Photo by Melody
Guess what time it is? It's time for the DG County Fair! Now in it's sixth year, enter your blue-ribbon photos or mouth-watering recipes for a chance to win a gift subscription! Click here here to get all the details, dates and entry rules.

Tropical Zone Gardening: Tropical Herbs and Spice!

Communities > Forums > Tropical Zone Gardening
bookmark
Forum: Tropical Zone GardeningReplies: 135, Views: 1,203
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
2:08 AM

Post #6026479

Here is a Cacao Tree, Theobroma cacao. The source of Chocolate!

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
2:19 AM

Post #6026514

This is Forastero a common field cacao in Central and South America.

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

January 20, 2009
2:19 AM

Post #6026515

My favorite food!!! Too bad that tree can't grow up here! Then I could make and eat all the chocolate I wanted. lol

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
2:30 AM

Post #6026549

This is Criollo cacao, a less commonly grown tree that produces somewhat smaller pods, but makes a richer / stronger flavored chocolate. Criollo and Forestero beans are often mixed to make a blended chocolate.

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
2:42 AM

Post #6026588

On top left is a ripe Criollo pod; under is cacao beans fermenting; right is cleaned dried fermented cacao beans ready to be roasted.

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
2:55 AM

Post #6026625

At last there is roasted cacao beans, ground, and made into a stimulating drink that makes coffee jealous!

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
3:41 AM

Post #6026825

The hardest part of making chocolate is growing it.

Below is a Criollo pod, split with seeds showing; and choice seed (Forastero) ready to plant.

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
3:52 AM

Post #6026861

Here are young Cacao trees, soon ready for the field.

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 20, 2009
11:03 AM

Post #6027429

Wow how very interesting; so - you make your own chocolate!?

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
11:19 AM

Post #6027448

Yes, a crude form of chocolate is made by sending beans through a poppy seed grinder, then gently heating the resulting ground paste with agave syrup or honey, and stirring it till it's smooth, and adding vanilla extract. Place the chocolate in a mould and cool, and cut into servings.
Flavorings such as orange peel, coffee, mint, cardamom, etc., can be added during the grinding process by mixing them with the beans in the poppy seed grinder.
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 20, 2009
11:33 AM

Post #6027465

Can you send me some ? LOL

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
11:43 AM

Post #6027478

Some day I hope to provide organic raw and roasted chocolates.

Aloha, Dave
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

January 20, 2009
3:32 PM

Post #6028100

I have never seen a Cocao bean or tree before, how very cool to have a chocolate farm! Thanks for the interesting pics - how long does it take to go from seed to producing tree?

Aloha.
goofybulb
El Paso, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 20, 2009
6:12 PM

Post #6028606

Oh, Dave, I was wondering when you will start this thread, you talked about it some time ago! As always, beautiful and rich in info!

If you decide to sell chocolate, I wanna be your first client!

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
7:17 PM

Post #6028844

The trees take about 4-5 years before they start to produce. In about 10 years they reach full production.

This Forastero tree has been in the ground for 12 years.

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 20, 2009
7:40 PM

Post #6028907

hey goofy - I was first LOL...
goofybulb
El Paso, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 20, 2009
7:52 PM

Post #6028939

OK, Duchlady! We're not going to fight, I'll be second! Surely Dave will have enough for both, or in fact for everyone in this forum!
astcgirl
Brandon, FL
(Zone 9b)

January 20, 2009
8:05 PM

Post #6028974

Thank you for posting, very interesting. I have a small seedling I hope oneday (emphasis on oneday) to plant in the ground. Tasted fresh cocoa beans on a trip to Mexico, I can just imagine those made into a hot chocolate like you posted. YUMMY. Do just add the gound beans with a sweetener like honey to make the drink?

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 20, 2009
8:25 PM

Post #6029044

The drink is simply made by grinding up the dried raw or roasted beans and dropping it in cool water, then slowly bringing it to a boil (medium heat) in a pan, turn off the heat, capping it for at least 5 minutes, then strained into a cup.

I put milk in it; sweetener can be added; a few drops of vanilla extract is good too!

Mocha (cacao & coffee mix) is a good way to start the day!
astcgirl
Brandon, FL
(Zone 9b)

January 20, 2009
8:41 PM

Post #6029081

Sounds delicious...thank you!
JPlunket
Vieques, PR

January 20, 2009
11:21 PM

Post #6029580

Trivia point: cacao is unusual in that its fruit stems directly from the trunk --there's a word for that behavior, but I can't call it to mind.
JPlunket
Vieques, PR

January 20, 2009
11:24 PM

Post #6029590

oh, yeah, "caulifory" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cauliflory

This behavior allows trees to be pollinated have their seeds dispersed by animals which cannot climb or fly.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 21, 2009
1:52 AM

Post #6030210

Cacao does exhibit cauliflory, but its flowers are fertilized by midges and other tiny flies. It is good to toss banana peels, citrus, and other rotting fruit (compost bucket) under the cacao trees when they are flowering to attract little flying insects.

The flowers are about 1 cm (1/2 in.) across; so far I can't get a clear photo of them.
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

January 22, 2009
6:29 PM

Post #6036871

Great Dave...always wondered how it was produced!!!!
stellamarina
Laie, HI

January 23, 2009
12:58 AM

Post #6038354

Cocoa made from roasted cocoa beans is a daily drink in Samoa. (I lived there for several years) They roast the beans over a fire on a metal drum lid and then pound them in a wooden bowl with a smooth big rock. Then put the cocoa paste into a kettle with water and bring it to the boil and then add lots of sugar. Strong enough to make your hair curl! I always loved seeing the colors of the cacao pods...like the colors of fire. One day I was at our local city dump here in Hawaii and I saw a rooster eating something. When I looked to see what it was it was a cacao pod with the seeds sprouting. I jumped into the trash and got the pod and was able to grow a few dozen trees for local Samoan gardeners to have. My own garden is too near the ocean for me to want to bother with it in my own garden...too sensitive to salt winds.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

January 23, 2009
12:59 AM

Post #6038358

A compost bucket to aid in pollination - who'd have thunk it! Thanks for the interesting topic, Dave.
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 23, 2009
1:11 AM

Post #6038399

I agree, I learned a lot.
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

January 23, 2009
2:28 AM

Post #6038700

Dave...Bob is processing our Cacao beans to make chocolate for the grandkeikis...we may call you for help!!!! We have 4 or 5 trees and they really produce! Do you think it is worthwhile to plant more?

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 23, 2009
2:44 AM

Post #6038757

No doubt Carol! Chocolate is the "Food of the Gods"! Learning how to eat the stuff, is the education of Angels!
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

January 23, 2009
5:35 AM

Post #6039233

OOOOoooooo. There are more ways than by the truffle? The DOVE?...do go on...
Maybe I could get excited about them...working really hard just to make me really fat seems futile (why work hard?) but if it were diverse and worth tasting rather than swilling... It would be fascinating. Really!!!

AH - Dave...question: After Bob read your thread, he told me there were two Cacao out by his greenhouse. Anything growing there is toast because the Ficus Banyan's roots are all in there...heck, the 'dirt' is getting like particle board! So, these two miserable trees are in pots growing into the ground(?). The trunk is about 4' high with little leaves/branches at the very top. Bob wants to make it shorter cutting the trunk completely off (like 'stumping' coffee trees). Would you fertilize like heck and 'stump' before transplanting and move it only when new growth appeared OR would you transplant it, wait until it is settled in and producing new growth and then whack it? #2 is my vote - #1 is Bob's. Now...you can avoid us having a messey divorce if you can tell us what to do. Mahalo

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 23, 2009
9:18 PM

Post #6041708

Hi Carol, it would be good to cut the plants back before transplanting them, to avoid transplant shock.
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

January 23, 2009
11:29 PM

Post #6042301

He, of course, paid no attention to me and did it both ways (two trees, two systems).

Can I come up and see your Chocolate Factory?
Bignonia
Atenas
Costa Rica

January 24, 2009
12:16 AM

Post #6042532

Here in Costa Rica Theobroma cacao plantations got a disease= caused by a fungus Monilia, the fruit turns black like rotten. My cousin from the caribean side of this country had plantations of this delicious cacao, I understood that the growers learned how to pollinated the flowers.
Once at my house, my grandmother obtained a big ball of cacao from dry seeds.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 24, 2009
3:49 AM

Post #6043419

Hi Carol, you are certainly welcome to check out my place, hope you won't be in shock from the simple way that I live.

Within a few weeks I will have put together a demonstration on how to make chocolate, in a crude yet tasty form! That would be a great time to stop by; I'll let you know when everything is ready.

Not anything close to a chocolate factory; all is done with old fashioned mills and grinders, and simple kitchen equipment. Stuff that anyone could reproduce in their own home!

Producing cacao in this area could provide an agricultural industry that few have taken advantage of yet.
The field that Hershey Co. helped to put together in Kea'au, produced cacao beans that had twice the average butter-fat of beans produced elsewhere in the world. It is a shame that they abandoned the project, just because the fields that they sponsored in Ka'anapali, Maui failed miserably!
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

January 24, 2009
5:53 AM

Post #6043745

hmmmmmmmmmm... The lights are going on...

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 24, 2009
2:57 PM

Post #6044464

Aloha.

Oh, my hawai'ian friends... My heart is heavy this morning. Life has a way of throwing curves at you. Reading about you guys growing cacao makes it even worse. I truly left a part of myself in the islands when I visited Hawai'i. How I wish I were among you in Paradise.

Mahalo nui loa for this extremely interesting thread, specially for someone who has yet to encounter a form of chocolate he doesn't like. My favorite: very dark chocolate with hot pepper inclusions in it: not for the keikis but oh so truly addictive once you get used to the idea.

I am not good company this morning. It will pass. Tomorrow will be better.

Aloha.
Pu'ole, a.k.a. Sylvain.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

January 24, 2009
4:14 PM

Post #6044772

Lol Sylvain - I am with you - food of the Gods, and I don't really have much of a sweet tooth!

Dave, tell us about the plantation at Ka'anapali and why it failed...you could even find a field to plant in up there now with all the new building going on. You wouldn't recognise the whole area, there is hardly an inch of land left, they are even building up the hills mauka from Lahaina..
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

January 24, 2009
4:57 PM

Post #6044973

David...and what Cacao did they plant in Keaau? The same that we have?

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 24, 2009
8:14 PM

Post #6045810

I don't know exactly where the cacao in Ka'anapali was planted, but that it was mauka of the tourist area.
It is my understanding that Hershey Co. and Amway, and some local investors started several fields of cacao to see what type of product they could produce in Hawai'i. Ka'anapali is where they made the biggest effort, but the climate there was not favorable for good production. Even though the Kea'au planting was very successful, they gave up on the whole project.

The Kea'au planting is right beside the "Banyan Inn", just outside of Old Kea'au Town by the new schools.
There is 10 acres planted there, with several varieties of cacao. My Forestero trees originated from there.
Several years ago, Bob Cooper began leasing the field in Kea'au for his business, which is (I think) "The Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory".

From what I can gather, the cacao tree loves cool wet weather. I have tasted chocolate made from beans grown in lower Puna, and it is not as rich as the same from my trees. The hot cocoa drink made from my beans seems to consistently have more fat in it than the lower Puna beans.
The main difference is that lower Puna is hot and dry, while up here it is cooler and wetter. Down country the trees need to be shaded; up here they can be grown in full sun.
Bignonia
Atenas
Costa Rica

January 24, 2009
8:38 PM

Post #6045873

varities of cacao here in Costa Rica have been grown in the Atlantic Coast of Costa Rica or our south pacific. Low altittude, very humid. It rains almost the whole year. (tropical rain forest). Rainy and high humidity (80% or more). As I explained before this kind of environmment improved the problem with Monilia (fungus). Nowadays I guess there are varieties tolerant to this disease.

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 26, 2009
2:26 PM

Post #6052597

Mauka...Mauka... my hawai'ian is extremely weak at best. The Hawai'ian dictionnary tells me it may mean "inland". When I re-read the sentence, it makes sense. I have learned something new today. Thank you for the enlightenment. Now, if it doesn't mean inland, someone PLEASE correct me.

Have a great day, all.
Pu'ole, a.k.a. Sylvain.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

January 26, 2009
4:41 PM

Post #6053090

Sorry for being so dense, but is it the fungus that makes the pods richer?

You got it Pu'ole, commonly used expression round here to describe direction, even on the local weather forcast. The direction toward the sea is makai,( kai is the Hawaiian word for the sea).

Internet problems this morning here...

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 26, 2009
6:38 PM

Post #6053612

The climate where the trees are grown, and good cultivation practices, make the beans rich with butter-fat.
Fermentation is what gives the beans their classic chocolate flavor.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 26, 2009
8:11 PM

Post #6053942

An interesting site that goes through the process of making commercial chocolate can be found at:

http://www.fieldmuseum.org/CHOCOLATE/making.html

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 26, 2009
10:33 PM

Post #6054556

Very interesting site, Metrosideros. Isn't chocolate unbelievably interesting in all its aspects?

Oh, what a delicious addiction. I could just see myself in a Chocolate Anonymous meeting standing before everyone and proclaiming:

"Hi, my name is Sylvain and I am hopelessly addicted to chocolate. As a matter of fact, Here... I brought some samples for everyone".

They would kick my sorry behind out of that meeting before I had finished opening the samples of homemade chocolate truffles, almond bark, mayonnaise chocolate cake and fudge I have brought just for that occasion.

I am trying to learn a few words of hawai'ian here and there because some day, I shall return to the islands. It's a promise I make to myself, not a threat to the islands.

Keep well, everyone.
Aloha.
Pu'ole, a.k.a. Sylvain.
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

January 26, 2009
11:07 PM

Post #6054699

A good word for that is... li'i li'i...little by little (a hicup sound where the single quotes are)
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 27, 2009
12:21 AM

Post #6054997

Sylvain, you are not the only one yearning for the islands. Once was definitely not enough.
Carol, I am so envious of your visit this week. If only, if only, if only...

Princess Kilikina
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

January 27, 2009
1:10 AM

Post #6055235

AH...I am looking forward to it too, Christi. I have never been in Kula where I will be staying. I have packed a box with some pressies...
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 27, 2009
3:51 PM

Post #6057520

Don't let anyone drag you down in the water and break your foot.
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

January 27, 2009
4:11 PM

Post #6057615

Dave, a very interesting site on the growing and making the chocolate, thank you. I had no idea that most of our chocolate beans are grown in Western Africa or what a labor intensive ordeal it must be to be a farmer. Interesting that the pods ripen year round instead of one or two large crops a year. Very enjoyable, and educational.

Pouring with rain here on Maui this morning - I hope it's going to clear up for Wednesday when Carol comes down the mountain from Kula! I am so looking forward to seeing her, and hope we can get that snorkle trip in. We will be careful of Carols' feet Christi!

Aloha!
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 27, 2009
4:29 PM

Post #6057702

Ice here today.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

January 27, 2009
6:46 PM

Post #6058318

Some ice and snoe here too.

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 28, 2009
2:18 PM

Post #6061473

BHM, Carol, have a great time together. I will be with you in spirit.

In sub-tropical Delray Beach this morning, It is currently 75 degrees with a delightful softbreeze. I live in the mauka part of Delray.

Spring fever has hit this polar bear. As the eskimos say in such dire times: we'll live longer if we take cover and wait.
Yesterday, I have restocked my little above-ground pond with 24 golfish, the filter has been cleaned and everyone seems happy in there.

Also, I have decided that this is the time to put this collection of potted plants hanging around my carport in the ground or the rubbish. Just so I am not off-topic, I have purchased a rosemary plant yesterday. It should go into the ground with the rest today.

Aloha,
Pu'ole, a.k.a. Sylvain
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 28, 2009
3:30 PM

Post #6061811

What a day. Dallas and most of the states are paralyzed with ice this morning. More time to look at the gardening magazines.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

January 28, 2009
8:17 PM

Post #6063095

Don't go out if you don't have to LouC. I got lucky and only got a little bit of ice and a dusting of snow. It went north, east and south of us.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

January 28, 2009
8:17 PM

Post #6063100

Sylvain, you have great weather going on there!!
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 28, 2009
8:58 PM

Post #6063433

You won't believe it. 19 this morning covered with ice. Right now at almost 3pm no ice and it is 45 degrees no wind so it feels warm.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

January 29, 2009
12:06 AM

Post #6064329

We reached above freezing today, barely. Most of the ice and snow is gone. Will be all gone tomorrow. When I went outside this morning it was 26* and it felt good. LOL
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

January 29, 2009
6:18 AM

Post #6065610

Doesn't sound like anyone would be thrilled with knowing about Hawaii weather? 250 miles to the north (rough guess) it is socked in with clouds, about 60 degs with a cold wind driving the pouring rain at a 90deg. angle...here in Hilo it was beautiful in the lower 70s with a nice breeze. It's called weather in the middle of the ocean around three of the tallest mountains in the world which can stop and deflect weather. Always exciting, never boring.
johnpeten
San Andres, Peten
Guatemala

January 29, 2009
1:03 PM

Post #6065943

Hi Dave, Reading your expose on Cacao was very interesting. As I live in Mesoamerica within a stones throw of the great Maya cities of Tikal and El Mirador I should know all about Cacao. I am totally ignorant and have never seen a tree here, only in the West Indies.
The locals and my Maya gardener know nothing about Cacao. In theory I should be able to throw some seeds into my garden and in about 3 years start producing pods.
I discovered that, as in Hawaii, Hershey made expeditions here but the projects came to nothing. Why don't we grow Cocao here? The reason is economic. Although Chocolate is very expensive the price that a farmer receives for the finished bean is very low and a profit is not possible. It is more profitable to grow Corn and Beans.
We have a similar situation with Coffee. Many of the large private Coffee Fincas have gone out of business. Local co-operatives now produce coffee but only receive a few dollars for 100 lb bags of dried beans (about 10c a pound). The members still live in hovels and are barely existing.

Thumbnail by johnpeten
Click the image for an enlarged view.

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 29, 2009
2:43 PM

Post #6066222

I was in Roatan (Honduras) 3 weeks ago and I was delighted to find some "equitable" ground coffee from a cooperative of small growers in the mountains. I bought about 10 lbs of the stuff and it is delicious: tasty, full-bodied almost robust without being acrid.

There should be more such cooperatives.

Sylvain.
johnpeten
San Andres, Peten
Guatemala

January 29, 2009
5:31 PM

Post #6066925

I buy excellent coffee grown, roasted and ground here. It still costs me about $3 a pound.

Roatan is renowned for it's diving. Do you scuba?

John

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 29, 2009
5:57 PM

Post #6067048

Hey John, in Hawai'i a farmer could never do well by growing and selling cacao beans.
The only sensible way to make their production worthwhile is for the farmer to grow the beans and make the finished product as well.
The cost of making a high quality chocolate is too expensive for any common person. The machinery alone is not within most people's budgets. The time is consuming too; who has the time to conch (heat and stir) their chocolate for two to seven days?

I like the idea of a cooperative (thanks Sylvain!) and have been encouraging my family and friends to plant cacao, as well as Vanilla to flavor the stuff with.

Now I need to figure out how to make sweetener out of Agave!

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 29, 2009
6:10 PM

Post #6067123

Vanilla!

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 29, 2009
6:56 PM

Post #6067282

Is that your property? It is beautiful.

Christi

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 29, 2009
7:31 PM

Post #6067432

Hi Christi, the photo is part of my Agave & Aloe garden. The gazebo is mine; the structure to the left of that is my neighbors.

Here is another view of the Agave garden.

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 29, 2009
7:53 PM

Post #6067494

Here are Vanilla beans!

Freshly harvested beans (green); cured and dried; and Vanilla beans being made into extract with dark rum!

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 29, 2009
8:14 PM

Post #6067559

luscious.

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 29, 2009
8:21 PM

Post #6067585

OK! What we have here is a definite case of Hawai'i envy.

I love your agave garden. Let's get our heads together and make tequilla cooperative. The world has enough sweeteners as it is and one can always use a bit more tequilla.

As far as the vanilla beans are concerned, it only reinforces my Hawai'i envy. I have 3 vanilla orchid plants at home but they don't even produce as much as a new leaf a year. They just want to go back to Madgascar or Hawai'i.

A fru-fru food store was closing when I lived in Canada. I took advantage of a liquidation sale and acquired a dozen vanilla beans, which I steeped in a 26-oz bottle of 94%alcohol for a couple months. Quebec is the only province in Canada where alcohol is legally sold. It produced glorious vanilla. Those were the days, my friend.

Take care.
Pu'ole, a.k.a. Sylvain.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 29, 2009
8:29 PM

Post #6067613

Hey, Sylvain. I'm with you. Maybe Carol would sell a couple of acres of her plantation and we could each have one and grow all kinds of beautiful things. Mitch left a blue agave with me when he moved to Oklahoma. I think that is the one that "Patron" uses.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 29, 2009
8:59 PM

Post #6067682

Most of the Blue Agave in cultivation is Agave americana.

The best tequila is made from Agave tequilana and its close relative Agave angustifolia.

Agave americana is a good plant for making "pulque", which is basically Agave beer!

Here is a variegated form of Agave angustifolia.

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 29, 2009
9:15 PM

Post #6067747

Dave, between you, Carol and RJ there is little in the plant world that you don't cover. I am always amazed and thrilled when you offer education. I'm still at the point where : I have a blue flower, a red flower, a white flower...a...ad infinitum...

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 29, 2009
9:49 PM

Post #6067878

Thanks for the compliments! The plants are easy; once you get here it just seems like the right thing to do to start making gardens.

Here's some more Agave and Yucca.

Thumbnail by Metrosideros
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 29, 2009
10:01 PM

Post #6067919

Quebec is the only province in Canada where alcohol is legally sold

I never knew that...
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 29, 2009
10:12 PM

Post #6067960

Hetty, I knew I would get myself in trouble naming names. "Dutchlady" is another with uncommon knowledge. Actually, there's no place to stop when I think of all the wonderful people on DG.
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

January 29, 2009
11:24 PM

Post #6068247

Absolutely fascinating thread! Thanks Dave! Carol, you should post some of your spice trees...then the title of the thread and the contents would make us all want to experiment! Hmmm let's see...mocha/cinnamon for breakfast...add a touch more vanilla for lunch, hmmm allspice for dinner...

The economics of the production of both chocolate and coffee in all these varied places is also fascinating. Alas the need for the "marketable" product has caused many more interesting items to be pushed to the wayside all too often. I love the idea of the co-op Dave. Good luck with that!

Yokwe all,
Shari
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 29, 2009
11:31 PM

Post #6068273

Hi, Shari. Glad to see you. If these could be raised in a container you would be the one to do it.

PK
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

January 29, 2009
11:36 PM

Post #6068285

Christi you give me waaay too much credit! My environment is much too harsh for most herbs and spices...too much salt in lots of hot wind. But I can dream along with others when reading these marvelous posts. How you doing Sweetie?

Yokwe,
Shari
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 30, 2009
12:35 AM

Post #6068514

Eating waaaay too much. Mike just cooked shrimp and okra...too full. He cooks, I eat!
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

January 30, 2009
12:51 AM

Post #6068564

Dave...just read the new posts...I was on Maui. John up in Nino'ole often sells his Cacao seeds to some hippy farmers who pay BIG BUCKS for them...like nearly $20 a pound!

Couldn't you sell to the Chocolate FruFrus...you know who I mean...they do alot of tastings in Volcano and in Kona...
pogonantha
el arish, FNQ
Australia

January 30, 2009
1:13 AM

Post #6068645

Dave, This article is a bit old but I thought you might enjoy it. Lots of Cacao and Teak replacing sugarcane in this area. Ann
http://www2.dpi.qld.gov.au/horticulture/6223.html

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

January 30, 2009
1:29 AM

Post #6068720

Yes, Québec is the only province in Canada where you can purchase pure alcohol. Spirits like gin, vodka, rhum, cognac, etc. are available throughout Canada but if you are looking for pure unadulterated alcohol, Québec is the only place where you'll find it.

Sylvain.
johnpeten
San Andres, Peten
Guatemala

January 30, 2009
2:21 AM

Post #6068976

Co-operatives are now, more or less, the only way to go for the workers to survive.. All the common vegetables up to more exotic products are now produced by co-ops. Many of ours are started with outside help(seed money).

The various cacaos and coffees (arabica and robusta) all trade internationally at similar prices, on average about $1.30 a pound. The farmer gets a lot more coffee for his investment than he would with cacao and the drying process is simpler, but at 10 cents a pound he is not going to get rich quick.
A cottage industry making chocolate sounds a wonderful idea. A large part of our population relies on micro businesses to put food in the pot.
I worked for Nestle, most of my life in different locations and have seen the chocolate conches at work. A long slow process without any chance of modernisation. Not at all like Willy Wonka's place. Some of the overhead belt driven machinery I saw was probably made during the reign of Queen Victoria.
pogonantha
el arish, FNQ
Australia

January 30, 2009
3:01 AM

Post #6069127

All over Australian agriculture "Value Adding" is the big thing. From wool sweaters that are produced on the farm, tropical wineries that use fruit seconds and do tastings for tourists to our Biodynamic milk/cheese/yogurt producers that have gotten huge.

Ann
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 30, 2009
3:51 AM

Post #6069298

When possible, we try to support the farmer and anyone else that is growing/making the product themselves. If we knew where to start we would purchase Kona coffee. Can anyone give us a clue. Now I am speaking of a coop or such...not a major company.

PK

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 30, 2009
5:30 AM

Post #6069580

Doesn't Mlassi grow gormet coffee?


Hawai'i Coffee Connection, LLC
P.O. Box 1767
Kealakekua, HI 96750

808-322-1895 owner Laurie Llanes

http://www.Hawaii-Coffee-Connection.com

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 30, 2009
5:46 AM

Post #6069604

I looked up the above website and found they are a bit high priced.

If you google Hawaiian Coffee, you will find a large selection with many private companies / growers.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


January 30, 2009
9:44 AM

Post #6069797

Hey Carol, I haven't looked much into selling cacao yet as I am just now starting to get consistent production.
I use most of what I get, and am trying to figure out a good recipe and process for making homemade chocolate.
I like the idea of using fruit to sweeten the chocolate with; it would be good if I could come up with a chocolate treat that is not bad for diabetics.

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 1, 2009
7:27 PM

Post #6079303

Oh, I do so love this thread. Thanks to all its contributors. Malama you all!

We found Kona coffee on Oahu when we went to the Costco in Honolulu. You entered the warehouse and this aroma of roasting coffee just assailed your nostrils. There was a guy in there who roasted Kona coffee right in the warehouse, cooled it down, packaged it and sold it just as fast as he could. We bought about 15 bags of coffee. Compared to the $25.00/lb they charge here for Kona coffee, it was worth buying an extra suitcase to bring it back home. Luckily, our luggage came from Costco so the new one matched the set.

Metrosideros, there is such a thing as diabetic chocolate. That's the ones that dietitians (food terrorists with a diploma) do not tell you about: the ones that contain 85% cocoa or more all have so little sugar as to be almost diabetic friendly. It's a manageable risk when used in moderation. The trick is in reading the nutrition facts pannel closely.
<
Gail and I also try to encourage the producer whenever we can. When we lived in Canada, the government of the province of Québec announced its misguided intention to stop the importation of unpasteurized cheese. What were they thinking about? The finest european cheeses are not pasteurized or made from pasteurized milk. Petitions circulated, people got quite huffy about the whole thing.

Upon scrutinizing the proposed law closely, many people realized it didn't mention locally-produced unpasteurized cheeses. A plethora of high-end locally-produced cheeses started appearing on the market to everyone's great delight. Realizing their foolishness, the government backed away from its plans. Quebecers now have quite an array of fine cheeses to choose from.

Take care, all.
Pu'Ole, a.k.a. Sylvain.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2009
8:17 PM

Post #6079584

Can you recommend the cheeses and where to purchase? I could live on cheese alone. Come from a line of dairy farmers, both cow and goat, and they could some of the best cheeses ever. When I was child my mother belonged to "Cheese of the month Club" and taught me there was more than Velveta (cheese?) and cheddar. Here I go again, OT. Sorry.

Christi aka Princess Kilikina

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 2, 2009
11:03 PM

Post #6084684

Those cheeses are only marketed in Québec. They come from cottage industries, micro-producers or just a bit larger than that. Tdon't seem to feel the need to go outside the country to market their products.

I imagine they couldn't keep up with the demand if they were to market in other countries, such as the US; not that we couldn't use a wider selection of fine imported cheeses, you understand.

My favorite cheeses to buy here come from Costco, who is slowly expanding its fine cheese selection and taming the public into:
a) trying them; and
b) purchasing them (if they don't faint).

Always in stock in our refrigerator: Parmegiano Reggiano, Swiss, Dubliner, a chunk of aged cheddar, some american slices and some kind of blue cheese. Beyond that is a case of seasonal availability at Costco's. We enjoyed a great Stilton around Christmas. It varies, kind of like the Cheese Of The Month club.

Take care, all.
Sylvain.
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 3, 2009
2:12 AM

Post #6085654

What? No Dutch cheese?!
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

February 3, 2009
3:03 AM

Post #6085880

OH...this area is a wasteland for good cheeses...unless you have recently robbed a bank!! Costco is a 2 or 3 hour drive which I do maybe once a year... sigh... Going to the Pacific NW on Wednesday and hope to gorge on some good Cambozola, some good cheddar (Loires...do you know about the Western Washington White Cheddar/) and...well...a lot of really smelly ones!!!
Islandshari
Kwajalein
Marshall Islands
(Zone 11)

February 3, 2009
3:17 AM

Post #6085925

Hetty...this is a cute little "dutch cheese" story. I have a dutch friend - Gerhard - whom I met in Saudi Arabia. His last name is Tip, and the Saudi's refer to garbage dumps as "tips" so they thought his paperwork was wrong and put his name down as Herr Nederlander. We would go shopping together, and he had me using the correct pronounciation of the cheeses, instead of the English versions. We were at the cheese counter and I had ordered some "howda" said all gurgly on the "how" part just as he instructed. The cheeseman at the counter knew us so called back "Howdy to you as well Herr Nederlander, Ms. Shari. What can I get you today?" We started laughing, it grew and, naturally being contagious, those around us were laughing...no one spoke the same language, but we just kept laughing. When someone tried to find out what was funny, we would peal off in new fits of hilarity. Finally we caught our breath, and ordered our cheese. He was out, and we ended up with Havarti. That got us started again. It was a fun day at the market that I will never forget.

Yokwe,
Shari
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 3, 2009
5:03 AM

Post #6086248

Herbal Leaf Plant Identification. What is it? Can anyone help identify this tall leafy herbal plant. Any information on this plant would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. Dr Hugo

Thumbnail by drhugo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 3, 2009
10:09 AM

Post #6086501

Shari that is a funny story and I can just imagine the scene.
But to end up with Danish cheese when you wanted Dutch - oh the horror!!
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 3, 2009
2:09 PM

Post #6086966

Having heard your laugh in person not surprised at others joining in...definitely contagious.
When this darlin' lady smiles, her entire face smiles.

Think I might to go to Costco in a bit. Getting really hungry for cheese.

Christi

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


February 3, 2009
9:10 PM

Post #6088896

Hi Dr Hugo, are there any flowers, fruit or seed-pods to show of your plant?
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 4, 2009
1:08 AM

Post #6089933

Hello Metrosideros,
Thank you for your reply. The only photo I have right now is the one (slightly out of focus) of the white flower buds. In fact, I have never seen the flowers bloom and am wondering if most of the plants are male and only the female one has flowers?? Or the other way round?? I am keeping watch on it and the moment the flowers develop fully I will post up the picture for you. The plant, claimed by many to have incredible antioxidant and healing properties is known locally only as the "South African herbal leaf plant." Any identification information you may be able to find and share would be greatly appreciated. Cheers! Dr Hugo

Thumbnail by drhugo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


February 4, 2009
2:54 AM

Post #6090438

Thanks Dr Hugo, it will be important to see the mature flowers.

From what I can see, the plant has paired flowers (is this true?). If so it may be in the Apocynaceae Family.
Does the plant have milky sap? Does it have star shaped funnel-like flowers? Can you describe the fruit?

The plant looks similar to a Tabernanthe. Maybe, Tabernanthe iboga, the African Iboga plant. It is very medicinal, and also potentially toxic. It is known to cure drug addicts, but has also killed people!

Please be careful to identify any plant which you plan to put in your body!

Aloha, Dave
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 4, 2009
2:25 PM

Post #6091711

Hi Metrosideros,
Thanks for your reply and warning although I am sure it is not toxic as many people have been taking this leaf as a medicinal herb for many years and nobody has ever died! They claim only that they have been healed! No, it also has no milky sap or any noticeable sap when we cut it for stem cuttings. It has no fruit. The flowers do not seem as if they are paired but single, but most of the plants we have and see growing around the island have no flowers, only leaves. Only one of my plant's flower buds are a little bigger today and look as if they might bloom over the next few days so I will make sure to take pictures and send them to you. So at this stage I can not really say or not whether the flowers are "star shaped funnel-like flowers." Thanks for your feedback and I look forward to hearing from you again if you find any new information. Cheers! Dr Hugo
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

February 4, 2009
4:35 PM

Post #6092246

Dr. Hugo... someone closer to you, in Kota Kinabalu is an interesting fellow AND botanist: Tony Lamb. I can't find his card, but he works closely with Borneo Books who would know how to contact him. Tony built the Gardens in Tenom and has recently written a book on Hoyas (and has written books on Vireyas and other genera). You might contact him... I will try to get more contact information for you...

Carol
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 5, 2009
12:22 AM

Post #6094158

Hello Carol,
Thank you for your reply. Yes, if you can find his email, maybe I can contact him to help find out the identity of this amazing plant. One of mine is about to flower for the first time so I will post the photo of it when it fully blooms in the next few days hopefully. I will also try and track down Borneo Books to find Tony Lamb.
Cheers! Dr Hugo
Bignonia
Atenas
Costa Rica

February 5, 2009
1:14 PM

Post #6096042

Hola drhugo , how about some odor when you crushed the leaves of this plant.
Bignonia
Atenas
Costa Rica

February 5, 2009
2:28 PM

Post #6096269

Hola drhugo
I think in this link http://happyhomemaker88.wordpress.com/2008/08/02/quest-for-a-healthier-life/ is shown some info about this incognit plant.
Checking the common name might help us to identify this plant.

drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 5, 2009
3:25 PM

Post #6096509

Bignonia, Yes, thank you, this is the one at http://happyhomemaker88.wordpress.com/2008/08/02/quest-for-a-healthier-life/ although we still do not know its scientific name and will keep searching. Here is a photo of the plant's tiny flowers coming out. Cheers! Dr Hugo

Thumbnail by drhugo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 5, 2009
3:43 PM

Post #6096578

Hi Metrosideros & others,
Here is some info on the names and uses of the plant from the above link:
HYPERLINK@happyhomemaker88.wordpress.com]
What my Feng Shui Master (who is also a a healer and good with using local plants for health) taught me was this plant called in Cantonese - “Por See Yip” or “Lam Fei Yip” - in English translation “Persian Leaves” or “South African Leaves”. Well, because it is so excellent in treating many ailments, I have given it a nickname myself - “Magic Plant.”

It really grows easily and its health benefits are :-

1) reducing cholesterol

2) reducing urea acid

3) reducing wind or flatulence

4) balancing blood pressure

5) countering insomnia as it promotes good sleep at night

6) reducing high blood sugar levels

7) reduce fat and helps us to lose weight

8 ) remove other toxins from our body

If you can track down the scientific identity from the names above, let me know please ans thank you all for your efforts. As you see there are many healing characteristics to this humble plant. Cheers! Dr Hugo

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


February 5, 2009
6:20 PM

Post #6097315

Thanks for the new photo Dr Hugo. From the flowers it looks like a composite, possibly a Eupatorium or Ageratum.
Keep us posted on the flowers as they mature. Any close-ups of the flowers will help.
The seeds will be very small.

Several Eupatoriums and Ageratums are known to have medicinal qualities.
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 6, 2009
3:01 PM

Post #6101166

OK Metrosideros, Yes, the flowers are coming into full bloom today and I will take another photo for you tomorrow. One more Chinese (Cantonese) name for the plant is: "Hark Meen Jeong Kuan." The Chinese Feng Shui masters are familiar with the plant and prescribe it for chewing as well as making tea from many leaves. But nobody seems to know its scientific identity?? It is considered as an amazing cancer fighter by those who know about it (including Chinese doctors) and there are many people who have totally recovered from various forms of cancer claiming that this is the antioxidant plant that did it! Will send more photos for you in the morning. Cheers! Dr Hugo

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


February 6, 2009
5:34 PM

Post #6101895

Thanks Dr Hugo; please keep in mind that plants are identified by their key physical characters, rather than by their medicinal qualities.
Close-ups of all parts of the plant will be helpful in determining a species. Flowers, fruit, leaves, stems, growth habit, are all important in separating one species from another.
As this plant has amazing therapeutic promise, it is important to identify it as an individual.

Aloha, Dave
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 7, 2009
12:45 AM

Post #6103768

Metrosideros, All points taken, thank you. Please find attached a shot of the flowers coming out as a further physical characteristic of the plant. I will take more photos later as they fully bloom. Cheers!

Thumbnail by drhugo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


February 7, 2009
1:02 AM

Post #6103875

Good photos Dr Hugo!

I've been all over the web, and the only references to this plant that I can find are written by you on other web-sites!
So far Ageratina or Eupatorium are the closest Genera I can think of.
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 7, 2009
3:23 AM

Post #6104487

Thanks Metrosideros, Posted the same photo twice, soory, so here are two more later photos attached. It can not be Eupatorium which are non tropical plants, or Ageratum that grows in America (temperate climate) and reaches a height of only 18"! Some of my current plants are over 6 metres tall! I am also planting them alongside the fence as an extra green barrier and thay are all growing very fast. Let's keep on trying to identify it. Let me know if you come up with anything new. Thanks for your support and interest. Perhaps we can find a sponsor to do scientific research and development and who knows, we could launch a real cure for cancer and other life threatening diseases?? Cheers! Dr Hugo

Thumbnail by drhugo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 7, 2009
3:25 AM

Post #6104495

Here's one more photo of the miniature white flowers.

Thumbnail by drhugo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


February 7, 2009
6:05 PM

Post #6106556

Thanks Dr Hugo, I had no idea that it reaches six meters tall! Any information that you can give on it's physical characteristics will be helpful.

Aloha, Dave
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 8, 2009
2:25 PM

Post #6109424

Hi Dave,
No odour when crushing the leaves (Bignonia). Once they reach a few metres tall the trunk is quite wooded and strong. The photos I have posted and the ones on the link above (happyhomemakers) show the physical characteristics and I don't know what else I can add. Of over one dozen that I have growing in my tropical garden, only one has the white flowers as shown above. When chopping a mature branch and planting it about one foot deep, it starts to grow within a few days. I have just planted another twenty alongside part of my fence for landscaping effect and added privacy, and of course an unlimited supply of medicinal leaves, not just for ourselves (limit of 2 leaves per day according to traditional Chinese doctors) but for visitors and friends as well.
Can anyone recommend any research service or company that could examine the plant and analyse its special phytochemicals for health benefits?? Cheers! Dr Hugo
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 9, 2009
11:44 AM

Post #6113801

I've finally found the local Malay name for the plant: "Sambung Nyawa" which translates as "Life Connection" which in turn probably realtes to its "longevity" benefits. If anyone can find any more info based on this name, then let us all know and I will keep searching too. It is definitely a tropical plant and does not seem to be known outside Malaysia and Singapore, and maybe a few other equatorial places in the region, maybe Indonesia. Cheers! Dr Hugo
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 9, 2009
2:06 PM

Post #6114211

Finally found the scientific identity: Gynura procumbens. Look it up and learn about the amazing and wonderful benefits this plant has for our health. Cheers! Dr Hugo

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 9, 2009
3:10 PM

Post #6114517

I want one!

Sylvain.

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


February 9, 2009
9:53 PM

Post #6116355

Hi Dr Hugo. I can't see that your plant matches Gynura procumbens.

Gynura procumbens is described as a fleshy climber with greenish yellow flowers.
The leaves have more serration than your plant shows and they sometimes are purplish beneath.

Gynura procumbens has many therapeutic properties attributed to it, but the description does not fit your plant.
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 11, 2009
6:27 AM

Post #6122862

Hi Dave, Yes, I think you may be right and we have had a "false alarm identity crisis!" Especially also in view of the fact that the scientific name "Gynura Procumbens" is in contradiction to the physical attributes of the plant. From Latin: procumbens, procumbent - present participle of procumbere, to bend down : pro-, forward, -cumbere, to lie down. That is, the plant is definitely "low lying" and therefore can not reach heights of 5 or 6 metres as we have growing. One gardener in Indonesia would also agree as his "Sambung Nyawa" (the local Malay/Indonesian name often used synomously with GP) in the photos he has sent me never grow higher than 50cm! So we are still searching! Keep in touch and let me know if you discover any more clues to put us back on the right track. Cheers! Dr Hugo

drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 16, 2009
5:13 AM

Post #6145086

Is our search dead in the water? Where can we go from here to scientifically identify this wonderful plant?? Any more ideas anyone??
Braveheartsmom
Hillsborough , NC
(Zone 7a)

February 16, 2009
4:57 PM

Post #6146713

My bet is that Dave is still working on it!

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


February 16, 2009
5:51 PM

Post #6147003

Still hoping to find something!

One thing that may help is to make an herbarium sheet, to send to any local plant experts.
This is done by pressing a sample of the plant on a sheet of cardboard, including flowers and seeds. Include a description of the plant with the pressed and dried sample; the physical characteristics of the plant are key in identification, rather than it's medicinal qualities.

So far the plant looks like a shrub in the Composite Family, Asteraceae.
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

February 16, 2009
5:53 PM

Post #6147012

There is a great website at the University of British Colombia with an ID Forum...you might try there.
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 20, 2009
3:31 AM

Post #6163399

Thanks for the advice but we do not have any institution in Malaysia that I know of yet that can analyse the plant. I could prepare a herbarium sheet like you say Dave and send it to you?? Aloha, I have already posted many messages on the UBC Botanical website but everyone there also seems stumped. We found many new plants recently growing wild on the edge of the jungle and would love to harvest and dry the leaves to make herbal healing tea to help others with various ailments. What an irony ~ here we are in the Age of Information and I can't find the information we need! Any help from anyone would be eternally appreciated as I continue my search for the real identity of this wonderful plant. Cheers! Dr Hugo

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


February 22, 2009
10:04 AM

Post #6172643

Thanks Dr. Hugo, I would be glad to have an herbarium sheet of the plant; seeds would be better, I would like to grow the plant.
Maybe sending an herbarium sheet to the Tropicos section of Missouri Botanical Garden would help. I will track down how to go about that if you wish.
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

February 22, 2009
5:49 PM

Post #6173949

Sure it isn't a Cestrum?

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


February 22, 2009
6:01 PM

Post #6174009

Oh my! Cestrums are extremely poisonous members of the Nightshade Family (Solanaceae), though they are wonderfully fragrant.
AlohaHoya
Keaau, HI
(Zone 11)

February 22, 2009
7:48 PM

Post #6174411

Hmmm...one man's treat is another's poison!!!

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 22, 2009
9:58 PM

Post #6174950

A deadly plant, oh how I miss my toxic garden in Montreal: nothing but highly toxic, perrenial and preferably large-sized plants where the lawn contractor is not allowed to enter alone. I have to admit those dangerous plantsare still the ones that hold the highest fascination for me.

Sylvain.
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

February 24, 2009
10:13 AM

Post #6181969

Hi Dave, Yes I can prepare a herbarium sheet if you give me the guidelines. I can laminate the leaves for a start, and the small white flowers also. But where am I to find the seeds as I can never see any? I could snip young buds off before they bloom too. I don't suppose I could airmail or courier a few stem cuttings to you could I?? There are probably quarantine regulations against it. Stem cuttings are very hardy and often I have left them for days or even weeks in a bucket of water and when planted they just shoot up. I would really like to know the true identity of the plant so I could write a full description of it including all its uses for healing. Why do you think we are having so much trouble identifying the plant? We are now drying the leaves in the tropical sun and making tea from them as well as "chewing the cud." Please give me specific directions about how to prepare samples and send to where for professional identification and analysis. I look forward to your reply. Cheers! Dr Hugo

This message was edited Feb 25, 2009 6:39 AM
drhugo
Langkawi Island
Malaysia

April 13, 2009
2:40 PM

Post #6403356

I am still trying to identify this herbal plant. Some of the white flowers have burst and produced tiny seeds. But what is it called? Can anyone help?

Metrosideros

Metrosideros
Keaau, HI


April 13, 2009
4:44 PM

Post #6403979

Hi Dr Hugo, can you show the seeds on the plant, and separated?
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

April 20, 2009
5:35 AM

Post #6435524

Jim Duke has written several books on herbs, He has traveled extensively. Perhaps you can find a way to contact him. I'll look for my books tomorrow and see if they give a web address. Otherwise, you could google Dr. James Duke.

katiebear
Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

July 22, 2009
2:04 AM

Post #6848978

This has been excellent reading I am going to try to grow some cacao here for fun. I just wonder how big a 4 year old tree will be have to keep it in pots and green house for the winter months but it interesting to do the vanilla looks interesting too! Thanks so much for posting this...Dana Tumeric I like to grow my own too

Thumbnail by Danasplants
Click the image for an enlarged view.

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Tropical Zone Gardening Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Welcome! Terry 92 May 31, 2007 7:56 PM
Gardening In AUSTRALIA . Way Way South ! ginger749 170 Dec 6, 2012 8:33 PM
Fern erradication AlohaHoya 85 May 12, 2009 2:37 AM
plants - I promise! Islandshari 23 May 28, 2007 11:33 PM
dead bees on young crape myrtles tab2 5 Oct 31, 2009 3:58 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America