Could you survive another Great Depression? (Quiz)

Houston, United States(Zone 9b)

Good thread topic! I'm 64% likely and DH is making steady plans to up that percent. He's gotten some guns and ammo this year and started hunting again, a veg garden will be going in again next year (not new to the idea but we'd moved so starting over) and we are working on buying our food storage items.

I'm not real handy at cooking like Grandma (milling my own wheat into flour or making my own breads and pasta etc) but I'll be working on that to as a "just in case".

I really wish skills like that had not been lost but handed down. Or perhaps our parents didn't care to learn because life had become about convenience?

Anyhow he's my scoring: Even though you may not be expecting the worst, you're the type of person who prepares for the worst. You live a relatively modest life. You don't overspend, and you aren't very materialistic.

You are also quite self sufficient and independent. You have many useful skills.
You can take care of yourself and those you love... which is crucial to surviving another Great Depression.

(Laura) Olympia, WA(Zone 8a)

61% "Even though you may not be expecting the worst, you're the type of person who prepares for the worst.
You live a relatively modest life. You don't overspend, and you aren't very materialistic.

You are also quite self sufficient and independent. You have many useful skills.
You can take care of yourself and those you love... which is crucial to surviving another Great Depression. "

I mainly fall short on money. I also rent so I'm not able to grow much food because I have to grow a stupid lawn, but if I could I'd remove the grass and plant it in a second.

Leesburg, FL(Zone 9b)

I was 65%, and the wording was pretty much like Tir's.

If i lived in a warmer climate, I would have a nice big garden, which would be helpful.
DH would go pretty much into shock without the internet though. that is one thing it would be very hard to live without... TV yes, internet NO.

DH is very handy... can fix just about anything, has weapons and ammo
I'm more frugal than he is
and i'd do all the cooking, gardening, etc. Though if that was the only way to survive ... he'd be out there too.

(Laura) Olympia, WA(Zone 8a)

I could live without internet, just really wouldn't like it. We don't have cable now, I would prefer my 7 year old daughter didn't spend all day watching commercials, we do have a lot of DVDs, but that just helps because we could be entertained without spending money.

I can cook and more importantly I can cook things that are homemade, cheap, can be used for several meals and/or stretch ingredients; things like bread, polenta, roasts, soups, casseroles, etc…

We own a hand gun and would like to get a rifle and go hunting.

We can fix a lot of things and those we can’t I can either figure out from a book at the library or we don’t need to begin with.

I stock pile staples without thinking about it and could feed us for at least a month at any given time. We might not like or get tired of what I make, but we’d be fed.

Olympia, WA

80% here and would have been higher given the right choices .......I have NO mortgage anymore......and I don't spend 75% of my income each week.

Leesburg, FL(Zone 9b)

same here wanna .... had to go with the choices offered.

Sherrie In, NH(Zone 5a)

65% I think I could ruff it out. I have a big veggie garden and can. Everything I got is bought and paid for home/car etc. There is a huge farm down the street that has a bunch of chickens and cows. I have a sewing machine if push comes to shove.

Houston, United States(Zone 9b)

My biggest fear is living in a big city with neighbors on top of neighbors. We saw after Hurricane Katrina how folks act in crisis. :(

Part of our sustainability plan is moving to the country lol.

Houston, United States(Zone 9b)

As far as sewing, I can go years without buying clothes. I dress modern but I'm not particular interested in buying the latest fashions or name brands so I could go without buying any new clothes but the kids would need some larger things....

Leesburg, FL(Zone 9b)

Tir

DH and I have talked about selling everything and moving somewhere warmer in the country where we could be self sufficient. We could do that easily.

I too sow, and really do not need a lot of clothes... jsut enough for the seasons.

get a few goats, a nice garden, a 'stocked' pond with fish ... Dh and catch, kill and clean them.

so -- I do think it's possible to live that way.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

77% I definitely think we could rough it out. I would cry but I would turn flower beds into food beds in a snap. I'd be a little worried about being in a city but we have good neighbours. I like to think we would band together if the circumstances were really rough.

Sherrie In, NH(Zone 5a)

I am not a "Needy" person. I dont have the top clothing, car or house. I always look ahead and try to be prepared.

Keep warm and put that next meal on the table.

Brazoria, TX(Zone 9b)

73% here. Retired and live in the country away from any convenience store about 5 miles. Hard to go anywhere without driving. We grow a lot of our food and rely on my canning every year. We only have the basic satellite but could live without it. We hardly turn the heat on in the winter as it hardly ever gets cold enough, but the summers are hot and humid. The ac makes up for it in the summer as well as the watering garden and plants.

Olympia, WA

It IS comforting to take that long serious look at what one's minimal needs truly would be in the event of catastrophic changes. We HAVE become accustomed to our creature comforts, but if we had to do w/o some of them, we could adjust. I can't imagine life w/o my computer connection to the universe, but it actually is not crucial to my survival.

Mid-Michigan, MI(Zone 5b)

Could You Survive Another Great Depression?
You Are 80% Likely to Survive Another Great Depression
You have been saving for a rainy day... or a rainy few years.
While most people may not have as grim of an outlook as you, they're also not as prepared as you.

If society collapses, you'll have plenty of food and resources for you and your loved ones.
And plenty of ammo for anyone who wants to steal from your stockpile!


*I don't agree that I have a "grim outlook". I just like to be prepared.

Houston, United States(Zone 9b)

some call it a realist. :)

ah yes, that would be my DH's reason for ammo haha. he wants me to take a gun class to learn how to shoot as well but I've not so far.

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

You all have me beat...I'm only 52% likely to survive. I could improve my score by buying a gun and growing more of my own food, but unless I can get rid of having to pay my California sized mortgage on one income I don't think my odds will improve significantly :-(

Leesburg, FL(Zone 9b)

KsKatt -- that sounds like me DH. He's prepared for just about anything. Those wheels are always spinning.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7a)

67% for me. "Even though you may not be expecting the worst, you're
the type of person who prepares for the worst. You live a relatively modest life.
You don't overspend, and you aren't very materialistic."


I don't consider myself a person who even thinks about the worst though,
just someone who is practical without being fanatical about it. I don't deprive
myself of anything but am not materialistic or a compulsive shopper and
I do save regularly. My husband tends to stockpile everything from ammo
to food supplies, and I think that can get excessive.

We live in a urban area and while I can grow a few veggies in summer
the climate is not conducive to growing our own food. Our biggest plus is
that we have no debt at all. We only use one credit card and pay that
in full each month. The biggest negative is the cost of insurance —
health insurance, dental insurance, auto insurance, homeowners insurance.
Those costs keep going up and yet you can't afford not to have them.

And, of course, we were not prepared to see our investment portfolio
drop a whopping 50% recently. That is discouraging and makes us
wonder if we will ever be able to retire.

Houston, United States(Zone 9b)

June, I know what you mean on all those insurances! And the numbers show we pay more for those who continue to not have their own coverages.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7a)

Tir -- And all our premiums went up this year, despite the
fact that I had only one routine medical checkup, no
traffic incidents ever, and nary a claim ever on our house
insurance. When I add up all that I have paid over the
years "just in case something happens" it is truly an
astonishing amount.

Houston, United States(Zone 9b)

Same here June. :( We did without medical before kids. Easy enough to pay cash for it. I even paid cash for my first pregnancy, no insurance and no "assistance". Would you believe that it was a grand total just over 5 grand. And my second baby, ON INSURANCE where I pay 400 a month for our family of 3 THAT baby cost the same in all my deductibles as the first PLUS my monthly insurance charge PLUS the bills for it (what the insurance also paid) was triple my first.

Why you ask? Because with the first I was upfront with all parties that I was a cash patient. I had them all giving me a "cash discount" without even requesting one. My epidural and the doc who administered it said he charges $1000 but for a cash payment TODAY he'd do it for $500. I was prepared for all the charges I'd incur (thankfully it was a problem free pregnacy).

My second epidural the doc charges $1,500.

So if you have insurance they will automatically charge you more. Plus you pay a hefty price for that so-so coverage anyhow.

This and other insurances my DH says are the biggest scam.

Our home insurance agent covering us just "recommended" we never make a claim either. He said most places will drop you after you've made 3 claims period (no matter if you've switched carriers etc). And yet you hear folks say, oh that tree damaged your roof, file a claim. No thanks.

I'll use this crummy insurance (s) for those major catastrophe's. Jokes on me. :(

But I digress. Sorry folks!

Kure Beach, NC(Zone 9a)

I'm at 57%.
Even though you may not be expecting the worst, you're the type of person who prepares for the worst.
You live a relatively modest life. You don't overspend, and you aren't very materialistic.
You are also quite self sufficient and independent. You have many useful skills.
You can take care of yourself and those you love... which is crucial to surviving another Great Depression.

One thing that may have helped my %, is that I have no rent or mortgage. We own our house outright.
Since we live in hurricane country, I know what it's like to not have electricity (sucks, but not the end of the world).
Now if I could just find a real job with benefits...
Barb

Reno, NV

I was at 65%. I think that's a reflection of where I am now tho, not what I could do if I had to. My folks were often broke when I was little and we made do. If it ever came down to survival I'd get over not wanting to hunt and those ca quial in our yard would be dinner. Lol.

I agree that there seem to be a lot of skills that just aren't passed on anymore. A little odd tho, in my family I learned how to cook and can and garden and all of that, my sister who's only 2 years younger than me didn't learn any of it.

Houston, United States(Zone 9b)

That's so sad! You were taught but sister wasn't. Was she just not interested? Was there just less time to do those things with more kids in the family?

I know of Grandparents who had tons of talent, non of which was passed to me. Crocheting, canning, gardening, building a home on a 3rd grade education, etc etc etc.

All I can do now is learn what I can and try to impart a love of learning to my children :)

So you are quite right. The % we are all getting isn't in what we COULD survive doing, it's in how we live now. With less food at the grocers or food prices high I'm quite sure many of us would go learn how to hunt and fish. And etc etc on the skills.

Reno, NV

I just don't know with my sister. I guess it was probably a combination of not as much time and not as much interest. I remember Mum show the two of us things like how to make butter but she doesn't. On the other hand she's a wizz with cars and I tend to forget they need anything other than gas.

Oh well. I've been teaching her cooking for just about a year now. Every friday we get to experiment with recipes while the boys get to clean the kitchen. Lol. At least something fun came of it.

I think Grandparents are a tresure. Even if they're not my own. Wonderful what you can learn and the stories you can hear visiting nursing homes.

Houston, United States(Zone 9b)

I know it! I love to talk with old folks!!!! Even as a kid I've gravitated towards people older than myself. I think I was born old in a young body hahaha.

Funny, about the cars needing more than gas :)

Reno, NV

I remember so many times as a kid going with my Mum to help some of the older folks in the community. Even when I was cranky and wanted to stay home I always ended up having fun and being fasinated by the stories. One of my adopted grandmas even had a house with hidden passages!

Houston, United States(Zone 9b)

I love those surrogate grandmas :)

Charlotte, VT

I only made 64%. Living out in the country is good because I have room for a big garden, but I also have to drive everywhere. Living in Vermont in cold country probably doesn't help either. I can and freeze vegetables but, I don't keep as many non-perishables anymore because everything has a shelf life and I hate throwing outdated food away. I could easily can a lot more if need be. I believe we can all do better if we had to.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

I think the really interesting thing is that no matter where we live it seems from the posts so far that we will all make it. Some of us (like me) may have to modify our exisitng conditions but we will make it. I find that really heartening.

Brewers, KY(Zone 6b)

81%. We've made some hard and serious cut backs over the past 2 years, refreshing to know it must be paying off!

(Nadine) Devers, TX(Zone 9b)

79% here...

Houston, TX

75%, but I think that the fact that my house is brand new is part of it.

Interestingly enough, I learned a ton from my father because he was a depression kid. I can find medicine on the front lawn, or the nearby trees, and can tell you what roots and berries will be edible (or at least not kill you). I can hunt, fish, shoot, and can make anything out of anything else. But the questionairre doesn't cover that kind of stuff.

I've also started making a major effort to get to know the neighbors. I figure that if things get bad we can help each other out - not to mention they like when I give them veggies.

Dover, PA(Zone 6b)

Interesting, I got a 71% but there was no choice for retired, So I put down working as I have a reliable pension. Also there where no questions about spending money on plants so I was safe there. LOL

Naples, FL(Zone 10a)

ugh, I got a 69%....

Olympia, WA(Zone 7b)


You Are 80% Likely to Survive Another Great Depression

You have been saving for a rainy day... or a rainy few years.
While most people may not have as grim of an outlook as you, they're also not as prepared as you.

If society collapses, you'll have plenty of food and resources for you and your loved ones.
And plenty of ammo for anyone who wants to steal from your stockpile!

(Laura) Olympia, WA(Zone 8a)

rachierabbit, hello neighbor! You should join us on "What weird weather we're having" http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/945289/

Olympia, WA(Zone 7b)

Laura, I've been lurking on the wierd weather thread just haven't posted. Hope your enjoying the sunshine this morning!

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