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Cooking: Jelly repair

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spredndjoy
Laguna Niguel, CA

October 28, 2008
7:38 PM

Post #5726680

I made a batch of grape jelly which came out more like a thick grape molasses. Does anyone know of a way to get it back to a jelly like consistency?
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

October 28, 2008
9:17 PM

Post #5727026

Sounds like it needed more pectin. But I'll bet it makes great pancake or waffle syrup.
spredndjoy
Laguna Niguel, CA

October 30, 2008
1:12 AM

Post #5731546

I checked further and only one jar came out as " grape molasses." So I made a batch of vanilla ice-cream and when it finished I made grape swirls throughout it with the one jar and it is the best grape swirl ice-cream imaginable.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

October 30, 2008
1:21 AM

Post #5731575

now thats using your head for a quick fix... Wish I was closer as I might be at your door step for a sample...LOL

Janet
Carolinorygun
St. Helens, OR
(Zone 8b)

October 30, 2008
6:23 AM

Post #5732381

Unless they're terribly overripe grapes have plenty of natural pectin and don't need the commercial kind.

Jelly/marmalade can take up to 6 weeks on the shelf to set, so an unset jar in a batch isn't necessarily an indication that it won't eventually firm up.

You can re-cook the jelly to bring it to the set point but there's a risk the jelly will end up tasting caramelized and less fresh, so really your method of swirling it through ice cream is by far the better option.

Carol
kassy_51
Marinette, WI
(Zone 4b)

November 6, 2008
3:07 AM

Post #5757554

I had the same problem making mulberry jelly.
But I think mine didn't get as thick because I wouldn't use all the sugar that it called for. Way too much sugar.
So instead we have mulberry syrup for waffles and pancakes :-)
Carolinorygun
St. Helens, OR
(Zone 8b)

November 6, 2008
4:14 AM

Post #5757727

This is going to sound weird or counter-intuitive, but jams with commercial pectin have much more sugar than traditional jams without it.

It's like a self-perpetuating cycle. The commercial pectin helps set the jam but needs more sugar to work.

Ironically, unless you're looking at a reduced-sugar pectin or something like Pomona pectin (which could jell water), you will have better luck reducing sugar in a jam that doesn't use the commercial sort.

Carol

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