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susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 7, 2009
12:40 AM

Post #5975240

Hello,
My name is Susan and my husband Don & I live in NC. We have a 4.5 acre farm and have been farming for 6 years now. We are suburbanites who were transplanted by circumstances to NC and moved to a rural county due to economics. Now we love it and would never leave. We were born farmers., we just didn't know it! We are trying to get our farm to the point of sustaining us and are on our way with a 3/4 acre veggie garden a soon to be one acre blueberry plot with 500 bushes and we hope by May to have 3 pork-ers, one for us and 2 to sell.

So what tips can you all give us to add to our plan? We also have a small greenhouse that I have not mastered yet and 2 coldframes. Oh yeah and Don likes to restore 2 wheel tractors.
Hope to talk with many of you,
Susan

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Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 7, 2009
3:53 PM

Post #5977096

Wow! That is some piece of machinery. {{{drool}}} Is that one of those machines that has all the different attachments... tillers, sickle mowers, etc? I'm thinking about getting one for our place, as a full sized tractor just doesn't make economic sense.

Welcome to the forum, and stand by for lots of ideas from the gang!
=0) Jay
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 7, 2009
7:39 PM

Post #5977977

Oh, you definitely need some chickens to help with pest control and for pure entertainment value.

What about a dairy animal? Are you both working off farm during the day or would you have time to commit to daily milkings?

Do you eat bread or oatmeal? Can you start a test plot with heritage grains to see how they do in your area?

What about an oilseed crop, like sunflower or sesame?


Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 7, 2009
8:47 PM

Post #5978196

Have you got a root cellar yet? I sure wish I had one here.

We're talking about compost heated water for the animals over on the farm forum, I think it is (solar in the barn). You might find that discussion interesting and thought provoking.

I'd be very cautious about adding animals... especially if money is an issue. Many folks end up with unproductive 'pets'... goats, horses, chickens, cows, etc. Make sure you've got the heart to cull and limit mercilessly, or you'll end up with too many animals, spending far more money than you ever intended and probably more than you can afford. Sounds like you've got a good plan with the hogs.

Before you add any animals, help out someone with the particular kind you have in mind and make sure you really want the animal and the work. Then build the structures you'll need first. Research breeds and types. Don't get too exotic to start, make your mistakes on common breeds, rather than rare, pricey ones. Write down your management plan (2 milking goats, stagger the breeding, butcher one kid & sell the rest, extra milk to the hogs sort of plan). See if you can stick to it, or can't bear it. Make new informed choice... eg. no babies 'cause I can't get rid of something I watched grow up (this is the one that got me with donkeys) =0)

There are many folksey crafts that are very pleasurable to add... rug hooking or braiding, leather work, wheat or rawhide braiding, wood carving, gourd carving or painting. Soap making seems to be a popular one, and you'll have lots of lard from that hog. Endless possibilities.

And of course... drool over seed catalogues! T'is the season and all...
I've already selected the seeds for the greenhouse I won't have for another year... LOL

garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 7, 2009
9:51 PM

Post #5978485

Good points Jay.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 7, 2009
10:13 PM

Post #5978601

Check into rabbits. They are economical to feed, you can butcher early and they sell good. Easy to care for too. I used to raise them before we moved here. I had my regular customers I butchered for but Easter was my big project with them. I'd breed so they'd be ready to go for Easter. Then I'd sit on the side of the road and sell them. I'd make enough that way to buy feed for the rest for the whole year. Tgere are also smaller breeds of cattle for milking that take less room and less feed. They give a couple of gallons of milk a day. Just right for a single family and farm.

Love that tractor. My uncle had one back in the day but it didn't look that good. Does he sell them after restoration? I had an uncle who did that with lawn mowers. It was a hobby for him. I got one from him and used it for many years.
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 7, 2009
11:46 PM

Post #5978979

Great Welcomes, Folks! Thanks!

Ok, Yes, Don uses the tractors in the gardens, the one in the pic is his baby, the "other woman" to me. lol He wants to show it at fairs and says if he got the right offer he would sell it, that makes me worry about my longevity, hmmmm?

We have another David Bradley that is our work tractor, exactly like the one in the pic but not as perrty, the pic below is Don using it last weekend. Then we have a restored two wheel Bolens that is narrower in size and easier for me to handle so I use that one. We love them, our reason for getting them wasn't restoration it was desperation. Our garden slopes and we couldn't use riding tractors in it without risking rolling so we discovered the 2 wheel walk behinds.

Ok, Jay, I am very proud of myself, I have already done just about everything you reccomended. I have thought, researched (for three years now) thought some more, prayed, discussed with Don, researched and talked to friends who farmed in MN for 20 years, THEN I made my decision. First I wanted sheep, so I bought lots of books and discovered there were too many diseases and not enough income potential. Then it was goats, I hate goats milk and cheese, they smell and I am not raising them for meat. Then it was chickens. I love them and they have alot of potential and I may still get a few but they would have to be for eggs and pets cause I couldn't eat them. I don't have room for a cow, though I would love one milking cow just for me, I may still look into this, I have 2 acres remaining so that should be enough room. Could never raise beef of my own, they have too cute of a face. So I decided on pork! We were given a 300 lb pig 3 years ago (long story for another post) anyway, she was ugly, stinky and nasty tried to eat me twice, so I had no problem taking her to a processor and going back two days later for my yummy pork! I am making a 16x32 area with a shelter for 3 porkers. Either, Duroc, Hampshire or ...??? I forgot the other one. So, I am ready to be a homesteader and I love the idea of soap, never thought of that! I grow lots of lavender, wooohoooo! You guys are all great inspirations!

Sorry to be so long winded, get me talkin bout my farm and I never shut up.

Susan


This message was edited Jan 7, 2009 6:50 PM

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CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 7, 2009
11:51 PM

Post #5978998

Is that bee hives in the back ground of the pic. And where is the pic of you with your tractor?
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 8, 2009
12:10 AM

Post #5979097

Bee Hives? No? It is a giant pile of oak wood chips. I will get aapic of me and mine in a few days and post it.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 8, 2009
2:12 AM

Post #5979540

What are the white boxes in front of the barrel?
fremar
Comer, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2009
2:58 AM

Post #5979782

OK just for my two cents worth. Chickens should be a must,if for no other reason than just the eggs.Also with a garden that size the the root cellar should be a must specialy if you have a good hillside to dig into. IMO larger farm animals are too high maintenance for my likes, 1 or 2 vet bills could deplete any savings you have unless you started out with substantial backing.
Definetely look into crafts they could supplement your income and most times can be a "cash crop".
Good Luck and happy farming
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 8, 2009
3:24 AM

Post #5979886

Oh, I don't know that is not on our property.

Fremar,
I might get a few chickens for eggs. We are thinkin about a root cellar and definitly thinkin bout crafts. Gotta love "cash crops" lol
dave719
Humansville, MO
(Zone 6a)

January 9, 2009
4:52 PM

Post #5985262

Susan show my toy to Bob I got this a month or so ago haven't had time to work on it. Was told the engine runs but haven't tried it yet. It does need a clutch Where does find parts for them
Dave719

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susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 9, 2009
5:24 PM

Post #5985387

Oh My Gosh, Dave if I show him, he will probably be knocking on your door in a few days , tools in hand! He loves restoring. You got a nice David Bradley there. How Awesome! They are wonderful tractors, will you actually use it in the garden or just want it to restore? Ok, to answer your question, Don looks on Ebay and gets stuff from there, but he knows about engines so he adlibs and modifies abit. We also have a good Farm & Tractor Show here in April and we actually bought our working David Bradley there.

So, are there any metal tags or plates anywhere on it that has model #'s or anything? We can help you determine the model and year made, that helps alot when looking for parts.

Don would love to help ya even long distance so I will dmail our email and phone # to you if you want to pick his brain. We love getting people interested in these tractors , they were very ingenious and really hard working little tractors, if you don't mind walking and we actually like that part of using these. I will post more pics this afternoon.

Best Wishes with it,
Susan & Don Berry
The Berry Farm
Sandy Ridge, NC
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 9, 2009
6:00 PM

Post #5985500

Here is Don's restored 1953 David Bradley Super Power,

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susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 9, 2009
6:01 PM

Post #5985508

This is my Bolen's tractor, it is girl size, I love using it.

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susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 9, 2009
6:02 PM

Post #5985513

And two more that Don wants to work on, one will be a working and one we want to restore for shows.

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Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 12, 2009
5:03 PM

Post #5996438

Hey Sue,
Sounds like you've got a very sensible approach to taking on new things. =0) Just remember, chickens don't lay forever, their production falls off after a couple of years, and you're looking at excess animals... money suckers. So figure out a plan for the hens when their production drops off...

I agree with the comment about large animals... especially if you only have a couple of acres. That doesn't sound like enough to support a dairy cow of any size, not even the Dexters. It doesn't allow the pasture to rest. And you'll have to breed that cow, produce those cute little offspring, and think of something to do with them. If you can't bear the flip side of animal husbandry, which is death, then don't go there, stick with plants. Trade for your meat.

A lot of raising livestock is about caring responsibility; it is a web of interdependence. And one of our responsibilities is being strong enough to hold the full measure of the life we share... including its death. There's a great book, "The Compassionate Carnivore" that I would recommend every aspiring homesteader read. It will support and encourage your decision to have a part in the meat you eat, to care enough to create the good life for your livestock, and acknowledge its gift of life to you.

A cow's life, a pig's life, a chicken's life and their death enriches and supports our own immeasurably. When we take that life, we should not do it with eyes averted, but with a heart filled with appreciation of this great web, and a deep wish that we may embody all life in its mystery and abundance.

It's hard, but we are up to the task, no doubt in my mind the folks here have hearts filled with courage and care...

Jay
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2009
1:09 AM

Post #5998569

Very well said.
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2009
3:30 AM

Post #5999231

This is why I am thinking through the animal thing very carefully. Thank you for your thoughts.
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 13, 2009
7:00 PM

Post #6001228

Sorry susan. I wasn't wearing my glasses when I read your first post. I thought you said you had 45 acres, not 4.5 acres.
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2009
9:18 PM

Post #6001669

I wish I had 45! Boy, what I could do with that.

4.5 is a blessing, I am happy with that.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 13, 2009
9:29 PM

Post #6001712

Jah, with 45 you'd end up feeling nagged about 'doing something' whereas 4.5 kind of tamps down wild, expansive energy... a little, anyway. LOL

Here's a thought...
research apple cider blends. I understand the best cider is made from a blend of apples. There's even a cider festival out there in your neck of the woods (which to me means anything east of the Mississippi) where you can try all sorts of ciders... Then plant a few trees, and make cider. Or apple wine. Boy, now that's good stuff. There's a winery up the road here that specializes in fruit wines... apple, pear, peach, nectarine (I'm drinking that one now), raspberry, chokecherry... why, hot dog, you could even do blueberry! =0)

Jay
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 13, 2009
9:32 PM

Post #6001730

'Nother idea...

Varietal vinegar... there's a friend of the above vintners that makes vinegar from wine grapes. Seems everyone and their mother is making local grape wine anymore, so they took a mediocre vineyard and make a very nice vinegar from the grapes. Unusual and they sell all they make.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2009
10:07 PM

Post #6001908

Or maybe one of those upick orchards. Blueberries and peaches do well for that. Maybe even those huge domestic blackberries.
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2009
11:41 PM

Post #6002245

Jay, already way ahead of ya, thought about Blueberry wine! lol

With 500 bushes I should have enough to make a batch.

There are so many things that one can do with land. I love being a farmer.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 13, 2009
11:54 PM

Post #6002309

Have you ever tasted blueberry wine? I'm very curious about how it would taste. The vintner up the road doesn't have that one. Some of hers are wine-like and some are more sherry like. I think it's fascinating how each one turns out. I really enjoyed the apple and pear, the strawberry was disappointing, the wild plum was like a sherry, so it goes nice in a spritzer for me. =0)

There are just so many wonderful, interesting fascinating opportunities... I totally agree with you.

I took the plunge today and ordered a high tunnel greenhouse, so that'll be my big step this year. Maybe we can figure this out together? And Cajun just sent me some lovely lettuce and patty pan squash seeds; I'm all aquiver with anticipation!

Here's to dirt under the nails...
Jay
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 14, 2009
12:04 AM

Post #6002376

Blueberry liqueur...
http://www.guntheranderson.com/liqueurs/blueber0.htm

or blueberry schnapps perhaps?
http://www.carniola.org/2006/08/how-to-make-slovenian-blueberry-schnapps.htm

Blueberry schnapps could put a zing in your pancakes or muffins.
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 14, 2009
12:42 AM

Post #6002524

Check out the blueberry schnapps recipe! Cooool!

I have made small batches of pear-ginger liquer, chocolate mint liquer and raspberry liquer. They all came out good.
Thanks for the link Merm.

Jay, happy to help you in any way I can with the greenhouse. Is it like a hoop house? We are helping a friend build a hoop house next weekend. I love my greenhouse. I have brocc, cabbage, tomatoes, cukes all germinated in there now and I just planted some peas in there too. I love my coldframes too, they work super. I have spinach and lettuce in those.

Send me a pic of what ya got, I love talkin greenhouses.
Susan
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2009
12:56 AM

Post #6002576

Yeppers, mine's a hoop house or high tunnel. It's a ways away, having just ordered it today, and the ground is too frozen to do anything. My bed plan is non-existent this year, as I'm also working on putting up another attached greenhouse that ends up in the middle of my big bed from last year.

Do you have a fallow period in your greenhouse, or do you grow year round?

Let my bumbling inform others... have a site plan, so you don't end up building in the middle of a vegg bed... }=0(

All this talk of alkyhaul has remembered me of the chokecherry liquer brewing under the bathroom sink... I'll have to give that a taste later. =0)

Blueberry schapps on your pancakes? Well, I guess we know how GM keeps her sunny disposition... LOL
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 14, 2009
1:27 AM

Post #6002698

LOL! Actually, I'm pretty much a tea totaler, but I do like to use selected spirits in my cooking and baking. ^_^

Dandelion wine and Elderberry wine are classics that you may want to try. Visions of giggly great aunts and their "tonics" come to mind.
luannewolf
Fayetteville, AR

January 14, 2009
2:21 AM

Post #6002991

Those old chickens make great soup stock - when my spring vegies mature (potatoes, carrots, onions) I make soup stock with a neighbor's old chickens, strain it, cool it to get the fat to rise and remove it, then can the soup stock. It's very yummy and salt-free!
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2009
3:27 AM

Post #6003256

GM, don't forget the 'lemonade'!
Mike didn't invent it, I'll guaran-dam-tee it. LOL
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 14, 2009
4:07 AM

Post #6003377

I dont use the greenhouse from around May to December. But that is just because of lack of knowledge. I am hoping to change that.

Keep me posted on your progress.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2009
5:00 PM

Post #6004790

Thanks, Susan! I'm sure you'll be hearing more than you can bear... I'm pretty wound up about it. =0) Which is tough in the dead of winter. Today and tomorrow, though, it looks like it's going to be nice enough to get the site cleaned up, anyway.

I've got Coleman's 4 Season, but I think I'll probably want a season off! I do travel quite a bit, and I actually moved up here so that I'd have to take winter off from so many projects (I'm a bad one for projects) and maybe have energy to do some pleasure travel, rather than just work travel (which I am getting heartily sick of, I assure you)

So right now, this minute, today (subject to change LOL) the plan is to fallow in winter and run chickens in the greenhouse, to til, fertilize and clean up. I'm probably just going to borrow chickens from friends for a couple of months and not get into more animals long term.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2009
5:57 PM

Post #6004989

What kind of work do you do, if I may be so nosey?
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2009
6:36 PM

Post #6005140

I'm retired...
I was a licensed vet tech for 10 years (small animal), and I was also an assistant trainer in a show stable, as well as groom and rider in a couple of private stables. Now I'm trying to stretch a buck and grow some good food... and see if I can get some field work done with donkeys, but I've got a feeling that's more for yucks and grins than anything. =0)

You?
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2009
6:54 PM

Post #6005196

I am retired now. But for many years I worked at a hospital in the lab and then in a blood bank. I am also a retired fire fighter and EMT. I do some training and boarding on the side to help pay for the feed but nothing I can't rest from when I need to. DH and I also pastor a church. That's our first job. The rest is icing. It's a small church and we hope and pray it grows. Not because we want a bigger church but simply because the more people who attend means you are touching and helping more people. It's a tough and scary world we live in and having God for comfort is important. He gives us hope and peace. Through the church I have also got somewhat of a speaking ministry. I get invited to Ladies functions and I dress up and do funny skits that go along with the theme of the conference. Then I do just a few minutes of serious speaking at the end to tie it all together. I think laughter is the best medicine.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2009
7:09 PM

Post #6005248

Max ought to be a big help to your ministry... I was going to say ass-et, but he just doesn't have quite the right qualities. =0)

It's interesting... I am training for ordination as a Zen priest; I am to be ordained this spring. I agree that a strong spiritual practice and community is a comfort in these times.

Joy to you,
Jay
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2009
7:15 PM

Post #6005277

I have heard of Zen Buddist but since you harvest your animals I don't you think you fit that criteria. What is Zen?
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2009
7:56 PM

Post #6005432

I am indeed a Zen Buddhist. At the moment, I am not raising any animals for meat, though it's under consideration. Only in America is it controversial (how we love controversy here); many Asian Buddhists raise their own meat.

One doesn't have to be a Buddhist to be Zen, though quite frankly that is something I can't quite wrap my head around. I know of Christian zennists, and Jewish zennists. It's a bit of a mystery to me...

Jay
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 14, 2009
9:33 PM

Post #6005844

Wow this conversation went from animals to tractors to spirituality. We are all so well rounded, don't you think?

My husband and I are also in ministry, we are Christians and we grow food for the needy.



Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 15, 2009
2:30 PM

Post #6008094

Kewl! How do you distribute the food?
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 15, 2009
7:44 PM

Post #6009290

We either go through larger ministries that feed the homeless and needy or we go through churches and senior centers.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 15, 2009
7:59 PM

Post #6009358

I've been thinking of going through our local soup kitchen, or maybe the local Salv. Army.

Providing, of course, that we produce enough for ourselves and hard hit friends first. Someday...

=0)
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 15, 2009
11:13 PM

Post #6009974

I like to take our extras to church and give it to the elderly and those who can't garden for some reason.

I have a dream for a ministry. I don't know if it will ever happen. It will take a lot of money and I don't know how to go about applying for grants and such. There is a huge drug problem here in our area. There are several contributing factors. The only work here is in the coal mines and it is dangerous work. There are lots of people who are disabled because of accidents and the results of accumulative damage over the years. They take lots of meds and many times they get addicted and turn into addicts. Also, because of the poverty that is rampant here, they will sell their meds to buy food and pay the bills. Many kids grow up in this enviroment and get hooked on drugs in their own homes. I would love to have a ministry that would give them an alternative. I would love to have a farm where they could spend a couple hours a day learning animal husbandry, gardening, cooking ect. Life skills that not only will help them later but give them something to be proud of now. The ministry could employ a few retired people who could pass on their lifetime of knowledge to a new generation. We could also have classes for adults, like budgeting and studying for GED. I would like to have camps in the summer that would last for several weeks. I could get people to come in and give demonstrations, have class work and at the end, a graduation ceremony complete with diplomas and make sure it gets in the newspaper. We could even work up to rescuing dogs from the pound, training them in the basics and give them a better chance of being adopted.

I know it's a big dream that will take a lot of money and it's not likely to happen but I hold onto it just the same. I wish one of those rich philanthropists (sp?) I have read about would cross my path and catch my vision.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 15, 2009
11:46 PM

Post #6010095

Maybe you could start small, with just one or two young people, and a network of elders to pass on knowledge? In any case, it's a lovely vision...

I'm interested in somehow starting a meditation group for veterans... a suitable space is a big problem. Talk about money issues...
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 15, 2009
11:58 PM

Post #6010139

I would love to be able to get a long term lease or better yet a donation of about 100 acres on a recovered strip job. When they recover them they are flat for the most part and they are seeded with Little Blue Stem grass. It makes awesome hay.

Service to our soldiers is very needed. We don't treat our soldiers like the heros they are. They and their families sacrifice so much for us and they get so little compensation. It's just plain selfish on our country's part and I am ashamed of it. What has steered you in this particular direction?

Here is a pic of part of a recovered strip job.

This message was edited Jan 15, 2009 7:04 PM

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Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2009
12:50 AM

Post #6010308

Which direction are you referring to, Cajun? I'm only going in about 6...

LOL
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 16, 2009
1:47 AM

Post #6010568

The meditation group direction.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2009
4:02 AM

Post #6011007

Relieving suffering...
This community has a lot of reserve and regular military, and is economically depressed. Support services are spare, and I think almost everyone can benefit from meditaition of one sort or another.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2009
2:31 PM

Post #6011946

Sue... another idea: flower farming. There was a small farm near me that raised iris, sold every rhizome they could produce every year in July (I think). And I notice someone over on the Farm Forum is doing daylilies...

Cajun, hope you're feeling better today, lungs clearing up and all. Did DH end up camping out in the barn?
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 16, 2009
6:57 PM

Post #6013087

Ended up not having to stay at the barn. The temps are around 0 here but we are blessed that it was dry before it froze so there is little ice to deal with. The small amount of snow is so dry it blows like dust when you drive over it so it's no problem at all. I went with him yesterday to feed but he wanted me to stay home today. I am much better but the cold air causes me to wheeze badly. The doc prescribed an inhaler and it helps. It's better for Knock to stay close to the house too as he has asthma. Hasn't had problems with it in a couple of winters but it's something we always keep an eye on. He bundled up this morning and went out for a few minutes with my camera to take a few pics of the creek. I'm about to upload them and see what masterpiece he has captured. I'll send any good ones.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2009
7:34 PM

Post #6013256

Probably silly to ask, but do you use a humidifier in winter? We found it helps us with our winter wheezes... of course, it's a lot drier here. =0)

Glad to hear you're feeling better; it's so draining when the lungs aren't working well.

CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 16, 2009
10:47 PM

Post #6014008

No. I don't have a humidifier. Never thought of it. I had one for the kids when they were little.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2009
11:35 PM

Post #6014163

I think it's getting to be time to drag ours out... I notice I'm coughing more in the morning, clearing the 'pipes'.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 17, 2009
12:53 AM

Post #6014464

I may look into one.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 19, 2009
12:09 AM

Post #6021434

Sue,
How do you raise broccoli without getting bugs all over it? We tried brocolli-raab one year and it was infested with flea beetles. I love brocolli, and it would do well up here in the cool, but bugs... ugh.

Jay
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 19, 2009
1:39 AM

Post #6021902

I don't know we don't have much troub;e with bugs on it? If I do see any it is when the plants are young and they are nibbling on the leaves. I usually dust if I have to, but honestly I have more problems with cabbage bugs than brocc. You might try pureeing garlic and making a spray with garlic and water. Or insecticidal soap.

This message was edited Jan 18, 2009 8:40 PM
luannewolf
Fayetteville, AR

January 20, 2009
12:06 AM

Post #6026001

NC and you don't have bugs? I may move there! Here in NWA the flea beetles don't bother the broccolli (just cabbage loopers and a black and orange beetle that I haven't identified yet - maybe harlequin bugs? - both of which need some kind of dust/spray or they will kill the plants) but they do wipe out my eggplants every year if I don't use some kind of insecticide. What about ticks and chiggers in NC?
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 20, 2009
1:21 AM

Post #6026325

I have heard about chiggers but never experienced them, Thank God. We have ticks. We treat our lawn so that we don't bring them in the house. We had bad potato beetles last year. Nothing we did got rid of them, lost alot of plants to them. This year I really hope we do not have a bug problem on anything cause we are growing to sell this year and I need to make a profit.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 20, 2009
1:24 AM

Post #6026335

Hey, Lwolf, if you moved up there, you could get a two-wheeled tractor from Don and forget having to throw hay every day!

Do you use row covers, Sue?
luannewolf
Fayetteville, AR

January 20, 2009
1:29 AM

Post #6026351

Good luck with the farmer's market. How much land are you planting? The chiggers here are worst when you go to pick wild blackberries or huckleberries. They also call them "noseeums" because you can't see them and they burrow under your skin and itch like crazy! And of course they don't want to borrow under your skin on your leg or arm, oh no, they burrow into your armpits and groin! About the only thing I can grow here without being assaulted by bugs are peppers - everything else has it's set of bugs to watch out for.
luannewolf
Fayetteville, AR

January 20, 2009
1:34 AM

Post #6026367

I actually have a friend here in Fay that just bought one of those two wheel tractors - now if he can just get it running! I would rather have a horse/mule/donkey. I really don't like internal combustion engines - I don't know how to work on them and tractors have no pollution control on them and they are NOISY! I read the other day that running a lawnmower for one hour put out the pollution equivalent to driving 350 miles! That is what I remember liking about cultivating with a horse - it was wonderful exercise (I didn't have to bend down!) and it was quiet - you could hear the birds, etc.
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 20, 2009
1:34 PM

Post #6027718

We are planting one acre of veggies and 500 blueberry bushes.

We love our 2 wheel tractors, we couldn't possibly do all this work without one and we couldn't use a riding tractor due to the slope of our land, too dangerous. As for pollution...I have no idea how to respond to that, I care about the earth but I also rely heavily on God to take care of all that, I don't litter but I do use my tractors and tillers. To compensate for the pollution my tractors cause I have donated 2,000+ lbs of produce to needy families over the last 5 years, so...they may have trouble breathin but they have full tummies.

:)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 20, 2009
3:12 PM

Post #6028023

We all just do the best we can, and what you're doing beats the bejeezuz out of sitting at a desk trading bogus financial derivatives...

IMHO

Lwolf and I just like big poopy things, and I know I've been laid into for the methane they produce... global warming and all that. }=0P
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 20, 2009
11:03 PM

Post #6029534

You couldn't prove global warming by the temps we've been having.

I agree. We do the best we can with what we have and as long as we are trying it helps. There is some drawback with everything. You just have to take the lesser of the evils. Kinda like voting. LOL
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 20, 2009
11:30 PM

Post #6029612

Yeah, a lot like voting. LOL
luannewolf
Fayetteville, AR

January 21, 2009
2:47 AM

Post #6030405

While my friend and I depended on a tractor to disk the garden in the spring and fall, we managed to cultivate almost an acre with a horse in about 1.5 hours. I don't know about the blueberries tho! Having an auger really does make all the difference!
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 21, 2009
4:14 PM

Post #6031947

But as Lynn Miller says, it's a good thing that horse farming is optional now, so that only the folks that truly love horses can farm with them and those that aren't drawn to them can use machines. Better for the horses, and better for folks sense of humor.

Besides, 4.5 acres isn't enough to support a horse. Maybe you could harness your pigs? LOL

I wouldn't mind having a two wheel tractor for some of the jobs around here, especially mowing. I'd like to have a sickle mower, so I could save the grass for feed.
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 21, 2009
6:47 PM

Post #6032599

You may laugh at that thought Jay, but one of my grandmothers had a boar that grew so large they hooked him up to the horse carriage. We have an old grainy photo of Curly Boy harnessed into the carriage, with grandma all dressed up in her late 1800's attire and hat. I think Curly Boy was eventually stuffed and on display in the Chicago or Ohio Ripley's museum at one time. I'll have to see if can scan the photo. He shows up in some old hog husbandry text books since he weighted 1255 lbs and no, that was not an obese hog, just a really big one.

My DH loves the walk behind tractors. He says it's in his Italian blood. The steep hills of southern Italy make ox power or walk behind tractors a necessity.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 21, 2009
7:00 PM

Post #6032647

So how many miles per oink? LOL How in the world do you steer a hog?
{shaking head}

Learn sumpthin new everday. =0)
Jay
garden_mermaid
San Francisco Bay Ar, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 21, 2009
7:34 PM

Post #6032730

You steer a hog with the reins the same way you would a horse.
I reckon Curly Boy mighta thought he was a horse. I guess when they bred the "Ohio Improved Chester-White" varieity, they didn't realize where the improvement was going to show.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 21, 2009
7:40 PM

Post #6032748

A nose ring or a bit?
Did they use a collar or breast collar type harness... Hope the scan works! =0)
What a great parade entry that would be.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

January 22, 2009
3:03 PM

Post #6035937

Hogzilla meets Macy's. LOL
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

January 22, 2009
3:16 PM

Post #6036008

Methane filled! LOL
farmer37
Dixmont, ME

March 30, 2009
11:35 AM

Post #6339185

I looked at the large photo and see that the cooling shroud is missing on the engine.This directs air over the engine.Rope starting an engine like this is dangerous because the flywheel fins can grab the rope or fingers.Another problem is that the tire treads are backward.Engine wont run long with shroud missing.
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 30, 2009
7:23 PM

Post #6341147

Not sure what photo you are talking about?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2009
2:44 PM

Post #6403412

Susan, Hi! Don't know how I missed this thread... This forum is one of my favorites; guess I've just been busy elsewhere lately. There was a time when I knew everyone (almost!) on DG, and read everything. But we are so large now, and specialized. Well, DG is specialized... I'm not. I'm too interested in too many things to keep up with all my mind wants to know... LOL.

Sounds like you and Don have a good start! What is your pH for blueberries? What variety? I just bought a few, but they have to go into pots until some elemental sulfur does its thing on a section of my soil. We sit on limestone.

Love your 2 wheelers!
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2009
8:38 PM

Post #6405041

Hi Darius,

Our ph tested at 4.4, the acre was a forest we just had it cleared last Fall. We are very busy, just put corn in today and green beans and 3 ft tall tomato plants yesterday. I started them a little too early. I have flowers on them already. :)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2009
8:47 PM

Post #6405066

That's wonderful (the pH)... and planting corn, beans and 'maters ain't bad either... ^_^
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2009
9:06 PM

Post #6405159

My gardens are slam full. I still have to put summer squash, zucc, cantelopes, peppers, eggplant in and I am nearly out of space. We are selling this year at the farmersmarket and we started a CSA program which is doing really well. I need to clear another acre. :)

check out our new website.

www.theberryfarm.org

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

April 13, 2009
9:22 PM

Post #6405240

Very nice web site.
Have you been over to the "Market Growers" forum ?
Those people would enjoy your site also.

Happy Growing,
Bernie
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2009
9:47 PM

Post #6405348

No Bernie, I havn't, thanks, I will visit.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2009
12:46 AM

Post #6406052

That's a great site. It looks very proffessional. Looks like you guys have your hands full but I'm sure you are loving it. I pulled 56 beautiful green onions today and put red onion starts in the holes. Also got a few taters planted, some broccoli, turnips, swiss chard, romaine lettuce, beets and radishes. Have to seed tomatoes, eggplants, peppers and watermelon tonight.
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2009
12:59 AM

Post #6406105

Hi Cajun,

Thank you. We are very very busy! I planted 30 tomatoe plants Saturday and have about 40 more in the greenhouse coming up. I am hoping to sell plants at the farmers market so I am starting lots of them. We have had a cooler than normal Spring so the cool weather plants I have in the ground are slow to get bigger and the seeds are germinating very slowly. Isn't it all fun though?
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2009
1:01 AM

Post #6406117

I'm having a blast with my little patch. DH hauled me in another load of composted manure and sawdust to finish my new 8 x 24 tomato bed. I'm growing lots of new stuff this year.
susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2009
1:17 AM

Post #6406249

Yeah, I had my years of trying new stuff. This year I am growing all the reliables so that I have good stuff to sell. It is fun trying new stuff. I am trying a couple of new varieties this year. I have about 6-8 varieties of tomatoes this year and 4 squashes, and 4 cukes. Oh, I forgot I am growing honeydew melon for the first time this year. I love them and hope they do well.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2009
3:33 AM

Post #6406963

What kind of tomatoes, squash and cukes are you going with? I'm going to grow my cukes in hanging baskets. I make them myself out of plastic jugs and coat hangers.

Thumbnail by CajuninKy
Click the image for an enlarged view.

susandonb1141
Triad(for a few more, NC
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2009
9:32 AM

Post #6407455

Cute. Let me know how this works.

Ok, for tomatoes, I have some Cold Set, Red Rose, Roma, Classica, Beef Master, Jelly Bean, Giant Belgium,Bella Rosa, Ball's Beefsteak, Early Girl.

For cukes I have started Fanfare, National Pickling, a couple others I don't remember?

Eggplant will be Twilight and Moneymaker. Peppers are Fat & Sassy, Cubanelle, Jalapeno, one other green one, I think?

I am excited about the tomatoes, I like the selection and hope they do well.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 14, 2009
2:53 PM

Post #6408470

I'm not familiar with most of them. Are they more for the market garden? Do you raise heirlooms and save your own seed?

I like the CSA idea. It's a good deal for folks who would like fresh, healthy veggies but can't grow their own for one reason or another. I'm looking forward to following your progress through the season. It must be very satisfying work.

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