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Forum: Article: Plants need calcium, too, just like teeth and bones!Replies: 16, Views: 80
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Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2008
1:00 PM

Post #5877351

So, the rock dust, or green sand, doesn't supplement the calcium in the quantities needed (or at all)? I should add a soft rock, like CalPhos, amendment to the garden soil as well?

I, too, noticed a weakness in my veggies this past summer and had determined, without testing, that the soil needed more phosphorus. I was going to look into what I could add before next spring, so you've done my work for me, lol.

Thanks for the article!!
Bev

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 10, 2008
1:39 PM

Post #5877432

I added LOTS of greensand to my garden for the trace (micro) minerals rather than the macro minerals. I haven't finished my research on minerals but so far, I still think I need greensand in the mix. Azomite seems to have some trace minerals not found in greensand, so I used that, too.

7 Springs carries CalPhos in our area, and I need more... now that I understand it better. Rex Harrill (the Brix guy) participates in an online group I belong to..."BrixTalk". They ALL recommend SRP (soft rock phosphate) and it does appear to be hard to get in many places. Of course, some of them want a whole truckload!

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2008
2:43 PM

Post #5877627

Can't we get sufficient soil calcium from the addition of bone meal, burying fish and deer carcasses, or an ample supply of egg shells in our compost?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 10, 2008
3:13 PM

Post #5877679

Probably... if you wait long enough! (It takes years for microbes to break down solids into a form plants can use.) I'm covering bone meal, fish meal, etc. in the articles I'm working on right now. Stay tuned.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

December 10, 2008
4:11 PM

Post #5877852

O good. Staying tuned for the article on bone meal and liquid fish fertalizer cuz I was going to ask the same question as Sundownr.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 10, 2008
4:38 PM

Post #5877946

Just remember, I am not an authority, LOL.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

December 10, 2008
5:03 PM

Post #5878013

I have heard that bonemeal provides phosphorus and calcium fairly quickly, but must be dug into the soil a bit because it doesn't move very well through soil. When you find out, I would like to know if this is true. I use both bone meal and rock phosphate, but can't always get the soft rock phosphate.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

December 10, 2008
5:07 PM

Post #5878029

That's what I read too paj. I always mix it in.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 10, 2008
7:18 PM

Post #5878390

Yes, true... quicker than some other forms. Not as quickly as colloidal forms (like soft rock phosphate) though. I believe it all boils down to what we individually can obtain locally and what our pocket books can afford. I always strive for "ideal" and often fall short.
lisaregina
New Carlisle, OH

December 17, 2008
2:44 AM

Post #5899893

I have blossom end rot problems and noticed that the solution used to help correct it is the same ingredient in ice melter, except in liquid form. Would it work to buy dry ice melter in the winter and till it into the garden soil in the spring to help correct calcium problems? I even thought about adding it to the planting hole, but I don't want to burn my plants. What do you think about this idea?
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

December 17, 2008
3:19 AM

Post #5900015

I really don't know, but it is worth trying on something you aren't too concerned about. In fact it would be best to plant two plants side by side and put snow melter on one and none on the other.
I was told by a horticulturist that snow melter wouldn't hurt plants, it was just fertilizer, so that confirms what you thought. It is a salt, however CaXX and will add to the salts in your soil, but if you have a lot of rain and snow there, they will be washed into the subsoil eventually.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 17, 2008
10:18 PM

Post #5902327

pajaritomt, thanks for answering the question... because I didn't know the answer!
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

December 17, 2008
10:20 PM

Post #5902336

You are welcome, but I didn't know the whole answer, but I think it is as good for your plants as any chemical fertilizer.
quiltygirl
No Central, AZ
(Zone 7b)

December 19, 2008
5:28 PM

Post #5908484

The EB Stone Organic mixes contain blood and bone meals, but the problem I then had was the dogs digging into the soil around the plants as that was an attractant!
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

December 20, 2008
4:23 AM

Post #5910672

I have not had trouble with dogs digging for bone meal, but I don't use blood meal because I have heard that they will dig for blood meal so I don't use it.
lisaregina
New Carlisle, OH

December 21, 2008
4:30 AM

Post #5914014

Thanks for the information pajaritomt, I am going to try and see if it helps. As long as it won't burn my plants, why not try it. I mean what do I have to lose? I thought about diluting it as well and use it in liquid form. Would be cheaper than the rot stop liquid that they sale in the store. So I'm buying some here real soon, I'll till it in when spring gets here.
pajaritomt
Los Alamos, NM
(Zone 5a)

December 21, 2008
7:28 AM

Post #5914278

Dig the bone meal into the soil a little. It doesn't dissolve in water very well. As far as stopping blossom end rot on tomatoes, I am not convinced it is lack of calcium that causes that. Where I live it is cool nights. Also, I find certain varieties of tomato are prone to BER and others aren't. But bone meal is great plant food whether it cures BER or not.

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