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Garden Hortiscopes & History: Fanny Farmer!!

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threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

January 7, 2009
11:41 PM

Post #5978948

I still have my Fanny farmer cookbooks!! Mom gave them to me when I first moved away from home. I still refer to them when looking for some things.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 8, 2009
2:21 PM

Post #5980990

I never had the fanny farmer cookbook, but I've got my trusty old Betty Crocker, which is pretty splattered and tattered from more than a quarter-century of use ;o)
Azalea
Jonesboro, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2009
3:29 PM

Post #5981210

Hummmmmm - I have a "Pillsbury Family Cookbook" that My DH gave me the first Christmas we were married - 1962. Guess he did it for self preservation. I still use it at least once a week, especially for cakes and pies. Never had Fanny Farmer.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 14, 2009
10:49 PM

Post #6006118

I adore old cook books. I usually pick a few up when the used book store has a sale. I read them like novels LOL. I still use my old dog eared Joy of Cooking from 1974 for alot of the basics. I'm a Betty Crocker fan too Terry. I have one of the Christmas Cookbooks and a 1960s Do Ahead Cookbook with a to-die-for receipe for escargot in puff pastry that isn't in the newer additions. It's interesting to see the how meal planning and presentation has changed over the years. Like the 50s, a meat and potato era in NA and there was an unwritten rule that you couldn't mix foods together or even let them touch on the plate LOL I'm not really sure when the Cassarole Craze began but suddenly they even got their own chapter/section. (I've read some pretty euuwwy cassarole receipes by the way).

This message was edited Jan 14, 2009 3:51 PM

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 14, 2009
4:11 AM

Post #6817034

I've had my Fanny Farmer cookbook for almost 30 years. The binding is so broken, it's now held together with duct tape.
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

July 17, 2009
3:49 PM

Post #6830792

No Fanny Farmer cookbook here but my oldie is a 1937 edition of the Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook. My MIL found it in a drawer in a house she moved into long before I met her in 1959. It was already looking very tattered. The pictures of the "modern" kitchen, canning jars (with wire bails) and especially the cooks dressed like nurses are very entertaining. The hairsyles look like something out of the old movies of the era, so they were definitely in style!

The dumpling recipe in that book never worked for me. I wrote something like BAD next to it so I wouldn't be temped to try it a 3rd time.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 17, 2009
5:17 PM

Post #6831128

Don't get me started on dumplings. I *do* use my Betty Crocker recipe for dumplings. Which are not like my MIL makes. (Poor DH made the mistake once of mentioning that during our first year of marriage...let's just say in the last 27 years, he's learned to eat mine and like 'em!)
threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

July 17, 2009
5:43 PM

Post #6831209

My Mom makes the best dumplings! I've never been able to get it right so I make the chicken and send it over to her to add the dumplings. Hers are so light and fluffy that when you lift the lid they almost float away!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 17, 2009
6:33 PM

Post #6831378

Those are my kinda dumplings, too. (Southern "dumplings" are really just big flat, square noodles in disguise.) Don't get me wrong: I love homemade chicken and noodles as much as chicken and dumplings. But the two dishes are very different, and dumplings were meant to be incredibly light, tender, moist delicacies, not hard little nubs of dough.

Okay, end of rant ;o)

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 20, 2009
10:07 PM

Post #6843354

I've gotten lazy, so have found that cutting refrigerater biscuits in quarters makes pretty good dumplings.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 20, 2009
10:17 PM

Post #6843401

I'll just enter my plea for people to try (or re-visit) simple, easy, from-scratch dumplings. I've found they are as easy--or easier--than opening a can of refrigerator biscuits, and they taste SO much better ;o)

I guess some of it depends on what you keep on hand; I rarely (read: never) buy refrigerator biscuits. (I confess my DH doesn't mind the frozen ones, and I will concede they are easier than from-scratch rolled biscuits, especially when I'm trying to get him out the door in the mornings.)

But I always have flour, baking powder and milk on hand, so I can whip up "drop" biscuits or dumplings without thinking twice about it.
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

July 20, 2009
11:41 PM

Post #6843726

Referigerated buscuits make good doughnuts too. Punch a hole in the middle with a bottle neck or the lid, and in the time it takes to make coffee you can have doughnuts to go with it. I've eaten them but never made any myself. Learned that from a submarine cook who was my hubby's best buddy on the USS Catfish.

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 21, 2009
4:06 AM

Post #6844860

Forgot about the donuts. We usually make monkey bread.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

July 21, 2009
10:27 AM

Post #6845381

I've made fried pies from ref. biscuits. Just roll them out add a heaping tablespoon of canned pie mix on one side, Fold it over and pinch together fry in hot grease or oil till brown on bottom flip over and brown on other side. We mostly liked apple but have made peach and lemon.
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

July 21, 2009
7:16 PM

Post #6847118

I wonder if something like a scone could me made in the same way, with jam, and then baked on a cookie sheet.

Greenbrain, tell us about monkey bread. I've never heard of it.

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 23, 2009
4:36 AM

Post #6853867

You'll find many Monkey Bread recipes on the internet. Basically, it's 3 cans of refrigerated biscuits cut in quarters & shaken in a bag of sugar and cinnamon until well coated. Put in a bundt pan and pour melted butter and brown sugar over it. Baked at 350 F for about 30 to 40 minutes. It's also called pull apart bread because that's how you eat it. Very addictive and loaded with sugar and fat. I usually only make it once a year; like in January; and serve with coffee or cocoa.

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 23, 2009
4:44 AM

Post #6853892

My mom, a Tennessee born and farm raised gal who grew up eating cornbread and biscuits made from scratch, would wrap hot dogs in refrigerated canned biscuits and bake them on a cookie sheet for a quick cheap meal. I've also used them to make minnie pizzas. Maybe we should start a new thread -- "101 uses for refrigerator biscuits". I'll have to try the fried fruit pies with pears. We're expecting a bumper crop this year.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

July 23, 2009
8:01 AM

Post #6854157

greenbrain, You must be living right! I have 3 pear trees with a total of 5 pears on them. They've got bit back by frost 3years running.
I made homemade bisquits for my DH almost everyday of our 50 yr marriage. Used the dough for all kinds of things over the years.
Mary, i'm not sure about scones but i've also made cinnamon rolls with refreg. bisquits. Roll them out.Than mix sugar, soft butter and sprinkle cinnamon on it and bake for bisquits.
I've not had monkey bread in a long time. Thanks for the receipe.

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 23, 2009
11:44 AM

Post #6854350

Nothing I've done. I live in the American Bottom. Very fertile soil & had plenty of rain this year.
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2009
10:16 PM

Post #6856761

Thanks for the explanation. My sister makes something like that every Christmas using yeast bread dough rolled into small balls. I think she calls them pull-aparts. Her husband's family has another name for them.

I think a thread for 101 uses would be great. Fun and useful too.

Whitewash on the tree trunk might make the trees blossom later and avoid the frost. It reflects the sun so the tree doesn't wake up so soon. Old timers used whitewash on their fruit trees for that, and to kill bugs that overwintered in the cracks in the bark. Not sure what it was made from but somebody would know. Maybe ask about it on the fruits and nuts forum.

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


July 23, 2009
10:23 PM

Post #6856778

Hmm...I'll have to look up when Fancy Farm, KY was founded...the whitewashed trees gave me the idea. When they decided to put a post office in the area, way back when...the head honcho said that they had to have a name for the place...the little wide spot in the road had every tree with a whitewashed trunk. He declared that this was the fanciest farm he'd ever seen and that is how Fancy Farm, KY got its name.

I'll see if I can dig the exact date up.
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2009
11:20 PM

Post #6856935

Interesting, how we went from Fanny Farmer cookbooks to refrigerator biscuits to whitewash! I found a recipe. There is no mention of it's use for fruit trees on this site, but it was used on chicken houses, outhouses and other outbuildings to give a clean appearance. I'll look for references for use on fruit trees.

http://www.oldhouseweb.com/how-to-advice/whitewash-recipe.shtml
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

July 23, 2009
11:30 PM

Post #6856960

Here is a reference to using whitewash on fruit trees, and a couple of different recipes.'
The article doesn't mention preventing early blossoms, but does talk about sunscald.

http://cecalaveras.ucdavis.edu/files/58343.pdf

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 24, 2009
3:17 AM

Post #6857840

I had no idea that there's a good reason to whitewash trees and outdoor wooden items. When my father-in-law retired, he was whitewashing everything at our summer cabins. I thought that he was just restless for something to do. I believe that he mixed lime and water.
Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

July 24, 2009
3:29 AM

Post #6857889

I keep reading thinking any minute I will see were you use buttermilk Southern living has it going on buttermilk biscuits Martha Stewart has some good old recipes too. I have the really old recipe books with all the neat old fancy candies cakes and pies like vingar pie when the depression and you couldn't afford a lemon or buttermilk pie they had some different things back then all the canning and pickling memory lane for some :)
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

July 24, 2009
3:46 AM

Post #6857940

My MIL made vinegar pie, and also made corncob jelly that tasted just like apple.

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 24, 2009
10:13 AM

Post #6858416

I remember my dad referring to a shoofly pie. Anyone else heard of or made this pie?

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


July 24, 2009
6:45 PM

Post #6860156

Well, I made a call to the Fancy Farm Post Office and now we have a date, and I even included a reference to the 'sun scald' preventative. Look for it this coming spring in the line-up.
Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

July 24, 2009
8:48 PM

Post #6860581

My mom used to pick the flowers off the squash plants and fry them. I have heard of sho fly pie

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 25, 2009
2:56 AM

Post #6861998

Fancy Farm is outside Mayfield, Ky. That's where my maternal grandmother was born and raised. She still lives on her farm outside Latham, TN in Weakley County and turns 90 next month. I'll try to ask her about Fancy Farm.

melody

melody
Benton, KY
(Zone 7a)


July 25, 2009
12:33 PM

Post #6862816

Yep, I'm about 30 miles from there over on the lakes.

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

July 25, 2009
12:58 PM

Post #6862883

I can't believe that I accidently ran across this while looking for a potato pancake recipe. It's the 1918 Fannie Farmer cookbook online.

http://www.bartleby.com/87/

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