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Florida Gardening: Mango

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

February 3, 2009
7:56 PM

Post #6088564

Does anyone down here grow them?

This is a first for me.

:)

This message was edited Feb 3, 2009 2:56 PM

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

February 3, 2009
7:57 PM

Post #6088576

The blossoms look great.

Should I be worrying about cold nights?

Be well

: )

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Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 3, 2009
8:28 PM

Post #6088705

The blooms will be toast if you get a frost - but you don't get frost in the Keys don't you?
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 3, 2009
8:29 PM

Post #6088709

Here is what mine looked like last week

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Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 3, 2009
8:29 PM

Post #6088712

And this week it looks like this (I am violently allergic so it had to go)

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helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

February 3, 2009
8:52 PM

Post #6088829

Hello Hetty,
What did you plant on your stump finally? I thought the blue BB was beautiful. Perhaps if you fill the BB with blue Lobelia and red Geranium, just for spring, repeating the blue...
Longboat Key is not in the "Keys", it is an island west of Sarasota. I Live here.
We must have had some frost because all the SeaGrape planted on the ave. are brown.But annuals along the ave. are ok. Go figure. Must be the windchill. I think FlyBoyFL should cover his inasmuch as it looks young and not too big.
Helene
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 3, 2009
9:01 PM

Post #6088860

My mango trees can take a light/brief frost without losing their flowers, as long as they are still in the bud stage.

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Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 3, 2009
9:13 PM

Post #6088910

Fred's mangoes lost all their blooms in the frost of ten days ago.

Sorry about the Keys confusion.. I do this all the time...

I have the blue birdbath on the stump - will post a picture soon. I like the look and so does DH.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

February 3, 2009
10:08 PM

Post #6089105

Just came in from the Avenue, very windy, very cold. I did cover my Myer Lemon because it set some fruit.because it is in a pot the covering is easy.

Yeah, not every key fits. People do this all the time. We have siesta Key,Bird Key, Lido Key, St Armands Key with St Armands circle (great shopping) and Longboat Key, all west side of Sarasota. Hope all is well for tonite.
Rene10
Wauchula, FL
(Zone 9b)

February 3, 2009
10:37 PM

Post #6089213

I have small mango trees at my home on Little Gasparilla Island. They are in bloom, hope the cold doesn't hurt them.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

February 4, 2009
12:07 AM

Post #6089651

Boy oh boy -- Dutchlady~

You didn't give the poor tree a chance to recover

and Dale~

Thank goodness for your photo. Do you really get multiple fruit on each blossom cluster? How old is the tree. My branches seem much too fragile. Are you near the water? Your being north of us calms me a little. What variety is it?

Longboat Key is lucky. The warmth radiating from the waters tempers our weather. But it is cooling down right now.

and Helene~

My Myer lemon is against our home and on the southwest side. It is in full bloom. Some of the buds are already set. It looks like a good year for it. I had one fruit last year.

Be well guys -- and keep warm.

:)

Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 4, 2009
1:03 AM

Post #6089906

Brad - I didn't WANT it to recover. After allergic reactions to the fruit some years ago (resulting in never ever touching the fruit), this winter I had a violent reaction to the pollen - so it was time the mango tree and I parted ways.
Someone just came and collected all the wood this evening.
I'm sorry if this offends anyone but in my case it was 'Good Riddance'
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 4, 2009
1:39 AM

Post #6090078

Hetty, Mango is a relative of Poison Ivy. It contains a chemical that is similar to urushiol.

Flyboy, The photo of the mango tree above is not my tree. Most of the mangos around here will have more than one fruit if you have bees in your area. I am guessing that being away from the mainland, on an island, you are not going to have many bees. If you have no bees you are dependent on other insects (or the wind?)

Next time the Serenoa repens or Saw Palmetto are in bloom around your area check out what insects are visiting the flowers. Those are the insects that will pollinate your Mangos. If you don't have many 'visitors' to those flowers then you aren't going to get good fruit set on your trees. It can vary widely from island to island.

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Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 4, 2009
2:02 AM

Post #6090196

Yeah Dale, I learned that the hard way a few years ago... :-(

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

February 4, 2009
2:28 PM

Post #6091721

Hetty~

Now I understand, I missed that point about your allergies. It must have been pretty old. Did you plant it? If it really is a relative of Poison Ivy, I pity the man who is going to use it in his fireplace.

and Dale~

If that is a photo of what you have growing nearby, I have a Key Lime right adjacent -- and it gets a heavy dose of bees and other flying visitors. And there are also Myer lemon and Navel orange and Pink grapefruit and Sweet kumquat on my lot. So, here's hoping.

I also have an avocado that I started from seed -- but it's just one year old (and seven feet high), but I doubt I'll be around to taste its fruit.

Be well

: )
Dutchlady1
Naples, FL
(Zone 10a)

February 4, 2009
4:09 PM

Post #6092121

I did not plant the mango; I suspect it was planted around the time the house was built, 1972. It had a severe pruning two years ago, and still was enormous. We have had 400-500 fruit on that tree in good years, and this year looked like it was going to be a bumper crop. I wasn't going to wait around for those. For one thing they fall and break my plumeria :-o and used to break the roof tiles until we had it replaced. Those mangoes are huge (Keitt).
I won't miss the tree. There are so many people with mango trees in this area, I know we will have mangoes to eat in July.
I was aware of the relationship with Poinson Ivy. I didn't realize the toxins would be released when burning the wood...

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

February 4, 2009
6:07 PM

Post #6092639

if it is anything like poisen ivy, then yes, the smoke from burning the wood will make you break out with alergies/rashes. I had poisen ivy oil in a blouse, it hung in the closet for 2 years, not realizing that it was still in the cloth (even after washing it), I got the rash back.
Also had several rashes from the fireplace by burning oak that must have had some oils on the wood. I' be very careful. Helene

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

February 4, 2009
7:32 PM

Post #6092997

Far as I know there are no mango trees around me. Citrus, yes.

And, smoke from burning poison ivy will getcha, every time.

But, I still miss the smell of burning leaves in the autumn. I wonder if our world is any safer with the environmental-wackies.

Hear any news about global warming these days/

Be well

: )

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 5, 2009
2:43 AM

Post #6094718

We are feeling the effects of Global warming right now. All the melting ice is changing the ocean currents.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

February 5, 2009
3:02 PM

Post #6096407

wren~

I hope that you are joking. Right now we are having weather much colder than normal.

But as for melting ice from the arctic ice cap affecting our earth, consider this:

Take a bowl of water and float a big chunk of ice in it. Make sure that the water is filled to the brim. Allow the ice to melt and watch what happens to the level of water in the bowl, and note whether any water spills over the rim.

Trust me, it won't.

So much for flooding.

Be well

: )

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 5, 2009
4:58 PM

Post #6096977

It has something to do with the change of temperature in the water that changes the course of the currents, can not remember it all now. I think my brain froze last night. LOL

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

February 5, 2009
10:24 PM

Post #6098439

OK OK

But I suggest that you take the time to read: http://www.env-econ.net/2005/09/the_simonehrlic.html

I think that man, in his ingenuity and ability to adapt, can consume and still survive.

Be well

: )

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

March 18, 2009
6:07 PM

Post #6285675

Now I ned help.

The mango survived the original cold spells, albeit with the browning-out of some of the leaves. Seems to me, however, that the buds failed to germinate -- and are losing the petals and browning out.

Here is a photo of a bud end.

: )

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

March 18, 2009
6:09 PM

Post #6285690

However, the tree is sending out brand-new buds. (See photo)

Does it know that the originals have failed to germinate, and is giving me another chance for fruit this summer?

Any experts out there?

: )

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Darlacooper
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 18, 2009
11:16 PM

Post #6287014

I'm no expert, but thats what is sounds like to me. They may be plants but they seem to be pretty smart. They know they need to reproduce and make seeds.

Darla
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

March 18, 2009
11:27 PM

Post #6287055

FlyBoy,

Your photo of the browning buds and flowers is normal. You won't know for a couple of weeks if those trusses have set fruit, be patient. If you don't see little green pea size fruits in the next few weeks then you will know that they didn't get fertilized.

The second photo of the newly developing flowers in normal also.

I have a mango in my front yard and it does the same thing. I think the trees are smart enough to restrain itself and not flower all at once.

I don't see anything in your photos that is out of the ordinary.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

March 19, 2009
4:30 PM

Post #6289996

Thanks

Any sense in my trying to use a Q-tip to help spread the good stuff?

Be well

: )
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

March 19, 2009
11:51 PM

Post #6291947

A small paint brush works better...

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

March 20, 2009
12:57 AM

Post #6292276

I'll try it.

Any suggestions of romantic music I can hum as I do it?

Be well

: )
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

March 20, 2009
2:26 AM

Post #6292727

1812 Overture?

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

March 20, 2009
3:04 PM

Post #6294713

Nah

Something more romantic, maybe like: Deep Purple

Be well

: )
toy747
South Florida, FL
(Zone 10b)

March 22, 2009
1:18 AM

Post #6301457

Dale, what is the name of the coleus in post Post #6291947? It is absolutely stunning. I want it.
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

March 22, 2009
10:46 AM

Post #6302629

Toy,

It is Glennis, grown in the shade. Shade makes the leaves a lot lighter color than when it get sun.

Purple Firespike>

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toy747
South Florida, FL
(Zone 10b)

March 22, 2009
2:02 PM

Post #6303027

Thanks Dale. I will have to look for that one. I really like it.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 16, 2009
8:35 PM

Post #6419898

I guess (so far) I am lucky.

Fruits are setting.

Here is one of the many clusters bearing baby Carries.

: )

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DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

April 16, 2009
11:04 PM

Post #6420498

Yep, plenty of fruit.

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 16, 2009
11:49 PM

Post #6420710

How many fill out on each cluster?

: )
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

April 17, 2009
12:39 AM

Post #6420954

The flowers on the end of a branch should produce about 3 fruit (average). Many of those little green pea sized fruit will fall off.

Also it depends on the amount of rain we get. If the weather stays dry the fruit will be small or the tree may drop some more of them.

For the largest fruit wait until they get up to half the size of an egg (or a little smaller) and then thin them by cutting off all but the 2 largest on a branch. Or just leave one per branch. Fewer numbers of fruit equals a bigger fruit.

Do you have a photo of the whole tree?
Darlacooper
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 17, 2009
1:45 AM

Post #6421325

Dale you have no Idea how much I love sunflowers! Those are just beautiful!

Darla

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 17, 2009
3:07 PM

Post #6423646

Dale~

Whole tree -- today

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 17, 2009
3:08 PM

Post #6423650

Spread

Be well

: )

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DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

April 17, 2009
5:11 PM

Post #6424247

Flyboy,

In my not so humble opinion that tree can only support 5-8 mangos.

If it is in your budget I would give the tree a layer of 'Black Cow' about 3-4 inches deep and some chunky bark on top of that for best results. Leave about 6 inches clear around the base (where the tree and ground meet).

eye candy>

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 17, 2009
7:43 PM

Post #6424867

Dale~

I understand the Black Cow -- but, why the chunky bark?

Pretty "eye candy." Looks like bougie to me.

Be well
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

April 17, 2009
10:31 PM

Post #6425456

Bark will keep the soil moisture higher and the soil temp cooler.

Containers>

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 17, 2009
11:38 PM

Post #6425686

Gee -- you have grass.

I remember that stuff. We have it up North.
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

April 17, 2009
11:58 PM

Post #6425760

The grass is at one of my clients...it is winter rye. Takes very little water and it makes a nice winter lawn.

This is my place in 2007, no grass>

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 18, 2009
12:06 AM

Post #6425791

It looks beautiful.

Mine is all river gravel where grass once lived -- and died.

Be well

: )

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

June 22, 2009
8:41 PM

Post #6724341

Now i need help -- again.

The connection is starting to show WET at this fruit. Does that mean it is ripe?

d-_-b

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

June 22, 2009
8:42 PM

Post #6724346

This is what the others look like.

d-_-b

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wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 22, 2009
9:10 PM

Post #6724458

No!!!!! The fruit has to be SOFT.
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 22, 2009
10:22 PM

Post #6724862

The two photos above, are they the same tree?

Both photos show fruits that have reached full size.

The second photo shows a fruit that is starting to develop a blush of yellow on the stem end and a bit of pink on the lower left, that looks normal.

The first photo shows some 'damage' to the stem just above the fruit, that is not normal.

If the fruit falls, before it colors up you can still eat it. I have eaten green mango, I like them with a little salt. They aren't as sweet, but, they are tasty. Small rule of thumb as apples.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 22, 2009
10:25 PM

Post #6724878

If I tried to eat a green one I would be in the hospital. I am highly allergy to member of the poison ivy family. I can only eat them when they are very ripe. Even then I have to be careful and not eat to many.
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 22, 2009
10:37 PM

Post #6724931

I am highly allergic to Poison Ivy (Toxicodendren), but, not to the other members of that family. Mangoes are OK, but, I think they develop a turpentine taste when fully ripe - I like them a little green.

I never eat more than one.

I love peaches, I have 4 trees and could eat many everyday.

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wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 22, 2009
10:43 PM

Post #6724949

Love peaches.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

June 23, 2009
1:56 AM

Post #6725715

It was the wetness at the end of the branch that got me. I didn't know whether that shows it is about to drop.

I'll let it hang for a while - and watch it.

Thanks guys

Be well

d-_-b
Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

June 23, 2009
2:26 AM

Post #6725846

When they are ripe i have a good recipe for Mango ice cream thats excellent and very easy to make I had a couple trees lost one last winter with the cold have lots of seedlings :)
amygirl
Miami, FL

June 23, 2009
11:34 AM

Post #6726645

To all mango lovers: The International Mango Festival at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden is the second weekend in July. Lots of mango tasting, interesting workshops, trees for sale, great food. For more details see: http://www.fairchildgarden.org

amygirl
Miami, FL

June 23, 2009
11:40 AM

Post #6726653

It is worth the drive! For the best selection attend on Saturday.

Fairchild's 17th Annual International Mango Festival, July 11-12, 2009

Celebrate the Mangos of Fairchild

You can buy hand selected mango trees and fruit, enjoy mango lectures and smoothies, view the world's largest display of mangos, take part in the world's only mango auction and buy mango merchandise and botanical art. There will also be mango culinary demonstrations, a fantastic International Fruit Market, fun activities for kids and much, much more.


amygirl
Miami, FL

June 23, 2009
11:42 AM

Post #6726660

Mangos will ripen off the tree. Of course, they need to be mature, but if a little unripe, they will ripen if kept at room temperature. We pick some of our mangos before fully ripe for our events and they do continue to ripen.
Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

June 23, 2009
4:29 PM

Post #6727626

Thanks that sounds like its worth the ride I tried one that was named pineapple banana it was the best I have ever tasted I would buy that one for sure very large sweet smooth and no strings! I was lucky enouh to to bring home half doz. planted all the seeds have small trees on there way was told 50/50 chance of getting one like the parent
amygirl
Miami, FL

June 23, 2009
5:25 PM

Post #6727889

It is probably much less than a 50% chance of the same as the parent. Mangos are grafted using budwood from known cultivars.
Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

June 24, 2009
12:31 PM

Post #6731235

there goes that lol be intersting to see though
Sunshinesw
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 24, 2009
9:55 PM

Post #6733627

I am thrilled to report I have good tasting mangos, I started from a seed about 10-11 years ago. I've picked few mangos couple of years ago, I thought it taste kinda funny but this year it's good. I have no idea what variety but it's green mango, I think fertilizing helped with the larger size and the taste. I am going to fertilize better next year now that I know it taste good. I think maybe 15 mangos on it.

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

June 25, 2009
1:05 AM

Post #6734373

Hey, that's great.

You deserve a prize.

Be well

d-_-b

Rene10
Wauchula, FL
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2009
1:33 AM

Post #6739346

Some body picked my three off my tree while I was away Wa!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! They were almost ripe when I was there!
amygirl
Miami, FL

June 26, 2009
7:40 AM

Post #6740317

That sucks!

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

June 26, 2009
12:39 PM

Post #6740730

Rene -- get your gun.

()
Sunshinesw
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 26, 2009
12:54 PM

Post #6740774

Flyboy, thanks!!
Rene, that's awful. Last year a guy came with a truck, trying to get the mangos from my neighbor's front yard. My DH asked him what he was doing, he said the owner said it was ok to pick the mangos. My DH told him I don't think so but I'll call the police, the man took off then.
Rene10
Wauchula, FL
(Zone 9b)

June 26, 2009
12:55 PM

Post #6740777

Flyboy, I would if I knew who it was but I have a number of weekly rentals close by so could have been any one of thembut it sure was dissappointing after waiting a year.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

July 3, 2009
8:37 PM

Post #6773633

Getting closer. Now, if I can out wait the little critters and varmints.

There are still eleven fruit on the tree

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Sunshinesw
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 3, 2009
8:39 PM

Post #6773640

Looks yummy!!!

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

July 3, 2009
8:43 PM

Post #6773648

Sun~

Didja ever taste them with vanilla ice cream?

Golly gee !!!!!

Be well

(^=_=^)
Sunshinesw
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 3, 2009
8:47 PM

Post #6773655

No, but I am making Mango & sweet rice with coconut cream sauce.
That's on my desert menu tomorrow. YUM!!!

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

July 3, 2009
8:53 PM

Post #6773665

Yum -- is right.

d=_=b

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

July 6, 2009
7:46 PM

Post #6785597

The eagle has landed !!!

I do not know how many of you have eaten real fresh mangoes -- but one of my Carrie mangoes finally felt soft -- and actually dropped off the tree as I watched it.

We sliced it for lunch and my DDW actually said it was the sweetest and most delicious mango she had ever eaten.

I have to agree. Sweet as sugar -- and absolutely no fiber.

If you plan to grow one -- pick a Carrie

You can't go wrong.

This message was edited Jul 6, 2009 3:46 PM
Sunshinesw
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 6, 2009
7:54 PM

Post #6785621

I like my mango little firm. I don't like it when it's mush soft.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

July 6, 2009
7:58 PM

Post #6785638

I agree The only soft spot was where the skin had bright-yellowed. The slices were firm.

And delicious.

Be well

(=:-)=)
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 6, 2009
10:25 PM

Post #6786147

Congratulations, mission accomplished.

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

July 6, 2009
11:11 PM

Post #6786294

Dale:

WOW. That's a mango !!!!!

Is it a Carrie?

It looks huge.

How long have you had the tree?

Be well

: )
DaleTheGardener
Tampa, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 6, 2009
11:25 PM

Post #6786340

Not my tree, it is on an estate where I work. The owner is really old and he doesn't remember which variety. The tree is about 30 yrs old and every year it has a couple hundred fruits.

The tree doesn't grow much anymore, just spends it's energy on making fruit.

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

July 7, 2009
12:21 AM

Post #6786537

That must be one very happy tree.

This is my first year, and I have a dozen fruit -- so I am satisfied.

And, it is a delicious variety.

Be well

d=_=b

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

March 6, 2010
12:11 PM

Post #7608792

June 2010 -- here we come.

Be well

(o_O)

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 9, 2010
1:49 PM

Post #7692605

This is today.

Anyone want to hazard a guess as to how many mangos will ripen?

Be well

(o_O)

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dsa2591
North Port, FL
(Zone 9b)

April 9, 2010
5:31 PM

Post #7693138

My brother got poison ivy in his throat and lungs from breathing in the smoke when a neighbor burned some once. He almost died.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 9, 2010
6:48 PM

Post #7693353

dsa~

Thank you.

I will definitely not burn the wood. I promise.

Be well

(o_O)
astcgirl
Brandon, FL
(Zone 9b)

April 10, 2010
5:00 AM

Post #7693881

Hello All,

This is my mango tree in a container, it needs to be put into a larger pot but I don't want to attempt that until there's either no flowers or fruit on the tree. Last year it flowered twice like this and I had no fruit, I'm worried that this year will be the same. Am I supposed to be doing something to make the fruit form? I tried putting the tree next to the citrus trees in full sun since that's where the pollinators have been busy lately, I've noticed wasps and some little flying insects landing on the mango flowers but I don't see any fruit forming. Could I have a dud tree, maybe a male tree that only produces flowers and no fruit? I have another mango tree in a pot also but it's just starting to push out flowers where as this one seems to be at it's peak, should I put them next to eachother?

Sorry for not having much knowledge but then that's why I joined Dave's since I have such great people to help guide me.

Thank you

Thumbnail by astcgirl
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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 10, 2010
5:30 AM

Post #7693942

Wish that I could help.

I have insects coming around. Some are wasps. Some look like house-flies. The weirdest look like Japanese beetles -- but with markings. These last ones don't seem to move. They hang on for a long time.

Anyhow -- good luck.

Be well.

(o_O)
Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

April 11, 2010
5:24 PM

Post #7697884

If you look at the flowers you have male flowers and female flowers cross them your self with a paint brush thats a really nice looking tree !

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 12, 2010
10:58 AM

Post #7699824

i know how to tell us and them apart but what's with the blosssoms?

be well

(o_O)
Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

April 12, 2010
5:29 PM

Post #7700680

just look at them you will see the difference
astcgirl
Brandon, FL
(Zone 9b)

April 13, 2010
5:39 AM

Post #7701850

Thank you Danaplants, I'll go out there today and have a look.

I put all my mango's together so they bee's/insects can have a party...hint hint. Just trying to help them along.

That one in the picture is Mallika Mango. I also have a Pickering and just bought a Man Doc Mai over the weekend at the Plant Festival.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 13, 2010
6:26 AM

Post #7701969

You don't get away that easily, Dana.

Are both F + M on the same stem?

Be well

(o_O)
amygirl
Miami, FL

April 13, 2010
7:47 AM

Post #7702189

Just an FYI, It is Nam Doc Mai. I love this variety! Great choice!

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 13, 2010
7:49 AM

Post #7702195

OK -- this thread is now morphing into an "R" rating.

This is what the mango blossoms look like.

I "Q" tipped the blossoms and massaged the end up and down the buds.

But I don't know whether i accomplished anything.

Thumbnail by flyboyFL
Click the image for an enlarged view.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 13, 2010
7:50 AM

Post #7702197

It was easy on my lychee tree.

This is a blossom end.

The males are the ones with the antlers.

Be well

(o_O)

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Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

April 13, 2010
12:47 PM

Post #7702875

lol i was wondering when you would say something about it lol :) How did your banana weather the cold mine are just starting to show green. My lychee is just puting new growth on lost a few leaves to the cold but all in all it came thru pretty good.

Thumbnail by Danasplants
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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

April 13, 2010
2:21 PM

Post #7703138

My bananas came through, fine. Lost a few leaves -- but now bursting forth. I am keeping two pseudostems -- about six months apart.

My lychees -- you can see- -- are in the same condition as yours. I am getting quite a few sets of buds and new leaves.

Be well

(o_O)

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

August 5, 2010
1:37 PM

Post #8020781

My mangos are starting to drop -- they are delicious. They smell like perfume. Heavy and sweet. It's a Carrie. I huess that I am lucky that I have so few this year -- just seven. Four in one clump and three stragglers.

If you've never had fresh mangos in vanilla ice cream, you are missing something.

Be well

(o_O)
Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

August 5, 2010
2:20 PM

Post #8020871

It is so easy to make ice cream I would take a couple of those and make mango ice cream out of them its the best

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

August 5, 2010
4:44 PM

Post #8021168

Nah !!

I can't imagine anything better than biting into the real mango chunks in the ice cream.

Be well

(o_O)

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

August 9, 2010
2:28 PM

Post #8029512

This year she is weird. (Carrie -- that is.)

On the side with no fruit this year, she suddenly send out all these new leaves. Some flush.

Be well

(O_O)

This message was edited Aug 9, 2010 8:12 PM

Thumbnail by flyboyFL
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Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

August 9, 2010
2:56 PM

Post #8029570

Mines doing the same thing I think its just normal but no expert here lol

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

August 9, 2010
6:11 PM

Post #8030006

Weird

Be well

(o_O)

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

January 29, 2011
9:09 AM

Post #8336811

How do they know?

Still cold -- bright sun -- but, the mangos know -- and so do the pollenators.

(o_O)

Thumbnail by flyboyFL
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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

February 28, 2011
12:58 PM

Post #8398226

I have to get more than seven this year.

Thumbnail by flyboyFL
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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

February 28, 2011
1:03 PM

Post #8398230

Some of there have to be fertile -- or whatever else it takes.

Be well

(o_O)

Thumbnail by flyboyFL
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Danasplants
Mulberry, FL

March 1, 2011
3:58 AM

Post #8399329

Wow yours looks great mines small it has buds too. It is really too cold here for these I think I lost my lychee this winter :(

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

March 1, 2011
7:26 AM

Post #8399823

We had persistent cold -- but no real frost.

Be well

(o_O)

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

December 7, 2011
6:29 AM

Post #8919814

Yes, Virginia (and FL Dave's Gardeners), there is a Florida springtime.

(0_O)



Thumbnail by flyboyFL
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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

December 14, 2011
7:31 PM

Post #8930002

flyboyFL wrote:But as for melting ice from the arctic ice cap affecting our earth, consider this:

Take a bowl of water and float a big chunk of ice in it. Make sure that the water is filled to the brim. Allow the ice to melt and watch what happens to the level of water in the bowl, and note whether any water spills over the rim.

Trust me, it won't.

So much for flooding.


I realize I'm jumping in here late.

You are spot on about the ice that floats on the oceans of the world. It won't change the water level as it melts.

That takes care of the arctic, where the ice floats on top of ocean water.

However, most of the ice isn't floating on water. It's also melting in the Antarctic, and in Greenland, and any of hundreds of glaciers all over the world. That ice currently sits on solid ground, and will definitely change sea levels as it melts. Which it is doing, according to most measurements. Ocean levels are actually going up faster than expected.

Here's an interactive map with projected sea level rise: http://geology.com/sea-level-rise/florida.shtml. At 3 meters, most of the Keys are gone, along with large tracts of SW Florida. At 4 meters, Amelia Island is miles from the mainland, the entire A1A strip from Ormand to Canaveral Seashore is a series of tiny islands, and Tampa is partially submerged. The entire coast is vulnerable to storm surge. At 9 meters, Lake Okeechobee is a bay facing the Gulf. At 30 meters, South Florida (below Gainesville) would pretty much cease to exist except for a large island centered on Winter Haven, Tallahassee would be a beach, Panama City a memory.

That said, I think the climatologists are still guessing about some of the effects, and I'm still planting fruit trees in Gainesville...but I'm not selling my North Georgia property. ;o)

-Rich

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

December 15, 2011
12:54 PM

Post #8930855

Rich~

Welcome aboard.

Let's talk.

I would rather be talking with Al Gore. He is the mis-informed who has been shouting, "Fire" in this theater of ours. But he manages to avoid live confrontations on this subject.

Thank you for affirming what I wrote a couple of years ago.

With respect to the effect we humans have on Global warming -- or Global Cooling -- uggghhh. Like it or not, we are passengers on this globe of ours. I like to think that maybe the proponents of Gaia -- who are trying to convince us that Mother Earth is actually a living thing -- have more credibility than have the current Chicken Littles.

I do not know how mature you are, but I remember well the warnings of "Global Cooling" back in the seventies. Those agitators were s convinced that we needed long underwear rather than boats. They, rightly, failed to blame it on man's actions. They relied on a few, remote, thermometers.

This world of ours is an object whirling through space. Like it or not, it is the sun which gives us life. Theoretically it is burning itself out -- and subsequently getting hotter and hotter. It is like being passengers on the Titanic and thinking that we could miss the iceberg by running to the other side of the deck.

Me, I have just renewed my Flood policy and have no plans of moving upland. (You can't catch fish from there.) In the eons of time, even before life has existed on this planet, the seas have risen and fallen -- and the glaciers have come and gone -- without any assistance from man's actions -- or inactions.

So, I will not get too excited about my ability to contribute to -- or delay these happenings.

Be well

(o_O)
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

December 17, 2011
12:17 PM

Post #8933283

flyboyFL wrote:I do not know how mature you are


Um, that's an open question. But I've been in this current incarnation 62 years so far. ;o)

flyboyFL wrote:I remember well the warnings of "Global Cooling" back in the seventies. Those agitators were s convinced that we needed long underwear rather than boats. They, rightly, failed to blame it on man's actions. They relied on a few, remote, thermometers.


I remember those warnings as well. I don't remember people getting quite as upset at the prospect - interesting because historically at least the success of our collective civilizations has been positively correlated with global temperature. In any case, our techniques for remote sensing have grown rather more sophisticated. You just have to pick through the interpretations of the people who are after all constantly fighting for funding to support their research, and who hence tend to sometimes exaggerate the significance of their findings. (As witness the unending stream of "scientists" seeking funding for studies of the gazillions of animal species that are being affected - as they have ALWAYS been affected - by the weather). The folks who oppose the idea of global climate change seem to overlook one important point: the global environment has ALWAYS been changing. Constantly. Just usually not so fast that anyone would notice (especially without precise measurements and the mathematical and number-crunching capacity to track and detect patterns). According to the people who study such things, we have been living in the past 50-100 years in a period of unusually mild and uniform weather.

I still get a chuckle out of Algore's blatantly self-serving rants on Global Warming. Especially the one where the chart he is using to indicate the correlation between atmospheric CO2 and average global temperature actually shows the temperature change LEADING the CO2 concentration. That should naturally come as no surprise to anyone who knows that huge amount of CO2 are dissolved in the world's oceans and who understands that the solubility of gasses in water DECREASES as the temperature rises. And of course, as any REAL scientist understands, correlation does NOT imply causation. That little truth has obviously not penetrated the murky depths of political consciousness.

The signal-to-noise ratio in the popular media is downright horrible. The ability of "reporters" to unblinkingly equate the terms "Man-made Global Warming" with "Climate Change" and then blindly swallow the assertions of the politically-motivated that ALL earth changes are somehow related to our activities is enough to make me wish I had a BS filter on the TV. Fortunately there are still a few real news sources that dare to point out that evidence now indicates most major extinct cultures and civilizations - including some we are only just beginning to uncover - disappeared as a direct result of climate changes that had nothing whatsoever to do with human activity. We hominids have always tended to cluster in areas where food was plentiful or easy to produce. Bodies of water have traditionally been the source of relatively "free" high-quality protein and calories. Most of the resulting coastal societies of the distant past have left few if any signs of their existence and subsequent passing because of large fluctuations in sea levels recorded in the surrounding rock and soil. Evidence of agricultural or hunter-gatherer societies are buried deep under the desert sands that cover what were once vast jungles and fertile plains crisscrossed by huge river valleys. Some of those are steadily being revealed by modern technology in the form of satellite-based ground penetrating radar and already verified by on-site digs that are mostly still in preliminary stages. And of course a lot more data have come to light because of the hard work of people excavating deep into the layers of exposed rock, ocean sediments, and ice sheets to reveal how the earth changes over time - some changes gradual, and others quite sudden. In some cases the sudden changes have been linked to volcanic activity or the presence of debris indication meteor impact; in other cases we still just don't know.

The measured levels of the seas is changing, and most recent indications are that the changes are occurring more quickly than previously predicted. We do know now that at least some large areas of Greenland's "permanent" ice cover is melting from underneath, leaving wide channels that are not yet apparent as changes on the surface. Meltwater from the surface is making it's way down through cracks in the ice and heating the mass from underneath. There is also strong evidence in the form of earthquake patterns that volcanoes deeply buried under the ice have begun to awaken and feed the melting trend. Around the world, photographic evidence and personal accounts indicate glaciers in quick retreat - snowfall is simply not adding enough new ice to make up for the melting, and the temperature of the ice is increasing towards 0C so that even minor further increases can accelerate the process. This is simply data - it does not depend on any belief in causes.

flyboyFL wrote:This world of ours is an object whirling through space. Like it or not, it is the sun which gives us life. Theoretically it is burning itself out -- and subsequently getting hotter and hotter. It is like being passengers on the Titanic and thinking that we could miss the iceberg by running to the other side of the deck.


I do understand the sun is aging - but I think the most reliable evidence points to that happening over periods best measured in tens or hundreds of thousands of years. It's certainly been widely accepted that drastic events on earth have already corresponded to fluctuations in the sun's energy output (the Maunder Minimum being perhaps the best documented of these, ironically enough), but on a larger scale I doubt our generation has to be concerned much about the sun's aging. Still, the list of things we don't know about the sun - the causes and patterns of gravitational changes, for instance, on which "short-term" fluctuations appear to depend - seems to always outpace our knowledge.

flyboyFL wrote:So, I will not get too excited about my ability to contribute to -- or delay these happenings.


I also don't think there is much we can do at this point to change what I see as primarily natural cycles or cosmic accidents. We live in interesting times, and we should, I think, be grateful for the fact that we have the means to gather and collate data from the world around us in ways previously undreamt of. Personally, I try to use that data to help me decide where to locate, what sort of shelter to live in, even what species and varieties I choose for my permaculture. (See - I knew we'd get back on topic eventually ;o).

-Rich

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

December 21, 2011
7:00 PM

Post #8938698

Boy -- that is a lot to digest in one sitting -- but I will try.

You are still just a kid. My son was born one year earlier than you. You can check on my annular rings aproximately by this: I adopted my nom de web frm my WWII experience of battling around the ETO for thirty-five missions in B-17G's with the 8th Air Force. So, I claim seniority.

When we started this conversation I feared that you and I would be at loggerheads with respect to puny man's guilt in what is happening to the environment. It is hard to understand this thrust to have us co-exist with the "conservationists" by roasting in the summer and freezing in the winter. And as far as the accusation that we are wasting and depleting the world's resources with our selfish ways -- well.

You may remember that famous bet between Julian Simon and Paul Ehrlich back in 1980. Simon believed in the horn of plenty -- Ehrlich was the Pied Piper of overpopulation and imminent disaster. The bet was on the resultantant prices after ten years -- with respect to a theoretical basket of commodities. Well, Simon won -- and set the naysayers and doomsday predicters back on their heels.

Google it if you are interested.

Things are changing -- as they always have. But, have faith in man and his opposing thumbs. (Women, too!) I like to think about the one-time shortage of computer memory. My first real computer had a bakelite cylinder for its memory. (Like what Thomas Edison used) It had sixty four (64) tracks and sixty four sectors. Riding above these tracks were readers which picked the data off of them -- or wrote on them. It was a monster device which required a sealed air-conditioned room for its home. (The cylinder, new, cost about one thousand dollars.) I just received a 4gig memory module free with a portable scanner. It is less than 1/2 inch square -- and must cost almost nothing. So, there went the shortage of storage space for manufactured commodities. My new telephone has 100K more capacity and speed and fits in my pocket.

So, react slowly. As Scarlett O'Hara said to Rhett -- "Tomorrow is another day."

Our problem lies in the fact that we, of my generation, were too busy with staking out a place in this wonderful land of ours, that we neglected what was being taught our children. But, as I hope, the pendulum will turn, and we will hope that the dream of my generation for.leaving our progeny with a better world will come to fruition.

Keep the heat truned on -- use fossil fuel if needed. Take with a grain of salt the thought that tomorrow will will chain the sun and the winds to serve us. These who think an electric vehicle will be the panacea, have to consider what has to happen in order to produce a charge out of a plug in the wall.

Be well -- enjoy the Holidays

(o_O)

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

November 11, 2012
12:17 PM

Post #9330442

If any of you faithful DGers are still following this thread -- here comes a wake-up call.

I planted the little tree almost four years ago. It was rather puny -- but well shaped and healthy looking.

I must confess that I ignored pruning it, and just allowed it to spread out. The fruit are delicious.

We had only one freeze-scare and I covered it with a sheet for a couple of nights.

This is what it looks like today. Golly -- it is huge.

I am not sure what I should do. It looks about to swallowthe adjacent Key Lime and Minneola Tangelo. Next will come my house.

Woe is unto me.

(o_O)

Thumbnail by flyboyFL
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pbyrley

pbyrley
Port St Lucie (+ Wk , FL
(Zone 9b)

November 12, 2012
4:41 AM

Post #9330867

Brad,
I admire your bushy mango "tree". I am pondering on where to plant a mango tree here in my Port St. Lucie house backyard. All the conventional (published) wisdom has seemed to say plant about 20 feet or more from the house and prune to keep it from getting too tall to harvest. I would want to be able to put a sheet over a mango tree in cold snaps, maybe with a 100W light bulb burning too. That your bushy tree has had fruit is a real eye opener to me. I will keep watching your tales of tropical fruit excellence!

ps You can be sure that I will transport my rooted Green Greek fig sprig with me to plant beside my concrete patio.

Paul

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flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

November 12, 2012
7:48 AM

Post #9331042

i plan to top it off this spring, before it buds. what i do not know is whether to get into it and thin it out.

It really is a bush -- a big one.

S'funny. All of my figs have a new crop on them. i do not know whether it is a "breba" crop -- or for real. The fruit are sparse -- but healhy.

Be well

(o_O)

pbyrley

pbyrley
Port St Lucie (+ Wk , FL
(Zone 9b)

November 16, 2012
1:21 PM

Post #9334812

Hi Brad - Here is a pruning article from the Lee County extension service;
http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/AgNatRes/Pubs/Pruning_Mango_Trees.pdf

It may answer some of your pruning questions.

Regards,
Paul

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

November 16, 2012
1:56 PM

Post #9334832

Thank you.

I just got to pick a couple of the Greek Whites (aka B-17G)

Hope springs eternal.

Be well

(o_O)

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

November 16, 2012
2:02 PM

Post #9334846

THAT WAS ONE GREAT ARTICLE.

Thanks, again.

flyboyFL

flyboyFL
Longboat Key, FL

June 14, 2014
3:00 PM

Post #9867943

Another year -- and can't wait.

Was it too early to pick this one?

Will it ripen?

What is the best way to keep it?

Be well

(o_O)

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