a horrible infestation of the whiteflies in our verbena and finally had to yank it all out. I replanted in some areas last year, and again it proved to be a huge attractant for the whiteflies. Both times, once the verbena was gone, our whitefly problem subsided... so I doubt I try it again. I do miss those cheerful non-stop blooms!

The sale at Bluestone is pretty great on that Silver Beauty ajuga. I got 9 plants for $27.97 including the shipping. That's not much over what I would spend to get the plants locally, if I could find them (which I can't), so I'm a happy camper!
SherryLike
SE Arky
United States
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2009
5:22 PM

Post #6404173

The pink/white Pinks, are easy, but I'm not thinking they bloom all summer, please tell me I'm wrong. However, they do nicely with the roses and Encore Azalea, which I love and were my new favs, until I learned I could grow clematis.

Thumbnail by SherryLike
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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 13, 2009
5:26 PM

Post #6404197

Sherry, I also love dianthus, but they kick out fairly early for us. My grandparents lived in Prescott and then ElDorado, Arkansas, so I'm familiar with your climate. They could grow many things through the summer at their home that cannot survive our summer heat.
SherryLike
SE Arky
United States
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2009
5:33 PM

Post #6404226

That darn whitefly is a pistol, but, knock on wood, I've never had it on the verbena, but I had it on one Knockout this spring, and one dwarf hardy hibiscus last year - and, the amazing thing is that the whitefly didn't hurt those plants or infest other plants. The same Knockout had it this spring, but it's disappeared, the hibiscus isn't up yet. FWIW, my aunt lives next door & she has whitefly, which has caused her to remove several plants. So, odd, that whitefly picks and chooses like that.

Do you grow Upright Elephant Ears in Baton Rouge &, if so, do you put them in full sun and, or shade, or a combination? Thanks!!

BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 13, 2009
5:39 PM

Post #6404262

I grow the Buddha's Hand elephant ears... they're a dwarf variety. I have them in filtered shade under a large oak tree. I've also grown the Black Magic before, but they weren't happy where I wanted them to grow, so they were given to a friend. She didn't have much luck with them either.

When I was a very young girl, my mom could only grow four things (she is the ultimate brown thumb). We had old-fashioned Shasta daisies, these hideous huge cacti, huge elephant ears and English ivy... all in the same flower beds around the patio. Everything, including the elephant ears was in full sun year round. Yep, bog plants with cacti and all surviving with no care at all. The combination looked pretty odd, but at least they survived! Once I hit late elementary school, I started doing the gardening! =P
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

April 14, 2009
3:11 AM

Post #6406864

I picked up some of the Delosperma cooperi 'Mesa Verde' today to try as an underplanting as well. I'm not sure how I'll like the foliage of ice plant with the roses, but the flowers look quite nice...
SherryLike
SE Arky
United States
(Zone 8a)

April 14, 2009
1:11 PM

Post #6408001

I never got the Black Magic in the right place, I gave them away, then the guy I gave them to, gave them to my neighbor and he still has them but they aren't doing much. I've never seen them do much, but I love them. OTOH, the Upees (Upright Elephant Ears) are wonderful and work every place they are planted, and make a fantastic/easy house plant.
silverfluter
Fredericksburg, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 14, 2009
11:28 PM

Post #6410858

Upees?lol First time I've heard that term. That's cute. I thought "Upees" needed a lot of shade.
SherryLike
SE Arky
United States
(Zone 8a)

April 15, 2009
3:00 AM

Post #6411900

Hahaha, silverfluter, thanks. Yip, IMO, Upees do need shade in our zone, or their leafs fry too quickly, tho, plenty of water will revive them...
davis1676
Disputanta, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 16, 2009
1:08 AM

Post #6416366

I wonder if you know about the hardy geranium co-op still going on? She also has pels & pansy faced. If you go down the co-ops you'll see it. She's not terribly expensive & she's giving DG a 20% discount, which in my case will probably cover the shipping. I'm planting several blue geraniums with my roses.

I also ordered a couple Festuca Elijah Blue for my mass bed. Think it may look very nice with them.

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 2, 2009
8:31 PM

Post #6632291

It's been a while since we chatted on this thread, but I had to add a new find, Chocolate Flower (Berlandiera lyrata)! The flowers really smell like chocolate!!! The one that I bought has silver foliage although the tag shows green foliage. It has a yellow daisy-like flower with a chocolate center. It only grows 1 ft. tall X 2 ft. wide. It likes full sun or part shade, so it's not going to be unhappy if the roses shade it. It's hardy to 5 degrees and its water needs are low. Does that sound perfect or what?!!! I put it with my yellow and purple roses.

Of course as soon as I started to dig a hole for it, I accidentally dug up a bulb. After that, I was afraid to dig much, so I didn't plant it very well. I'm really excited about it though. My zinnia and basil seedlings are still tiny! The zinnias at least are blooming and starting to branch out, but I don't think I'll try the seed thing again! Anyway, thought I'd share this chocolate flower since I'm kind of silly excited about it!
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

June 2, 2009
9:35 PM

Post #6632570

Phab, photo please? Thanks for sharing!

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 2, 2009
11:34 PM

Post #6633072

i'll be watching to see how this one does for you. i've had it on my list for quite a while but kept holding off. i don't remember why now...

Heliopsis 'Loraine Sunshine' is a good one for me under the roses. i'll see if i can find a picture.

here are some pictures in pf. it says full sun, but it doesn't really like full southern sun. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/55618/

This message was edited Jun 2, 2009 7:37 PM

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
4:12 PM

Post #6636261

Oooh, that is a pretty one tracks.

Well, Ev, you forced me to learn more about my new camera. Actually, it's my dad's old camera. He gave it to me b/c he couldn't figure out how to use it. I was a bit worried that if my dad the mechanical engineer couldn't figure it out, I sure couldn't, but I'm coming along. He gave me his just in the nick of time as my old camera is ready for hospice care.

Here is the Chocolate Flower.

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Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
4:13 PM

Post #6636263

Here is the backside of the flower which is also pretty.

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Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
4:14 PM

Post #6636270

Here is the foliage.

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Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
4:16 PM

Post #6636280

Last pic, if I can find it. I tried to get it against the African daisies so you could see how silvery the foliage is by comparison.

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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

June 3, 2009
4:20 PM

Post #6636307

Thanks, Phab! Those look like hybridized dandelions! I wonder if the leaves are edible in salads... That would be so appropriate for the Victorian style rose gardens, with the herbs interspersed. =)

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
4:45 PM

Post #6636438

The leaves are kind of fuzzy yet very soft, but probably not good in a salad! The tag said that it was a good plant for a sensory garden. I thought that referred to the chocolate smell, but the soft texture is probably another reason. In this pic, you can see one of my pitiful zinnias. I think they might be pretty by fall.

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cactuspatch
Alamogordo, NM
(Zone 7b)

June 3, 2009
5:10 PM

Post #6636562

Interesting, chocolate flower is growing in the desert behind my house. So I would not think it could take the extra water under roses! I like sedum under my roses as they are evergreen and keep the moisture in the soil. In my arid climate that is a good thing!

Thumbnail by cactuspatch
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Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
6:37 PM

Post #6636962

Beautiful! My sedum always dies in the summer. I've kind of given up on it b/c clearly, I don't know how to grow it. FYI, the tag on my Chocolate Flower has a logo that says "Desert Adapted."

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
6:43 PM

Post #6636993

now i remember why i didn't put it in the rose garden. i figured it would be too wet.

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
6:57 PM

Post #6637059

Wow, you water your roses! lol! That's why I thought it would be great for the roses b/c I hardly ever water them!
cactuspatch
Alamogordo, NM
(Zone 7b)

June 3, 2009
7:06 PM

Post #6637103

We water everything but natives here--and if we don't get rain for months we water the natives just so they look nicer. I love to water. LOL! The roses are on drippers set to water 3 times a week. Drippers clog often so I also get a hose and a long slow watering once weekly. I think watering is my favorite thing to do in the garden. It brings in all the wildlife and is like a mediation for me. : )
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

June 3, 2009
7:11 PM

Post #6637133

Phab, you don't have to water your roses?! Perhaps our weather isn't identical afterall. Right now, everything in the yard is screaming for water. It's been Hades hot here for a few weeks and all the water is evaporating, even with rainfall.

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
7:31 PM

Post #6637228

Sometimes our weather must be a bit different b/c last week here, the weather was just gorgeous. I had to wear a long sleeved shirt in the morning b/c it was actually chilly! Today, I am really hoping for rain. They got a downpour yesterday about 6 blocks from me, but I didn't get any! I'm hearing thunder now, but not a drop of rain.

I really should water my roses more. I'm sure they would be prettier. My goal for this summer is to remember to water if we don't get 1" of rain during the week. Still, for me, having drought resistant plants just makes it easier to compensate for human error and they take the heat better too.

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2009
8:44 PM

Post #6637525

i water my main garden, which is the rose/and other stuff garden, twice a week for an hour each time. that's all we're allowed with the restrictions. thankfully, most of the plants in there are fairly well established. the newer ones and a few in pots can be hand watered at any time, so i do take care of them a little more. all of my pots are bottomless except for one, so by next year, i won't have to worry too much about them either. i just planted them all with new plants this spring.

i hate being at the mercy of my garden and i'm finding that most of my choices have proved to be good ones and can take the heat and drought conditions pretty well.

i hear thunder. yay!
milesf1
Woodstock Valley, CT
(Zone 5b)

June 8, 2009
2:11 AM

Post #6656515

Here is an update of what I posted last year...the nepeta 'Walkers Low' and 'Brookside' Cransebill are so big they are more overplanting at this point...had to prune them back so I could find my Louise Clements!

Thumbnail by milesf1
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BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

June 8, 2009
3:22 AM

Post #6656871

With the "Cali corner" I've tried many of the underplantings listed in this thread just to see what will work well here. In different sections of the garden, I planted Diamond Frost (Euphorbia), Silver Beauty ajuga, Chocolate Chip ajuga, Mesa Verde iceplant (Delosperma), Variegated iceplant (Delosperma), Dragon's Blood sedum, Tricolor sedum, Angelina sedum, Chocolate Balls sedum, Ogon sedum, and several types of portulaca. I also mixed in some other plants, like daylilies and clematis. Everything's looking great so far, even in full sun and temps in the 90's. For the bed I'm preparing now, I've also purchased some Rainbow ajuga to try. Thanks for the suggestions, everyone!
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

June 13, 2009
3:52 PM

Post #6682189

Question on this for everyone using Euphorbia (Diamond Frost) under their roses... I planted some and it seems the Diamond Frost gets leaf spot and then it spreads to the roses. I had no spots at all on the roses until the Diamond Frost got some and then got tall enough to touch the bottom of the roses. Does anyone else have this problem? How have you handled it? I may end up just ripping out the Diamond Frost and sticking with the better behaved sedums, Southern shield fern, daylilies and ajuga. Opinions?

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2009
12:16 AM

Post #6687619

sorry, no help here.

i did want to offer this suggestion though. i'm having great luck with Lavandula pinnata this year. it's grown about 3 x the original size already and sneers at the heat, humidity and 18+" of rain in one week. it smells good too.

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vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2009
8:49 PM

Post #6691868

nope, no leaf spot or other problems whatsoever.
Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 16, 2009
4:19 AM

Post #6693871


18+ inches, Track?!?!!! Geez!

I have a cousin near Tallahassee, one in Gainesville, and one in Ft. Lauderdale. Does that cover all the microclimates? It's hard for me to contemplate Florida with microclimates, but doubtless there are. {chuckling}

Geez, 18+ inches! I can't even imagine 18 inches of rain in one week!

Linda

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 16, 2009
11:41 AM

Post #6694450

yes, it happens here. last year we got 27" in less than a week...thanks to Faye.
cactuspatch
Alamogordo, NM
(Zone 7b)

June 16, 2009
5:19 PM

Post #6696084

We don't get that much in a year.

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 16, 2009
6:38 PM

Post #6696375

you don't get tropical depressions, tropical storms and hurricanes like we do! it can take some getting used to but every place has the good and bad. thankfully, being in the middle of the state, we don't have to worry about being washed away with the ocean.
lrwells50
(Lynn) Paris, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 16, 2009
10:54 PM

Post #6697524

In 2001, Houston got 39 inches in about 6 days from Tropical Storm Allison. Our daughter called from her dorm room at Rice at 3 in the morning (hate those early morning calls,) and the electricity had gone out and she couldn't see a thing. She said she woke up because the A/C was out, and she was so hot.
cactuspatch
Alamogordo, NM
(Zone 7b)

June 16, 2009
11:42 PM

Post #6697738

We did get a lot of rain last year and the weather guy said it was because of Dolly.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/quiltdiva/2705801266/
that was behind my house on our property. We don't have any bad weather here really. Guess that is why I find the details interesting when people make those comments. When I moved here someone told me "the only bad weather we get is in March it can get windy" I think of that every year as I moved from the eastern part of the state that gets lots more wind. ; )

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 17, 2009
12:52 AM

Post #6698119

we just had the usual late afternoon/early evening thunderstorm-2.5" in an hour. typical for this time of year. normally this happens every day in summer but the last few years we've been in drought situation. it looks like we may be coming back into our regular pattern-finally!
Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 17, 2009
2:15 AM

Post #6698537

{gasp} 39 inches, Irwells, is more than a a yard!!! A YARD!!! UNbelievable!

And, Trackinsand, 2.5" an hour nightly weeks at a time? WOW!

VERY different than my part of the country.

Linda

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


June 17, 2009
2:50 AM

Post #6698750

LOL, Linda, that's what I was thinking too! We usually don't even see rain from April-Nov.
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

June 17, 2009
4:42 AM

Post #6699219

Well, we're having extremely uncomfortable weather for both people and plants. You literally drip going outside. No more of that Southern Belle "dew"! It's as if you're continuously in a hot sauna due to the 45% humidity... but we are in a DROUGHT. We haven't had rain for weeks and it's not forecasted for at least the next 7 days either. A high pressure zone has been hanging over us and pushing all the rain north for what seems like forever. So, the heat factor is over 100 degrees every day and we're just BOILING! I must say, it's miserable even standing outside to water the plants.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 17, 2009
11:57 AM

Post #6699784

We've had a very rainy and cold June and we just returned from six days on Cape Cod where we wore the clothes we normally wear in March. Too cool! Too cloudy and rainy this time. The deer ate the roses in the back but didn't touch the main rose garden thanks to Repels All.
crockny
Kerhonkson, NY
(Zone 5a)

June 18, 2009
9:01 PM

Post #6707250

Bliss -- I have ajuga chocolate chip in full sun and it's great! It spreads, but neatly and has lovely purple flower spikes in the spring -- I'm spreading it around as much as possible I love it so much ... unfortunately I don't have any pictures of it ...
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

June 18, 2009
11:46 PM

Post #6707918

Crockny, the Chocolate Chip ajuga is definitely a winner in my book with the roses!!! Even in our heat, current drought (can you imagine that in Louisiana?!), and extremely high humidity, it looks completely fresh and vibrant. I have it in full sun under some very young rose bushes and it's thriving. I was surprised to see an ajuga do so incredibly well in full sun.

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 10, 2010
7:58 PM

Post #7449198

After three days of freezing temps dipping as low as 18, Chocolate Plant and Flambe Yellow Strawflower don't look very happy, but they didn't freeze. The ajuga looks and feels fine and the creeping rosemary is gorgeous. The African Daisies, pentas, and Mexican Petunias that survived past winters are dead. Just something else to consider if you enjoy your garden all year but occassionally have a hard freeze

I'm thinking of trying peanuts under the roses this year. I usually have a few growing in the garden that the squirrels have buried. They're always pretty although the flowers are often hidden under the foliage. Can't find a seller of the ornamental kind, so will probably just buy a bag of peanuts at the farmer's market. It'll be interesting!
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

January 10, 2010
8:17 PM

Post #7449242

Phab, it's interesting that you resurrected this thread. I had been rethinking some of what I posted here and was considering resurrecting it as well. I planted the Diamond Frost and was entusiastic at first, but now I cannot state more emphatically how much I have come to hate it! It got tall and lanky and tried to take over the entire bed. I ripped out all the plants and have been fighting seedlings ever since. Unlike the other "ground covers" that were planted that stayed low to the ground and mannerly, this one was not content to receive the sunlight filtering through the roses, but instead decided to reach for the sky itself and take over the garden. Truly... a thug in every regard. I would not suggest anyone plant this unless you want a constant battle in the future.
vossner
Richmond, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 10, 2010
8:29 PM

Post #7449275

interesting...my euphorbia DF has not been a problem at all. I have it potted and inground, not a thug for me. However, it is super easy to propagate and that usually is a thug characteristic.
SherryLike
SE Arky
United States
(Zone 8a)

January 10, 2010
11:38 PM

Post #7449804

We haven't had weather this cold in years. Is it safe to assume that the roses will make it?? I had to move many this fall - do you think single digits will do them in??? We're above freezing this pm, but it's the first time in several days...
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

January 10, 2010
11:44 PM

Post #7449823

Sherry, I have a thread on that topic posted here:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1067705/

I am fearful for many of my roses and other plants. It doesn't look good out there in the gardens at all.
GEENP
Ridgeley, WV

January 11, 2010
5:53 PM

Post #7452167

I have the solution for critters including digging dogs. Cayenne pepper. Sprinkle it where you want to stop activity and once they get a taste they stay away. We have a german shepherd that was digging in the garden and once she got a taste of that she stayed out. My sister in law sent me five lbs of CP for Christmas. I just put the pkg under the tree and thought the dogs (2) were so good since they didn't bother the tree at all. Then on Christmas when I opened the gift bag I understood. I have a list of things to try in the rose beds. And I have a whole new spot to put things in, the rose bed. Thanks everyone.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 11, 2010
7:58 PM

Post #7452523

I am planning a garden of Showbiz roses (I have one already and it blooms forever from early spring until hard frost). Unfortunately, it doesn't have any noticeable scent.

The garden is a raised triangle edged with logs that are completely covered in ivy. So - I will plant six of these red roses, but will underplant with purple heliotrope - which is very fragrant.

What do you think? Red, green, and purple . . . should be colourful :-)

Once fall approaches, I will tear out the heliotrope and plant white mums.

Thumbnail by Seandor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 11, 2010
8:01 PM

Post #7452534

Here is a picture of heliotrope

Thumbnail by Seandor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SherryLike
SE Arky
United States
(Zone 8a)

January 11, 2010
9:12 PM

Post #7452786

Anything purple & red is heaven & yours is bea-u-tiful!

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 11, 2010
10:16 PM

Post #7452993

Wow, I only tried heliotrope once and it was ugly. Yours is lovely.

I was very excited about the peanut idea even if I couldn't find the ornamental peanuts in the article which looked much prettier than the squirrel planted ones that have popped up in my beds. I went to the farmer's market and bought a bag of raw Valencia peanuts. Turns out that's possibly the biggest variety of peanut plant you could get -- grows to 4ft. Darn it! My neighbor must have fed the squirrels Spanish peanuts which are supposed to be more common here and are small, so I don't know why my farmer's market has Valencias!

I hate it when I have a plant obsession that I can't immediately satisfy!
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 12, 2010
1:55 PM

Post #7454744

Alas - those aren't my heliotrope - just an image from google. I am only hoping they turn out so well. Now Elphaba has me worried . . .
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

January 12, 2010
3:33 PM

Post #7455084

I've never had a bad Heliotrope, Seandor, so put your fears aside.
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 12, 2010
5:09 PM

Post #7455420

I start heliotrope from seed each year. The best variety for me has been Benary's Marine. 18"
from http://www.damseeds.com
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 12, 2010
8:36 PM

Post #7456012

Alas - they don't ship to the USA - so I will seek a source for Benary's Marine here - does it have a strong fragrance? Its the fragrance I really want . . .
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 12, 2010
8:52 PM

Post #7456045

Yes strong fragrance
midwest_tyro
Mount Prospect, IL
(Zone 5b)

January 12, 2010
9:03 PM

Post #7456075

I grew Heliotrope 'Blue Wonder' last year from seed with a very good germination rate, and the plants had a very nice fragrance and bloomed into fall. I got the seed from Harris Seed. Might be another one to look into.

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 14, 2010
5:59 PM

Post #7461618

Evey, when you were laying out the law for yourself. I was totally laughing b/c I try to do that all the time, but usually, I find a way to break my own rules. Like I told myself that I wasn't going to buy fuchsia anymore. I fall in love with it and it last about a month and then it gets hot and it dies breaking my heart. After this freeze, I went to the nursery to see if they had anything that I could put out for my wintering hummingbird. Wouldn't you know that they only thing they had was a lovely little fuchsia! I just had to buy it right? The hummer flew up to it almost as soon as I put it out there. I have feeders up too, but I think he should have some natural food too.

I went on and on about peanuts and then I was at the store and saw seeds for chives. Chives might look good? Might scare off pests? What the heck, if they don't grow, I'm only out a couple of dollars. I put the seeds out already. I'm not waiting until spring and I'm not going to try to start them indoors. They can fend for themselves!
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

January 14, 2010
6:52 PM

Post #7461754

Well, you can actually claim the fuchsia is because you need to feed the hummingbirds in winter, right? LOL! I am sticking to my rule. I think the shell shock of the view in my driveway will stick with me for quite a while. That just gives me a great excuse to explore smaller plants that are hardy for a wide range of temps and are easily planted... Hmmmm
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

January 14, 2010
8:37 PM

Post #7461993

You can put mothballs in the garden and potted plants and that will keep dogs, cats and most other animals out of the plants or pots. I kept them in my houseplants as my cat loved to dig in the pots and lay on the plants. Now she stays clear of them. I've also tried them in the yard and everything stays out of my garden.
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

January 14, 2010
8:42 PM

Post #7462005

Phab, what does chives smell like when it's in full bloom? Ms. Dougie next door has a lot of society garlic and it actually was so repulsive a few weeks ago that I went looking to find out what stunk... I had picked up the awful whiff of it from the OTHER SIDE of the house!!! Don't torture your neighbors if you can avoid it!

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 14, 2010
11:44 PM

Post #7462552

LOL! They might be stinky. Might keep the neighbor's mangy, one-eyed cat from poopin' in my rose beds. Probably not. Mothballs huh? That would really stink!
cactuspatch
Alamogordo, NM
(Zone 7b)

January 15, 2010
3:23 PM

Post #7464152

I have chives and soc. garlic and find them both to smell wonderful but you have to be right on them to notice in our dry climate. However, one of my cats will actually eat the chives so don't know if it repels them all.
midwest_tyro
Mount Prospect, IL
(Zone 5b)

January 15, 2010
3:26 PM

Post #7464159

When I bought my house there was a small patch of garlic chives in the back yard. They have pretty white flowers and no scent, unless you damage them then they smell like chives.

Not sure what kind of chives you got Elphaba, but a warning - the garlic chives reseed like crazy!!! at least around here. I'm still fighting them being in the lawn, under bushes, etc. 20 years later.

Elphaba

Elphaba
Rockport, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 15, 2010
4:18 PM

Post #7464312

I saw the white garlic chives, but I got the purple allium schoenoprasum instead. I just like purple! I thought about getting both but decided to go for a blanket of purple. If they grow at all. If they take over, I'm cool with that. Nothing else is filling out the way I'd hoped.

There were already lots of little seedlings coming up and I have no idea what they are. Weeds probably. The dead stalks of the zinnias that I grew last year have new green growth at the bottom. I didn't know they were a perennial. I already pulled some up and threw them away. Oh well.

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