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Seed Germination: Indoor seed starting - your successes and failures

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perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 13, 2009
9:26 PM

Post #6134517

What have you sowed successfully indoors this winter, and what isn't germinating for you? Maybe the successful can help out the unsuccessful with advice.

My successful germinations:
daylily (in fridge for a while, then soaked overnight)
candy lily (2nd attempt - soaked and 2+ wks in damp soil in fridge)
belamcanda chinesis (2nd attempt - same as above)
lewisia (only 6 of 31)
digitalis - 3 types (sown on surface)
basil - 3 types (oops - maybe should have waited longer- they popped right up)
asclepias tuberosa (in fridge for a while, then soaked overnight)
(All above on heat mat under lights til germination)

Unsuccessful:
candy lily (1st attempt) - just put in the fridge after 1+ month no germination - still hoping
belamcanda chinesis (1st attempt - same as above)
gerbera daisy - sown near surface on heat mat under lights Jan 23rd. Should I give up?
lewisia (balance of) - I put out to wintersow - still hoping

Others still too early to tell.

Your turn.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 13, 2009
9:34 PM

Post #6134552

Oops. Left out:

Slightly successful:
tricyrtis maculata - a few teeny sprouts, but over a week later they don't seem to have grown at all.

Unsuccessful:
tricyrtis latifolia - (sown Jan 11). just put in the fridge and will leave there for a few weeks - still hoping.
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

February 17, 2009
5:08 PM

Post #6151341

Sowed Jan 24 - Rosemary 15 with 2nd set of leaves

Feb 1 -
Alternanthera Purple Knight ...all up
Dichondra Emerald Falls ...all up
Dichondra Silver Falls,... just starting to germinate
Licorice ...all up
Impatiens Tango ...1/2 up
Impatiens Tempo ...1/4 up
Cup & Saucer ...1/4

Feb 8 -
Rudbeckia Cherry Brandy ...all up
Lobelia Sapphire - ...up
Anagallis monellii ...up
Stocks 10 Weeks ... up
Salpiglossis Royale Chocolate ...up
Pansy Purple Rain ...1/4 up
Gazania Kiss Mix... up
Pansy Black Beauty ...1/4 up
Torenia Suzie Wong ...none
Torenia Duchess Mix ...all
Coleus Dragon & Volcano ...3/4
Pentas Red Lace... all
Petunia Opera Supreme Lilac Ice ...all
Petunia Baby Duck ...all
Petunia Superbissima ...most
Malva Zebrina ...up
Aster Pavlova dark Blue ...up
Rudbeckia Goldilocks ...most up

Feb 10 -
Bacopa Snowtopia ...couple
Petunia Opera Supeme Pink Morn... none
Bacopa Bluetopia ...none
Petunia Ramblin' Razzleberry mix... all
Diascia Coral Rose... couple
Petunia Blue Wave ...most
Petunia Easy Wave Mix... few
Petunia Shock Wave ...1/2
Petunia Explorer Coral ...none
Petunia Dble Glorious ...none
Petunia avalnce Grape... 1/2
Verbena Tuscany few...
Verbena Imagination ...1/3








joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

February 17, 2009
5:18 PM

Post #6151386

perenniallyme,

The stuff you put in the fridge, are they still in there? If so, take them out, sow them and put them under lights or near a sunny window. I don't think they will germinate in the fridge.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 17, 2009
10:50 PM

Post #6152776

Hi Joanna. That's quite a list of successes! You're certainly doing something right.
The stuff I put in the fridge - I did it because I had successful germinations of 2nd batches after I had those seeds in damp mix in the fridge for a few weeks, where the 1st batches that hadn't been done that way weren't germinating ( both belamcanda and pardancanda). So I thought I'd try putting them in the fridge for a few weeks, then take them out and see if they germinate. They've only been in the fridge 5 days so far.

New stuff sprouting:
asclepias tuberosa (most)
gaillardia pulchella (half plus)
delphinium grandiflorum (just a few)
dill
another digitalis (ferruginea)
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2009
2:21 PM

Post #6160047

Perernnially~ your lewisia should enjoy excellent results with wintersowing. I did 2 years ago with gorgeous blue blooms later in the season.

Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 19, 2009
2:41 PM

Post #6160116

Successes so far 2009: Spirea, barberry, trumpet lily, easter lily, rugosa rose, petunia, Nierembergia, cinaria.

Failures: astillbe - these germinated then died probably because I overwatered, begonias - nothing germinated - again probably too wet, nemesia - germinated then died.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 19, 2009
4:09 PM

Post #6160601

garden6, I thought that lewisias took til at least the 2nd year to bloom, and I've never seen blue ones. Are you sure you're talking about lewisias? If so, I'd sure love to know what the cultivar is!
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2009
5:53 PM

Post #6161064

Perennially~ OMG!! I just reread your entry. ...linum lewisii is the one. I 've now had my coffee...Please don't throw any weeds at me!!! LOL!
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 19, 2009
10:20 PM

Post #6162087

No weeds available to throw today, garden6. I wouldn't dare to communicate with anyone before at least 1 or 2 cups of coffee myself. Oh well, maybe someday there'll be a blue lewisia that blooms the first year - who knows?
Seandor, are you trying again with the astilbe and others? I don't have any experience with them. Did you take covers off as soon as they germinated and use a bit of hydrogen peroxide in the water?
JanLynn
(Jan) So Milw, WI
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2009
10:44 PM

Post #6162180

I sowed 4 different types of maters (2 diff cherry, Roma and "Endless Summer"), burpless cukes, 5 diff types of hardy hibiscus (25 'plants' total) in peat pellets, soaked in hot water with hydrogen peroxide added, covered the little greenhouses (each holds 25 pellets) and put the trays in my oven with the appliance light on. This was done on Sunday afternoon. Monday morning I had 90% germination in the two trays!!! Yes, I have used the oven to bake--- BUT, always check before turning the oven heat on and wait until oven has completely cooled before I put the trays back in. Looking forward to homegrown maters :)

Jan
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 19, 2009
10:51 PM

Post #6162202

Wow, that's quite a success! How long did you soak the seeds, and did you keep the water hot for a period?
JanLynn
(Jan) So Milw, WI
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2009
10:52 PM

Post #6162207

Only "problem" is germinating Gold Star Esperanza/Tecoma Stans Gold Star...These are also in the oven but have not germinated as of yet---perhaps I'm being a bit impatient??? Does anyone have experience with this and have any suggestions for me??? I LOVE this plant and, yes, I know it's not hardy in our winters but I really, really want this plant... :(

Jan
JanLynn
(Jan) So Milw, WI
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2009
10:53 PM

Post #6162212

I didn't soak the seeds at all---just the peat pellets. Pretty easy, hey?!
JanLynn
(Jan) So Milw, WI
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2009
10:59 PM

Post #6162229

I actually grow a lot of things that are not hardy (i.e. tropicals :) so my basement is full of brugs of varying sizes, EE's, etc. I even grew some brugs from seed last year!!! I DID soak the brug seeds for 24 hrs in very hot water with HP added and it took 2-3 weeks for them to germinate (with the aid of the "oven greenhouse"---LOL)!!! Now if I can only get the Esperanza to cooperate...
aardvark7
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

February 20, 2009
12:27 AM

Post #6162604

Oooooooooh noooooooo. I have fungus! I guess I'll have to say goodbye to what I sowed and many have already sprouted but I doubt they'll make it. Lost to the fungus:

Zinnia 'Envy'
Orange Zinnia
Red, Red and Yellow, and Yellow Four O'Clocks
Shasta daisy
Purple coneflower
Nasturtium

Sometimes you just want to cry. I sterilized everthing, the water the container, the seeds; it must have come from the peat pots that I did not sterilize. I guess I shouldn't have presumed they wouldn't introduce fungus. Anyone know how to rescue seedlings from fungus?
Stacey
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2009
1:52 AM

Post #6162978

Aardvark, what kind of fungus? I had some mold when I tried using wooden labels, but I threw away the labels and watered with peroxide water for a while, and it went away.

JanLynn, I haven't tried peat pellets. Do you like them better than just using the seed-starting mix?
HawaiiAL
Kailua Kona, HI
(Zone 11)

February 20, 2009
2:00 AM

Post #6163008

aardvark: don't over water just damp,if still geting fungus spray pots and dirt with neem oil, may take two times. a day or two apart should do it .i use it all the time on the island,fungus will start a soon as i water.

should add i use starting soil by ferry morse(lowes) peat pots,and the in sides of jiffy pot to cover seeds to proper depth.

This message was edited Feb 19, 2009 4:06 PM
aardvark7
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

February 20, 2009
4:55 PM

Post #6165170

OK I have no idea what kind of fungus it is, long white hairy hyphae, some little pots worse than others. There is also some green mold in some places. Many of the green Envy and orange zinnia had sprouted so I took them out of the flat and set them in indirect light on the kitchen table. It has been overnight and they don't look like they are kicking the bucket yet. Maybe they will make it, I hope. Going to at least try to save them and the others. Which should I use, the H2O2 water or the neem? Gotta go to the store now, somebody please input quick. Thanks! Stacey
jenepat
North Richland Hills, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 20, 2009
4:56 PM

Post #6165175

I'd recently heard that keeping a fan running in the location that you have your seeds helps with fungus growth and damping off. Since I started the fan, I haven't lost any to either problem. It's one of those standing fans that occilates back & forth. I keep it on 24/7.
aardvark7
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

February 20, 2009
5:02 PM

Post #6165202

Thanks Jenepat. Have the ceiling fan going and am on my way to the store. I can always use neem and hydrogen peroxide so I'll just pick up both.
JanLynn
(Jan) So Milw, WI
(Zone 5b)

February 20, 2009
7:19 PM

Post #6165901

For fungus gnats and/or mold you can also use cinnamon. Cinnamon is cheap and organic besides smelling nice :) When I notice a couple of fungus gnats I sprinkle some cinnamon on the top of my potted plants' dirt. Everytime I water my plants I add/use H202. I do like using the peat pellets when starting seeds. By the time the baby plant is ready to be transplanted I cradle the pellet w/the plant in one hand and will remove the netting with my other hand. Some seedlings have strong roots and the roots will grow thru the netting (i.e. castor beans grow a very strong root system) but I have noticed that some of my seedlings root systems are unable to grow thru the netting (unfortunately). I've also heard of some ppl using 'rockwool' for seed starting but not sure what that is. Another item I use frequently is "Wet Floral Foam". I used that for almost all of my brug cuttings when I first started rooting them. The WFF must not be allowed to dry out completely and I have cut it in little pieces for seed starting also. You DO NOT have to remove the seeding/cutting from the WFF when planting/transplanting as the roots grow right thru the foam. I'm gonna finish posting this now and then look for some pictures that I posted several years ago using the WFF.

BBL...Jan


The "Propagation" Forum has lots of info that you may also find useful. The thread where I discuss my use of the Wet Floral Foam is:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/642059/

My posting is halfway down. HTH!!! Jan

This message was edited Feb 20, 2009 3:42 PM
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2009
7:30 PM

Post #6165949

perenniallyme . . . alas, I did not take the cover off after the astillbe germinated . . . and I don't have any more seeds to start . . .

Next time I will follow your suggestions.

thanks to everyone regarding fungus . . . I have also had the problem. I will begin spraying/watering with Hydrogen peroxide in the water.
JanLynn
(Jan) So Milw, WI
(Zone 5b)

February 20, 2009
9:56 PM

Post #6166473

Stacey/aardvark:

I have some extra seeds that you may like...dmail me!

The 4:00's are known to be such an easy seed/plant to grow but I never had much luck growing them from seed :) A couple of years ago I just threw some seeds on the dirt and they grew---best way to grow them, IMO, is by direct sowing. They are listed as an annual in my zone but the 4:00's grow a very deep taproot and they come back every year for me now :) I have some of the "Kaleidascope" 4:00 seeds that I harvested from my plants last year...lmk if you'd like some :)
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2009
10:12 PM

Post #6166563

Seandor, did you see today's article on degree of difficulty starting from seed? Astilbe was listed as (3) - not worth the effort.
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

February 20, 2009
10:25 PM

Post #6166644

I tried 4 o'clocks a couple of years ago. I think they were time-zoned challenged since the blooms opened in the morning instead of the afternoon. They didn't get very big but that's probably because of our cool temps in May & June. Our night temps are very cool as well even with hot days
aardvark7
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

February 21, 2009
1:23 AM

Post #6167436

Maybe overkill but sprayed with neem and then sprinkled some cinnamon on top. Gosh it must have been way too much water. Sometimes I wonder if those domes are really necessary. They seem to cut off the air circulation and make the environment way too humid. And then the shock they must get in this dry Texas air when the dome does come off. But next time I water it will be with the hydrogen peroxide solution. Thanks to you guys for your help with my fungus problem! :) And thank you, Jan, for your offer of 4O'clock seed. I'm going to "wait and see" what happens to mine (I see 3 of the red ones poking up now - so they're not dead yet). If the fungus gets them I'll send you dmail Jan.

Hey, I did have some earlier successes: "lavendar lady" lavendar, philipene lily, moss rose, tecoma stans, basil, rosemary, lemon balm, Lindheimer muhly grass, asclepias curasavicca and syriaca and tuberosa. Interestingly, all of these were grown in plastic containers with plastic wrap on top (holes for ventilation), and NO bamboo skewers for tags.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2009
2:31 PM

Post #6169076

perenniallyme - yes, I saw the article last evening and immediately tagged it. Now I don't feel so bad . . . still I had about 40 germinate and now they are all kaput.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2009
2:52 PM

Post #6169174

Sounds like you did really well on the hardest part. I hope you'll try them again sometime.
JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

February 21, 2009
2:57 PM

Post #6169197

I have a few questions.
How much Hydrogen peroxide must be mixed in the water?
Can someone explain me what 'neem' is. Babelfish doesn't recognize the word.
About the cinnamon: is it a problem if some of the cinnamon comes on the seedlings?

I have fungus too, and want to try all three, to see what works the best for me.
Thanks.
Jonna
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2009
3:18 PM

Post #6169294

Hi Jonna,
Here's from Wikipedia:

Neem oil
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Neem Expeller OilNeem oil is a vegetable oil pressed from the fruits and seeds of Neem (Azadirachta indica), an evergreen tree which is endemic to the Indian subcontinent and has been introduced to many other areas in the tropics. It is perhaps the most important of the commercially available products of neem for organic farming and medicines.

They have a lot more info on it, and you should be able to find info all over the internet.

Most people say to use 1 part H2O2 to 9 or 10 parts water. I started out that way, but have been using less, though am starting to have some algae(?) growth on my seed starting mix. Haven't had any damping off though. This is my first time using it, so I'm no expert.
JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

February 21, 2009
3:34 PM

Post #6169391

Thanks Sharon, I found it. It's not common in Belgium. I found a shop, but it's rather expensive, $ 20 for just 100 ml.
I think I'll try the other 2 first. And when I once can buy the neem oil cheaper, I will try that too. I read it's also good against louses, etc.


perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2009
3:55 PM

Post #6169470

Jonna, I believe you dilute it quite a bit, so if it's 100% neem, it goes a long way.
tubbytee
Ames, NE
(Zone 5b)

February 21, 2009
7:40 PM

Post #6170303

I seen a light stand for trays of seedlings made of pvc (home made).. Now I can't find it Any help please

Tubby
HawaiiAL
Kailua Kona, HI
(Zone 11)

February 25, 2009
7:57 PM

Post #6189265

Jonna find neem oil for plant use, mix 2 tablespoons per gallon of warm water, the sooner you use it after you mix it the better. you may need to mix in a half teasoon of dish soap to help it mix.it will cloud up at cool temp.the pure stuff is good for skin disorders and weird rashes.it may be expensive but it works.will remove 400 kinds of bugs.
JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2009
10:20 PM

Post #6189834

HawaiiAL, Thanks for your advice. I will try to buy the neem oil.
summer_girl
Germanton, NC
(Zone 7a)

February 26, 2009
9:11 PM

Post #6194494

JanLynn - Never heard of using the oven, please tell us more.
aardvark7
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2009
12:51 AM

Post #6195447

Update on the fungus infested pots: ALL of the zinnia and four o'clocks and shasta daisies made it. Yeah! But only 4 out of 10 of 'Empress of India' and 0 out of 10 of 'Cherry Rose' nasturtiums made it. Not a single coneflower (echinacea purpureum) out of 20 pots survived. Still have seed for the coneflowers though so I'll try those again tomorrow, but WITHOUT wooden tags and the dome. Think I'll germinate them in some recycled styro egg carton bottoms.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2009
1:08 AM

Post #6195506

Sorry to hear aardvark, but glad some of them made it.
I'm having a possible problem with some of my digitalis. Still only working on their 2nd set of baby leaves, but the leaves on some are getting yellowish - faded and sickly looking. Any ideas on what's wrong? I'm still using peroxide in the water. Should I stop using it? (Other foxglove flats look fine so far).
aardvark7
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2009
1:15 AM

Post #6195518

Is it the bottom-most leaves closest to the soil that are yellowing and looking sickly?
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2009
1:56 AM

Post #6195648

Some have only their first set of leaves and they're yellowing - a few have made it to 2 sets of leaves and it's the 2nd set that are yellowing. Does that tell you anything?
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

February 27, 2009
2:14 AM

Post #6195747

Do you have the soil too wet? That may cause the leaves to turn yellow. I run a fan. I made the mistake of using popsicle sticks and it took a while to write out plastic ones. Glad I changed them. I haven't lost any seedlings, but if I left the sticks in, I think it would have caused problems.

Once the 2nd set of leaves form, I start fertilizing once a week with a diluted fish fertilizer (about 1/4 strength). That really make a difference in growth and color.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2009
3:29 PM

Post #6197495

I suppose the soil could be too wet. I'm starting to get some algae growth on some flats, but not the ones with the yellowing leaves. I'm having a difficult time trying to figure out how much water to give them, because with this seed-starting mix the water seems to get fully absorbed in the top and I'm concerned that it might not get down to the roots unless I give it enough. It seems too early to start watering from the bottom, because I don't think the roots are down that far yet. - ????- just don't know.
geraldine87
West Warren, MA

February 27, 2009
11:01 PM

Post #6199402

Thank you all, am starting to plant seeds in home and your advice has 'really' helped.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2009
4:20 PM

Post #6202009

Update on ungerminated pardancanda and belamcanda that I put in the fridge for 1+ weeks when they wouldn't germinate - back under lights - some on heat mat, some not - they are now gradually popping up - hooray!

The icelandic poppy seeds that I scattered on top of the given-up-on gerbera daisies are sprouting. Boy are they teeny and plentiful.

Gaillardia pulchella doing well - 2 batches both sprouted quickly. Think I've given up on gaillardia aristata - 2 kinds planted 3 weeks ago - no signs of life. Wonder if they needed more stratification than a few weeks in the fridge/freezer.

Crocosmia lucifer is popping up thankfully - whick means the seeds I sent in the piggy swap are good.

Also planted 3 weeks ago - echinacea - 2 types seed from hybrids - no signs of life.
aardvark7
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2009
5:05 PM

Post #6202180

Sounds good!!! Throw those aristata back in the fridge for a few more weeks; you might be able to snap them out of it.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2009
9:19 PM

Post #6203241

Think I might, but there's not much room in the fridge right now.
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

February 28, 2009
9:25 PM

Post #6203276

How about outside. Cool enough?
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2009
10:01 PM

Post #6203418

gee, Joanna, what an inspired idea! Where the hell is my brain anyway? - We're supposed to have storms the next few days - either rain or snow, but the little 4 and 6-paks might fit inside a couple of 2 gallon water jugs that I scarfed from my neighbor's recycle and haven't used for wintersowing yet. Think I'll try it. Thanks.
geraldine87
West Warren, MA

March 1, 2009
1:06 PM

Post #6205590

Hi! I did some seed planting and sprinkled perlite on top to help prevent damping off. Will the perlite burn the new seedlings??
Also posted on other site, but need ALL the help I can get !
Thanks.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 2, 2009
1:33 PM

Post #6210265

I planted some Amaranthus on Saturday - and they have already germinated!
geraldine87
West Warren, MA

March 2, 2009
2:53 PM

Post #6210655

Wow Seandor, morning glories, violas, wave petunias, ornamental grasses planted last week, none up yet. I did put a light coating of perlite, hopefully to prevent damping off.
Are you going to the Round Up in Halifax? Would be great to meet you there!
Had pansy greens, viola greens all with some buds or flowers on, and crocus and daffodil bulbs breaking ground yesterday! Made me think of Spring, Sun, Warm weather.
Did I say ground? Have 12 inches of snow in Warren !!
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 2, 2009
7:01 PM

Post #6211769

Which Halifax? I know of Halifax in Nova Scotia - is there another one?
jennyappleton
Fairfax, CA

March 3, 2009
5:55 AM

Post #6214795

Thanks for starting this thread, and offering advice!I'm hailing from Northern CA with a few questions:

1) I started several six-packs of seeds indoors with organic seeds from Territorial Seed Co in southern Oregon (sweet basil, thai basil, three pepper varieties, two heirloom tomatoes, parsley). They all appeared as specified in the 'days to sprout' listed as stated on the packets, very healthy, with their first hypocotyl leaves showing strongly. Then, about two weeks after sprouting, most of the cotyledon (first two leaves) are pointing upward, closing together. My indoor environment is approx 70 degrees, but may not offer enough light - 4-6 hours bright indirect light a day, total 8 hours of indirect light a day. Should I take them outdoors to increase light exposure, at the risk of temperature exposure? What's more important?
2) When planting by a moon calendar, is the 'favorable planting date' listed in the farmer's almanac the day to start seedbeds or does that refer to TRANSPLANTING dates?
Thanks in advance,
Jenny
geraldine87
West Warren, MA

March 3, 2009
1:25 PM

Post #6215427

Morning Seandor, we got sun!! Glad you found the Round Up page!!
Just checked and my black millet seed is starting to sprout...was scared starting plants from seed, but it will be less $$$...
Used plastic strawberry container from store, washed with bleach and soap, used seed starting soil and put a little xtra perlite top of soil to hopefully discouraged dampening off...
kitchenshop
Craig, CO
(Zone 3b)

March 3, 2009
1:40 PM

Post #6215475

Jennyappleton - I think your seedlings need lots more light. Can you set up light fixture if its too cold outside? Or maybe put them outside in a protected place and bring them in at night?

I don't know anything about moon phases and planting
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 3, 2009
2:48 PM

Post #6215715

Jenny, I ditto what kitchenshop said. Don't know what your temps are there, but the peppers will be more sensitive to cold than the basil. I'd try to get them under lights asap.
Seandor, yes there is a Halifax, MA. I haven't been there, but looked it up several months ago when I was thinking about going to a plant sale at some botanic garden there. It's somewhere west of Boston and probably east or southeast of you. Check mapquest.
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 4, 2009
3:00 PM

Post #6220075

Ah! Well it turns out I do know about this roundup - but alas - we will be on holidays then. I really would rather be at the roundup - so take lots of great pictures. ^_^
candace111
Eugene, OR

February 28, 2010
9:24 PM

Post #7595049

Hey. I'm looking for some feedback from some experienced seed germinators. I'm working on a project as a student that involves a flat packaged polyethylene container that is designed to function first as a greenhouse and second as a planter, which eventually leads to hardening and transplanting. My blog is http://theopenlair.blogspot.com/

I would appreciate any feedback. Please check it out. My containers for the germination that also change into the pot are designed to be flat packed so that you can easily store them away without all the bulk and clutter.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2010
5:48 AM

Post #7598830

jennyappleton,

There is a forum here at DG called Gardening by the Moon for that kind of information, under the listing for general gardening.
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

March 2, 2010
1:38 PM

Post #7599248

Sure glad this thread came up. I forgot what I had seeded when last year.
Karldan
Norfolk, VA
(Zone 8a)

March 4, 2010
8:11 PM

Post #7605335

[quote="perenniallyme"]candy lily (1st attempt) - just put in the fridge after 1+ month no germination - still hoping[/quote]

I bought seeds from Park's and simply planted them in Jiffy cubes on the heat mat, all grew. I had one pure pink seedling that reseeded in the garden with a vengance, little fans everywhere, and always bloomed the same pink.
Every year I like the challenge of growing something I have never grown from seed before. This year I started Gerberas (large marigold-like seeds), blue salvia and cirsium (a Japanese thistle in reds and pinks.) All germinated readily along with an old favorite, Malva sylvestris (zebrina and Mystic Merlin.) These malvas may be considered "old-fashioned" by some, but they are as easy to grow and as quick to flower as zinnias or marigolds, and I have had plants with dozens of gladiolus or delphinium-like flower spikes in rosy pinks, mauves and purples. Stunning in the vauze, and as a bonus, a bug magnet, the honey bees fought the bumble bees and other insects for the pollenation rights. I like the ease and sterility of Jiffy cubes.
I have a blog here and some seed trades if anyone is interested or nosy.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

March 4, 2010
9:20 PM

Post #7605477

joanna - I thought you kept very strict records...
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

March 5, 2010
6:24 AM

Post #7605991

I start out with good intentions then get too busy and forget to "record" the info.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2010
3:08 PM

Post #7606988

Ah, yes...I have a lot of "good intentions"...YIKES! You would not want to know...

BTW, I have some extra 4'oclock seeds if you want them. They are so easy. One year, several years ago, I just put some seeds in the ground near the end of summer, on a east-facing wall and they just came right up and formed a very nice hedge! Hardy any trouble at all. I was really quite pleasantly surprised as I was living in a rental home at the time and there were no plants at all there. I remember them from my childhood, as I used to suck the nectar out of them...very tasty. I hear that they are poisonous, but I guess I never ingested enough of them to get any adverse reaction. So if you want some let me know.

CHEERS!

Evelyn
bigred
Ashdown, AR
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2010
4:58 AM

Post #7608114

all the peppers,tomatoes and herbs have been moved off the heat mat/grow lights to make room for another couple of trays of seeds. Good germination on all except the chives,seeds are probably too old and stevia,3 out of 36 cells came up,2 died.

now under lights on heat(2/21):
>Variegated jewels of opar...maybe 1/2
>ruella elegans...low germ...so far but they only just started sprouting
>bartlethina sordida(could be spelled wrong,can't read my own writing)...none,seeds from trade and it looked mostly like chaff and inmature seeds
>Jasions laevis...none
>Pachystegia insignis.. little over 1/2
>mimosa pudica...1/3 but just started sprouting
>calandrina grandiflora...3/4

>variegated rue..1/2
>vaiegated horehound..1/3
>variegated borage...all

Salvias:
s.subrotundra...most
s.semiatrata...only a couple but they just started sprouting
Limelight..1
s.clevelandii...none
s.canariensis...all
s.reptans...all
Hot Trumpets...3/4
Brenthurst...all
Purple Volcano...1/3
Caradonna...3/4
s.regeliana..1/3
s.jurisicii...5 out of 6 cells

now out in the cold greenhouse,it's a whole new ball game,there's little green heads everywhere.

Other annuals such as petunias,torenias,impatiens,vincas and others are one next weeks schedule in the GH.


I have a more complete WS list in my journels.

P
edewitt
Boise, ID

March 6, 2010
5:45 AM

Post #7608184

So far I've successfully germinated

Cosmidium burridgeanum
Magnus Echinacea
Happy Lights Antwerp Hollyhocks
Dutch Black Hollyhocks
Gazania Kontiki Stars 'n' Stripes
Kingfisher Daisy
Pom Pon, Rigoletto, & Black Beauty dahlias
Some dahlia seeds I harvested from my Sunshine dahlia
Mix of daylily seeds
Pink Calla Lily
Pin Up Flame & Pink Petticoat Begonias


Now the problem is keeping them alive until the frost subsides. I haven't been consistently place them beneath my ceiling fan to harden them up a bit and earlier this morning I placed my cosmidium and hollyhocks underneath it and the wind blew a few of the seedlings over and they aren't getting back up. No me gusta.

Here's a picture of one of my dahlia seedlings from the seeds I harvested.

Thumbnail by edewitt
Click the image for an enlarged view.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 6, 2010
5:50 AM

Post #7608193

pretty cool. Great record keeping.

Janet
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2010
5:07 PM

Post #7609347

Lobelia 'Blue Moon' - sowed 2/27 - up
L. 'Blue Moon - sowed 2/27 - up
Diascia 'Apricot Queen' - sowed 2/27 - up
Tomato - 'Blueberry' - sowed - 2/27 - up
Tom. 'Sub-Arctic Plenty' - sowed 2/27 - up
Tom. 'Aunt Ruby's German' - sowed 2/27 - up
'Giant Tree Tomato' - sowed 2/27 - up

These are the ones under heat. None of the others are up yet.
slopesower
Running Springs, CA
(Zone 7a)

April 12, 2010
5:57 PM

Post #7700745

Okay, as you can see, my little sprouts are growing beautifully. Now all I need is some sun and warm weather. I need to plant out, my beds are ready, my sprouts are ready, but it is snowing again today. I'm having some zone envy when I look at the pictures of the veggies that they are already picking in the warmer areas.

Anybody else with me on this?

Thumbnail by slopesower
Click the image for an enlarged view.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2010
7:38 PM

Post #7701002

slopesower...me, too!

Thumbnail by evelyn_inthegarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2010
7:56 PM

Post #7701044

I put some outdoors, on the cold back porch...I guess you could call it wintersowing...as well as the ones in the bedroom, downstairs bathroom, DH's workbench and on a shelf w lights in the basement.

Much to my amazement, the alyssum, calendulas, lupine (2 kinds) and cosmos are the ones on the back porch, which is now 35 degrees, and they are looking quite perky!

Tomatoes in the basement, downstairs bathroom, oh, and some of the petuntias are still doing OK there, but they are so tiny...I think I should start some more as I have lost a few of those.

Here's a picture of the shelves on the back porch...

Thumbnail by evelyn_inthegarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

slopesower
Running Springs, CA
(Zone 7a)

April 12, 2010
9:23 PM

Post #7701203

evelyn-I wintersowed also. I have about 100 jugs on my back walkway and about two thirds of them have sprouted. The sweet peas are about to peek out the top. I think that the slow ones need some weather that is warmer than we've had. We keep getting teased with a few days of sun and then down goes the temp. It's 35 degrees here now also and spitting snow all day.

I got impatient and planted a few broccoli, cauliflower, leeks, and cabbage sprouts in the garden last week and I am anxious to check on them to see how they are doing. I keep reading that they can handle the cold. I planted too many of everything so I have some spares.

Isn't it fun though?
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2010
9:31 PM

Post #7701394

Where is Running Springs?? We live in the Sierra Foothills, just southeast of Placerville. West of Lake Tahoe and East of Sacramento..at 3500' elevation...I guess most people don't believe it when we say that it snows in CA...and it was in the 80's on the east coast last week...go figgur..
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2010
9:48 PM

Post #7701484

Well, sorry, I got off-topic, as the topic is our successes and failures from indoor sowing...

Well, my first failure, was learning how to sow seeds indoors...the only thing I ever sowed indoors before was tomatoes, which, I suppose can be sown anywhere that eventually becomes warm.

For my first experiment was alyssum. I started some old seeds from 1989...a bunch came up. then I took it of the heat and took the cover off as well. I suppose you might know what happened...2 seedlings survived, and one is now in a cell pack, so the whole thing was really my lack of experience, as this is all new to me.

Then I sowed some tomatoes from 1987..now they did well, as I have 2 6-packs of them growing, as well as many others.

So that was a success. Now the petunias...well, they are more of a challenge for me. (So tiny!) I have several now, off heat and under lights, but still very small, and I have lost a few do to either drying out or damp-off, but I suspect drying out. I will have to keep them under wraps longer and wait until they get bigger before transplanting them into individual cells.

How do you keep those tiny seeds moist without keeping them wrapped (in bags or domes..etc)?
Seandor
Springfield, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 13, 2010
5:56 AM

Post #7701877

Okay - on Saturday I soaked seeds for dwarf morning glories (Convolvulus tricolor ), Zinnias, tithiona, in a solution roughly 90% water and 10% hydrogen peroxide. I left the seeds overnight in the solution and Sunday morning I planted the seeds in seed starter, then put the containers on lighted racks, with heat pads underneath. The containers had lids loosely attached.

Anyway, within 24 hours the dwarf morning glories, the tall zinnias and the tithiona had all sprouted - even though the packages indicated they would take between 5 to 18 days to germinate!

Go figure!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2010
4:18 PM

Post #7703394

Maybe they meant 5-8 days, without your TLC...:-)
Margui622
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 13, 2010
4:44 PM

Post #7703458

I'm having great luck with the leather flower clematis, but can't get a snapdragon vine seed to come up. And funny, I thought it would have been the other way around.
slopesower
Running Springs, CA
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2010
4:53 PM

Post #7703476

evelyn-We live in the San Bernardino Mountains at an elevation of about 5700 feet. Some of our community goes as high as 6200 feet. We live in a pine and oak forest with snowfall into May and then we get warm summers.

As to success and failures-I had really good luck inside with both veggies and flowers. My petunias, violas, geraniums. and coleus are big, green, and ready to plant out. I even have two blooms on my snapdragons.

Two flowers that I have struggled with are cleome and astilbe and I even have tiny sprouts on those. The only ones that show no signs of life are Black Cohosh and Blue Lace Flower. I've never tried them before.

I'm also really happy with the germination of my alpine strawberries.
I want to plant!!!

Thumbnail by slopesower
Click the image for an enlarged view.

slopesower
Running Springs, CA
(Zone 7a)

April 13, 2010
4:57 PM

Post #7703490

I'm giving some credit for my great germination to Pro-Mix planting medium. I had to hunt all over to find it and had to drive over an hour to get it. But, I think it was really worth it. I have had pretty good luck in the past with seed starting soils from Home Depot and Lowes, but I'm loving this. I will buy even more next year.
Elijablue
Wheaton, IL
(Zone 5b)

April 13, 2010
7:28 PM

Post #7703877

I'm having no luck germinating Salvia coccinea. Sowed them about 6 weeks ago, and nothing! Tried heat mats and lights. Any suggestions?

Successfully germinated torenia, delphineum, zinnia zowie, zinnia profusion pink, celosia bombay orange, and an heirloom tomato. Verbena bonariensis just sprouted - I hope I can grow it on!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2010
8:25 PM

Post #7704022

runningsprings...oh, that sounds like a lovely community. I lived in Topanga before I moved up north. My mother was ill and needed me, and I ended up living here since 1987...over 22 years, and now am married for over 20. Tell me more. Are you far from San Diego?

I just started growing from seeds this year, so I have a lot to catch up on. I have tomatoes, peppers, petunias, alyssum, lupine, impatiens, snaps, calendulas and cosmos started. Most indoors, but some have sprouted outdoors in 35 degree weather...I did not follow the WS guide, but I guess you could still call it WS'ing...they are on a shelf on my back porch, in containers and some of the containers I have opened after they germinated, and the lupine I moved from jiffy-starts to cell packs due to overwater on the jiffys...well, they didn't need soaking.

Thumbnail by evelyn_inthegarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Karldan
Norfolk, VA
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2010
9:34 PM

Post #7714317

Elija, sorry to hear about your poor luck with Salvia coccinea. I started them in Jiffys, one seed to a Jiffy because the seeds are somewhat large. No heat mat, just under the grow light. I also have a flat of Salvia "Blue Bedder", a large (2, 2.5 feet) salvia. One thing about Salvia, the seeds MUST be fresh. Unlike most other annuals, Salvia seeds will not germinate after one year. I planted Bonfire this year, it grows about 2 to 3 feet for me, with large gladiolus-like spikes which make excellent cuts. Here is the package and the vigorous seedlings. All this leads up to the fact that I have extra seeds that cannot be saved because they will not grow next year, and I will gladly send you a pack or 2 of S. coccinea "Bonfire" for a SASE.
Happy gardening.

Thumbnail by Karldan
Click the image for an enlarged view.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2010
7:41 AM

Post #7714907

Karldan,

That is good to know about the salvia seeds, as I have started many things this year from old seeds, especially tomatoes. I will check all my salvia seeds and be sure to use them this year, as I am new to seed-starting, though I have done it on a limited basis, mainly sowing in situ.
niki_tay
Palmyra, NY

April 18, 2010
9:53 AM

Post #7715180

I have started everything indoors this year, but I can't seem to start peppers. I have increased heat and light on them and this is the second flat. so far I have 8 pepper plants from two flats.
Any suggestions?
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 18, 2010
1:20 PM

Post #7715557

Hi Niki. I don't have a lot of experience starting peppers, but the few kinds I've sown have all sprouted within a week or so on the heat mat with light around 14 hrs a day, and under a dome. I don't remember but think I planted them no more than 1/4 inch deep, possibly less. Are you sure your seeds are good? You might try soaking the seeds overnight before planting.
joannabanana
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

April 24, 2010
7:12 AM

Post #7732386

Lesson learned for 2010. Use Promix BX for seed starting. The PGX was too fine, compacted too much and did not provide enough air to the roots. The plants were slow to grow, but once I transplanted them into the BX soil mix, they really took off.
tishrh
Mount Vernon, OH

April 25, 2010
9:50 AM

Post #7735551

Try this for peppers. take your soil and mix with water. Put into container that you are using to grow. Put your pepper seeds on top. Use vermiculite on top. Cover just enough where you can still see the seed. Mist whole thing again, I say mist so you don't wash everything out. They don't like real hot temps. so try to go for the 70- 75 degree temp. Cover with glass or plastic.
tishrh
Mount Vernon, OH

April 25, 2010
9:53 AM

Post #7735555

Successful seeding: Bat flower, passionflower , hibiscus, peppers, tomatoes, butterfly orchid, glomerata, canna lily, stapelia

unsuccessful: rosemary (last try I did better) , Gerbera Daisy (only 20% germination)
Chocolatemoose
North Pole, AK
(Zone 1)

April 25, 2010
9:54 AM

Post #7735558

tishrh...How did you germinate your bat flower seeds? How long did they take? Where did you get them?

tishrh
Mount Vernon, OH

April 25, 2010
3:46 PM

Post #7736338

The first ones have taken 3 months, my green and black bat flowers. My white and brown haven't popped up yet but it can take up to 9 months. I got them all from e bay.

I have a rope soil heater which they seem to like. Keeps the soil temp anywhere around 80 to 85. I just water it and make sure there is alot of humidity.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 26, 2010
9:35 AM

Post #7738703

Trish

Gerber Daisies are very hard, you have to start them in December under a doom and on heat mats to have any success with them.

I've finally manage to get some good germination on mine this year...

Janet
Margui622
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 26, 2010
5:08 PM

Post #7740081

I had no problem germinating two plants - came up like nothing, but since I've put them in to the ground - they've stopped growing. I think it's weird. So quick to germinate, so slow to grow.
tishrh
Mount Vernon, OH

April 28, 2010
3:36 AM

Post #7744368

I think that I kept them (gerber daisies) too wet they do not seem to like too much water so some of my plants rotted. I put a fungicide on them and it did better.


Karldan
Norfolk, VA
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2010
7:42 PM

Post #7747045

I had great success with Gerberas. Every year I like the challenge of growing something new, I never grew before. Among others, this year it was Gerberas, a pack of seeds from Aimers. The seeds were large and Marigold-like. I planted one to a Jiffy cube, on the heat mat. They all germinated and grew rapidly, and were transplanted into 3" pots to grow on. Last weekend all were transplanted into the garden. Here, they often perennialize, especially under a mulch of pine straw.

Thumbnail by Karldan
Click the image for an enlarged view.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

April 30, 2010
7:02 AM

Post #7750804

Karidan

Great picture, mine are still tiny tiny... I'll be lucky to get any blooms this year if they don't hurry up, but then if we are lucky and get some warm weather I think they will take off.

Janet
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 30, 2010
3:57 PM

Post #7752189

I think I will start mine in summer or January, which would be better, for next years blooms?
tishrh
Mount Vernon, OH

May 1, 2010
5:18 AM

Post #7753616

Beautiful! I may have to try germinating them that way late this year.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

May 1, 2010
12:40 PM

Post #7754602

Karldan ~ What date did you start your gerberas?
Karldan
Norfolk, VA
(Zone 8a)

May 1, 2010
12:51 PM

Post #7754629

I started them Jan 25. That's the seed packet of Aimers, BTW. They grew fast, put into 3" pots, and now in the garden. Older hybrids from years ago took a year to bloom, the newer hybrids bloom much faster. DON'T bury the "crown" of the plant deep. And Miracle-gro often.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

May 1, 2010
2:28 PM

Post #7754902

Thanks for your good advice! I am starting a gardening- seeding calendar, for next year, and trying as well to kep up with what I have started so far. yesterday, I knocked over a flat of lupine seedlings and I almost cried. It takes so long for some things to start and they can get damaged by one thing or another in an instant...like dry up, damp off...etc. though we all do our best to prevent those things, sometimes we just get in our own way...LOL!!! ☺
smb12321
Franklin, TN

May 2, 2010
8:15 PM

Post #7758738

What went wrong?

First year for seeds. I have a good place - sun room next to pool. No soaking, baking, peroziding, etc and yet got a good percentage to start. Problems occur between first and second leaves when I lose the most. I sprayed religiously, set them in and out depending on weather, etc but they died. Underwatering? Will all seeds grown? Are older seeds "bad" or harder to grow? The ones from the Texas Wildflower company had the best success.

Many thanks in advance.
tishrh
Mount Vernon, OH

May 3, 2010
3:31 AM

Post #7759152

Normally if I lose small plants around the one leaf or two leaf time it is from underwatering or overwatering. Though sometimes it is from having it too cool temps. You said you set them in and out depending on weather. Did you put them in direct sun? Sometimes some plants will get "shocked" from a different lighting and atmosphere.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 6, 2010
9:01 AM

Post #7769315

I've got basil that is dying off one plant at a time. the first one I thought was maybe due to overwatering but really they aren't watered that much. The stem was black that was in the soil.

Now I've got another one that has wilted but the stem isn't black?

Anyone have any ideas? I can take a picture when I get home from work tonight and post if ya want to see.

Janet
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

May 7, 2010
11:56 AM

Post #7772678

Yikes! I went to the top of the thread to re-read it, and it reminded me to check the things I put in the "mini-frige" on the back porch. Alos on top of it, I have some old Lupine seeds in "Deno-bags" .

Janet ~ In my inexpert opinion ~ It sounds like damp-off to me...anyone agree or disagree?


TTYL!☺

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

May 7, 2010
11:56 AM

Post #7772679

Sorry! I don't know how these duplicate posts occur...??



This message was edited May 10, 2010 11:13 PM
Elijablue
Wheaton, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 7, 2010
7:04 PM

Post #7773825

I agree - sounds like damping off - the fungus that attacks seedlings for a multitude of reasons.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 10, 2010
6:57 AM

Post #7779819

funny thing is two of them did die but the rest are ok so will plant them and see what comes of it...

thanks folks

Janet
smb12321
Franklin, TN

May 12, 2010
4:31 AM

Post #7785741

Is there a book or site showing plants in various stages of growth? I grow both veggies and flowers from seed but this year my wonderful granddaughter (who lives with us and "helps") combined all the seeds into a huge pile. Now I have okra growing beside cosmos, tomatoes and yarrow. Most of the stuff, though, I can't identify - various perennials, wildflowers, herbs, etc . I'd like to transplant now but am unsure of the plants. Thanks
angedawn47
Lake Charles, LA

May 13, 2010
3:05 PM

Post #7790632

I want to try Janlynn's method with the peat pellets. So I soak te pellets in warm water with hydrogen peroxide. I am assuming a 10:1 ratio. I'm wondering if she put the seeds on top of the pellet or buried it?

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 14, 2010
4:36 AM

Post #7791761

the depth is determined by the seeds you are using. read the back of the packet.

Janet
tishrh
Mount Vernon, OH

May 14, 2010
6:32 AM

Post #7792030

another successful seeding: pumpkin on a stick and easter egg plant . - just transplanted them into bigger pots
stephowser
Liberty
United States

June 6, 2010
11:26 AM

Post #7864042

[quote="Seandor"]Successes so far 2009: Spirea, barberry, trumpet lily, easter lily, rugosa rose, petunia, Nierembergia, cinaria.

Failures: astillbe - these germinated then died probably because I overwatered, begonias - nothing germinated - again probably too wet, nemesia - germinated then died.[/quote]

Easter Lilys are all over my yard. From My Grandmothers! They reseed themselves. Perennial, place where you want them for the next year.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

June 7, 2010
5:00 PM

Post #7868082

The lupine in the plastic bags worked great...though I did not record the results and some of them did not make it, but it was a great way to germinate them. I won't be trying them in peat pellets any more. Though that method worked fine in spite of the fact that I got them too wet...most of them germinated anyway as well. They are very slow growing though as they are now in cell packs. maybe since the weather is warming up I will just find places to plant them. I read that they are good in part shade. Most of the native lupine are in part shade as well, so I will go with that as it gets very hot and dry during the summertime.

dyzzypyxxy

dyzzypyxxy
Sarasota, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 17, 2010
5:12 PM

Post #8104873

Does anybody know if CFL's give enough light for seedlings? I live in Florida and it's still too hot to put my fall veggie seedlings outside.

Indoors with the a/c going, it is about 75 or so but I don't have a window that gets any sunlight.

But all my overhead lights have CFL's, so I wondered if they would work the same way as regular fluorescents do for plants.

thx

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