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Shady Gardens: Shade Garden Inspiration - Show off your garden!

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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 4, 2009
7:22 PM

Post #6221154

It's heading toward springtime, I have a brand new yard to plant, and I'm looking for ideas. Who wants to show off their shade garden?!

Let's get some shade garden pictures posted here for a little spring rejuvenation and inspiration.

I moved into a new house last fall and didn't have time to do much of anything before the weather was too cold for planting. But I did manage to at least pull together some plants for this tiny part-shade patch. Here it is freshly planted last year...

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threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

March 4, 2009
7:25 PM

Post #6221169

:-)

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CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 4, 2009
8:56 PM

Post #6221485

This is shortly after planting this bed last summer. Dense shade.

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CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 4, 2009
8:58 PM

Post #6221494

Opp's, wrong photo, try this.

Thumbnail by CountryGardens
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CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 4, 2009
9:00 PM

Post #6221495

Same bed, 2007

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threegardeners
North Augusta, ON

March 4, 2009
9:02 PM

Post #6221501

wow, that filled in really nicely!
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 4, 2009
10:46 PM

Post #6221917

Gorgeous threegardeners and CountryGardens! Are those tons of impatiens in the last photo? For some reason I've never had luck growing them in my container plantings (silly, I know), but I really should try them in my shade beds this year.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 4, 2009
11:03 PM

Post #6221991

The impatiens are 2007. The other things were planted in 2008. No impatiens!
It was hard picking a picture, to many shade gardens, not enough good pictures.
Back part of this is the one with the new Hostas. To the right is the picture I posted by mistake.
Bernie

Thumbnail by CountryGardens
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lrwells50
(Lynn) Paris, TX
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2009
11:10 PM

Post #6222021

Beautiful gardens!

Here's my garden that needs some color. I have planted impatiens in the past, and they are beautiful, but I'd like a perennial. Are there any caladiums that don't have to be pulled and stored in zone 7b? We've trimmed trees since this picture, and I'm going to have to wait until they leaf out to see if I've still got full shade, or if I could consider it partial.

Lynn

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2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2009
11:13 PM

Post #6222032

hey Bernie - would you mind sharing the names of your hostas in pic #1? They are beautiful!

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 4, 2009
11:58 PM

Post #6222236

They are so old, we don't know what they are. Definitely need to be redone this year. I will dig & divide, then pot up the extras & sell them cheap.
Did I hear you were going to KY RU. I could bring some there.
Bernie
2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

March 5, 2009
1:12 AM

Post #6222623

Wish I could, but no. If you decide you want to mail (bareroot) a couple, please dmail me. I particularly like the one on the far left. Sure wish we new the names.

I have never had plants in our back yard so I am wanting to do a hosta garden in the back since it is so shady. People who lived here before us, didn't have anything. Not even grass. :( I am starting from scratch.

Thumbnail by 2racingboys
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gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

March 5, 2009
1:17 AM

Post #6222646

"scratch" sure would be nice! I would really look for the best layouts and really plan.. When I started I knew absolitly nothing and just stuck plants in the ground. Now I really want to move lots of things ar ound for the texture effect. I may this summer. Huchreras of all colors by the hostas. That looks really pretty and interesting. Big clusters of hostas. Yellows and stripes and green. I really love the yellow and lemons colors for hostas. Bought several of them last summer. Smiling. Can't wait to see them! Ronna
2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

March 5, 2009
1:28 AM

Post #6222689

Ronna, we have a small pond going in close to the tree we got each other for valentine's day. :)
Our 5 year anniversary is the 20th of this month (first day of spring) and we promised that we would work on this to make the house more of a home. :)
Our boys have never been able to come out here because of all of the mud. Kinda sad really.

The main plan is to install the small pond (100 gallons) buy as many hostas & ferns we can afford and keep going from there. We have alot of stone already to build a few steps and to go around the pond. Basically we lack good weather, time, and plants galore. lol

I will post pic when we're done.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 5, 2009
4:26 AM

Post #6223469

I'll definitely send you some Hostas. I have some left from a couple plants I divided last year, if they made it through the winter. Also have some that I planted to close together. I need to move them around so there will be some extras there too.

Ronna,
What do you mean, make a plan ? I have been here since 1982 & only stick things where there is a little hole. Fall of 2007, I made an Iris bed, since I got a ton of plants from Round up's. I have about 20 kinds of plants in there now.
Last fall I bought Iris on a Co-op here & needed to burn off another patch of grass for them. Then I hosted a RU here & a DG member from Twin Cities brought odels of them. Of course I needed some of them, too. More plants will mean more burned off lawn.
Like one DG'er said at the RU, not much future in grass!
I am planning on a new pond with a stream & waterfall this summer. At least get started on it.
This is the crowded Hosta Bed.

Thumbnail by CountryGardens
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2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

March 5, 2009
2:41 PM

Post #6224460

Bernie - that is just beautiful! Everything looks so happy there.
Yes, please when the time comes, just Dmail me with your price & address & I can send you money however you like - PayPal, check, money order or whatever.
Thanks again! I can't wait for spring!
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 6, 2009
12:54 AM

Post #6226952

Lots of great inspiration here! Keep the posts coming--I'm making notes. ;)

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

March 7, 2009
1:37 AM

Post #6231390

Very nice CountryGardens! I want to do the same this summer. Love all the different colors and textured! Ronna
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 7, 2009
11:03 PM

Post #6235081

Astilbe and ferns

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doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 7, 2009
11:05 PM

Post #6235085

farfuguim, ligularia, hostas ferns, etc. etc.

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lrwells50
(Lynn) Paris, TX
(Zone 7b)

March 8, 2009
12:38 AM

Post #6235489

Beautiful stacked stone wall, doss. Our lot is flat, flat, flat.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 8, 2009
1:35 AM

Post #6235738

I am lucky to be on a slope. It makes landscaping (once you've got the wall done) pretty easy. It's hard to go wrong.
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

March 8, 2009
8:41 PM

Post #6238815

Bernie's gardens are beautiful...planned or not. Another big thank you Bernie for hosting the Fall RU at your home. It is always a great time with great plants, great food and gracious hosts.

Here is one of my beds in early June 2008. By the end of the summer it is much more filled in. It lies between the house/deck on terraced beds, and off of the pic to the right is a steep drop down to the lake.

Thumbnail by marie_
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doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 9, 2009
5:39 PM

Post #6242902

Love your stacked walls too Marie. Lovely setting.
marie_
West Central, WI
(Zone 4a)

March 11, 2009
5:26 PM

Post #6251989

Thank you.

I'm very pleased with the result, but a real bugger to work in. A friend thought that you'd need to be part mountain goat to garden in that spot. There is a 5 foot high retaining wall just off to the right of the pic.
gardengus
Flora, IN
(Zone 5a)

March 11, 2009
5:48 PM

Post #6252089

My shade garden is on the north side of the house. This is from last year.

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gardengus
Flora, IN
(Zone 5a)

March 11, 2009
5:51 PM

Post #6252103

When the hostas are still small I have a tendency to plant things where I should not then they get totally covered by the big leaves.

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gardengus
Flora, IN
(Zone 5a)

March 11, 2009
5:56 PM

Post #6252124

I love corydalis,but have a hard time keeping them.

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gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2009
10:40 PM

Post #6262718

Sorry still no plants in Michigan yet... Boo Hoo!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 16, 2009
3:08 AM

Post #6273566

Hellebores and ferns.

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bifdiehl
Gettysburg, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 16, 2009
8:03 PM

Post #6276510

Doss - what's the creeping stuff in your picture? Is is creeping thyme? Love how it looks with your pavers.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 16, 2009
10:02 PM

Post #6276927

It's baby tears. I have to be careful to keep it back or it would take over. Only a houseplant for your zone though.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 17, 2009
1:19 PM

Post #6279765

I have wanted to try corydalis. Gardengus, what do you think is the problem with yours not sticking around? (We're in the same zone, so I wonder if I'd be wasting my time with it.)

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 18, 2009
1:53 AM

Post #6282804

Don't forget about grasses. I think they can look great in a shady place.
Here's a shady part of my yard.
Don't mind the wire cages - just my method of bunny / deer protection...

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CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 18, 2009
2:13 AM

Post #6282897

Here's a link to a good Deer repellent.
http://www.treeworld.com/
I tried it a couple years ago when deer were giving me fits. I had a spray bottle. Couples shots to each plant & the problem stopped immediately.
It's for sale at a lot of garden centers. I just used this web site to show what it is.

Very pretty garden.
Bernie

This message was edited Mar 17, 2009 9:15 PM
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 18, 2009
2:25 AM

Post #6282953

I like baby tears, doss. Hard to believe such a teeny little plant is capable of taking over. I think I am going to get rid of my golden creeping Jenny this year (or try to)...people tell me it doesn't kill the plants it grows around, but I'm still nervous because of the aggressive spread rate. Mine is with Japanese Ferns and hosta, and I don't see how the fern can push up thru it.
gardengus
Flora, IN
(Zone 5a)

March 18, 2009
3:42 PM

Post #6285035

Kayly, I wish I knew why (about the corydalis) I think it may be water, last year we had a very wet spring and there were more seedlings than normal. I do not normally water the shade garden behind the house unless it is exceptionally dry.
The yellow do much better than any of the other colors, I was successful with it for about six years.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 18, 2009
7:25 PM

Post #6286041

Very pretty wee robin. It's a lovely combination. I'm a big fan of hakone grass and use it whereever I can. I even grow it in full sun - not the yellow kind but the variegated kind.
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 19, 2009
3:56 AM

Post #6288385

This is probably my favorite combination in my garden...

Love Pat hosta with maidenhair and Japanese painted ferns and Bridal Veil Astilbe. I just wish Astilbe bloomed longer.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 19, 2009
10:07 AM

Post #6288841

Or, how about a different grass this time...

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 19, 2009
10:10 AM

Post #6288845

I like the foliage texture differences in my shady areas.
That's why I like to throw in grasses.
But there are lots of others, like this hosta next to syneilesis.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

March 19, 2009
10:32 AM

Post #6288867

Weerobin, that's one beautiful planting of Syneilesis! We've had it planted in one spot by the front door but the dog trampled it last year. Hoping it recovers and springs back to life this year, but we're doubtful :( Where did you buy yours? We've been desperately looking for more and did place an order with Hillside Gardens last year but it's hard to find!

Noreaster, have you ever tried Aruncus 'Misty Lace'? http://www.greatgardenplants.com/?pageId=154&sourceCode=DGarden Looks very similar to Astilbe when in bloom and the flowers last much longer!
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 19, 2009
12:47 PM

Post #6289160

Wow, I really like that Aruncus...I've always avoided it because of it's large size, but that cultivar sounds perfect for my small garden. I prefer the airier astilbes, so that really appeals to me. Now I have to figure out where to squeeze it in!

That Syneilesis is really cool looking too, Weerobin.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 19, 2009
9:11 PM

Post #6291213

Noreaster, that is a beautiful combination! Astilbes seem to hate me, but I've thought of trying aruncus to see if it fares better. I definitely like that feathery look, and the large size isn't a problem for me. I've got plenty of space, just not lots of light.

Weerobin, your shady grasses look lovely. I've had good luck with liriope, so I'll likely try that again--looks nice pretty much all season, and I think it's cute in bloom. It's also, at least in my experience, not at all picky about soil and seems just about impossible to kill. You've gotta love that in a plant!

doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 19, 2009
11:48 PM

Post #6291934

Noreaster - what a beautiful garden. I love astilbes too and although they don't bloom long, their texture is a lovely contrast to the hostas.
Weerobin. That's a beautiful combo with the Japanese Blood Grass. I love that stuff too.

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2009
12:12 AM

Post #6292041

I agree with KaylyRed! Astelbies seem to hate me also. But the Goats beards really go wild in my yard. Love them. Mine has gone to town! Divided them three times now. Nothing coming up in my yard yet. Oh I do have crocuse open yeah! And daffy and tulips coming up also. ;) Ronna
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 20, 2009
12:55 AM

Post #6292270

RCN, I'm not sure where I got my syneilesis. It's been several years ago.
I saw it listed this year by Plant Delights and Keep It Green nurseries.

By the way, I just ordered from Keep It Green for the first time this year.
Their plants came early, bare root.
Frankly, caught me a little off-guard, but I got them in the ground this past weekend.
(We just happened to have a decent weather weekend - the first gardening of the season for me...
I had a blast!)
I've always been leery of bare root plants, especially requiring early planting.
But these were very handsome plants with really big root systems; I have a really good feeling they'll do well.
I plan to order from them again next year.
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 20, 2009
3:55 AM

Post #6293139

Weerobin - thanks for posting about http://www.keepingitgreen. com. I've never heard of them and they're in Washington. There are several things here that I've been looking for.

Beautiful and inspirational shade garden views, everybody. I have really avoided more hostas because of the slugs I have - I just can't keep ahead of them. I saw 4 slugs today for the first time. One native, that supposedly only eats decaying matter and three of the European. Those tiny ones can clean a newly budding plant out before they're big enough to see. Arghhh!!

Kathy
2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2009
11:37 PM

Post #6301073

Doss, Marie, WeeRobin, Bernie, Noreaster everyone!
Ya'll stuff is just amazing!!! Love it all!!
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

March 22, 2009
10:45 AM

Post #6302626

Thanks for the link - I've already emailed them about the Syneilesis but haven't heard anything yet. Price is better than Plant Delights :) I'm not crazy about receiving bare root plants either, but since it's still early in the season I should have time to get them potted up!
chuck7701
McKinney, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 23, 2009
6:18 PM

Post #6308693

We put a small 30 gallon barrel pond in several years when the tree was smaller!! Now the roots have lifted one side of the pond. So consider situating it a good distance from any tree base or major roots. We wanted a larger concrete pond, but the installer said if we went with a larger one that close to the oak tree, there was a good chance it would harm the tree now if not later.

If you sink it into the ground, level with sand/gravel and line the bottom with concrete squares for bottom support for walking in to clean, and fill in the sides with larger gravel and sand. The other consideration is cleaning and draining when installing and landscaping around it. How and where to drain and/or clean it. Under a tree and you will be cleaning regularly!!!!!

Other than that, use your imagination. Start with lots of ferns, hostas and indigenous bog/creek plants. Corkscrew Rush grass makes a nice addition in or around the pond.

Chuck



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chuck7701
McKinney, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 23, 2009
6:45 PM

Post #6308798

katie59 and Hosta lovers with snail problems

Sluggo, sluggo, sluggo, or any of the organic snail and slug baits with iron phosphate. Green light used to make one that was cheaper in price... The best stuff out there when used routinely. Once you get them under control with this bait, your fears and problems will disappear. It can also be ordered in bulk (10-25 lbs) online even cheaper.

Hellibores for sure, but they are slow to establish. Plant a Japanese Maple. Louisiana Iris make a nice background, and can give the appearance of grasses.

Here's a pic of my pond and shade area from today.

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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 23, 2009
6:53 PM

Post #6308828

That's a beautiful shady sanctuary you've got there, chuck7701! I have zone envy at the moment. All I see here is brown and more brown. And today it's raining, so the brown foliage has a backdrop of gray sky.

In a month, though, things will be different. :)
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 23, 2009
7:41 PM

Post #6309028

Thanks, Chuck. I'm going to go broke trying to get rid of these slugs. LOL. It's nice and wet here and they love it. I have 4-5 inch slugs crawling up the side of the house in warmer winters. At least this year it was cold - I hope that got rid of a lot of eggs.

I heard the coffee grounds spreak on the top of the ground helps and that Kmart sells a slug bait with the same ingredients as Sluggo. I'm going to check it out.

Nice picture, Chuck. I cleared off an area by a rotting stump this weekend (ranunculus repens is rampant, as are our native salal and dewberry and the introduced himalayan blackberry. I'll post pictures this week to get ideas for planting from you all.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 23, 2009
9:20 PM

Post #6309443

chuck, that's an incredible staghorn fern growing under your tree. Fabulous. And it's in such a lovely setting.
chuck7701
McKinney, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 23, 2009
11:02 PM

Post #6309853

katie59 - Slugs - you will need to treat the first time heavy, or lightly two nights in a row. Repeat one application again in three weeks to break the egg cycle, and again in three weeks. Once you break that cycle it is easy to eliminate virtually all of them. I usually treat about ten feet into my neighbors yard as well.

I only lightly treated twice last summer early spring and august, and several years ago I had them so bad large Marigolds disappeared overnight, and you couldn't set a beer on the ground. As long as the main ingredient is iron phosphate. Naturally occurring in the soil, just not in high enough quantities to affect them. Disrupts the digestive system and they die in three days.

Doss - Thanks, the Stagmeister wouldn't cooperate to turn and smile for the camera. Just moved it to that side from the right, and still working on adjusting the chain to get it to face the back patio. Two years ago the basket got top heavy, busted the original small chain, so I started hanging it sideways. Started it from two little sprigs about 7years ago - it does favor that shady spot.

Kalyred - And I thought I had zone envy for the Florida year round growing climate! Would much prefer not having the winter freeze/summer heat wave to deal with. Waiting for all the rest of the summer plants to shoot up now.



lrwells50
(Lynn) Paris, TX
(Zone 7b)

March 24, 2009
12:32 AM

Post #6310196

I will never forget the first time we went to my husband's family's cabin near Quilcene, WA. Fluorescent orange and green slugs 6" long! At least I assume they were slugs, although a lot more attractive than our much smaller, slimy dirt colored ones.
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 24, 2009
3:44 AM

Post #6311210

Our native ones are very pretty.

But we have the European brown and orange ones, as well.

http://oregonstate.edu/dept/nurspest/banana slug.htm
jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
5:59 PM

Post #6323002

Shade beds are some of my favorites. Like doss, we have a sloping urban lot. Two mature trees and a long north-facing side created large partial sun/bright shade beds. There's a French drain alongside the house so the bed shown here is only 4' wide.

This is the north side of the house, upper bed, a few years ago. Late last year I reworked it, so it's currently a work in progress:

This message was edited Mar 26, 2009 11:01 AM

This message was edited Mar 27, 2009 7:33 AM

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jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
6:02 PM

Post #6323017

Brunnera 'Jack Frost' and a palm which has since been taken out. The statue is a 'kirin', a mythological Japanese dragon-horse

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jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
6:03 PM

Post #6323024

This bed looks very different if you're at the top looking down! When the callas are in bloom they are magnificent:

Thumbnail by jkom51
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jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
6:06 PM

Post #6323034

At groundlevel, many plants are fighting it out. I overplant, so have to prune back regularly. Here the brunnera fights to keep its head above the bacopa and plectranthus, while bearded iris and alstroemeria foliage add some nice contrast in shape. This bed is so shady the alstroemeria almost never flowers, but the variegated foliage is so pretty, I keep it where it is:

Thumbnail by jkom51
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doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
6:07 PM

Post #6323038

Lovely gardens jkom. I love the callas. Mine are blooming right now and they are so 'spring'!
jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
6:08 PM

Post #6323046

These two plants were very pretty, but neither survived our cold wet winters. This is Lysimachia congestiflora and a New Guinea impatiens:

Thumbnail by jkom51
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jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
6:12 PM

Post #6323056

I agree, Doss. I love to combine callas with either my purple bearded iris or orange clivia, as I did here:

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jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
6:14 PM

Post #6323063

The lower second bed on the north side has to live on run-off from above. I use soaker hoses, with an occasional hand-watering for the new plants I'm always putting in, LOL. I may have posted this one before - I love the combination of bearded iris, rosy oxalis siliquosa, and variegated aucuba:

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doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
8:32 PM

Post #6323563

What great plant combinations you come up with jkom. I love that callas with just about anything!
jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
9:51 PM

Post #6323892

I also like the way variegated aucuba goes with hellebore. Color, shape and texture complement one another perfectly.

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jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
9:56 PM

Post #6323908

The next set of photos is in the lowest part of our property. It's shaded by two mature trees, a walnut and a maple. Thus, it gets winter sun but summer shade. The trees suck up moisture and nutrients in summer, and to make it worse it's the coldest area during our rainy winters. All of these make for hard conditions; even broom (cytisus) has had to struggle here.

Here's the silver maple bed:

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jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
9:59 PM

Post #6323917

The bed around the walnut is one of the largest I have - certainly the curviest! Here's the front of it, looking towards the back of the property (the green slat fence is a schoolyard below us):

Thumbnail by jkom51
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jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
10:01 PM

Post #6323922

If you move to the right of the photo above, then turn around to look up towards the house, this is what our slope looks like. It's a good workout to weed this property!

Thumbnail by jkom51
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jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
10:05 PM

Post #6323938

"Shade" in CA, even Northern CA, can be misleading. It's more like 'partial sun' elsewhere, because the UV index is so high here. Even our cloudy days can be very bright indeed! So the nasturtiums keep blooming in this area even into early summer, because the trees start to leaf out by May, keeping the soil cool enough for them to survive. Here they are in all their early glory, though - a previous April:

Thumbnail by jkom51
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jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 26, 2009
10:08 PM

Post #6323954

I really love lamium maculatum but it just isn't xeric enough to survive our dry summers without help, and our chilly winter rains make it retreat so drastically that it's failed to return for me after a couple of winters, despite my planting it in several places. I really love the "Pink Dragon" form of it, though, so I may try it in a pot to see if that will help it survive:

Thumbnail by jkom51
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Smokey_SC
Piedmont, SC
(Zone 7b)

March 26, 2009
11:41 PM

Post #6324374

jkom51, are the impatiens in full shade?
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 27, 2009
12:12 AM

Post #6324501

The lamium survived for me in pots but not in the ground. I don't know why though.

Your beds are so beautiful. What is your secret for such lush plantings under trees, especially the walnut?
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 27, 2009
3:54 AM

Post #6325447

doss - I have a variegated lamium that I can't get rid of. I literally stuck one piece in the ground (I had ripped it off from a piece at my brother's). When I learned the next season that it did too well here, I started to take it out. I'm still ripping. I think it loves our moisture here . . .
jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 27, 2009
2:39 PM

Post #6326861

Smokey, the New Guinea impatiens can take some sun, but I think it's warmth that really keeps them around. Thus it can be difficult around here because our nights cool off so drastically. I have an Impatiens sodenii and it's in full shade.

Katie59, your lamium may be lamium galeobdolon, Yellow archangel. It is handsome, but also an extremely aggressive variety of lamium and considered invasive in some areas. Other lamiums, including all the maculatum varieties, are very well-behaved in contrast.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 27, 2009
2:48 PM

Post #6326898

jkom, your beds are stunning!
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 27, 2009
5:08 PM

Post #6327609

Yes - I Googled it and I think you're right!!

Yellow archangel - eek - that sounds scary. I think you've convinced me to pull with renewed vigor. Of course now it's battling it out with the Bishop's weed in one spot in the bed - I'd better be careful or between them they'll get us all . . .

I have seen it in other wetland areas in the woods around me and I see from the following article that is had, indeed, become a problem in these parts.

Ihttp://www.arthurleej.com/p-o-m-April03.html
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 27, 2009
6:27 PM

Post #6327915

The bed to the right is in shade, the one to the left is in sun.

This message was edited Mar 27, 2009 12:06 PM

Thumbnail by doss
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katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 27, 2009
6:55 PM

Post #6328012

Wow, what a beautiful finished walk.
Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 28, 2009
5:55 AM

Post #6330295

GASP you folks are awesome!

jkom51, your post #6323938 got me thinking very differently about the "deep shade" under my 40+ year-old Fruitless Mulberries. I've several seriously neglected azaleas in the bed, but that's pretty much it. Lord knows how they've survived the neglect; lack of water, feeding, pruning, but survive they have, with even an occasional.

I simply haven't known what to do with it, assuming that nothing will grow in that "deep shade." Well, your post, jkom51, really spun my thinking around. Nevertheless, I said to myself, it's deep shade, running off to my thread in the beginner's landscaping forum to grab my photo of the space to prove to you that it is "deep shade." Aaaah, but it's not deep shade, is it? See it here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=5537482 .

Moreover, even if it never saw a speck of sun on the surface, you taught me that it derives some benefit from the "light." Then there's the character of this tree's root system; large, heavy, with mind-numbing webs of bright orange hair roots sucking up any moisture in the ground. An arborist assessment of the trees 20-or-so years ago advised me that the trees are likely in the water table, thus not requiring surface water any longer. So, I "grew" my concrete patio on the eastern side of the concrete block fence, no longer inviting them to visit beyond that fence.

So, a huge thank-you to all of you for the lessons in your posts. I'll include your wonderful forum in my design briefcase and be back to ask questions, if you're willing. You are awesome!! I'll lurk and learn and be back.

Thanks again,
Linda
chuck7701
McKinney, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 28, 2009
1:18 PM

Post #6330831

Linda,

Your right, that is not deep shade, you have some sun coming in...so you can grow lots of things. The first suggestion is to do something with that concrete block wall. Paint, stucco, anything to take away the block effect and blend with the house exterior. That alone will add tremendously to the look of your future garden.

Your probably right about the feeder root problem. Take a section of the area and cut out or dig up those fine roots. Lay some of those stones in the background down. Check back in a few months to see if the fine orange feeder roots come back. This will give you an idea of what to expect, and what will or will not grow.

If they do come back like I suspect, then you will have to go with plants that have a woody type root. Holly ferns will do well, at least they do around the base of my oaks. Hardier type ferns and the like. Plants like hostas, certain high moisture ferns, and perennials plants with a softer root tissue that require water will be your worst enemy.

I think you do need to work on soil nutrition and organic matter. Those mulberry trees are heavy feeders and pull nutrients and moisture from the top soil. Start with a deep feeding for the trees. Look up how to root feed trees around the drip line. The ground looks bare, so mulch heavily and lay a stone walkway on top to start amending the soil now. Fertilize with a good balanced brand with a good iron and sulfur content.

If you want to start using organic fertilizer, start with a 50-50 mixture of organic and synthetic. The next time cut back to 25% synthetic, 75% organic. On your 4th feeding it should be all organic. Takes about a year to kick start an organic cycle, after that use synthetics sparingly as it upsets the organic cycle if too much is used.

Tour your area, visit landscaped homes, nurseries, and see what grows well in similar conditions. Finding the right plant for the right conditions is 3/4 the battle of easy gardening.

Chuck
jkom51
Oakland, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 28, 2009
7:50 PM

Post #6332280

doss, I had my gardener bring in a few cubic yards of top quality compost from the Davis St. Recycling Center run by Waste Mgmt. It's great stuff for the non-edible garden. Just dumped it atop the tired clay soil, keeping it away from the trunks, and planted container plants. Some plants have had trouble near the walnut but I think that's mostly to do with the fact it really sucks away all the moisture in the soil! The compost, lots of organic fertilizer and mulch really help.

Confession: once the nasturtiums and oxalis fade away, there's definitely bare spots that need filling in, LOL.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 28, 2009
11:21 PM

Post #6333009

That's for the hint. Sounds like a bargain. We have a composting facility here too although I've been worried about using it because of plant disease etc. Maybe it's worth a try.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2009
3:31 PM

Post #6335353

KaylyRed, if your new yard has a shady woodland, the woodland peonies are beautiful.
This is p. japonica.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2009
3:33 PM

Post #6335359

And this is p. obovata.
They won't do well in dense shade, but an open woodland suits mine fine.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
3:04 AM

Post #6338428

Those are really pretty, Weerobin! I'm afraid the shade I have in back might be a little too heavy, but it could be worth a shot. Alas, my lot has 3 large maple trees along the south side that want to block out most of the sun. Fortunately I have some part-sun along the north privacy fence or I'd go crazy. :)

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

April 5, 2009
10:18 PM

Post #6368867

Weerobin I love those woodland peonies! Im having lots of zone envy right now with all these georgeous photos. I look out my window and see nothing. I do have the ligularias coming up. That is great. A few daffys, I don't think to much more... Snowy and cold today. Ronna
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 5, 2009
11:19 PM

Post #6369181

Here's a photo I took just the other day. This area is in bright but total shade. I like the azaleas with the hellebores. It's a larger photo of the area above with the baby tears.

Thumbnail by doss
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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 6, 2009
3:06 AM

Post #6370171

Wow, doss...that's lovely.
2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

April 6, 2009
10:11 PM

Post #6374049

Very nice!
May I ask what that carpet-like ground cover is?
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2009
10:24 PM

Post #6374113

Doss, that maple really doesn't get any direct sun at all?

I have one corner near the house I'd like to put something shrubby...but it's in the shadow of the house all day. Not dark shade, but no real direct sun at all. I was just wondering how many options there were for that scenario.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 6, 2009
11:19 PM

Post #6374376

The ground cover is baby's tears. Yes, that whole planting area gets no direct sun. I'm not sure that butterfly would survive in your zone but there are other maples that would stand up for you. You might want to ask on the Japanese Maple forum. There are people who grow JM's in your zone there. You could ask there what trees might fit your space too. I have a number in pots that only get very dappled shade and they do fine there. I know that the hellebores would work and you can find another type of fern that would grow there.

Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2009
11:44 PM

Post #6374535

doss, I have seen Butterfly for sale at several nurseries here...I even bought a little baby one to use in a container (because I love yours so much- I've seen you post it's pic before). Mine will never get to be like yours, of course, but it seems to have lived thru the winter in it's buried container...and it was pretty cold one. The guy at the nursery where I bought mine said he's had one in his garden for years (or so he says!;)) I guess I have to worry about the buds, though, if we get a freeze this month or next?

I wasn't actually thinking about a maple for the spot I mentioned...I need something lower and fuller, like a hydrangea or even just some perennial with some height and fullness. Just didn't know how those would do with absolutely NO direct sun at all.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 7, 2009
12:31 AM

Post #6374786

You might consider a ligularia if you have enough water there. They are really stunning. A big hosta is another idea but it will take some time to get big. I envy you your hosta growing weather.

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 7, 2009
12:45 AM

Post #6374871

Will Viburnums grow there?

Doug
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2009
2:40 AM

Post #6375568

Or acanthus mollis, maybe.
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2009
3:53 AM

Post #6375902

Yes, I've seen some viburnums in nurseries, but most of the ones I saw (when I was looking for something to use as a screen, against the fence) were larger. I'm looking for something 3-5 feet in height, I think.

Doss, I've always been tempted by that darker Liguaria, but I keep hearing about major slug issues with that, which scares me. Acanthus is something I don't recall seeing up here...I'll have to look that up. Anyone grow Rodgersia?
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

April 7, 2009
8:40 AM

Post #6376321

Weerobin, you're teasing me with those beautiful Peonies! LOL I've got several 'rock garden' type Peonies to plant in my new garden but P. japonica and P. obovata would look even nicer :)

doss, I've been admiring your gardens ever since I joined DG and your photos continue to inspire me :)

Noreaster, Butterfly might make it for you - I remember seeing my first Butterfly Maple years ago in a garden at a nursery near Castine and they've got to be colder than you, probably Z5a? I was so taken with it and years later when I met DH, told him the only reason I fell in love with him was because he had Butterfly in the landscape! LOL Not sure if Viburnum would do well if there's no "direct sun"? They'd live but you might not have as many flowers. Two of my favorites that don't get real tall are Viburnum 'Conoy' http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/84418/ and Viburnum lantana 'Variegatum' http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/84452/. Conoy has lustrous glossy foliage and incredibly fragrant flowers. Most reports say 4'-5' but some I've seen used in landscapes are only about 3' - it's possible they were pruned to keep them shorter. Variegatum doesn't have the sweetly fragrant flowers but the contrast of the red berries in the fall is spectacular with the variegated foliage! I've seen VV's comments in PF and I totally disagree with him - I think it's just a "male" thing because DH feels the same way -not me, I love the variegation :) Ours has been in the landscape about 4-5 years now and is less than 4' tall. I looked for my photo but darned if I can find it this morning! I think it's too cold for Acanthus to work for you :( We're Z6a and we have a tough time keeping it alive here. Now Rodgersia, YES! I have it growing in the gardens but not nearly as spectacular as it was when growing in my Maine gardens. I took a division of my original plant to my in-laws' summer place in Michigan. I know it actually prefers moist soils but I also know where it's planted in Michigan and it's thriving even with the competition of the trees it's planted under AND my MIL's neglect of the poor thing! LOL I think it's just much happier with the cooler temperatures :)
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

April 7, 2009
6:33 PM

Post #6378209

Noreaster rogersia and ligularia do well here in shade. In fact ligularia 'Rocket' is not sun tolerant at all. Another choice for the height you're looking for is actaea simplex (bugbane)
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2009
6:55 PM

Post #6378280

dahlianut, Actaea is a plant that just confounds me. I have a few different cultivars in my garden- Brunette, Hillside Black Beauty, and Atropurpea (sp). The Atro and HBB are planted together in the shade, and will be four years old this season. HBB just does not seem to grow at all! It flowers, but the height is not there...Atro towers over it. But Atro hasn't put on a lot of fullness, either. Maybe this will be the year for that one. I like it, but I think I want something with more density for this particular spot near my house.

I planted Brunette in a more dappled light location ( a little more direct sun than the other two cultivars), and it promptly turned an ugly shade of green and many of the leaves continued to shrivel and die all season, despite lots of water. I just don't know what Actaea wants to be happy!
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2009
6:57 PM

Post #6378292

rcn, thanks for the suggestions on the Viburnum. Your post reminded me that someone told me they really smell...but in a bad way? I think I'm leaning towards giving the Rodgersia a shot...
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

April 7, 2009
7:16 PM

Post #6378366

They are really slow to establish I know. Mine have suffered from our drought conditions these last years too. What about a shorter dogwood? Some are in your height range. I have a 'Halo' in full shade and its establishing well.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 7, 2009
7:33 PM

Post #6378429

The slugs do eat the ligularias but with a little Sluggo it's not a problem.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

April 7, 2009
7:36 PM

Post #6378447

I don't have slugs. I think they'd get their butts frozen off here. Seriously they're here, just not in my garden. I haven't heard of them being a problem with ligularia before. Thanks Doss for that info. I'll pass it along (to gardeners, not slugs).
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2009
7:53 PM

Post #6378530

That dogwood is very pretty...and yours gets no direct sun?

Doss, Sluggo stops working for me by mid season...either I can't keep up with the chipmunks eating it all, or the slug population in my yard is just too formidable by mid summer.. I have the ideal conditions for them, with all the rocks to hide under, and there is no way to change that. I'm going to put out more chipmunk proof traps this year, baited with Sluggo Plus.
dahlianut
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a)

April 7, 2009
8:07 PM

Post #6378596

A little dappled late evening sun and in the spring before the green ash leafs out. Otherwise its under the ash canopy.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 7, 2009
9:58 PM

Post #6379123

I replace my Sluggo about every two weeks so I imagine that if you are only doing it once that it would stop working.
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2009
10:02 PM

Post #6379149

I have to replace my Sluggo every night, since the chipmunks stuff their cheeks all day long with it!
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2009
10:23 PM

Post #6379239

Now that's crazy. Who would've thought the chipmunks would EAT it?

Maybe give them an alternative feeding station somewhere else?
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2009
10:39 PM

Post #6379289

Yeah, they are quite brazen about it and will do it right in front of me. I've watched them stuff their cheeks..they scarcely miss a single piece.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2009
11:00 PM

Post #6379386

Great! I've got chipmunks here. Who knew they'd eat Sluggo?

So far they haven't stolen my bulbs. Shhh! Don't tell them.
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2009
11:40 PM

Post #6379596

Reminds me of the time my nephew confessed that he picked out the most tasty things from the Scrabble mix. Of course, I thought he was referring to the nuts. Turns out he was picking out the pretzel sticks. I told him to go right ahead, that I didn't think anyone would care . . .

The Squirrels aren't realizing that they're hoarding the iron phosphate granules. Ew!

Here's another DG thread on Sluggo and wildlife (though it doesn't refer to chipmunks)
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/719090/
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2009
8:32 AM

Post #6381066

Noreaster, a lot of the Viburnums have incredible fragrance (i.e. V. carlesii, V x burkwoodii, etc) but then there are some, like the V. lantana 'Variegatum' mentioned that "almost" stink! The fragrant Viburnums are delightful in the gardens but you don't have to worry about those that tend to "stink", you'd have to get real close to detect any fragrance :) I have problems with the Actaea here :( After three years in the gardens they've finally established nice clumps - look gorgeous in the spring but by the time they get ready to bloom the heat here really knocks them down. I'm experimenting with different areas trying to find a spot where they'll actually thrive and bloom but haven't been successful - yet!
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2009
5:48 AM

Post #6407322

Wow, such great stuff going on here by everyone!

I'm posting these pics here upon Katie59's request, instead of a whole new thread. Sorry :-p

I took this picture of this woodland clump (it's not in my yard unfortunately) this last weekend.

Thumbnail by redchic01
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redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2009
5:56 AM

Post #6407332

two others from the same clump, the weekend before.

Thumbnail by redchic01
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redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2009
5:57 AM

Post #6407335

the last of them.

Thumbnail by redchic01
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Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 14, 2009
12:30 PM

Post #6407836

Those are lovely. They are sort of ethereal looking.
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 14, 2009
5:46 PM

Post #6409165

Aren't they beautiful? And the size of the stand is amazing. I haven't yet convinced redchic (Shelly) to sneak over and night and dig me out a few, but I'm working on her. LOL
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 14, 2009
9:05 PM

Post #6410193

REdchic What are those gorgeous things? Or did I miss you saying what they are?
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2009
9:10 PM

Post #6410208

Thanks Noreaster, Katie, and Doss.

Doss, sorry that I didn't mention the name up above. I definitely meant to. They are Erythronium oregonum AKA Fawn Lilies.

This message was edited Apr 14, 2009 2:13 PM
Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 14, 2009
9:14 PM

Post #6410226

Even the name is ethereal! You guys out there in the PNW have the coolest stuff!
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2009
9:19 PM

Post #6410250

lol, thanks. But, you have some pretty neat things over your way too! However, I do agree about the fawn lilies... I think that they're one of the best of our natives! I bet that they we grow over your way down to zone 6, not sure about zone 5 though. That's tough.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 14, 2009
9:19 PM

Post #6410252

I tried growing them here and they didn't make it but they sure are pretty. From what I've seen on line that patch that you posted is pretty spectacular!
redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

April 14, 2009
9:23 PM

Post #6410283

thanks. I don't think that they do so well in your heat Doss. :-( I just checked on their hardiness and it's zones 3 -9, but I've Never seen them growing in warm spots, only cool shady ones. However, maybe you would have luck with erythronium californicum instead of sp. oreganum????
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 14, 2009
9:35 PM

Post #6410352

Thanks for the idea. I'll go and look that up. I probably don't keep my garden moist enough for them though.
2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2009
1:40 AM

Post #6628711

UPDATE:
just wanted to show you all my progress so far. It's been a long time coming & non-stop HARD work, but I did it!!
Here is the before for anyone who missed it above. http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=6222623


here is part of the pond & hosta bed. New zoysia sod was laid over the past few weeks. I have more coming friday.




This message was edited Jun 1, 2009 8:40 PM

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2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2009
1:44 AM

Post #6628724

a fuller view of one section

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2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2009
1:47 AM

Post #6628732

part of the other bed

Thumbnail by 2racingboys
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2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2009
1:51 AM

Post #6628751

a nice birdhouse dh brought me the other day. It holds a pot at the bottom.
Some happy hostas, ferns & moss live here now. I love the new residents. :D

Thumbnail by 2racingboys
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2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2009
1:55 AM

Post #6628770

I found this unique very old church pew all broken up on the side of the road in the country & put it all back together again this weekend.
A friend told me it was a pice of junk & a waste of time, but not anymore!! bet they are all jealous now. lol It's just fabulous back here!!
These old barrels were piled in a corner at my MIL's house doing nothing so I figured I'd add to the old-rustic charm the backyard has now.

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2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2009
1:58 AM

Post #6628781

I added a little faery garden to one of the old trees.
My youngest son thought it was so funny.

Thumbnail by 2racingboys
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2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2009
2:08 AM

Post #6628827

So here is me (dirty person on the left) & my friend on the right. She helped me lay a 'few' pieces of sod then decided it was too heavy. lol
It was a nice thought though.

So this is what I have been up to. Still MAJOR work going on here. More sod to lay this weekend, another HUGE bed to make & we are starting on the deck. Yay!!

Will post more progress pics again soon. Thanks to everyone for their shade garden inspiration!!! I'm almost there!! XD


Kristy

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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

June 2, 2009
4:49 AM

Post #6629532

I'm loving these photos! Your beds look really wonderful, racingboys. :)

Here's how mine's looking these days. I found a couple of cute little twig chairs at a garage sale for $1 each. Here's one of them with hosta 'Pineapple Upside Down Cake.'

Thumbnail by KaylyRed
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KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

June 2, 2009
4:52 AM

Post #6629540

I built a central raised bed in the one shade area using field stones. I actually found an animal grave there, left by previous owners, and did not want to disturb it. But, since I couldn't dig in it either, I raised it up about a foot so I could plant. Here's what the result looks like now.

Thumbnail by KaylyRed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

redchic01
southern willamette , OR
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2009
4:56 AM

Post #6629556

That was a great idea on how to deal with that situation Kayly
Twincol
Fresno, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2009
5:52 AM

Post #6629647

Kristy, what an awesome piece of work (or is it pieces?) I often see shade gardens under the canopy of trees and wonder how these gardeners manage to water them in such a way as to 1) keep the smaller plants sufficiently moist, and 2) avoid roots rising? My only tree experience is with Fruitless Mulberries and that has taught me about invasive larger roots, as well as a multitude of hair roots sucking all of the moisture out of the ground.

My solution to all of these problems on the opposite side of a concrete block fence was to cover the ground under the tree and beyond with concrete, as is shown here. I keep ground-planted vegetation to a bare minimum (no pun intended) and live with a variety of pots of all sizes, including 1/2 of an old iron ocean float about 4 1/2 feet across with a rose tree planted therein.

See some of it here http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=6026601

Linda (Bartlett in CA [chuckling]) :-)

Great pics, gal!

{edited to add} BTW, the opposite side of this same stretch of fence is discussed above on March 27, at 10:55 p.m. of you're interested.



This message was edited Jun 1, 2009 11:05 PM
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

June 2, 2009
8:23 AM

Post #6629775

Kristy, nice to see this thread bumped and look at all your hard work! Impressive what you've done with the area and I love how you incorporated the pond into the slope with the Hostas. I really like all the extra little "touches" - watering can, potted plants on the bench and birdhouse - and the church pew is perfect :)

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

June 2, 2009
11:22 PM

Post #6633014

Wow is all I can say 2rb... Great job on the yard. You have been buying hostas and plants like crazy girl! Great job. I remember seeing the railroad ties back there and thats all. Now georgeous.

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 3, 2009
10:34 AM

Post #6634966

Kristy, what a change from the beginning! It's gorgeous.

Doug
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2009
7:45 PM

Post #6637282

Great job Kristy. When I first saw your garden I thought, 'what a huge job'. I'm so glad that you weren't intimidated by it and really took it in hand. Hat's off to you - and laying your own sod too, even with the "help" of a friend. :-)

Good solutions Twincol. I love the pansies.
2racingboys
Bartlett, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 4, 2009
1:05 PM

Post #6640349

Thanks everyone. It's been a lot of fun really. I did that one long bed on the left in one day, then planted the next. I was on a roll that week!! lol
And yes, I have been buying plants like crazy, but only because I needed to & that was soooo much fun!!! I got great deals though so that was nice.

It's been amazing to see all my neighbors & friends coming over to see what I am up to everyday. lol They are wondering what is going on everytime I back the truck in. I guess they know I have a load of something or another. lol

The fun is not over yet as we are starting the deck this week. Dh has some nice plans. Nothing fancy, but will be for us.
We are going to do a 'floating'/'low profile' style, maybe 1 step up, curved around the pond to have a slight 'overlooking' of it and squared off all the way to the wall. You can see the shaping in the pic. On the other side there is junky stuff to throw out. Jeep mudding tires, raggedy trailer, etc. That stuff has got to go!!

I still have to pressure wash the dirt/mud off the house & fill in a few holes where some bushes were I had just planted. (They were not happy in so much shade!!) I gave them to the girl that helped me lay the sod. She has full sun at her place.

Will post more pics as progress continues. Will be a busy weekend for us!! YAY!!

Kristy

Thumbnail by 2racingboys
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Noreaster
Maine
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 4, 2009
1:09 PM

Post #6640362

That all looks wonderful, Kristy!

Kayly, that was a very considerate and creative solution to the pet grave. Very nice!

cperdue

cperdue
Little Rock, AR
(Zone 7b)

June 4, 2009
2:29 PM

Post #6640742

Great job!!! Will look forward to seeing the deck.
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

June 4, 2009
6:07 PM

Post #6641689

I love the idea of two girls getting dirty laying sod. That's not easy work. Nice job!!

The changes look great and I agree with Noreaster's comment about the pet grave. That is very respectful and sensitive of you to keep it intact.

Kathy
quiltjean
North Chelmsford, MA
(Zone 6b)

June 30, 2009
10:04 PM

Post #6760314

I am new at sending images, so please bear with me. I took a couple of pics this grey afternoon and will try to download them. I tried to download five, but only one is here. This is my garden next to the Merrimack river. I am particularly happy about my Canada lilies this year. Right now the garden is all yellow with the Stellas and the Happy Returns and Ennie Weenie, plus a yellow perennial digitalis and a rogue Rudbeckia.
I'm also happy that my baby Kousa dogwood is in 'bloom'; the bracts have lasted more than a month. I will see if I can download.

Thumbnail by quiltjean
Click the image for an enlarged view.

katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

June 30, 2009
11:55 PM

Post #6760677

You can only do one photo per post, but you can string together posts with no problem.

I like it! I'm all for impact and lots of color (sometimes in the PNW, we need something to stand out from the year-round green and gray-blue), but in your case, I like the softness of the greens and yellows. It's soothing and natural looking, but not wild and untended natural. It definitely draws you in for a meander . . .

gardenlady123

gardenlady123
Plainwell, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 1, 2009
12:04 AM

Post #6760706

Wow quiltjean I love the garden. Really pretty. My kind of paths and flowers. Very relaxing. Ronna
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 1, 2009
5:45 PM

Post #6763859

HOw lovely. It must be great to take a stroll through that beauty. ANd is that water too?
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

July 12, 2009
7:03 AM

Post #6809125

Do you know that the sunflower bloom for me in dense shade. Who knew? Do Azaleas and Rhods and Camelias do well in the shade? I doubt it would bloom.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 12, 2009
11:01 PM

Post #6811525

Camellias can almost grow and bloom in the dark and azaleas will bloom well in shade that is bright but no direct sun. I find that I have better luck in general with kurume azaleas and sasanqua camellias.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2009
3:32 AM

Post #6812597

hellnzn11 - Now that you mention it, when I was a kid I planted some sunflowers in a concrete planter box outside my grandmother's house. I dug some seed out of the birdseed mix. The planter was shaded by a huge maple, plus it was under the eaves of the house. Thinking back, it may have gotten a teeny bit of morning or late afternoon sun, but I think it's pretty unlikely it got much at all. My grandma used to plant annual geraniums there, and I remember she was always disappointed that they didn't bloom much. (She wasn't much of a gardener, herself.)

Well, the little seeds I buried as a kid surprised us all by growing into enormous sunflowers. I remember them being so tall that they looked like they had to scrunch down to fit beneath the porch roof. But those sunflowers were the first plants I ever grew, and I think maybe I got my gardening bug right then and there. I was no more than 5 or 6 years old.
Pigweed12
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 12, 2010
10:57 PM

Post #7554506

My shade garden is now three years old. With hostas, ferns, hellebores, azaleas, I've filled a small condo garden...the drama has to come from focal points (like this lantern) and other objects to catch the eye.

Thumbnail by Pigweed12
Click the image for an enlarged view.

KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 13, 2010
5:51 AM

Post #7555396

What a beautiful and tranquil haven you've created, Pigweed! It's really lovely.
Pigweed12
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 13, 2010
11:39 AM

Post #7555587

KaylyRed

Thanks for your kind remarks. It really cheers me up to see the beautiful gardens posted on this site. We are covered in snow in VA this winter.

Pigweed12

Thumbnail by Pigweed12
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

February 13, 2010
11:56 AM

Post #7555606

I meant to send you a Dmail Pigweed12 when I saw your name/location as a new subscriber - Welcome to DG! I see that you found your way to one of my favorite forums :) You'll have to visit us in the Mid-Atlantic forum http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/f/region_mida/all/. We used to have a few members from the Richmond area who posted there regularly - the more the merrier!

The photos of your garden are beautiful but I'd much rather look at without all the snow. Anxiously awaiting spring here :)
HoosierGreen
Danville, IN

February 13, 2010
8:00 PM

Post #7556595

In a few weeks, hopefully, the shady parts of the garden will look like this (taken a couple years ago).

Thumbnail by HoosierGreen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 15, 2010
3:02 AM

Post #7559789

Oh Hoosier that is so pretty. What are the blueish grassy looking things? They probably don't grow here in the desert. I have some pretty dense shade on the north side of my house where the two Fruitless Mulberry trees are taken over and pretty dense, the morning sun is somewhat blocked by a cargo container that we use as a shed and a part of a wall for our yard. Like someone else in California said, the UV index here is so high that our dense shade is probably like your part shade.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 15, 2010
3:47 AM

Post #7559879

Pigweed, your garden is lovely - so lush in just 3 years! I'm still trying to get the knack of getting my garden areas to look like that. I second Debbie's (rcn) warm welcome. You are not too far away, and some of us get together for seed and plant swaps, and trips to garden events if you are interested. Check out the Mid Atlantic forum for info about the next seed swap in Frederick, MD and a trip to the Philadelphia Flower Show. Terri
HoosierGreen
Danville, IN

February 15, 2010
1:49 PM

Post #7560537

hellnzn11: The blue flowers are forget-me-nots which self-seed every year, and I have masses of them. So many, I pull up bushels of them after they are done blooming. There's always enough left to reseed plentifully. They make beautiful drifts of color for a few weeks every spring. Interestingly, I tried planting forget-me-not plants from a garden center, and they always died out. The ones I have now are descendants from plants from a friend's garden.
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 16, 2010
3:11 AM

Post #7562922

Hm, I planted them in too much sun here and they struggled after the heat came. Food for thought now. Looks great.
HoosierGreen
Danville, IN

February 16, 2010
2:19 PM

Post #7563684

They always die completely after blooming and going to seed. The new seedlings form small plants that just kind of sit there until the next spring when they take off and bloom. If you would like some seed this summer, just let me know.
vsweet
Sparta, NJ
(Zone 6a)

February 16, 2010
4:54 PM

Post #7564060

My garden is part-shade to deep shade. None of if gets more than 4 hours of sun. I actually timed it one day. Since I've fenced and the deer can no longer graze I've been able to garden for the first time in 17 years!

Thumbnail by vsweet
Click the image for an enlarged view.

hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 17, 2010
6:24 AM

Post #7565978

vsweet, I'm feeling your pain. Rabbits and gophers here are the devils.

I would love some seeds Hoosier, it is nice to have something that blooms so nice, even if short lived as long as something is always in bloom.
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 17, 2010
6:25 AM

Post #7565979

Sorry thank you btw.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 17, 2010
2:49 PM

Post #7566453

For me it's chipmunks...and apparently my shiba inu puppy, too. It's going to be an interesting year. Last year the chippies ate the buds right off my toad lilies--they seem to love them. This year, I think the shiba will keep the chipmunks away, but I'm still figuring out how I'm going to keep the shiba out of the hostas and other perennials. He "pruned" my baby pieris shrub last week. :(

But how can you get angry at this sweet little guy?

Thumbnail by KaylyRed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 18, 2010
3:20 AM

Post #7568292

lol I am so glad I am not alone. I love SI dogs, they look like little foxes. There is a breeder by my house and I just roll on their little All About Me personalities. The breeder said the moms don't even like their own pups as they get older because they want all the attention on them or want no attention on they themselves. I love the indifference in their personalities, because it is so funny to watch them, they remind me of my Shar Peis. Kind of cat like, I think.

No chipmunks here, no moles or voles, just gophers and I think they are useless creatures. For the life of me, I have not clue as to their value. I don't think I have any gopher snakes around, or they would be eating a feast.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 18, 2010
3:35 AM

Post #7568328

My shiba clearly adores me, but he definitely does think he's the star of the show where the other dogs are concerned. And he's a total diva. Hellnzn, have you ever heard the patented "shiba scream?" When they get overly excited or take offense to something, shibas let out a war whoop that would make Xena, Warrior Princess green with envy. ;)

But I do love my shiba. He would definitely NOT be the dog for someone who likes very trainable, mellow, sweet dogs who fawn all over you. But I'm an experienced dog owner who likes independent dogs. Still, my shiba is the polar opposite of my 45 mph couch potato greyhounds.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 18, 2010
10:22 AM

Post #7568795

Hello!
I drop in from time to time.I mostly hang out at the NEG.,Poppies,Garden Talk.
The shade gardens are really wonderful here.
My gardens are mostly 2 years old a few are 3 yearsold.
I confess I didnt read everylast thread,the pictures are so wonderful.
I always like to see what gardeners do with shade.
This is an album of my shade area.
http://picasaweb.google.com/jgentle4/ShadeGarden200902
Pigweed12
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 18, 2010
11:37 AM

Post #7568835

ge1836

Love the way you attached your photos. Thanks for sharing so many wonderful pictures.

Pigweed12
(Bill)

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 18, 2010
11:56 AM

Post #7568850

Thanks Bill
Its a great way to share a lot of images without a mile of posts on one thread
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 18, 2010
2:03 PM

Post #7569062

Beautiful, ge! Your gardens look like they must keep you very busy. :)

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 18, 2010
4:33 PM

Post #7569404

Thanks,
I'm retired so I have time. Mornings from 6AM to 11 are for planting and fussing,this includes photos. Then I sit on the deck and gaze.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 18, 2010
11:06 PM

Post #7570267

Hi JoAnn. I follow a lot of your posts, but I don't think I've seen pictures of your gardens before - just the bear! Pretty neat. I've got almost 100% shade, so I'm always on the look out for plant selections. I didn't recognize the pretty plant in picture #19 - helebores? columbine? What is it - I'd like to add it to my list for spring planting. Thanks, Terri
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2010
4:03 AM

Post #7570821

Ge, what's the plant in photo 28?
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2010
4:04 AM

Post #7570823

AH: Number 19 is a columbine, but I don't know what variety . . .
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2010
7:09 AM

Post #7571054

Good to know since my friend here just sent me seeds.

I loved the variety there.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 19, 2010
10:40 AM

Post #7571097

Hi everyone.
3 19 is Columbine Black Barlow
The blue flower is Platycodon Sentimental Blue,Its a dwarf Bluestone perennials
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2010
5:00 PM

Post #7571830

I THOUGHT that black one was somehow related to Nora Barlow . . .

And Platycodon - thank you, I should have recognized the blossom shape. It's not a plant I'm terribly familiar with. That shade is mesmerizing.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 19, 2010
5:32 PM

Post #7571912

It is intense and a long blooming plant even tho the blooms dont last long.They are replaced by new ones as they fade.
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 19, 2010
8:36 PM

Post #7572334

Good to know, thank you!
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 20, 2010
3:30 AM

Post #7573206

Oooo someone sent me Columbine Black Barlow seeds yee ha.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
9:52 AM

Post #7573773

Hope they grow well for you. The flowers are so dramatic.
Pigweed12
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2010
11:15 AM

Post #7573820

I would love to see more pictures of shade gardens for spring inspiration. Snow is slowly melting in Richmond and the hellabores are coming up.

Thumbnail by Pigweed12
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
11:36 AM

Post #7573836

Were byou hanging from the clothesline when you took that picture?
My spring shade is woodsy with ferns and Foam Flowers.
Some anemone Sylvestris and woods lilies.

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
11:36 AM

Post #7573837

foam flowers

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
11:37 AM

Post #7573839

I see the thumbnails arent loading again.
Pigweed12
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2010
4:10 PM

Post #7574308

Taken from my bedroom window on the second floor. Hard to get pespective in my small yard. Love your pictures.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2010
4:27 PM

Post #7574339

Great photos, everyone, and loved your album ge!

Clematis Candida in the shade:

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
4:27 PM

Post #7574342

Here are some from my BEDRM also

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
4:28 PM

Post #7574343

and another

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
4:29 PM

Post #7574346

I love white blooms in shade Thanks Pirl
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
4:49 PM

Post #7574401

Though shade plants often have beautiful blooms, I think foliage is just as important.
Two of my favorite types of plants for shade are grasses and hardy gingers.
Here's hakonechloa macra All Gold, which really brightens things up.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
4:52 PM

Post #7574414

And here's an asarum. I lost the tag long ago.
I have many species and cultivars scattered around, so I'm not sure which one.
At any rate, here it is alongside a heuchera, columbine and a couple neighboring hostas.
(and a few weeds, I see...)

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
5:03 PM

Post #7574437

And another great shade foliage plant, syneilesis aconitifolia (shredded umbrella plant).

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2010
5:13 PM

Post #7574453

I have a few Hakonechloa and they do brighten up the shade - lovely photo. The gingers are well behaved here and blend in so nicely with other shade plants.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2010
5:14 PM

Post #7574456

Love that shredded umbrella plant. How much shade will it tolerate?

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
5:48 PM

Post #7574534

As I get older I apreciate leafy plants so much more.
Flowers are nice but a great coleus or hosta are just as interesting.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2010
10:03 PM

Post #7575020

Same here.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2010
11:12 PM

Post #7575148

Pirl, my syneilesis is in a pretty shady situation - just a little morning sun.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2010
11:19 PM

Post #7575158

Thanks. I'd have the ideal spot for it.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 21, 2010
12:05 PM

Post #7576417

Bill, another great shot of your garden. Great perspective. JoAnn, tiarellas are one of my favorites. I first saw them in the woodlands at 'Winterthur'. I have had a hard time getting them to survive or grow, but I keep trying. They should have no problem here, so I don't know what I'm doing wrong. Cool artist studio too. And Weerobin and Pirl - you guys always have the most interesting plant selection - everytime I see your posts, I have to add things to my list! Clematis and grasses for shade - new ideas for me :-) I've posted this picture somewhere before, but I don't remember where. Shot of native trilium (not sure which one it is), that I transplanted from a nearby friend's woods. Same growing conditions, so it is doing well. Terri

Thumbnail by aspenhill
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2010
12:10 PM

Post #7576421

Terri My Foamflowers will see their 3 rd year and my neighbor said they dont last long.
OK by me.I will have room for the other survivors I overplanted.
I love Wintertur. It was a stop added to a visit to Longwood Gardens.
Who would have guessed Gunpowder would leave such a beautiful legacy.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 21, 2010
12:37 PM

Post #7576459

I went looking for my pictures of the tiarellas - it was actually at Longwood. Winterthur had the ferns. Sometimes I get things mixed up :-)

Thumbnail by aspenhill
Click the image for an enlarged view.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 21, 2010
12:40 PM

Post #7576462

Here are the ferns at Winterthur.

Thumbnail by aspenhill
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2010
12:54 PM

Post #7576472

Welcome to my world

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 21, 2010
1:12 PM

Post #7576491

Hee hee. I recently saw where you posted your age, and with my mathematical inclinations I always see patterns in things, and thought how funny, our ages have the same numbers in them right now, just transposed! You have an excuse for sometimes mixing things up, but it looks like I'm starting a little too early :-)

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2010
1:14 PM

Post #7576493

Get a good grip on life right now.
Its a rough ride.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 21, 2010
1:58 PM

Post #7576553

Love that field of Tiarellas and the one of ferns.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2010
2:15 PM

Post #7576567

Endless amounts of room and help.
My GF used a phrase when looking at huge gardens
Three "M's"
Mass
Many
Money.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2010
2:38 PM

Post #7576609

GE, I was enjoying your album of photos.
It struck me how most of us garden in parallel universes.
Your yard could be my yard or could be like many others on this thread.
We have mature plantings which are postcard perfect and we're eager to share on line.
Then there are works in progress filled w/ newbies.
And I suspect some problem areas which didn't make the album.
But then we all have the requisite mulch pile, wheel barrow, shovel, etc.
It's as if we're living the same lives in different locations.
DG gives an opportunity to tour the yards of other gardeners
whose idea of gardening is more than mowing the lawn.
Thanks for giving us a glimpse of yours.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2010
3:28 PM

Post #7576737

I used to believe I was an average gardener and content with the grandmothers homilies about garden secters
I found out the first year on DG that my vision was too small.
These enablers encouraged me beyond what I believed was capable.
Its thrilling to share ideas and plant lore.
Gardening is more than just sticking a plant in the ground.
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 22, 2010
4:34 AM

Post #7578187

"As if we were living the same lives in different location." That's a great sentiment and so TRUE!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 22, 2010
9:26 AM

Post #7578361

Found this

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Pigweed12
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2010
11:45 AM

Post #7578422

Great composite pic. I've been pleased that my asiatic lilies bloom so well in the shade and most get stronger every year.

Thumbnail by Pigweed12
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 22, 2010
12:22 PM

Post #7578440

Thanks for the pic of lilies with hostas Its just what I want when my Tiny Snowflakes bloom.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2010
4:47 PM

Post #7579031

I like lillies - both for the height and late season bloom, but didn't even consider them for shade. Late last summer, Stormyla told me that she has quite a few that are doing great in her shade garden. Got Casa Blanca, martagon, and two others (pink) that I can't remember the names of right now. Got them in the ground before fall, so this will be the first year for them. Can't wait to see how they perform. Terri
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2010
6:26 PM

Post #7579259

Is your area deep shade or dappled shade, Terri?

I have hundreds of lilies and they do best for me in full sun but those in dappled shade always last longer.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Pigweed12
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2010
6:39 PM

Post #7579288

Oh, your garden is beautiful! Fortunately, I get a couple of hours of morning sun and then dappled shade the rest of the day. I have a few lilies under a large holly tree and they are rather weak but keep blooming and surviving. Every year while the spring mess of blooms and leaves fall from the holly I debate cutting it down ...but, then in summer I love the cool shade once again.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 22, 2010
6:42 PM

Post #7579292

Ohhhh yeaaah Pirl.My BuggyCrazy lilies better look like that.in a meer 4 months.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2010
7:06 PM

Post #7579357

Thanks.

I'm looking forward to the more than 100 new ones as well.
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 23, 2010
3:20 AM

Post #7580630

My day lilies do poor in shade or part shade too.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2010
10:01 AM

Post #7580890

They really like sun.
Pirl you animal!! 100 lilies? What did you get? Is that 100 bulbs ?or varieties?
My list is shy of yours by about 20 for spring planting.
32 varieties

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2010
10:30 AM

Post #7580901

This is my list of bulbs to go into the ground April
TINY ATHLETE
GREY GHOST
TINY SNOWFLAKE
SWEET SURRENDER
GRAND CRU
POLLYANNA
PETIT BRIDGET
PARTNER
TINY SKYLINE
LADY LIKE
TRAVELLER
SOPHIE
ACAPULCO
ROBINA
MONTENEGRO
EYELINER
GIRAFFE
BARUTA
ROYAL SUNSET
RENOIRE
PINK ANGEL
WHITE TWINKLES
SPICE ISLANDS
BLACK OUT
BRUSHSTROKE
DEEP IMPACT
CANDY CLUB
LEMON ICE
RIENESSE
ORIGINAL LOVE
MENORCA

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2010
12:57 PM

Post #7581010

There are a bunch od enablers here somewhere. Evyes clems have another convert.
I only have to erase the spot for Daniel DEronda to substitute Duckling and Mrs.Yuk

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2010
2:23 PM

Post #7581224

Pigweed - thanks. It didn't happen all at once.

Hellnzn - I know nothing about growing daylilies in California other than Jasper Dale who lives in Long Beach and all I sent him are doing very well and expanding at a rapid rate.

I love the idea of starting small because finding spots that are huge is now impossible here. I can find smaller spots much more easily and we did remove a ton of Ghost ferns to make room for 5 new ones I bought and have them planted with 4 older (1992) existing more common clems like two each of Multi Blue and Belle of Woking at the fireplace wall.

I didn't keep a list of all I bought, ge, because it might have stopped me from buying more and more. There was seldom an offer I didn't succumb to in the dark days of winter. When they all arrive I will list them. I bought by 3, 5 and 10 of a kind.

This message was edited Aug 16, 2010 3:44 PM

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2010
2:47 PM

Post #7581279

You are just not to be believed.That sounds wonderful.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2010
2:56 PM

Post #7581309

It's bordering on insanity, ge.

Some of those lilies will be planted in shade, like the 6 Purple Prince, to avoid bleaching out in sun.

Then there's 6 Lily Nepalense that will have part shade since it's what they want.

There are 21 already potted up in the garage since I received them late and had no chance to plant them.

The list goes on...

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2010
2:59 PM

Post #7581314

I wish I had bought more than 3 Purple Princes.I also want more Landini which held up well in the sun.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2010
3:07 PM

Post #7581335

Eek! You reminded me that I bought a total of 9 dark ones for another area. Glad to hear about Landini - it just might go well with Centerfold, which is more shade than sun.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2010
3:25 PM

Post #7581368

i got centerfold too. by a stroke of luck in the absence of research, It will go in the part shade garden.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2010
12:20 AM

Post #7582704

I'm first trying the lilies on the edges of my woodland shade on the north side of the house. I think it gets a little bit of morning sun and a little more of late afternoon sun. Still pretty shady, but dappled a few hours at the beginning and end of the day. Stormyla keeps trying different varieties, and has been keeping track of the ones that do better in the shade than others. I'll be using her list for the next orders. Pirl and ge, sounds like you both are getting extensive collections - if either of you or Pigweed try any of your lillies in shade, I'd love to know which are the best performers. And now clems too - I've been following Victor's posts about Evey's site. Enablers, Enablers, Enablers :-) My poor pocketbook.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2010
1:19 AM

Post #7582896

I will keep track for you and for myself.

Nelly Moser clematis loves some shade. It keeps her from fading out too fast. The side with shade gets morning sun and vice versa for the side shown in this photo with late afternoon sun.

I'm currently on the hunt for another shade clematis and I'll double check before I name the other one that I've heard likes shade.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2010
1:40 AM

Post #7582957

Clematis for shade:

http://www.paradisegarden.com/shop/product.php?id=PGC0085&browse=1

I believe Miss Bateman also grows and blooms well in shade but I can't find the link that said so. Here's what Clematis on the Web has to say about it:

http://www.clematis.hull.ac.uk/new-clemdetail.cfm?dbkey=293

If I find more I'll post.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2010
2:30 AM

Post #7583077

This is really helping me a lot. I need a lot more color in my shade garden, and all suggestions are appreciated.

One of my notes from a DG post last year for a Clem shade performer was Clematis 'Rooguchi'. I planted it towards the end of the season, so again, waiting to see how it will perform.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/77519/

I only have three Clems so far. The other two are 'Hagley Hybrid' and 'Jackmani' that I planted together on a trellis near the garage. Shown here with my nephew many years ago (he is now 14, but what a cutie he was at 2)

Thumbnail by aspenhill
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2010
3:06 AM

Post #7583169

He is a cutie!

The clems are lovely and they're so nice crawling over shrubs, up trees, on trellises or even decaying stumps.

Since you seem to like slate/bluestone/river rocks - do you have space for a blue/silver shade garden?

Clematis Omoshiro on a decaying stump. When the stump finally rots out completely I'll ask a local tree cutter for another one.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2010
4:04 AM

Post #7583248

Lots of space. Blue/silver shade garden would be nice, but I'm making myself focus on the large area between the house and the pond right now. Probably shouldn't start anything new for another two seasons. Made the mistake for years of dabbling all over the place, and never getting any one area truly established. Just my nature to want to try everything at once, so I have to forcibly set limits :-( I like clems, but kept thinking that I'd need trellises all over the place and that they only liked sun. I'd love to see more pictures like the stump one for non-trellis ideas.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2010
9:35 AM

Post #7583658

As I read this thread I am trying to think if I have any lilies in shade. I believe I planted lilies where it is shady part of the day but just enough sun to support Oriental Poppies and other sun plants.
These areas probably get enough sun to marginally qualify as full sun areas.
In November ,I planted asiatics in a few areas that have sun part of the day but dont support annuals well . The jury is out on lily performance there until July.I will definatly report then.
Pirl had said last year that lilies in part shade would br shorter. My only lilies in part shade ( dappled AM and 3 hours in late PM) are dwarfs anyway so who can tell.
Dwarf Buff Pixi.

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2010
9:38 AM

Post #7583659

I have Grafitti's in a spot that gets bright shade all day until late afternoon.

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Pigweed12
Richmond, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2010
11:23 AM

Post #7583696

These border lilies only get two hours of sun in the morning but then bright shade the rest of the day. (Picture is second year.) I tried roses there hoping that it would be enough light, a failure. The daliahs didn't please me either, now I'm going with cannas.
Wish I had seen that beautiful Nelly Moser before I ordered my clematis this year. It's really wonderful...and shade tested too.

Thumbnail by Pigweed12
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2010
12:05 PM

Post #7583726

I am going to plant Tiny Snowflake and Sweet surrender in between the Hostas here.
T Snowflake will go at the walkway and Sweet Surrender will be behind the JM.

This message was edited Feb 24, 2010 7:06 AM

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2010
2:15 PM

Post #7583953

Here I've found that lilies in the shade are either shorter or stretching for the sun and for every flower I may miss out on, due to the shade, I have the others that last longer.

Very nice display, Pigweed.

There are specifics for what constitutes part shade, full shade, etc. but the biggest help is the gardener seeing what works. A neighbor, who is a Master Gardener, planted her Joseph's Coat roses (3 of them) in shade. If they got an hour of direct sun it was a lot. As you'd expect they're gone now since they were disappointing to her: the roses must have been disappointed in her!

Last year I did try dahlias in front of the area with the lilies in part shade - it was close to 100% failure - all my own fault.

For any lilies that anyone wants to try in any type of shade I would recommend planting in pots, which can easily be moved if it doesn't work out to your satisfaction.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2010
2:21 PM

Post #7583966

always good advise from pirl.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2010
4:15 PM

Post #7584237

It's called learning by mistakes: experience.
graceful_garden
Hahira, GA
(Zone 8b)

February 25, 2010
12:01 AM

Post #7585284

Kaylyred - What is the large blue flower(s) in the picture you posted on June 1, 2009 -post #6629540. It is gorgeous! Looks to me like some kind of balloon flower, but I cannot find any so big! I would love to know! Thanks!!
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 25, 2010
12:59 AM

Post #7585422

You mean the ones in the background here?

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=6629540

They do look like balloon flowers, but they're not. They're campanula persicifolia 'Ceorulea'

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/89717/

And I suspect the camera angle makes the blooms look bigger than they actually are. They're really not overly large--maybe 1" across at the very most (and I suspect less; I just can't remember precisely.) I don't recall them being much bigger than the bloom on a balloon flower, but since I don't have any in my garden I really don't have any way to compare them.

Still, they seem to have bloomed just fine in dappled shade last year, which I consider a plus! They really never got any direct sun and they handled the conditions with style. (They're under the branches of a mature maple.) We'll see how they do this year and how prolifically they reseed under the conditions I stuck them in. :)
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

February 25, 2010
1:09 AM

Post #7585454

aspenhill wrote:Lots of space. Blue/silver shade garden would be nice, but I'm making myself focus on the large area between the house and the pond right now. Probably shouldn't start anything new for another two seasons. Made the mistake for years of dabbling all over the place, and never getting any one area truly established. Just my nature to want to try everything at once, so I have to forcibly set limits :-( I like clems, but kept thinking that I'd need trellises all over the place and that they only liked sun. I'd love to see more pictures like the stump one for non-trellis ideas.


Raymond Evison had an interview where he was talking about alternative ways to plant your clems. He's an advocate of thinking outside the box in how you use clems in your garden. Here's a link to that interview:
http://www.youtube.com/v/ZFY4yqBJQas
graceful_garden
Hahira, GA
(Zone 8b)

February 25, 2010
1:12 AM

Post #7585461

Kaylyred - Yes, those- they look HUGE in the picture!! Very pretty, no matter the size! Thanks for responding!! Samantha
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2010
2:26 AM

Post #7585709

I'm eager to try some of Evison's clematises in hanging baskets.



This message was edited Aug 23, 2010 11:33 AM
katie59
Woodinville, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 25, 2010
3:57 AM

Post #7585977

I got Diana's delight this year. And Guernsey Cream was my first clematis and is a consistent favorite. A hanging basket sounds fantastic!!

I'm going to use a couple of mature elderberry bushes that I'm trying to kill as supports for clems this year.
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

February 25, 2010
4:39 AM

Post #7586039

I used to have Asiatic Lilies in the shade here, they got some morning sun but the rest of the time it was all shaded by trees and the shadow of the house and they did so well, but I was surprised. They even had sort of bad drainage there. I forgot about Lilies until you guys all started talking about them. I had several Candy lilies from seed that never bloomed in the pure sun here, and they got eaten by a gopher that year, I think because they never came back up the next year. They were from seed so I thought maybe it was a biannual or something. I never looked them up, but should do it again. They look so nice in your garden.

I met Jasper Dale at the RU's here.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2010
9:59 AM

Post #7586363

Thanks for the Evison video.
I need more clems now.
Enablers all.Where will it end.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2010
12:49 PM

Post #7586457

I'm looking forward to all the new faces in the garden this year.

This message was edited Aug 23, 2010 11:35 AM

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2010
1:41 PM

Post #7586516

Drowning in clem pics and redoing files for 2 Ceramic tubs.New combo pics and everything.
I just have to decide which clems to choose.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2010
2:00 PM

Post #7586555

I've been working on a project of selecting which ones to order for months now and I'm still not done.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2010
2:47 PM

Post #7586646

I added Fleurie and a white one ?Halls
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2010
4:11 PM

Post #7586842

Halls?

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2010
4:13 PM

Post #7586847

Hyde Hall

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2010
4:16 PM

Post #7586860

Thank you. I thought maybe I had missed one.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2010
4:20 PM

Post #7586874

I have to slow down on the net.Too many balls in the air. Confused and disabled.
My lily bulbs in the garage are in good shape. That has me psyched.
Lilies are so forgiving.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2010
5:07 PM

Post #7586981

Agreed.

I've received lilies with mold that went on to bloom beautifully. It's the dried out ones or the totally mushy ones that can be problems.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2010
5:13 PM

Post #7586998

Ohh yes.The mushy ones. First year here I planted a tub of First Crown.Only 1 grew .I emptied the tub and planted the stalk in Sarahs garden. It took 2 years to bloom. The rest of the bulbs went to compost,they were nearly there anyway.
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

February 25, 2010
5:25 PM

Post #7587036

ge1836 wrote:Thanks for the Evison video.
I need more clems now.
Enablers all.Where will it end.

I know the feeling. When I first saw Zuzu's rose parades, I went from 30 roses to over 100 in rather short order! =P

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2010
5:38 PM

Post #7587067

Zuzu is way too addictive.

One of the nicest parts of growing clematis is that after the first flush of blooms there are the surprise blooms throughout the rest of the year.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2010
6:13 PM

Post #7587148

I am slowly add ing Clems to my gardens. I think a walk to the creek after the snow melts is in order.
Pirl suggested dead branches for trelises .In this tract t\any tree removal is done by contractors and they chip everything they cut down.
Trimming saw and a rope should get me what I want.

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2010
10:09 PM

Post #7587718

Just so everyone understands, I thought dead branches, about an inch wide, could be spray painted to match Jo Ann's cobalt blue container and they could lead the clematis towards the rose bush where she wants them to bloom.
BlissfulGarden
Baton Rouge, LA

February 25, 2010
11:39 PM

Post #7587869

Ohhh, very cool idea! I love seeing unexpected jolts of color in the garden. That's something that is very inviting about JD's garden... it's got a fun randomness to it with the great mixtures of hues, textures and items used in unexpected ways. Great imagination, Pirlie!
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

February 27, 2010
5:09 AM

Post #7591228

Rooguchi does grow well in the shade here. However it's a very small clem and not a climber and the flowers are small and dark so they are a little hard to see in a shade garden. I love it because I know that it's there though!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2010
12:10 PM

Post #7594038

New combo for new part shade garden.
The Gold Heart will be planted with Astilbes and Hosta.This garden is visited by deer from time to time so I will have to spray the lilies and hostas there.

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2010
12:15 PM

Post #7594045

Good morning JoAnn. I keep meaning to ask you how you do your collages - is it Picassa, or something else? They are so nice, and I look forward to them. Terri

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2010
12:25 PM

Post #7594054

Terri! Its Picasa. Its so easy when you learn the software. Choose the pics and picasa arranges them for you. Its embarassing that people think I am that clever.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 28, 2010
4:40 PM

Post #7594457

That's a great color combo! The 'Gold Heart' dicentra will really pop. Have you maybe considered adding a gold-leafed hosta somewhere in the combo to fill in for the 'Gold Heart' after it goes dormant in the summer? Or something like one of the bright green heucheras could fill the bill, too.

I've had some pretty good luck keeping my dicentras from going dormant by cutting them back by about 1/2 to 2/3rds after they finish flowering. (Don't wait too long, though, or they start to go dormant.) I've even had some rebloom, which people tell me is almost unheard of with dicentras. The one I had the best luck with got full morning sun, then full shade all afternoon (it was on a north-facing foundation.) You do have to keep them moist, though, if you want to avoid the dormancy.

Of course, I've only tried this with plain ol' dicentra spectabilis, not 'Gold Heart.' But I love the color of the gold against the pinkish red hearts. Kind of reminds me of a corydalis I saw at our local nursery last year...'Cherry Berry,' I think it was called. That one almost followed me home, and just might this year. :)

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2010
4:43 PM

Post #7594464

Thats great advise. I am trying to develop that area into a easy care place. I will consider some of the light green Heucheras as the gold leaf Hostas are slug bait here not to mention the deer.
I will plant Palace purple heuc. but there are heucherellas with green gold leaves that will work too.
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 28, 2010
6:12 PM

Post #7594650

I think the spot will look beautiful regardless. It looks very stunning in your collage. :)

I'm not sure, but I think 'Maui Buttercups' isn't a terribly big hosta and may be pretty slug resistant with it's heavy corrugated leaves. I could be wrong, though--I don't have it in my garden...yet. hehe

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/4726/

This message was edited Feb 28, 2010 12:14 PM

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2010
6:40 PM

Post #7594692

I had heard slugs dont like heavy leaves.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2010
6:47 PM

Post #7594706

Slugs don't but deer aren't as discriminating.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2010
6:51 PM

Post #7594715

SPRAY SPRAY SPRAY
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2010
6:57 PM

Post #7594722

You're hired!
hellnzn11
Rosamond, CA
(Zone 8b)

March 5, 2010
9:45 PM

Post #7607862

I had this freak freeze so now I am afraid to start some of my direct sow shade plants that I was hoping to toss in the ground. Too early so maybe I will have to do more in water bottles, it is a pain but worth it.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

March 6, 2010
2:34 AM

Post #7608006

Sorry about your odd weather.
I have such bad luck with seeds.I only direct sow flower seeds of the hardiest plants.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 7, 2010
6:32 PM

Post #7611903

We shouldn't have another freeze. I think that it would be safe to put out seeds depending on their individuality - like don't sow caladiums for instance. YOu must have good earth if you are direct sowing. I'm jealous.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

March 8, 2010
12:59 AM

Post #7612324

No good earth here,clay and rocks. I have mulched and used compost for the 3 years I have been here. I direct sow easy to germinate plants like annual poppies and Larkspur.I will also sow cosmos as soon as its warm enough.These are self propegating plants anyway.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 8, 2010
6:25 PM

Post #7614442

Oh I see. How wonderful that you can sow those beautiful plants. I love cosmos particularly.
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2010
2:25 AM

Post #7615044

It's been awhile since I visited this thread and I've been missing out - so many great ideas!

Terri, that slope of Tiarella at Longwood is stunning!

ge, always the enabler :) Your collages often give me TOO many ideas! LOL I've been thinking about adding Lilies to the list of plants for my new garden but now I'm wondering if I'd just be inviting the deer! So far they haven't touched the Daylilies that border this area but giving them more choices to munch on might be too much temptation for them :(

Weerobin, your photo of 'All Gold' Hakonechloa inspired me! I have always loved the bright foliage of Heuchera 'Citronelle' in this bed but late last fall discovered the blasted weevil has probably killed at least 2 of the 3 planted here :( I tried 'All Gold' last summer in another bed and loved it - more vigorous than 'Aureola'! I'm thinking AG might be a perfect replacement for the Heuchera :)

Thumbnail by rcn48
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rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2010
2:27 AM

Post #7615045

KaylyRed, I was successful keeping my "plain ol' Dicentra spectabilis' going strong through late summer in my Maine gardens by cutting them back but no luck here in the warmer climate of VA. It took me several years to find a good match to mask the bare spot left when 'Gold Heart' goes dormant. It might not work for you, although there is one report of success growing it in Z5a in PF, Hardy Begonia (Begonia grandis) http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/722/. It's a perfect solution because it comes up late and by the time Dicentra is beginning to go dormant, the foliage of the Begonia quickly fills in the bare spot and is a gorgeous late summer bloomer! Still in bloom in early September...

Thumbnail by rcn48
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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2010
2:39 AM

Post #7615053

beautiful
KaylyRed
Watertown, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 9, 2010
5:09 AM

Post #7615241

That begonia is beautiful! My dicentra usuallly stays the summer here in WI when I cut it back, but I'm tempted to give that begonia a try either way, because it's lovely. Don't recall ever seeing it around here before, but I'm all about zone pushing. :)
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 9, 2010
5:38 AM

Post #7615331

Lovely garden, rcn, and that begonia is stunning.
rcn48
Lexington, VA
(Zone 6a)

March 10, 2010
5:14 AM

Post #7618121

The best part about the Begonia? It self sows everywhere! :)

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 22, 2010
7:55 AM

Post #7647572

I too, love those Hardy Begonias. As Debbie says, they spread very easily by dropping seeds/bulbils and are very easy to dig up and move or remove if they spread too much. Mine were blooming up into November this past year.

Doug

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weare6ponders
Birmingham, AL

April 5, 2010
5:35 PM

Post #7682563

RCN,
Thanks for posting your pictures. It is very inspiratonal. I'm new so this was the first place I stopped. Nice to "meet" you all.

marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

April 5, 2010
5:42 PM

Post #7682586

Doug, I live in Somerset. Can I grow begonias like yours here? Do you have to dig them up for the winter or just mulch them and leave them in the ground?? I'm planning a shade garden and am looking for some color besides green ferns and hostas. Any body have any suggestions.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 5, 2010
5:48 PM

Post #7682604

Welcome to DG, weare6ponders! You're bound to enjoy the people and the variety of topics covered here.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

April 5, 2010
6:46 PM

Post #7682769

i'm going to go ahead and start a new thread here. It's getting too long.

Here we go!
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1085822/

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