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Fragrant Gardening: What is the most fragrant flower in your plantings?

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kathy65468
Eunice, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 24, 2008
5:15 AM

Post #5824933

I want very much to have fragrance as many months of the year as possible. What is the most fragrant flower in your yard? When does it bloom? What zone are you in? WOW it almost looks like you are taking a test. Sorry. I really am interested in your opinion as to the best plants for fragrance.
In my year the most fragrant flowers are native honeysuckle which blooms in late spring and continues til summer heat kicks in and night blooming jasmine which has been blooming late summer and continues til frost. I live in zone 5.

Thanks so much for responding.
violabird
Barnesville, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 24, 2008
4:15 PM

Post #5826091

Brugs, Butterly Ginger (may not bloom for you since it needs warm temps and needs a long growing season) but just one bloom wafts the yard!

I love my tea olives (apricot scent) blooms intermittently all year long for me, winter honeysuckle bush (stong lemon scent in winter), winter daphnes, Banana Shrubs (spring & fall if you get Skinnerianna) Gardenias, and so many more, lol

Post your zone Kathy!

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

November 24, 2008
6:09 PM

Post #5826531

Vi - she's in zone 5

Let's see for mine (Z7)
Winter: I'm clueless but hoping that the Daphne will bless me with her scent...what a heaven-like fragrance!!!
Spring: Ohhh the Daffy's have a great scent - some more then others...seems the plainer the looks the better the scent. Lilacs are always good for a few weeks. Honeysuckles. Dianthus
Summer: Oriental/Trumpet Lilies, Plumerias (not hardy), Jasmines/Gardenia, Nicotiana 'Fragrant Cloud' (annual - will continue blooming into fall - night scented), almost forgot Stock (another annual but SO worth it!!
Fall: Brugs seem to still be blooming, Tuberoses (not hardy) are blooming by fall time. Night blooming Epis (not hardy - night scented),

Lavenders and Rosemary - spring thru fall

This message was edited Nov 24, 2008 1:14 PM
Kalpavriksha
Sarasota, FL

November 28, 2008
12:09 AM

Post #5836770

1)Michelia champaca; I live in zone 9b/10a. Flwr-Jun-Sep. Its scent is hypnotic, without poison. 2nd Jasminum sambac var. Grand Duke (Rose jasmine) flwr. Jun-Oct; 3rd J. molle flwr Jun-Oct; 4th J. officinale var. Flore Pleno flwr. all year; 5th Aglaia odorata, still in a pot and now 7 ft high. flwr all year off and on.
I miss the Eleagnus fragrance that's best from Orlando and north.Flwr Oct-Dec. They grow here, never see them flower or detect fragrance.
The white-cream colored Brunfelsias are nice, flwr. Jun-Nov.
I'd rank the Trachelospermums, Brugmansias, Daturas, Hedychiums, Cestrums, Crinums nicely similar in fragrance and flwr May-Nov.
Raphiolepsis indica have nice fragrance similar to Eleagnus. They flower Mar-May. There's a fragrant Spathaphyllum at Selby Gardens that flowers year round with the same scent.
kathy65468
Eunice, MO
(Zone 5b)

November 28, 2008
2:08 AM

Post #5837046

This is going great. These posts will give all of us who are looking for fragrance some new varieties to look up and try.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

November 28, 2008
8:48 PM

Post #5838697

Hmmmm...the Crinums...a few of you have mentioned those...I'm thinkin' I NEED some...LOL
carolyn_haack
Saint Petersburg, FL

November 30, 2008
11:44 PM

Post #5845373

Well, I'm in the near-sub tropics, so most of what I can plant won't do well outside up north, but you might try some as a houseplant.

Strongest fragrance-definitely the orange jasmine. Of course, I've got so darn much of it...
Sweetest fragrance? A tossup between my coconut blooms, my banana blooms and my little stars orchid.

I do miss the scent of lilacs though!
kathy65468
Eunice, MO
(Zone 5b)

December 1, 2008
4:04 AM

Post #5846313

Come spring I might try to talk you out of some of that orange jasmine. I would definitely miss lilacs. My favorite time in spring is when I bring an armload of lilac blossoms in for vases throughout the house.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

December 1, 2008
4:06 AM

Post #5846321

WOW, I didn't realize we had this forum! Thanks so much for starting this thread!

My DD is 2 and LOVES all flowers. It's so sad, the dear goes to smell so many of them and most have NO scent at all. I try to tell her but she still pretends they do and says they all smell nice. I'd love to build her a "real" garden that is full of beautiful sweet smelling flowers. I'll be happy to follow along this thread. :)
kathy65468
Eunice, MO
(Zone 5b)

December 1, 2008
4:19 AM

Post #5846352

I am glad that you found us. The thread is getting a slow start but there is plenty now to chose from and start planning for spring. Perhaps next summer your little one will understand why you are smelling the flowers.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

December 1, 2008
4:21 AM

Post #5846356

:)
carolyn_haack
Saint Petersburg, FL

December 1, 2008
11:49 AM

Post #5846773

Kathy, I'd be delighted to share some of my orange jasmine! It's so common down here that no one asks for cuttings, but I'll start some up for you, and come spring they should be ready to make the long journey north.

I grew up on Long Island, and my mom's friend had huge Lilac bushes. So we always had vases full of fresh lilac all over the house. The scent is still one of my faves.
Tir_Na_Nog
Houston
United States
(Zone 9b)

December 1, 2008
12:24 PM

Post #5846817

Ah the lilac, "almost" impossible to have in Texas. :( It is one of the most fragrant flowers to!
mqiq77
Danielsville, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 3, 2008
12:09 AM

Post #5852365

Gardenia, mockorange,osmanthus fragrance,seven son(yum),clerodendrum tricottimum,korean spice viburnum, honey suckle,jasmin, daphney,and a close cousin edgeworithy crysanthy(SP)
Mike

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 3, 2008
3:26 AM

Post #5852972

seven son(yum), Mike????? Hmmmm...going to google
DyanesGarden
Port Washington, NY
(Zone 7a)

December 3, 2008
3:34 AM

Post #5852993

How about Clethra? Blooms in summer.
mqiq77
Danielsville, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 3, 2008
4:32 AM

Post #5853268

Chantell believe me you will like seven son.The bark is interesting, and the growth habbit is one any one can use for accent plant.Mike

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 3, 2008
3:36 PM

Post #5854326

I found it, Mike and yes, it sounds like something I'd like...issue is becoming space-related...esp. if the shrub like plants I put in last year (Daphne, mock orange, korean spice, & abelia - won't even mention the gardenias) continue to thrive...LOL. Keep meaning to ask the neighbor's if I can rent some yard space...dang, townhouses...just not enough space. My son (16 y.o.) asked what I wanted for Christmas...I told him build me a mini trellis to go over the top of the stairs of the deck...I was thinking maybe sweetpeas or something along those lines...a vine but not a heavy duty one like the passis that are on a trellis over the bottom of the deck stairs. Anything to create more space to grow things...ya know? I have no pride. LOL ^_^
WendyCal
Beeville, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 3, 2008
4:15 PM

Post #5854483

Four O'Clocks (Mirabilis jalapa) have a gentle, sweet scent. A planting along a fence, perhaps 10feet long, will scent your whole yard. Also, with the new varieties available, they are absolutely gorgeous! Down here, in Zone 8b, they do best in afternoon shade, with twice weekly waterings.

Moonflower (Ipomoea alba) are fabulously scented, and in a mixed planting in a sunny location, with Morning Glorys (Ipomoea ***), totally stunning!

Sweet Alyssum (Lobularia maritima) makes a great front border, or you could plant a little 'pasture' of it. Also, by sowing your seeds approximately 2 weeks apart, you'll have blooms all summer.

i can't think of any more off the top of my head, but hope this helps!
kathy65468
Eunice, MO
(Zone 5b)

December 4, 2008
4:58 AM

Post #5856996

That would be awesome carolyn I would love to have some orange jasmine! We will definitely do some swapping come spring. I am looking forward to it.
kathy65468
Eunice, MO
(Zone 5b)

December 29, 2008
5:58 PM

Post #5940045

Looks like suggestions have slowed down over the holidays. I am working on my spring orders for the gardens. I am spending much time in the plant files and google to research the suggestions here and decide what will do best in my yard and what tenders I can make room to keep indoors during next winter. I look forward to some trading in a couple of months if anyone has fragrants to share.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 29, 2008
6:04 PM

Post #5940067

Sadly this forum seems to slow down a bit this time of year...probably many of the others do as well with nothing to report. Another way to pass the time and come up with new ideas is to search ebay's plant category with fragrant as the search term - check the box below it so that if "fragrant" is in listing it'll come up for you as well. It's a nice way to come up with some ideas at least.
mqiq77
Danielsville, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 29, 2008
7:00 PM

Post #5940267

Daphne, and winter honeysuckle are here at the right time, and they open your sinus.
Mike
Darlacooper
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 30, 2008
2:51 AM

Post #5942018

I miss Lilacs! I really do, we had them when we lived in Western NY. I'm a transplanted Yankee!
Darlacooper
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 30, 2008
3:00 AM

Post #5942064

carolyn If you have any of that Orange Jasmine left over I would love to try it in my garden

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
3:04 AM

Post #5942087

Mike - when does the Daphne bloom for you? I've got one finally and it's doing great...I cant' wait...this has been years in coming
LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2008
3:09 AM

Post #5942109

Yes, the butterfly ginger have the best and strongest fragrance and I think tea olive smells like peaches.

Jasmine too - edited - I meant jasmine have best fragrance, not that they smells like peaches. LOL!

This message was edited Dec 29, 2008 10:24 PM

Thumbnail by LiliMerci
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Darlacooper
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 30, 2008
3:10 AM

Post #5942115

I just bought a tea olive, I have the butterfly ginger on my wish list

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
3:13 AM

Post #5942133

Nicole - peaches? Really? Gonna have to go take a sniff of the one that has some blooms on it now...all I know is I LOVE them!!! And I'm gonna keep whining every time someone mentions the butterfly ginger...at least till mine finally bloom...FOUR years this spring...seriously!! I swear I'll feed them to death if need be!!!

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
3:14 AM

Post #5942139

Darla - what type of Tea Olive did you get?
Darlacooper
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 30, 2008
3:20 AM

Post #5942177

this was the tag on it

Fragrant Tea Olive
Aceituna Dulce
Osmanthus fragrans

LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2008
3:21 AM

Post #5942183

Darla, send me a dmail in the spring and I will send you some butterfly ginger. They multiply like rabbits. And I might have some of those orange jasmine seeds. Let me look if you don't get them from the other DG.

Chantell, how long have you had your ginger? Mine did not bloom in the container and the ones I have planted in the sun do better than the ones in the shade, although I do get some flowers from the ones in the shade (but not this summer for some reason).

Yours will be fine to put in the ground. They do die down completely in the winter and you may need to heavy mulch that area, but I think they will be fine.

There are different type of tea olive? I don't have any, but one of my neighbor has one and it smells incredible when I walk by them. I can't remember when his bloom, may be May? They remind me of the plantations I use to visit growing up in Charleston, SC.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
3:48 AM

Post #5942283

Nicole - mine's been in the ground - part sun though as they were looking fried in full sun...maybe I'll trim up the branches above their heads so they get a bit more sun into the afternoon. This spring will be spring #4 for them, I believe. As for the Tea Olive astcgirl and someone else raved about the scent of the Osmanthus fragrans "Fudingzhu" which after much time searching realized that http://www.nurcar.com/featurdPlants/html/osmanthus.html was the only place I could find it. Used my Christmas gift $$ to purchase that one and the Osmanthus fragrans aurantiacus since the 2nd one could be planted in the ground here. The "Fudingzhu" has some blooms opening up now and ahhhh, what a beautiful scent. Here's their page in DG watchdog http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/c/3285/

Darla - depending on how mine over winter I might be able to spare some orange jasmine cuttings...just remind me if you'd like to try rooting some. As for your Tea Olive you'll have to let us know how her blooms smell when the time comes. I can't find anything on google about that particular Osmanthus
LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2008
4:06 AM

Post #5942350

That's not too bad of a price. I may have to get me one. Thanks for the info.

As for your butterfly ginger, I don't know why yours are not blooming. So sad. Mine are maintenance free and neglected. I will be glad to send you some in the spring too if you'd like. They all die down in the winter, but I can dig them in the spring. Just send me a dmail and remind me. It does look sad in the sun, but once they have water, they perked right back up.

I brought a cutting over for my neighbor and she did not know what it was. When she saw me the next day, she said that the fragrance filled her whole house and it smelled kind of "spicey". When I told her it was a ginger, she nodded.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
4:11 AM

Post #5942370

Ohhhh "spicy" - my favorite of all favorite scents!! Mine are plenty big enough...both of them even sent up 2 stalks a piece this past summer. Someone mentioned feeding them well...so I'm going to go with that notion since all else has failed. Most the time when I threaten to get rid of something - it thrives the following season...I kid you not!! LOL I was extremely pleased with those 2 Tea Olive size and health...both listed as 1 gal but are easily 3 ft tall and the one in bud to boot!!! Both could be potted up to a 3 gal with as large as their root balls are! They do have a min order of $30 (I believe) and shipping may seem high but that was a fairly heavy box that I rec'd and it wasn't from packing...it was the plants themselves!!! I think you'd be very happy ordering from them - very nice folks!!
LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2008
4:13 AM

Post #5942382

May be I can find a GA gardening friend that migh want to go in on one.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
4:16 AM

Post #5942397

Excellent idea!!! If not just grab the "Fudingzhu" and one of the others that you might be interested in. If I think about it, I'll take a pic of them in the morning so you can see what I mean by size!! They also have a great selection of Gardenias, if I remember correctly. Their catalog is quite large - only avail online but certainly fun to window shop through.
LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2008
4:20 AM

Post #5942410

Very DANGEROUS! ^_^
Marilynbeth
Hebron, KY

December 30, 2008
4:44 AM

Post #5942477

I didn't know this we had this forum either, and I'm glad to have found it with this thread!!!

My 3 favorite fragrant plants that I have now, are (they're beautiful too)...

Agastaches!
Lavender!
'Miss Kim' Lilac!

I really love all Agastaches! They're fragrant, beautiful, attract Hummingbirds and/or Butterflies, long blooming, and low maintenance. I just gotta have them in the garden! Each year, I add more and more Agastaches (Hummingbird Mint). They're not invasive like 'Mint' is, by the way.

Lavenders are a 'must have' in every garden! I love them! They're also, fragrant, beautiful, attract Butterflies, pretty sure most varieties are long blooming, and low maintenance.

You just have know the soil and growing conditions for both Agastaches and Lavenders. A good place to find these 2 types of plants are at High Country Gardens. That's where I started buying from them in Spring 2005. http://www.highcountrygardens.com/
http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/c/28/
It's also a Dave's Garden Watchdog 30 company.

I have 2 fragrant 'Miss Kim' Lilacs growing in my yard that I planted a few years ago from one gallon pots. Each year they get more beautiful! I also get more fragrant blooms!

Marilyn


This message was edited Dec 29, 2008 11:51 PM

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
5:19 PM

Post #5943783

Big ole welcome to you, Marilyn!! I agree...have to have my lavenders and lots of them!!!

Nicole - LOL...ok, I measured the smaller of the 2 sweet olives and she was just over 30" - here's a pic - not great but gives you an idea - that's a 6" pot to her left.

Thumbnail by Chantell
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
5:22 PM

Post #5943791

oopsss...well there's the leaf...ugh...was taking pics for plantfiles obviously...here's the "right" one

Thumbnail by Chantell
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2008
5:28 PM

Post #5943812

Wow, that is a pretty good size.
Marilynbeth
Hebron, KY

December 30, 2008
5:47 PM

Post #5943877

How couldI forgot to add another favorite fragrant plant?!

The 'tall' Phlox! ( Phlox paniculata )
Beautiful colors and wonderful smell! I just have to keep the Wild Rabbits away from it, because they love it as much as I do!

Thanks for the welcome, Chantell! :-)

Marilyn

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
5:50 PM

Post #5943882

Every year I tell myself to remember to plant some of that Phlox - do I remember...nahhhhh. I swear I planted some years ago (before I knew about DG and to check on vendors reputations) and it never came up :( Gonna do it this year...I will, I will, I will!!!
Nicole - yes, I thought you'd be pleased with that size!!! Happy to enable you as others have me!!
kathy65468
Eunice, MO
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2008
6:18 PM

Post #5943979

I have seen phlox in the catalogs, of course, but did not realize they were fragrant. I have often considered planting them because they are tall and description says they have plenty of bloom. Thankyou for the reminder. I will definitely plant some this year.
Darlacooper
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

December 30, 2008
6:35 PM

Post #5944035

Oh my...another plant to add to my wish list! lol I love this thread!
Marilynbeth
Hebron, KY

December 30, 2008
6:44 PM

Post #5944071

Here''s are 5 one-gallon pots of Agastache rupestris ( Licorice Mint or Sunset Hyssop ) that I have growing in one of my flowerbeds.

Pic taken 7/23/07 at 6:21 pm EDT

I just love the scent of Agastache rupestris! When I'm pinching the stems to make the plant bushier, I just have to smell the stems of the plant! Just love to keep adding ( and having lots of Agastaches for the Hummingbirds ) these wonderful plants to the garden!

This message was edited Dec 30, 2008 1:52 PM

Thumbnail by Marilynbeth
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Marilynbeth
Hebron, KY

December 30, 2008
6:46 PM

Post #5944078

Another look...

Thumbnail by Marilynbeth
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Marilynbeth
Hebron, KY

December 30, 2008
6:47 PM

Post #5944084

Closer look at the flowers...

Thumbnail by Marilynbeth
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Marilynbeth
Hebron, KY

December 30, 2008
7:02 PM

Post #5944147

I'm going to start a new thread of Agastaches, so I don't tie this one up with any more of my pics. :-)
LiliMerci
North of Atlanta, GA
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2008
7:06 PM

Post #5944161

I planted some Plox from seeds last year but the rabbits must have eaten them. They came up a little bit but never had a chance.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2008
7:50 PM

Post #5944340

Ahhh Marilyn you're fine...we don't get pressed about that sort of thing over here. If we did - they'd have kicked me to the curb long ago!! LOL
Marilynbeth
Hebron, KY

December 30, 2008
8:15 PM

Post #5944415

LiliMerci,

I find the young wild rabbits are the worst ones ( of the wild rabbits ). I sprinkle some ground cayenne pepper on plants that wild rabbits like/love to eat.

I go to Kroger's ( if you have one near you ) and get their big plastic bottle of it ( it's alot cheaper for the size and alot cheaper going to Kroger and buying their own Kroger brand of spices ). It's the 16 oz. ( 1 lb. )size. It has a red round plastic cap on it that you can sprinkle ( and it has a opening for dipping ). The bottle is clear plastic.

The ground cayenne pepper has to be sprinkled on after it rains also.

Marilyn
Marilynbeth
Hebron, KY

December 30, 2008
8:17 PM

Post #5944421

Chantell,

LOL! I just didn't want to tie the thread up with my pics, but thanks! :-)

Marilyn
mqiq77
Danielsville, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 5, 2009
4:34 PM

Post #5969057

Chantell, the daphne are about to burst, the buds are swelling, and I would say about the 20th down here.BTW, they should do pretty well where you live.
Mike

Edited to say I am ancious, because I do have the wet weather blaugs, and every thing went wrong, like leaky hose, due to light freeze, and one of my cats missed the box, and yuck !!

This message was edited Jan 5, 2009 11:39 AM

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 5, 2009
4:38 PM

Post #5969078

Doin' the happy dance...gonna take a peek at mine and see if I can find any buds or buds to be!!!
Marilynbeth
Hebron, KY

January 5, 2009
11:43 PM

Post #5970698

How could I forget Dianthus 'Firewitch'! Love the scent! I had one before and need to get another!
kathy65468
Eunice, MO
(Zone 5b)

January 6, 2009
12:38 AM

Post #5970941

Guess I have another for my want list. I am very anxous to try some of the suggestions here. Come on spring!
WendyCal
Beeville, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 4, 2012
3:50 PM

Post #8954597

THREE YEARS since I posted to this thread???

Bump,

for old times sake! lol

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 4, 2012
8:47 PM

Post #8954966

Oldie but a goodie


One of the most fragrant in my garden so far is Dianthus "Itsaul White"http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/DIIW.html you can smell it from many feet away
but I'd have to say the #1 is Sweet Autumn Clematis can smell it across the yard and around the corner

It's on my list to get more fragrant flowers.
kinda disappointed when flowers have no scent at all

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

January 5, 2012
9:49 PM

Post #8956261

Wow, thats a loaded question, lol. The most fragrant...gosh depends on the time of the garden year. Peonies, lily of the valley, lilacs, my wild roses, nicotiana (sweet sensation), sweet alyssum, prunus cistena, Mayday tree, trumpet lilies, dianthus X loveliness, cosmos, sweetpeas, philadelphus (mock orange) and honeysuckle vine. Kathy.
mqiq77
Danielsville, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 5, 2012
10:53 PM

Post #8956284

I have daphne that is about to burst in bloom. Winter honeysuckle in Feb. Gardenia, dianthus, mock orange, peony, seven son, and of coarse, wild honeysuckle, that takes over. I have a sweet autum clemitis, that has run wild in the lower portion of the yard, that I'm trying to natualise, and the clemitis is not native, but climbs the trees.As of now, I have other interest, so let her climb. Mike

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

January 6, 2012
7:08 AM

Post #8956509

Oh that Daphne fragrance is wonderful!!!! Mine died :(
candela
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 26, 2012
5:56 PM

Post #8983523

the most fragrant are osmanthus(ooh), brugmansias, brunfelsia(ahh), mock orange, ylang ylang, michelia, butterfly gingers, hedychiums, telosma cordata(mmm),cattelayas, begonia odorata, crinums, sweet almond, gardenia and of course there is nothing like crushed allspice leaves. seven son and daphne? have to look those up

Thumbnail by candela
Click the image for an enlarged view.

missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

January 29, 2012
2:09 PM

Post #8986869

Right now, the winter daphne are going nuts with perfuming the yard.
islandgirl37
Marathon, FL
(Zone 11)

February 18, 2012
7:50 PM

Post #9011576

Most fragrant... top of the list would be Michelia Alba. Close seconds are Michelia Champaca and Cananga Odorata(Ylang Ylang). Not only are their fragrances incredibly beautiful, the fragrances waft for great distances. I can smell 1 single Alba bloom several feet away and a tree in full bloom will nearly scent my entire block.

I also love Orange Jasmine, Osmanthus,Plumerias(some, not all are very fragrant), Simpsons Stopper(Myrcianthes fragrans), Portlandia Grandiflora,( this one needs warm, humid and lots of blooms on it to smell the vanilla, chocolate scent) Aglaia odorata(Chinese perfume plant,t such a pure, beautiful lemon scent), Aloysia virgata(Sweet Almond-almond and vanilla), Osmanthus fragrans, Osmanthus fragrans Fudingzhu, Osmanthus fragrans aurantiacus, Brunfelsia Americana, Brunfelsia densifolia, Brunfelsia gigantea, Brunfelsia lacteal- one of these, not sure which one, is very spicy and almost smells like allspice at night.

I have 2 Stemmadenia littoralis- Milky Way trees and they do small nice but the fragrance doesn't travel for and to my nose they smell like Simple Green Cleaner. Nice, beautiful trees and always blooming, just not as fragrant as would like.

One of my all time favorites is Heliotrope. INCREDIBLE!!!! But it just will not grow down here. I've had several of them and as soon as the summer heat kicks in they just cannot take it.


islandgirl37
Marathon, FL
(Zone 11)

February 18, 2012
8:16 PM

Post #9011600

Candela... I have never heard of telosma cordata before. I'm not wild about vines, but this is one I'll have to check out. What is the fragrance like?
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

February 18, 2012
8:52 PM

Post #9011623

Finally ...the edgeworthia
candela
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

May 14, 2012
5:09 PM

Post #9123916

Islandgirl37 .
my telosma cordata is in a pot not a huge out of control vine so far. The smell reminds me of osmanthus. A must have for a fragrant garden. I will try and take a picture for you. Do you have an updated picture of your ylang ylang after you cut it way back last year I am ready to cut mine way back.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 29, 2012
4:22 PM

Post #9143868

Our Gardenia jasminoides 'Kleim's Hardy' is blooming now and smells fabulous.
daylilydreams
small town, MN
(Zone 4b)

May 29, 2012
5:08 PM

Post #9143940

Fragrance here is provided by these plants Chionanthus virginicus fringe tree, oriental lilies, OT lilies,peonies, dianthus and nepeta the foilage smells like mint.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

May 30, 2012
6:28 AM

Post #9144539

Yes the Gardenias have arrived...here's old faithful 'Shooting Star' - 5' + tall now...sweet girl

Edit to say - oops photo's upside-down...ugh

This message was edited May 30, 2012 8:29 AM

Thumbnail by Chantell
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Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

May 30, 2012
7:01 AM

Post #9144578

Ok...I'm a little OCD and that photo is annoying me...here she is right side up

Thumbnail by Chantell
Click the image for an enlarged view.

candela
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

May 30, 2012
8:06 AM

Post #9144686

nice, i have never seen that gardenia.

alot of fragrance in the garden now with all this rain. plumeria, sweet almond, michelia, begonia, crinum lily

Thumbnail by candela   Thumbnail by candela   Thumbnail by candela   Thumbnail by candela   Thumbnail by candela
Click an image for an enlarged view.

missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

May 30, 2012
11:56 AM

Post #9145001

So missing the Fl potential for all those wonderful tropical blooms and fragrances. I lived in Ft. Lauderdale Jr. High and some HS years - but too young to appreciate gardening opportunities -- did a lot of crabbing tho and now miss that too!

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 9, 2012
3:28 PM

Post #9354007

My garden group has a Daphne in its display garden near a seating bench, and it is nice in bloom. In my own yard, plain old yellow or white Four-O'Clocks are very nice on warm summer evenings.
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

December 23, 2012
6:36 PM

Post #9365690

Well, let's see: cape jasmine gardenia, wild honeysuckle, clove drops carnations, dianthus, hyacinths, irises, roses, abelia which smells like honey, petunias when I can get them to grow, grapes have a faint smell when they are in bloom, peaches and apples. And snapdragons. The blueberry bushes have a faint smell. Pine trees. Thrift, which my son thinks stinks. I used to have some eleagnus which had a wonderful scent. I had to cut it down because it became invasive. I think I have covered it. Luciee {;^) P.S: Gardenia is most fragrant in my yard. L

This message was edited Dec 23, 2012 8:39 PM

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 25, 2012
5:32 PM

Post #9367019

We have talked about fragrant flowers, but there are some great plants with fragrant foliage. I have a geranium that I brought inside for the winter with leaves that smell like old-fashioned roses. I plant a lot more basil than I can use in the veggie garden. I just like the way it smells when I am foraging around.
GingerGaia
West Monroe, LA
(Zone 8a)

February 18, 2013
6:42 PM

Post #9423722

I also have wildhoneysuckle all around the edges of my garden . Heavenly, but a pain ti keep out of the garden. Planted i agree with sweet olive, mock orange, confederate jasmine, but my fav are antique roses.

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

March 1, 2013
7:40 PM

Post #9436032

#1 Mock orange in the Summer, my myer lemon smells good too. My daffodils just finished blooming and I have sooo many that they really make the garden smell wonderful. If anyone wants smelly daffodils I have tons extra, they really multiply well, LOL. Lavender and rosemary in summer. Honeysuckle, I love honeysuckle!
I have allergies so I'm pretty careful what I plant as far a smelly plants.
Elsa123
Pretoria
South Africa

March 1, 2013
8:17 PM

Post #9436076

Hi,

Mandevilla laxa and Vigna caracalla. Brugs for nighttime fragrance.
However, I won't plant any of them too close to my bedroom window. The fragrance on all of them is very strong. Mine is planted towards the upper part of my garden (about 20 feet from the veranda), and it has never been too intoxicating...

Elsa

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 10, 2013
4:37 AM

Post #9444506

Crinums, moonflower, honeysuckle, english lavender, basil, agastaches, lemon balm, daffodils, trumpet and oriental lilies, sweet violets (viola sp), ginger lily, chocolate daisy, bouncing bet (soapwort). And some I've forgotten at the moment. :)

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 10, 2013
11:35 AM

Post #9444837

yes the fragrance of Saponaria (Bouncing Bet is wonderful, peppery but sweet).
Some others that I just love Hemerocalis flava (lemon lily), Lily of the Valley, German Bearded Iris, my wild Roses, Trumpet Lilies, and Peonies...yum!!!

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 11, 2013
9:06 PM

Post #9446505

Bouncing Bet is invasive here - but it attract butterflies, too.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 12, 2013
1:58 AM

Post #9446569

Yes, same in TN but already here in large numbers. Not much to do about it but enjoy the fragrance.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 14, 2013
3:01 PM

Post #9449433

When we decided to raise honeybees, the hardest part for my blind wife was giving up some of her favorite fragrant plants. Fragrant azaleas, Carolina jessamine, fragrant oleander varieties, Texas mountain laurel and brugmansias...We are still searching out replacements. This thread is a wonderful place to get ideas. I love watching hummingbirds so agastache is my personal favorite fragrant plant. Followed by lavender, thyme and rosemary. It may be a guy thing, but I like the scent of Vitex negundo. (Chinese chaste tree). It smells sort of like lemon pepper.
Among fragrant blooms, my Spring favorite is jonquils. My summer favorite is an unidentified red rose. The blooms have the classic old rose scent, but, what I especially like is that the foliage has a sort of green apple scent. Autumn clematis would be my favorite fall bloomer, if it weren't so aggressive in this area. Since we can't grow autumn clematis, #1 position for fall bloom is a toss-up between fragrant goldenrod (Solidago odora) and deep sea crinum. (The crinum blooms first in summer, but gets lost in a scent-scape of magnolias, honeysuckle and gardenias. It has the stage to itself, however, when it blooms again in October. Witch hazel is my favorite winter bloom, but others here would vote for the tea olive. It usually blooms in Jan. or Feb. in our garden. There are some unexpectedly fragrant camellias, as well.
I would add the cool season annual mignonette and sweet box to the list of fragrant plants we seem to be creating. They keep a nose happy in the off-season.
High summer is a tough season in our scent-scape. 'Fragrant Angel' Echinacea sounds promising. Has anyone gotten a whiff of that one? (Jim)

Photo of the mystery rose.

Thumbnail by Amargia
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 14, 2013
8:40 PM

Post #9449795

Amargia - Why did you have to get rid of the plants you mentioned? Do they affect the bees, or do the affect the honey? I had heard that some types of Buckeye are toxic to bees - but I hadn't hear anything about any others.

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

March 14, 2013
9:22 PM

Post #9449813

Jim, my daughter is getting us a beehive started next month. I have been working on getting more flowering plants started for the bees. Have you found any good lists of good bee honey plants and obviously I am concerned about bad plants for making honey too. The only one your "bad" list I have so far are Brugs, and I can't say I've been all that successful with them anyway. I don't have oleander but the neighbors do so that could be a concern. Thanks for your help.
Domehome

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 15, 2013
4:53 AM

Post #9449944

I'd like to know as well. ^_^
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 15, 2013
4:59 AM

Post #9449949

Not sure but I'd bet it affects the 'taste' of the honey. I know the bee keepers in this area will market certain flavors of honey.

In fragrant bloom right now, Carolina jessamine. It is on the breeze and catches my attention while working out in the yard... wonderful!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 15, 2013
9:36 AM

Post #9450318

We are playing it very safe. My observations are that bees will avoid blooms that are toxic or adversely affect the taste of honey. The trick is to make certain there is something blooming they especially like at the same time the less desirable plant is in bloom. My wife gave up her 'Pride of Augusta', but there is still a wild form of Carolina jessamine growing in the nearby woods. We just make sure there are crocus and clover blooming for the bees at the same time the jessamine is blooming. There is a old beekeeping tale about how a village avoided conquest by the Roman legion by giving the soldiers honey to eat that came from bees that had fed almost exclusively on oleander. The soldiers all became violently ill and the legion withdrew. But, the bees consumed the oleander because it was a seaside village and there simply wasn't anything else for the honeybees to forage on at that time of year. My wife developed her fascination with fragrant oleanders while living in Galveston so I gather oleanders can thrive in seaside conditions. They aren't particularly fragrant, but sunflowers are a good way to keep bees from taking any interest in oleander or any of the other toxic blooms of high summer. Fragrant perennials in bloom at that time would probably include many fragrant Mediterranean herbs and catnip.
If your neighbor's oleander still worries you, you can try the method we've used with my wife. Offer her a replacement plant. We bribed my DW with fragrant and tea camellias. lol.
Here's a link to a list of good bee plants that has links to other list, including one that focuses on ornamental gardens, if I'm remembering things right.
http://themelissagarden.com/plants.html
If you do a search on "bee plants" combined with your state name or broader geographical area you can probably find list that are more exact. I've actually seen jessamine on one online list of recommended bee forage plant list for the deep south. My opinion is that if a bloom is poisonous to people directly, it is a bloom I would rather the honeybees stay away from and I've heard of one case of a child dying because she mistook jessamine for honeysuckle and drank the nectar.
The list of fragrant plants that adversely affect bees and make bad honey are relatively small. In fact, some of the most sought after honeys come from very fragrant plants. Keeping bees has changed the choices, but I think it has actually expanded our palette of fragrances in the garden. (Jim)

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

March 15, 2013
11:06 PM

Post #9450963

Thanks for all the information. I have so many poisonous plants in my yard as I have deer. I'll have to really take a look at what could be a problem. There are lots of plants that bloom pretty nonstop here in California. It shouldn't be too hard to keep a good supply of pollen plants blooming for the bees.
ytnpham
Cut and Shoot, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 1, 2013
8:10 PM

Post #9469294

Has anyone ever grown flor de loroco? It's a vine that bloom all summer in my zone. I've had mine for 3 years and it's sprouting new growth right now. When it bloom it scent the whole yard. I plant it next to my porch so I can breathe its fragrance while relaxing after work. I would pick some of the flowers and laid them on my night stand at night. The scent is sweet and heavenly and intoxicating. It will died back but is root hardy. Just cover it with mulch in winter. I can't wait for mine to bloom again. It loves the heat and thank goodness we have plenty of that here. I highly recomend this wonderful vine for anyone wanting something different, totally pest free, very fragrant and bloom all summer.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 1, 2013
9:55 PM

Post #9469360

yt - I would love to read about this vine but google is not being helpful... Does it go by another name or can you share a link re this vine please? I'm drooling here while reading your description.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 2, 2013
1:45 AM

Post #9469400

I'm not yt, but here is more info... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fernaldia_pandurata

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

April 2, 2013
2:34 AM

Post #9469407

I absolutely LOVE the intoxicating scent of lilac - which, sadly, will not grow and bloom at all well in my area. Very, very sad.

Probably the most fragrant plant in my garden is confederate jasmine: Trachelospermum jasminoides
It thrives on the privacy fence in my backyard. The aroma is so strong as to be clearly 'heard' on the far side of the garden and even out in the street in front of my house. Numerous people walking by on the sidewalk have stopped to inquire about the source of that heavenly aroma. They always want to tie it to one of the many flowers in the frontyard and are always shocked to learn that such a strong fragrance is actually emanating from the backyard.

Other highly fragrant flowers in my yard include:

tea olive (shrubs) - blooms almost year round, although blooms seem more fragrant at certain times
Magnolia virginiana
some lilies
privet shrubs - Pretty sure this is Ligustrum japonica. They were here when I bought the place and are very common in this area
certain roses - such as Double Delight & Mr Lincoln


That's all I can think of at the moment, although I have the strong sense that I may be forgetting something. I'll post again if I think of something else.
ytnpham
Cut and Shoot, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 2, 2013
7:45 PM

Post #9470283

Thanks for your help, Cville Gardner. A friend of mine whose grandmother's from El Salvador and she brought the flowers here on a visit, said she use them to make a dish like back home. I was at a nursery near my area that specializes in exotic and a wonderful scent lead me to the plant. I bought it and fell in love with it ever since. I took some cuttings last year and they rooted quite easily. Anyone who comes to my yard during bloom time always beg for a cuttings and usually come away with one, plus chicken eggs and whatever's ready from the garden. :)

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 3, 2013
1:54 AM

Post #9470398

You're welcome. I wish I could grow it in my climate zone. :/ I have visited El Salvador and had pupusas made from the flour. Very versatile plant!

Where did the name Cut and Shoot come from? :)
ytnpham
Cut and Shoot, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 3, 2013
5:23 PM

Post #9471129

Only a Texan would gave a place such a name. I think it was named after a land dispute and cutting and shooting was involved! I don't know, only guessing. I actually live & work in Conroe. My older sister live in your zone, NE Arkansas, she got a plant from me and it's thriving in her greenhouse. She work from home so when it bloom she would work from her greenhouse so she can enjoy its scent.
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 3, 2013
5:46 PM

Post #9471145

Without a doubt, mine is Brunfelsia - it is a huge shrub in my yard and perfumes the whole block!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 3, 2013
6:22 PM

Post #9471182

KayJones ~ I agree on the Brunfelsia. The fragrance is wonderful. The sad thing is mine has a short bloom time.

Does yours bloom throughout the summer? I have two different cultivars, one is blooming right now. The other blooms later in spring.
ytnpham
Cut and Shoot, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 3, 2013
7:35 PM

Post #9471261

Don't forget old fashioned sweet peas, they're blooming right now on my tomatoes trellises. I planted those back in November. The smell of sweet peas is one of life's many simple joy. Definitely some of my favorites.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

April 3, 2013
11:31 PM

Post #9471354

I forgot to add wisteria to my list. Some 8yrs or so ago I started training a wisteria 'tree' (forcing it to grow as a short tree rather than a vine). It's in full bloom now, and the sweet aroma was heavy when I walked outside today. There are sections of our highways, including one interstate, that are lined with wisteria vines. They are not good for the trees upon which they grow, but the blooms are gorgeous. It's as though the highways are lined with lavender wallpaper, and the intense aroma even permeates our cars as we drive by.

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

April 4, 2013
7:09 AM

Post #9471591

About 30 years ago, I used to have a shirt-tail relative that grew Citrus in Texas. I ended up with a quart of strong Orange Blossom honey that wasn't salable - and no-one else wanted it, & it finally gotted passed on to me. It was a very dark honey and the Orange Blossom smell & taste were too strong for most uses - but I managed to use it all up by thinking of things that would usually use orange extract.

After that, I lived in Italy for a while. Sometimes the smell of Orange Blossoms at night in June was too much. Before that, I never realized that even good smells can be over-whelming.

Usually fragrant flowers are insect pollinated & don't have too much airborn pollen - Wisteria should be that way. But when I lived in Charleston where Wisteria ran wild, something was in bloom at the same time as the Wisteria that really bothered my allergies.
sparklinBarb
Burnt Chimney, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 4, 2013
7:44 AM

Post #9471620

When we moved into our new home some years ago, late in the summer, about the time the sun was going down and the night critters started waking, I started catching this wonderful scent. It always brings memories back of Mom taking us up The Mountain (part of the East River Mountain above Bluefield, Virginia). There she would be, bravely telling the four of us little ones to stomp as hard as we could so the snakes that so terrified her would think it was thundering & stay away, and we would track down the elusive wild grapes for Mom to make her wild grape jelly. The heady scent of those grapes was wonderful! Well, I searched and searched, and finally I discovered the source of that elusive, memory-stirring scent ... the Kudzu! I wouldn't trade that scent for anything in China, just for the warmth it stirs in my heart alone!

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

April 4, 2013
9:40 AM

Post #9471745

Oh, I love the heady aroma of wisteria, pollengarden!

To me it is a most 'lovely' smell, never too strong. None of the fragrant flowers I listed as being in my garden are so strong as to be unpleasant, although I know what you are talking about as I've experienced that sort of thing with perfume, usually when the wearer has gone quite overboard. I would say the wisteria scent is 2nd to the jasmine in intensity, and even the jasmine is not too strong to be enjoyable.

The jasmine is growing on my backyard privacy fence, on both sides of the fence so that 1/2 of it is on the neighbor's side. Whereas I actually find a bit of wild overgrown charming, they seem more the types to enjoy more precise and manicured plantings. Thus one day I went out there with my hedge trimmer intending to sheer the jasmine from the neighbor's side of the fence. The husband, who was outside at the time, saw me and came rushing over to tell me how much he and his wife enjoy the blooms and to ask me not to cut it back. I left it growing on both sides of the fence ever sense. It gets the most compliments of any of my garden aromas.

Although it's true that many people in Charleston grow lemon and lime trees, and I've even seen the occasional small orange tree here, I've never actually had the opportunity to smell orange blossoms. They sound fabulous, but I can understand how even a good thing can be too much in some cases. As to your allergies, I think the tree pollen is fairly dominant right now (at the time of the wisteria). I was surprised to learn that even something as ubiquitous as oak is a major allergen which adversely effects millions.
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 4, 2013
10:34 AM

Post #9471797

Lilacs is one fragrance I miss - can't grow them in Florida, but had several in the yard in Missouri - YUM!

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 4, 2013
8:46 PM

Post #9472309

Oh how I wished I could keep Brunfelsia alive. Kevin gave me a couple when Becky and I were able to visit with him while road tripping to FL years ago. When they bloomed - I remember thinking surely heaven smells like this. But they didn't make it. I'm half considering giving it another shot...and attempting to plant it in the ground a couple of feet in front of my house. Between the brick and the south facing - I've managed to keep other things alive that weren't really hardy here.

If anyone knows where I could purchase that flor de loroco at and a good source for a decent sized Brunfelsia please let me know. ^_^
ytnpham
Cut and Shoot, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 5, 2013
7:32 PM

Post #9473210

Chantell, I got my flor de loroco at J.R.N 's nursery in Houston. They don't have a website. You should see this place, every tropical edible imagined, lots of orchids, exotics and bonsai. I don't know if they ship either. I just gave away my last cuttings and will make more this summer. I would be more than happy to send you one if you like. Just D mail me to set up or however. I'm new at DG so I not sure how the process work. I'm just thrilled that you want to try this plant.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2013
10:50 AM

Post #9473707

Chantell, if you get a cutting from ytnpham, and it grows for you, I'd love a cutting of yours!!!
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 6, 2013
4:06 PM

Post #9473982

What is ytnpham?

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2013
9:09 PM

Post #9474243

Kay - that's a DGer's name - see post 2 up from your's
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2013
4:18 AM

Post #9474360

Well, DUH on me!

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2013
9:28 AM

Post #9474657

OH puhlez...you've seen MY posts over the years...I'm the queen of duh...seriously
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2013
10:12 AM

Post #9474698

LOL I'm 'blonde', ya know! (ya, right!!!).

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2013
10:07 PM

Post #9548071

I have lots of fragrant flowers, but nothing beats the colony of common milkweed I let grow in my garden. It blooms in the summer, and if you deadhead, will rebloom. I control the population by pulling them outside of the clump I allow.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2013
2:26 AM

Post #9548149

I do the same. Love it! And it's a butterfly magnet for sure.

Thumbnail by Cville_Gardener   Thumbnail by Cville_Gardener   Thumbnail by Cville_Gardener      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2013
6:14 AM

Post #9548290

What is the best fragrant cultivar of milkweed for a garden?

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2013
6:44 AM

Post #9548327

The common milkweed pictured above, Asclepias syriaca, is one I grow and know to be nicely fragrant. It can be a bit of a thug unless you keep it pulled but I don't find it difficult to pull. Asclepias speciosa is fragrant as well. Many of the others have no fragrance at all. I grow A. curassavica for the Monarch butterfly cats to eat and it has no fragrance. It's lovely and colorful in bloom though.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2013
11:11 AM

Post #9548640

Do they handle drought ok? Do they need a lot of care? I'm thinking of adding them to my "awful front hill", which is a steep hill, mostly sunny, with fairly poor soil -- and I don't plan to water it much.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2013
1:02 PM

Post #9548726

Milkweed is drought tolerant and doesn't need any additional watering unless there is a prolonged severe drought. Like most things, new plants benefit from a weekly watering until well established. The plant has a long taproot. It may start small but will grow to 6 ft. and expand. Flowers do not always appear the first season but should the second season.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2013
1:28 PM

Post #9548760

Thanks, Cville -- sounds as if it might fit in just fine.

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 6, 2013
5:58 PM

Post #9549118

Yes! The common milkweed is wonderfully fragrant, and monarchs visit all summer. I keep mine in the border in tight clumps, and pull anything growing outside. Some call it a thug, I call it a wonderfully fragrant freebie!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2013
6:07 PM

Post #9549133

Ok, so Asclepias syriaca it almost is. Here are my last questions -- is it drought tolerant? will deer eat it? is it long-lived? I hope the answers are yes no and yes...

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 6, 2013
9:05 PM

Post #9549402

Yes to all except the deer. They will not eat it. It increases every year. Deadhead if you do not want seed. Or collect the seed and spread it around in the wild. The bees and butterflies will thank you. I have a lot of the milkweeds, and the common is still a favorite . It can stand very dry conditions, as it does in the wild.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2013
10:57 PM

Post #9549469

I haven't found it prone to be eaten by deer but we don't have a large deer population to contend with. I suppose it depends somewhat on your growing conditions how much it takes off. We have a long warm growing season here and it does multiply very easily. Thug isn't necessarily a bad thing. It can be an affectionate term but it's generally understood by most gardeners. :)
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2013
8:01 AM

Post #9549807

Lavender4ever: Thanks for the assessment -- that's good to know.

Cville: I don't mind plants that are reasonably aggressive, and in fact I am looking for that for my awful front hill (quite sunny, steep, rocky) -- but I don't like plants that self-seed wildly, or that "run." And I especially don't like Aegepodium (bishop's weed) which does both. On my awful front hill, I hope to get it so I only have to tend to plants on it once or twice a year, so anything that runs rampant will not do.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2013
8:22 AM

Post #9549836

I understand. There is some info here about A. syriaca in MD.

http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Habitat/WildAcres/habichat37.asp

Sequoiadendron4

Sequoiadendron4
Lititz, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 7, 2013
8:43 AM

Post #9549849

I would say my hamamelis virginiana is the most fragrant thing in our gardens. It's also one of our first blooming and one of our most beautiful :)
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2013
10:34 AM

Post #9549955

Thanks, Sequoioadendron - - I've added it to my list. I really want to plant every fragrant native shrub I can get my hands on! Can you confirm you mean "virginiana" though? Apparently it blooms late fall, October - November); at least according to Lazy S, http://www.lazyssfarm.com/Plants/Shrubs/Cl-It%20Shrubs/shrubs_trees_F-It.htm#SHRU13690 , while Hamamelis vernalis blooms in the early early spring (January - April) ("Hamamelis vernalis Ozark Witch Hazel Ozark Witch Hazel is a winter-blooming deciduous Missouri Native with a rounded habit and noted for it's extremely early and 4 week long bloom period. Fragrant, round flower clusters to 3/4" wide have yellow petals and reddish inner calyxes producing a rusty orange effect. 2-5" long green leaves turn beautiful golden yellow in Fall. Royal Horticulture Society award of Garden Merit.")

Sequoiadendron4

Sequoiadendron4
Lititz, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 7, 2013
10:40 AM

Post #9549965

Yeah it blooms so early that it blooms in fall...haha j/k ;P

Seriously though I put the wrong plant. The actual plant I have is Hamamelis x intermedia 'Arnold Promise'

Sorry about that :)
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 7, 2013
10:58 AM

Post #9549980

Please don't forget Caryopteris "Dark Knight" (bluebeard) - it will multiply freely. The fragrance is picked up on the wind and is so sweet and spicy. If the shrub looks tired you can cut it way back and it will spring back. Very attractive.

Sequoiadendron4

Sequoiadendron4
Lititz, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 7, 2013
11:04 AM

Post #9549985

Hmm...I don't remember my Dark Knight being very fragrant. I guess I'll have to sniff it again later in the season.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 7, 2013
12:14 PM

Post #9550042

As I am gardening --- it wafts over. Took me a while to identify the source. Not floral at all -- spicey. Brush it. And it is stronger. Not to be confused with black knight.

Sequoiadendron4

Sequoiadendron4
Lititz, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 7, 2013
12:23 PM

Post #9550049

Alright, I'll have to keep that in mind. Mine is sure coming up real nice.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 7, 2013
2:10 PM

Post #9550166

Needs to be in flower for fragrance. That blue is piercing isn't it!!

Sequoiadendron4

Sequoiadendron4
Lititz, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 7, 2013
6:51 PM

Post #9550478

Sure is especially for that time of year.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

June 8, 2013
2:07 AM

Post #9550679

I was thinking the same thing RE my Dark Knight. Haven't noticed the scent, but then my sense of smell is not the most accute.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 8, 2013
8:11 AM

Post #9550976

It took me a while to isolate the origin of the fragrance. It is like a Christmas tree- can seem like no odor and then a stong waft of wow!

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

June 8, 2013
9:25 AM

Post #9551026

Mmmm. I like the smell of Christmas trees. I'll have to pay more attention next time mine blooms.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 8, 2013
10:02 AM

Post #9551059

Thanks to everyone for the milkweed info. I might have the wrong kind on my "want" list.
I think I know what you mean, Missingrosie. I wasn't impressed with the aroma value of prostrate rosemary. I had almost forgotten about it. Now, suddenly, it is scenting the whole front garden. The result of several days of rain after a dry spell, perhaps? I do notice the rosemary most when watering or after a rain.

Sequoiadendron4

Sequoiadendron4
Lititz, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 8, 2013
4:28 PM

Post #9551388

Our Sweetbay Magnolia just bloomed for the first time today and not only is it beautiful but the fragrance is amazing!

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 8, 2013
8:30 PM

Post #9551607

Oh y'all are killing me. Devon - if you're finding any of these fragrants - please let me know where!! I would agree that all Rosemarys are not created equal as to scent. Mine was a NOID from Walmart yearS ago...planted right beside my stairs...love when I brush against it!! Not sure all family member have the same appreciation of navigating the stairs between the Rosemary and Gardenia...LOL

Speaking of fragrant shrubs - don't forget the Japanese Clerodendrum aka Peanut Butter shrub - the flutterflies LOVE it...it blooms from July till late September here in 7A. Wonderful lily-like evening scented blooms. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/772/ How's yours doing, Devon?

This message was edited Jun 8, 2013 10:48 PM
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

June 9, 2013
2:36 AM

Post #9551731

Chantell: My peanut butter shrub (for which thank you very much!) is still in its pot. I might get it into the ground tomorrow. I've been working 24/7 on my awful front hill, which sadly is not fragrant at all. Just one large ugly nightmare. Chantell, you're my source for all things fragrant, but if I find anything you don't already have, you'll be the first to know!

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

June 9, 2013
4:38 AM

Post #9551790

Sequoiadendron4,

I can definitely 2nd that on the SweetBay Magnolia (Magnolia virginiana). It has a most heavenly aroma which reaches all over the garden. I have one in my front yard and love it, both the flowers and the scent. This tree grows wild in the forests here, so I'm guessing it might be a native. Excellent choice!
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 9, 2013
5:56 AM

Post #9551840

I have read about the peanut B shrub. It sounds devine but I am afraid of it popping up many feet away in many places. Can it be grown forever in a pot? And if yes, does it grow so fast the pot needs change frequently? I lost a huge daphne this year - just up and died after many years. The heartbreak of daphne strilkes --- but how sweet beautiful it was for many years. If i could put the PB plant where the daphne was planted, would be great.

Sequoiadendron4

Sequoiadendron4
Lititz, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 9, 2013
6:49 AM

Post #9551887

DOS: I read that it was evergreen in the south and can grow huge. Up here our leaves turn yellow and drop. I also think its smaller up here, only about 25 feet or so. At least I hope so or it will get too big for its location :)
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 9, 2013
7:29 AM

Post #9551930

Sequoia- in the south the leaves turn yellow and drop too. I have a big pile that I picked up yesterday. Magnolias are very messy. - the size and the mess is why many don't plant -- but oh those creamy huge fragrant blossoms ... Are you saying you totally lose the leaves to bare limbs?

Sequoiadendron4

Sequoiadendron4
Lititz, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 9, 2013
10:39 AM

Post #9552198

Yeah but maybe it was because it was its first year.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 9, 2013
11:56 AM

Post #9552309

I will check it out curious because told my daughter to check it out. She lives in NE.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

June 9, 2013
12:08 PM

Post #9552324

It depends on which magnolia you have - and probably where you live in the south. Here it is almost certainly much warmer (and less cold in winter) than in NC, even though both may be considered the south. Here fall is just spring with fewer flowers. (I have flowers blooming in my yard all year round.) Winter here is the last 2wks of Jan and the 1st 2wks of Feb. During that time we may make it down to 28F maybe 3 to 5 times in the overnight hours. Most of the time we still get back up to the 60s or 70s the following day. Daffodils start blooming here no later than the 1st week of Feb, and other flowers are quick to follow. We typically only get a light dusting of snow once every 10yrs or so. Winters here are so mild that I have a split-leaf philodendron, usually considered a houseplant except in Florida, growing in a large tub in front of my garage where it has lived year round now for 12yrs.

As to magnolias. I have a SweetBay magnolia (M. virginiana) on one side of my front yard and a Southern Magnolia (M. grandiflora) on the other. The Southern Magnolia is the one with the large, white flowers and leaves which are so dark green as to be almost black. The leaves are glossy, dark green on top and cinnamon colored on the bottom. The Southern Magnolia grows very large, and is often seen with large sprawling limbs that dip down close to the ground. The Southern Magnolia IS evergreen here. Its glossy dark green leaves remain intact year round. Thus it does not make a mess on the lawn, and there are no leaves to rake. On rare occasion a single leaf may be found on the lawn, but it does not shed its leaves in fall like most other trees do. Since I hate raking, this is one of my favorite trees in my yard as it requires virtually no care.

The SweetBay Magnolia (M. virginiana) in my yard is relatively small and slow growing. I have seen many SweetBay Magnolias growing wild in the forests around here, and they have always been relatively small trees. Mine is about 20yrs old and is maybe 15ft tall. My SweetBay Magnolia does shed its leaves, all of them, in fall. In that respect, it is a messy tree, and what's worse most of its leaves end up in my neighbor's yard, so some years I end up raking his yard, too. Despite our very mild winters, despite the fact that I usually still have the AC running on New Years Day, my SweetBay Magnolia spends winter as a statuesque but leafless structure of barren twigs, even as the stately Southern Magnolia wears a full cloak of healthy, green, and glossy leaves just a mere house-width away.

So, yes, to M. grandiflora being evergreen here. No, to M. virginiana which looses its leaves in fall even here - or, at least mine does. (I've never actually paid attention to the wild ones and thus cannot say for sure whether they loose their leaves.) I've scratched my head over this, and read a number of rather confusing comments from others regarding whether or not M. virginiana looses its leaves in fall. Some who live in colder areas say, no, while others say, yes. Some say the leaves turn brown but stay on the tree - mine very definitely fall off, and I think I prefer it that way. There seems to be no rhyme or reason as to where the respondents live vs whether or not their M. virginiana looses its leaves. I've decided this probably depends on the cultivar as well as where it is located. There are now quite a number of named cultivars of this species, and my guess is that some of these vary in terms of whether they retain or drop their leaves in fall in warmer climates.

Below, I've attached a few pics from my SweetBay Magnolia (M. virginiana).

In my next post, I will attache pics of my Southern Magnolia (M. grandiflora) for comparison. These are not the best pics, just some that happen to be on my laptop right now - and easily located. I could not locate a pic of the whole tree to show shape.

Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring   Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring   Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring   Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring   
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DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

June 9, 2013
12:26 PM

Post #9552354

Here is my Southern Magnolia (M grandiflora). This tree never sheds its leaves, at least not here. (A godsend for the lazy homeowner such as myself who hates to rake leaves.) Note how much darker and glossier the leaves are vs the one above. Note, too the cinnamon colored undersides of the leaves of this one, a characteristic not seen on the SweetBay. Also note that the flowers of this one are much larger, at least 2x the size of the SweetBay blooms. All that said, the SweetBay blooms have a stronger and more intoxicating fragrance.

These photos do not do the tree justice. Its leaves are much more glossy than they appear here. A neighbor took it upon herself to remove (steal) the lower limbs of this one, so I have to do my best to aim up high over my head to take pics of it, and most of the time it's backlit due to its location.

Bottom line here, I agree as to the strong scent of SweetBay Magnolia. As to whether it looses its leaves, I suspect that depends on the cultivar and where you live. I'm showing the Southern Magnolia here for comparison. It also has a very nice scent, although not as strong as the SweetBay; however, this one does not loose its leaves in my area.

The 1st 2 pics show the blooms. Note how big they are compared to the leaves.
The 3rd pic shows the rust or cinnamon colored undersides of the leaves.
The 4th pic was added to show that leaves on new growth are much lighter than the normally dk green color. Also shows early bud stage.
The last pic is the only one I could find of the trunk and part of the canopy. Note the trunk of this one is darker vs the silvery, light grey of the SweetBay. (The lighter green on the far right is another, closer tree overlapping this one, not a magnolia.)

Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring   Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring   Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring   Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring   Thumbnail by DreamOfSpring
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DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

June 9, 2013
12:45 PM

Post #9552384

I brought the Southern Magnolia into the conversation, because I'm wondering if some of the info may have become confused between the two. The Southern Magnolia does grow very, very large here, but I have never seen a large SweetBay Magnolia here. My SweetBay does loose its leaves here, but the Southern Magnolia does not. Although the SweetBay bloom is less than 1/2 the size of the that of the Southern Magnolia, the two blooms look quite similar. They have similar fragrance, but the SweetBay has the strongest fragrance.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 9, 2013
1:34 PM

Post #9552437

Thanks! Clarity! Southern - that's the heavenly devil I deal with. The leaves so thick that they ' clack' when raked.

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

June 9, 2013
1:53 PM

Post #9552463

missingrosie,

I had a feeling these two might be getting mixed in our conversations. Your "leaves so thick they 'clack' when raked" is a perfect characterization of the Southern Magnolia (M. grandiflora), and I think your comment answers a question I was dying to ask: whether the Southern Magnolia retains its leaves there in NC. From your comment, I gather it does not. Ouch. I can only imagine what a huge mess all those stiff leaves would make. Thanks for the info. I was just so curious about that. SweetBay leaves are fairly thin and almost floppy, btw.

BTW, I did some more investigating on my hunch that some of the named cultivars of the SweetBay Magnolia might actually retain their leaves. I found at least two such cultivars that are said to remain green and retain their leaves year round even as far north as Delaware and PA. They are cultivars 'Henry Hicks' and 'Perry Paige'.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 9, 2013
2:42 PM

Post #9552550

We lose perhaps 25 % of leaves. Right at the time of bloom tho! So we have yellow leaves and blooms at once - not the best combo. When it is good it is good but when it is bad it is awful! The flowers are 8 inches or more across. I trimmed ours up so a tree with a trunk. I saw one with the entire top cut off ( I know...I know... But the horizontal branching turned it into an umbrella shape and the property owner hung multicolor bird houses from the branches. It looked so good and I thought ---- cuts down on those leaves too. I am catholic --- I may have to go to confession If I did that to our huge magnolia. Do you think it would kill it???

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

June 9, 2013
4:43 PM

Post #9552648

Right now...my most fragrant blooms...Patch of Iris g. 3-4ft wide and 125ft long (pix 1)... Yummy!!!!
Pix 2 is Dictamnous purpureas
Pix 3 is Hesperis matronalis 10-15ft wide by 35-40ft long...very fragrant!!!!
Pix 4 is More Iris g.

Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy   Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy   Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy   Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy   
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Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 9, 2013
9:54 PM

Post #9553003

Missingrosie - re the PB shrub - IMHO it gets too big for a pot...and I'm not sure if you kept it pruned how much blooming it would do for you. :-( Sorry, wish I could be more help...mine's been in the ground since I rec'd it
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

June 10, 2013
4:25 AM

Post #9553134

Thanks Chantell. I think I may try it anyway. Edge of the woods and far from currently cultivated areas -- if it doesn't need full sun. I don't have one foot in the grave and the other on a banana peel (grin) but no spring chicken either --- so I don't think in my lifetime I will have to deal with digging up unwanted offspring. And no neighbors on that end. So -- if it isn't on invasive lists here in NC - I will give it a go and visit it every now and again to take a whiff!

This message was edited Jun 10, 2013 10:40 PM

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2013
7:23 PM

Post #9554286

My milkweed colony, with buds.

Thumbnail by lavender4ever
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sparklinBarb
Burnt Chimney, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 12, 2013
7:29 AM

Post #9556169

C'ville Gardener, I've been away a while, but I've a question (going back to milkweed a moment, if you don't mind). You said: The common milkweed pictured above, Asclepias syriaca, is one I grow and know to be nicely fragrant. It can be a bit of a thug unless you keep it pulled but I don't find it difficult to pull.
Forgive my ignorance, but by pulling, do you mean getting up volunteers, please? Thanks so much!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 8, 2013
6:28 PM

Post #9592240

My July favorite. The scent of 4-o-clocks is somewhere between honeysuckles and jonquils to me. The Deep Sea Crinum are wonderful now, but their blooming is the result of cooler than normal temps. This is the first year I've known them to bloom in July. Their usual bloom time in this area is May and again in late October. 4-o-clocks are always around this time of year.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

July 8, 2013
8:39 PM

Post #9592415

Some of my favorites: this weeks bloom;
1) Dianthus
Left) D. X Loveliness, 12-18"
Right) D. grationopolitanus Ceddar Pinks 6-10"
2) Penstemon palmerii, the only fragrant penstemon 48"
3) Valariana officinalis 48"
YUMMMMMMM, these fill the air with such sweet fragrances!!

This message was edited Jul 8, 2013 8:42 PM

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 9, 2013
6:36 AM

Post #9592673

It's a tossup.

Rose Jude the Obscure

Rose The Ingenious Mr. Fairchild

And Rose Jacquelyn DuPre

Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack      
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lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

August 5, 2013
6:11 AM

Post #9621865

Barb, yes pull volunteers of milkweed if it grows anywhere you do not want it. It sends out underground runners. It pulls very easily and in my garden, this is not such a chore.
I have oriental lily blooming that is scenting the entire garden.

Thumbnail by lavender4ever
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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2013
2:21 PM

Post #9622338

Lovely picture lavender - it looks like Casa Blanca!

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

August 5, 2013
5:25 PM

Post #9622508

I bought it in a mix, but I think it is casa Blanca too. Very strong scent!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 10, 2013
9:07 PM

Post #9627140

Casa Blanca is one of the best!

At this time, the hybrid tea 'Falling in Love' is most fragrant. The scent is classic rose with just a touch of fruitiness.

Thumbnail by Amargia
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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2013
3:39 AM

Post #9627215

What a beautiful rose!
cactusman8
San Marcos, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 19, 2014
11:30 AM

Post #9897662

Not now planted in our garden, but I have to mention the tuberose (polianthes tuberosa) that I recall from my grandmother's flowerbeds.Probably my favorite, even now. I also appreciate the smell of the Texas mountain laurel (Sophora secundiflora) which grows wild in our area. The scent of the flowers reminds me of grape candy. The flowers and seeds are poisonous, however.

This message was edited Jul 19, 2014 1:04 PM
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 19, 2014
1:46 PM

Post #9897783

Right now it's the Oriental Lily 'Sorbonne'. I had the fun of buying six at a greatly reduced cost, and I bring one into the house every few days. They stay in bloom a long time both outside and in because the petals have nice substance. Not overpowering, as some Orientals can be. Sweet and refreshing at the same time.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack         
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brendak654

brendak654
Anna, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 19, 2014
7:05 PM

Post #9898032

[quote="cactusman8"]Not now planted in our garden, but I have to mention the tuberose (polianthes tuberosa) that I recall from my grandmother's flowerbeds.Probably my favorite, even now. I also appreciate the smell of the Texas mountain laurel (Sophora secundiflora) which grows wild in our area. The scent of the flowers reminds me of grape candy. The flowers and seeds are poisonous, however.

This message was edited Jul 19, 2014 1:04 PM[/quote]

YES! The tuberose. Ah! I have a row in the garden each year and I can expect them to be blooming in early August in zone 6. At 7 in the evening, their fragrance permeates the air. Heaven scent! Come October I will mow them off and lift their bulbs and dry and store for winter in anticipation of replanting come spring.

Today I watched a segment on Gibb's Gardens in GA. The owner talked about the Paper Bush being one of his favorites. I looked it up and I think it was for zones 7-10. That leaves me out. Sounded wonderful!
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 19, 2014
7:46 PM

Post #9898061


Look for winter's gold or snow cream. -- I think you can grow it in protected site

The fragrance is heavenly (matched in my opinion by daphne) deer don't touch either. Daphne and this do not like wet feet - don't mind moisture but no sitting in it. I can keep cut edgeworthia ( paper bush ) in house for several weeks and the fragrance is wonderful.

From Louis the plant Geek:

The fragrant flowers of Edgeworthia demand nose-to-blossom appreciation. Judging by the shrub's likely ultimate size in your climate—see "Size" above—site close enough so some of the mature stem tips will be right at hand to a visitor standing on an adjacent pathway or patch of lawn, and yet not extend so far, or so numerously, that the shrub will become an obstruction. Edgeworthia doesn't lend itself to much pruning, especially that which is only needed because the shrub was planted too close to the edge of its bed. Instead, plant to have perfect close-range viewing when the shrub is five to ten years old; in the meanwhile, provide any needed access into the bed by laying a few stepping stones. Remove them as the shrub increases its outward reach.

Siting to enhance hardiness must trump all else if you're experimenting with establishing Edgeworthia in climates colder than Zone 7. Ideally, the best location for hardiness would also be the best for easy enjoyment of the flowers. Is there a sheltered location that is also convenient (enough) to a walkway or a doorway to the house? When in doubt, go for the location that can provide the most hardiness enhancers listed, below, in "How to handle it: Another option—or two!"

When hardiness isn't a problem (sigh), Edgeworthia can be sited prominently regardless of its exposure. What could be better, year-round, than a mature shrub at the center of a courtyard? A whole group of them at the center of an even larger courtyard.
Culture
Sun to part shade in rich moisture-retentive soil with good drainage. More sun is best when growing in climates at the cold end of the hardiness range; more shade is best in milder climates, especially if they are also hot.
How to handle it: The Basics
Plant in Spring, ensuring enough water to enable the shrub to establish. Edgeworthia normally doesn't need formative or maintenance pruning (apart from cutting off any Winter-killed tips); let the shrub grow on its own. Established shrubs are self-reliant except during the most extended drought, or if planted in soil that isn't sufficiently moisture-retentive.
How to handle it: Another option—or two?
The unusual flowers, long period of bloom at the very beginning of the new season, and the bloom's fragrance all make Edgeworthia irresistible, and therefore a tempting experiment for gardeners in climates colder than Zone 7b. Maximize your chances for successful establishment by implementing as many as possible of the following steps.

1. Don't attempt to establish small-size shrubs. If necessary, grow in a container for a year, or for years, until the shrub is several feet tall.

2. Plant in humus-rich soil that is on a slope, no matter how small; if there's no other option, create the slope by planting at the crest of a small mound. As usual, good drainage enhances Winter hardiness. It's fine for surface water to be present during and after heavy rains, as long as the water isn't hanging around. Water that's moving through is fine even if, for a while, there's a lot of it.

3. Plant in full sun, so that new growth is most likely to be maximally hardened by the time severe weather arrives in Winter.

4. Site with all possible shelter at the East and the North, to reduce the severity of wind that, typically, is colder than that from the South or West. Does your house have a South- or West-facing alcove? Is there a fence that extends from the North corner of a West-facing wall?

5. Site with low evergreen shrubs across the front of the Edgeworthia, so that sweeping winds that approach frontally don't have full access to the base of the shrub.

6. After the foliage has been shed for the Winter, mound around the base of the shrub with several inches of gravel or sand; because shrubs begin flowering even when small, you'll want to leave the tips of the stems exposed. Using gravel or sand as an overwintering mulch ensures that there is less moisture around the base of the plant than there would be if a mulch of bark or leaves were used. Remove this mulch in earliest Spring, while blooming is still in process and new leaves haven't yet emerged.

7. Place evergreen boughs atop the gravel or sand mound; if possible, mound them up nearly to the tips of the bud-laden Edgeworthia branches. Poke them through one another, as well as through the Edgeworthia branches, to help anchor them. The boughs will buffer wind, and hence reduce wind-chill, without impeding air-flow that will help keep the surface of the shrub's branches (and the mound around its base) from becoming waterlogged. Remove the branches in late Winter or early Spring, before new foliage emerges.

If the "luck" that was created, mostly, by hard work and careful planning in following steps 1 - 7 above, enables your Edgeworthia to establish, you can experiment in successive years with lessening the amount of protective mulch and boughs.

If a subsequent Winter is—surprise!—severe, and substantial die-back occurs, don't give up. Edgeworthia can resprout from very low. Wait until new growth appears before pruning Winter-killed tips.

If your shrub has become old enough to sucker, those can take over if the mother shrub is killed to the ground. (Edgeworthia is propagated by division or by cuttings, not by grafting.) If Winter is regularly severe enough to kill the tips of branches, this means that the flower-buds are killed, too. An Edgeworthia that hardly ever flowers is, perhaps, not worth all the effort.

brendak654

brendak654
Anna, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 20, 2014
10:43 AM

Post #9898442

Doubt that I have that protected of a site. But will give it some thought.

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