Photo by Melody

Article: Vivaldi in the Garden: Viva Vivaldi!

Communities > Forums > Article: Vivaldi in the Garden
bookmark
Forum: Article: Vivaldi in the GardenReplies: 24, Views: 76
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent

jjacques

jjacques
LE TAMPON
Reunion (French)

March 4, 2009
7:50 AM

Post #6219390

Very refreshing article! I am also very fond of baroque music though I would listen more to Bach than Vivaldi but his music definitely goes further than mere harmonious sounds and delicate figures. Being in the tropics spring is not too obvious but I lived in France for some 30 years and yes indeed May was my favourite month! Just the sight of opening buds of horse chestnut trees made me want to stop time!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 4, 2009
2:37 PM

Post #6219955

I definitely prefer Bach to Vivaldi, but I've been wondering for quite a while how to combine my love of music and my love of DG! I think you've done it, Ben. Shall I write a companion piece on

edited to say I HATE THAT! Stravinsky's Le Sacre du Printemps, or The Rite of Spring? Like Vivaldi, Stravinsky is interested in shepherds dancing and ritual celebrations.

This message was edited Mar 4, 2009 1:09 PM

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2009
5:22 PM

Post #6220742

The Vivaldi is still playing-- the slow part must be where you catch your breath from frolicking and sit down on some moss... I just love the beginning of a Grieg piece- Spring or is it Morning? anyway its beautiful too.
You'll all know this, maybe its overdone, but nice. And you can use it all year!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ya5ICVKUERg

Hmm, that one is jazzed up a bit newish..I wish I'd checked for a traditional version.

This message was edited Mar 4, 2009 12:25 PM
BennysPlace
Beverly Hills, CA

March 4, 2009
11:00 PM

Post #6221967

Hi jjaques!

Why thank you! I love the buds on the horse chestnuts! You just brought back a wonderful memory. Thank you so much again!

Hi Carrie,

I think that would be a lovely idea! :-)

Hi Sally,

Ahhh yes, Grieg. Another beautiful, garden meditation piece. I love it. Thank you so much!

Blessings to all,
Ben

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2009
12:16 AM

Post #6222337

Stravinsky? Really? I'm not sure many readers would go for it - and I mostly compose while I garden!

jjacques

jjacques
LE TAMPON
Reunion (French)

March 5, 2009
4:08 AM

Post #6223407

Hi Benny
I am sure many of us cherish those horse chestnut buds, I do not know about USA but in France (at least the Paris area..) many schoolyards are planted with those trees so they stay closely associated with childhood.
Yep Carrie, Stravinsky needs some education and effort of the ear and aesthetic to be appreciated but so does Charlie Parker and Pierre Boulez...

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 5, 2009
4:53 AM

Post #6223563

sure carrie, educate us. Cite a few Spring pieces and teach us music theory...
BennysPlace
Beverly Hills, CA

March 5, 2009
3:43 PM

Post #6224702

Hi jjaques,

The first and only time I have seen horse chestnut trees was when I lived in England. Like Fance, the kids of England assoaciate the trees with childhood. I was just amazed by these beautiful trees at all times of year. I loved them.

I agree with Sally, Carrie. Go for it.

jjacques

jjacques
LE TAMPON
Reunion (French)

March 5, 2009
5:10 PM

Post #6225089

Hi Benny
I think this tree originates from the Balkan area and was brought to Europe around 1700 so it is quite widespread there and a familiar sight in any large gardens and park, it is used in Paris along streets and sometimes pruned as 'Marquise' or in different shapes. And of course when autmn comes and the tree releases its fruits it brings cheap toys for any kid around!
BennysPlace
Beverly Hills, CA

March 5, 2009
5:19 PM

Post #6225120

:-) Do you call them conkers in France as well?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2009
6:23 PM

Post #6225381

The first lesson is "April is in my mistress' face", by Thomas Morley. This English madrigal is an excellent example of the high renaissance school that came before the Baroque period exemplified by Benny's Vivaldi. Note how the different months are associated with different melodic motives.

Edited to take off the extra underlines!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hd0oZXi-Ygs&feature=related

This message was edited Mar 7, 2009 10:51 AM

jjacques

jjacques
LE TAMPON
Reunion (French)

March 6, 2009
4:27 AM

Post #6227824

Conkers? Never heard this before. We call the trees 'marronnier' although 'marronnier d'Inde' is more relevant, the (unedible) fruits are called 'marrons' (from the brown color) which is confusing as 'marron' is another world for chestnut which correct name is 'chataîgne'...
Just checked on my dictionnary, and yes, conkers is marrons.
BennysPlace
Beverly Hills, CA

March 6, 2009
3:32 PM

Post #6229140

Hi there jjacques,

I had no idea how popular this game was. Some even spray there conkers with a resin type spray to make them extra hard and shatter proof. The idea is you continue to hit the other person's conker until it breaks. I tried it. It was fun. I just enjoyed collecting them because of how they felt. Now I know you can call them marrons too. :-)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2009
3:40 PM

Post #6229164

Hey guys, check THIS out:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/321/
BennysPlace
Beverly Hills, CA

March 6, 2009
3:43 PM

Post #6229179

Thanks Carrie...

The horse chestnut is SUCH a beautiful tree!

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 7, 2009
3:39 PM

Post #6233489

carrie- lovely piece, thanks for the Morley link

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 7, 2009
3:49 PM

Post #6233535

You're welcome. Are you ready for Stravinsky?

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 7, 2009
3:53 PM

Post #6233548

Doubt I'll ever be ready for Stravinsky! But you could try. I just heard last night that Grieg was considered pre-Stravinsky, or pre -whatever you call it, and I love Grieg!

jjacques

jjacques
LE TAMPON
Reunion (French)

March 7, 2009
4:24 PM

Post #6233654

Munch on Stravinsky and next step you'll be ready for Stockhausen, then you can enjoy the sounds of trains and pneumatic drills;)) Not that I despise Stockhausen but it never sounded like spring to me...

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 7, 2009
4:27 PM

Post #6233666

OK, this is music that couldn't have happened without Stravinsky. Please ignore the sappy introduction by Rodgers & Hammerstein. (Can't leave a tender moment alone.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y9mzCWns7js&feature=related

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 7, 2009
4:28 PM

Post #6233673

Enjoying trains is John Cage, isn't it?

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 7, 2009
4:36 PM

Post #6233702

That was nice

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 7, 2009
4:48 PM

Post #6233751

I'm looking for something painless to ease you into the 20th century. Do you like Broadway? John Williams? The music for Star Wars, Phantom of the Opera, all that Andrew Lloyd Webber stuff is pretty much infused with the music of Stravinsky, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky and other first half of the 20th century Russian guys. I can't think of his name right now but there's a guy Stravinsky studied with who wound up on Broadway in a lot of harmonies and melodies and snippets.

Think about ragtime and then listen to some of this, which Stravinsky wrote in 1924.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTGoqle4m34&feature=related

And don't say "that was nice" - you're not supposed to be unaffected.

This message was edited Mar 7, 2009 11:49 AM

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 7, 2009
7:15 PM

Post #6234238

John Williams, of course I know. I went to the real original Star Wars when it came out. and have seen he does more. Mussorgsky--Pictures at a Museum? Tchaikovsky I do like. I would have thought he's considered much different than Stravinsky.
Interesting--But I confess my head is not really concentrating here when its super mild out and I'm trrying to cram a whole day of garden into a few hours as always. It's hard to decide which I know less about, music or poetry.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 7, 2009
10:32 PM

Post #6234980

Well from a musicology point of view , all that music is in a (not always straight) line, and Stravinsky is one of the stops along the way. Miss Saigon, that's the show I was trying to think of earlier!

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Article: Vivaldi in the Garden Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Very Well Done, Benjamin skaz421 7 Mar 5, 2009 3:47 PM
Vivaldi's music Hemophobic 3 Mar 5, 2009 3:52 PM
Free Score to Vivaldi's 4 Seasons & many more bluespiral 5 Mar 21, 2011 10:05 AM
Vivaldi raerae1 1 Mar 9, 2009 4:15 PM
Beautiful music 3pmp 0 May 1, 2012 8:48 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America