Photo by Melody

Homesteading: March on the Homestead

Communities > Forums > Homesteading
bookmark
Forum: HomesteadingReplies: 246, Views: 819
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 5, 2009
5:54 PM

Post #6225273

So what's everybody up to?
I noticed some green shoots coming up on my raised bed, pushing through the straw mulch, so I pulled off the plastic and straw and TAH-DAH... the garlic is coming on strong! Yeah! I tried fall planting garlic a couple of years ago, but the gophers ate it. =0( I didn't think gophers liked garlic... apparently we have eye-talian gophers here. LOL

Here's a pic with the plastic pulled off and the straw mulch waiting to be removed...

Thumbnail by Jayryunen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 5, 2009
5:59 PM

Post #6225293

Not only did the garlic come on (you can see them in the forefront of this picture), but a few of the onions I tried to overwinter also made it, in spite of my doing nearly everything wrong. I scratched compost into the bed in the fall (not supposed to fertilize overwintering onions) and I didn't dry them off for two weeks before covering them (instead, I think I watered them %-\). These are Utah's that I'm going to try and get seed from. You can see them in the back of the picture, looking just beat to heck from my tender ministrations. LOL

I had to hurry to do this, as the wind starts to kick up around 9:30-10 these days. The straw was still so nice and dry that I put it in one of the donkey's stalls.

Thumbnail by Jayryunen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 5, 2009
6:06 PM

Post #6225320

Here's the bed all cleaned off, with the poly hoops up waiting for the row cover. You might be able to make out the rebar running alongside the bed at the base of the hoops... I use that to wrap around the edges of the row cover to hold it down, and put the bricks on the ends. But by this time, it was too windy to even think about trying for putting the row cover over, so I'll have to wait til maybe this evening or tomorrow morning, when the wind is down. I'm just glad we're getting a lull in the morning and evening. So often the wind just seems to be going 24/7.

In the background you can see the plastic lying out and drying off, held down by cattle panels, which we used to hold it down on the bed this winter. We'll fold it up and get another season out of it. =0)

Thumbnail by Jayryunen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 5, 2009
6:47 PM

Post #6225460

A while back someone wanted to see my seed starting set-up. I finally got most of the junk cleared off it, and here it is. It's in the same little room as my pressure tank, so this is as far away as I could get. You can see it's an A-frame, with a single shop light on the top, a double set of lights on the second shelf, and braces on the bottom where another set of lights could be attached for flats on the floor.

Time to start my herbs...

Thumbnail by Jayryunen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 6, 2009
5:20 PM

Post #6229573

Wouldn't ya just know it... the wind has been roaring ever since, gusts probably to 40, steady at 30... things just getting beat to heck out there. There's no way I can get the row cover on, and it's supposed to keep up all tonight and tomorrow.
{{sigh}}
Hope there's something left by Sunday, which looks to be the first break. Thank heaven these are bulbs and it's a WARM wind... snort.

Jay
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 7, 2009
4:12 PM

Post #6233613

HOORAY! The weather today is absolutely miserable... woke to the soft pattering of rain, ate breakfast to the ticking/tocking of sleet, washed the dishes as I watched the swirling snow flurries. I'm not even going to grumble about having to wipe the mud booties off the dog's feet when they come in... when they go out. LOL My boldest, baddest, goofiest dog just stood in the door and looked out when I opened it to let her out... uh, no, I don't think I want to go out in THAT. How is it that an animal that loves to roll in dead things won't go out in a little weather? LOL

But it's wet and it's wonderful.

Oh dang, the sun just came out. GO AWAY! I want puddles, for Pete's sake. I want water sluicing off the roof. I want snow up to the banisters on the porch.

I'm beginning to think it's like dating... the more you want it, the less you get it.
LOL
Jay
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 8, 2009
5:40 PM

Post #6238026

Finally! No wind this am, dashed right out and put the row cover on. Here's what it looks like with the old way of controlling billowing... #9 tie wire hoops. It works pretty well, but as you can see the wire doesn't exactly conform to the cover, and a strong wind can actually move it enough to work the wires out a little. It can eventually lead to the rebar coming unrolled and the whole rig coming undone. Only happened a couple of times last year, but I've been looking for a better system.

Thumbnail by Jayryunen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 8, 2009
5:45 PM

Post #6238037

Here's the new way... I've put in some fence staples on the railroad ties and run haystring through it, crossing over from side to side. This is one way I've seen it done on the big high tunnels. It certainly conforms better. I think the haystring might be too abrasive for a whole season, but I've got softer cord on order. Shouldn't be but a day or so before the winds kick up again and test it.

Thumbnail by Jayryunen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 8, 2009
6:04 PM

Post #6238114

Jay i think your wind is alot like our here in OH. Just always windy at 25 -30 mph all spring. If it ain' t windy its a blessing.
Good idea on the string.
i m going to try a few hoop mini Gh on my raised beds.
i have left over plastic from the big GH and i have tulle for bug protection that i use also . When i m done iwth the plastic.
It could work ? i hope
nice pics
enjoying your thread alot and learning much :)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 8, 2009
6:22 PM

Post #6238207

The tulle will work, provided you grasshopper problem isn't too bad. I tried that one year and the little buggers ate right through it. LOL

The GH plastic will work, but it'll get pretty hot under it and need to be vented somehow. I've used plastic to warm the bed early in the spring, but I don't put plants under it because of the venting needed. Maybe you can figure out a slick system. =0) Frame the ends or something.

Yep, 20-30 pretty constant here... just a breeze. LOL The little tunnels over the plants really helps with the battering and drying out from the wind, and it hides all your tasty morsels from the bunnies and birds. I couldn't grow much out here without 'em.

Send pics and let us see how your garden comes along!
Jay

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 8, 2009
8:43 PM

Post #6238824

I was thinking of a flap of tulle under the flap of plastic. kinda like a little triangle window ? i got a great tape that holds and is uv protected and wont break down quickly.
i will send pics soon :)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 8, 2009
8:54 PM

Post #6238864

Can't wait!
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 10, 2009
12:30 AM

Post #6244637

I'm liking the new billow system much better. We haven't had any real wind yet, but it certainly handles the strong breezes better (25-30 mph).

Now I'm stuck with wondering how to do it in just plain dirt, instead of a raised bed. Any ideas? I can make ground staples; I'm just not sure they'd stay in in a gusty high wind.

{{scratching head}}
Jay
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 10, 2009
2:39 PM

Post #6246804

Well, dang. We've got 40+ mph gusts this morning, and they've stripped the row cover off. =( The haystring has it nicely gathered, so it's not flapping and tearing itself apart in the wind, but the garlic is exposed. At least it's warm.

I've got snow fence ordered as a wind break, so maybe that'll help.
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 10, 2009
3:49 PM

Post #6247117

No wind this morning, after several days of FREAKY 40-50 mph wind & cold but no snow. It's supposed to rain/snow tomorrow night (promises, promises) so I am going out now to spray my fruit trees. Been putting it off for too long, the apicot blossoms are just about ready to pop. Somehow during the winter, the nozzle of my brand new (last year) spray bottle disappeared. Emailed the mfg, and today they kindly offered to send me a new nozzle gratis! Meanwhile, I'll try to get the apricots done, at least, with a tiny spray bottle from the dollar store.

Re tulle, Jay, do you mean yard goods from a fabric store? When I lived in Scottsdale I'd buy a bolt of it (green, of course) when the local fabric store had a sale in January, and use it to cover my veg garden. Raised armloads of all kinds of lettuce in the winter, down there. I think the netting lasted 2 years or more before the sun ate it. I never compared it in cost to row covers, but it was pretty cheap.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 10, 2009
9:11 PM

Post #6248406

Yes, tulle from the fabric store. It is cheap, pretty sure it's cheaper than the row covers, but I gave up on it after the grasshoppers ate through it. Also, it offers no frost protection, not as much moisture conservation either, which are big plusses with the row cover. But it all depends on the budget. =0)

I've gotten a couple-three years out of the row cover material, and as it gets torn (by wind, by dogs jumping on it, once by a dang chipmunk chewing through it) I use the bits for smaller covers over pots, patches, preventing carrot seeds from drying out while they germinate... you get the idea.

Jay

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 10, 2009
10:42 PM

Post #6248774

spray a little cayenne pepper on it , chipmuncks don't like that . LOL
found this thought you might find it interesting
http://www.grabbittools.com
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 10, 2009
10:57 PM

Post #6248828

That's a very cool tool, but I don't think it will work. The wind will rip the row cover apart around it. I used similar clips on the PVC greenhouse... just popped the suckers right off and that heavy construction plastic flys very nice thank you. The light weight row cover will just tear. Not to mention, I just ordered over $100 of windbreak fence, so I'm not spending anymore money. LOL

The dog got the chipmunk, so that took care of that. =0) I'm not one to think something is too cute to die. That's our dog's job and she's pretty good at it. Gophers, mice, chipmunks. She's got them down to a manageable number now.

Thumbnail by Jayryunen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 11, 2009
4:26 PM

Post #6251719

Gophers may be the only pest critter I don't have! Had bunches of them in Scottsdale. When I advertised my house for sale down there, I called it "Gopher Baroque". LOL
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 11, 2009
7:25 PM

Post #6252453

LMAO!

Where's Heber in relation to Flagstaff?

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 11, 2009
11:09 PM

Post #6253336

We stayed in Heber Utah for 4 months. :)
Yeah i can see how it would not work. The last plastic i used did very well in our hurricane of 75 mph winds. didn't tear. Cost a big $$$ and since the new GH is bigger and taller i can't use it . Gonna make a smaler one for the old plastic later.
To funny on the dog. LOL
my theory is if it taste good , eat it. LOL squirel and possom ain't to bad deep fried with a bit of ranch dressing . :)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 12, 2009
4:15 PM

Post #6256348

It'd take a dozen chipmunks to make a sandwich! LOL I suggested cottontail for dinner, but the SU nearly fainted, so I don't think we can go there. =0)

Wetness predicted... measurable even... so must go seed pasture.
Tah,
Jay
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 12, 2009
5:12 PM

Post #6256607

No pasture, but I got my Little Garden tilled & planted yesterday. Might do the Big Garden today, but my water pump is solar so I need lots of sun -- cloudy again so we may not get it. I don't know about measurable precip -- haven't had any for so long I forget what it feels like.

Heber is on the east side of AZ, Flagstaff is sort of in the middle. Heber is south of Holbrook, and I-40 runs between Flagstaff & Holbrook. It's about a 3 hour trip by car, about as far as going down to Phoenix from here.

Taynors, I don't think I have ever been to Heber, Utah, but both towns were named for the same guy, an early Mormon. (How's that blizzard doing? 75 mph winds, wow.)

Jay, does your SU object to eating the cute little bunnies, or are they not good to eat? Somehow I lump them into the same group as clams, you can't eat them in months containing no Rs (May, June, July, August). I know, I know, that makes no sense whatsoever. LOL

Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 12, 2009
5:21 PM

Post #6256652

It's more the wild issue... though cute's a factor too.

I'm pasteurizing goat milk at the moment. It's in the 40's here right now, almost sunny--those high, very thin clouds that just dilute the sun a bit. Not too windy either. I'm torn about the seeding... they're predicting 2" of snow, followed by warm and dry. That'd be great to get things started, but will something show up to keep the little oatlings going? Fribble, fribble. %-\

Ordered goat cheese culture this week, looking forward to something besides yogurt and lemon cheese with this. =0)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 12, 2009
9:46 PM

Post #6257790

Well, I bit the bullet, screwed up my courage, took the plunge, threw caution to the wind (might as well join everything else down in the pasture) and compromised. LOL I seeded half of the area, which means 50# of oats broadcast and covered by harrowing. I pulled Levi the Great White Ass out of winter storage, harnessed him up and hooked him to the tire harrow. It's the first time he's actually done field work for his supper. I'm so tickled. We did a pretty good job, he only tried to lay down once (another reason to always have a buggy whip handy) and it's doing something that looks a lot like snow higher up in the mountains. Still warm down here, breezy but not bad. If wetness shows up tonight, at least I got something in the ground. And if it doesn't, the seed is covered and the birds and mice will get less of it.
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 12, 2009
11:13 PM

Post #6258169

Oh how I am longing for spring Jay!!! I like your setup there! I have started my seeds indoors as well. DH does not seem to like my green house that covers the dinning room table. huh? Go figure. My garlic did awful last year, whats the secret? I believe I had poor drainage as they seemed to melt! weird. :/
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 12, 2009
11:24 PM

Post #6258217

Melting... that sounds like what my onions are doing and I think it's a combo of wet and freezing. =0( My raised bed is highly amended with peat and compost, as well as being lined with hardware cloth to exclude the gophers. Were your garlic bulbs in a raised bed or in the ground? Did you mulch and cover them with plastic to keep the mulch dry over the winter?

DH is beginning to sound unreasonable... no chirpilating feather dusters in the living room, no seedlings in the dining room. Does he have any idea how much he is saving in mental health and food bills here? Where's his sense of perspective? All he really needs is the recliner and the remote, what's he gettin' all uppity for? LOL Wait! Has he run out of life support factors (beer and chips)? You may need to recalibrate the fuel delivery system, readjust octane proportion. Has he been polishing golf clubs or casting flys across the room? Could be same bug you've got! LOL

Jay
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2009
12:59 AM

Post #6258704

Well, I planted in the spring. I planted in huge above gound pots with drainage holes in the bottom. I used good soil mixture with mulch. Maybe I should have put them in the ground. I dont know. I was so disapointed because I wanted to make garlic braids. :(
I know!!! DH is a big bummer. Wet blanket and stuff. He has a touch of OCD and does not like things out of its place. Chickens...outside. check Garden plants... in the backyard in the ground. check oh no!!! we are out of beer and chips!!! ahhhh...he may notice the six showgirls and silkies in the blue tote in the dinning room. hehehe
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2009
1:15 AM

Post #6258795

We are getting a nasty, wet snow right now. I had so hoped we were finished with that mess for this year but I knew better way down deep in my knower. I am sure it won't hurt my onions as they have been out all winter in the snow, ice, sleet ect and done just fine. I am also not worried about the seed I planted a few days ago because none of it has sprouted yet. But I am worried about all my little garlic just coming up and my rhubarb that is just peeping out from under the mulch.
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2009
1:20 AM

Post #6258835

Do you always get snow this late or is this an oddity? I mean NY we get snow as late as April or so. I LOVE rhubarb!!!!
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2009
1:27 AM

Post #6258878

We didn't have much snow last winter but this year has made up for it. It's pretty normal for this time of year. I was just hopin' against hope I guess.

I have never eaten rhubarb before. MaryE sent me some of her plants to give it a try. They grew good last year and she said I should wait a year to harvest any so I am looking forward to eating some this year. How do you fix it?
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2009
1:39 AM

Post #6258940

My grandmother grew it out in the backyard every year. She would try to make pies from whatever we did not eat. Which was not much. hehehe You can make it up in pie like apples too. I have boiled it and have used it to make rhubarb zuccini bread. It is so good.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2009
1:51 AM

Post #6258995

Braids would have been so nice, bummer to have lost this years. But there is always next year!

I think this fall I would try putting the garlic in the ground or the pots in the garage? Mulch deeply (I had 6" on mine) and keep them dry till later in the spring. I'm going to keep the mulch on my later next year; I got bit by all that warm weather we had, and I think I've uncovered them too early. They'll make it (I hope) but I think they'd be more vigorous and healthier if they hadn't gotten hit by this bout of single digit cold and the wind!

Cool about the rhubarb! =0)
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2009
2:21 AM

Post #6259144

I have not had mine covered at all. I didn't have much hope any of it would come up. The beds were frozen pretty deep so I wasn't sure it was garlic and not weeds. I dug one up and it had the bulb on the end I had planted. I planted hundreds of them. Maybe some will survive.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2009
3:07 AM

Post #6259392

You could send some to sewin to braid! LOL
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2009
11:00 AM

Post #6260316

LOL! You guys crack me up. So planting garlic in the fall is recommended. I was told Spring! bummer. That may have been the problem. I planted it in the spring last year. I can put it in the lean-to next time. Its still cold but not as cold as outside. Maybe that will make a difference. So I should also wait to bring it out until April? Thats when spring starts here. Still a threat of snow though. Maybe I should wait until May.?. I had never done the braids but bought a book to try. oh well, next time.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2009
12:51 PM

Post #6260549

i think darius did a article on garlic
i will see if i can look it up

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2009
12:52 PM

Post #6260559

i think darius did a article on garlic
i will see if i can look it up
here we go
found it
http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1029/
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 13, 2009
4:08 PM

Post #6261215

Great article by Darius. Thanks for the link, I read it just in time, was about to plant garlic bulbs out by the potatoes but instead will plant them amongst the lettuce!
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 13, 2009
4:15 PM

Post #6261248

Re making cheese, I am new at that and have only made queso blanco, yoghurt, and lemon cheese. The queso blanco was okay, the yoghurt wasn't too tasty but was okay, but the lemon cheese didn't curdle like it was supposed to so I panicked and added apple vinegar, then strained it anyway, and what I got was very sour cheese. Ewwwww. So if you have goat milk available, Jay, why do you need to order goat cheese culture?

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2009
11:19 PM

Post #6262888

You can plant them with roses too ( garlic love roses ) companion planting. ? so i read in a book.
:)
AZgrammie your very welcome glad to help, she is the one to look for if you ever need any info on gardening IMHO :)
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2009
11:23 PM

Post #6262910

Thanks everyone for the garlic info!! :D

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2009
11:25 PM

Post #6262918

she has several on garlic if your interested
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2009
11:36 PM

Post #6262964

Always! Mine did not work out so well. :)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 14, 2009
12:13 AM

Post #6263141

AZ... you need different kinds of cultures for different kinds of cheeses. I'm going to try making my own chevre and "Fresh French Style". =0) Just like different yogurts have different tastes, same with cheese. We also got a sweeter yogurt to use as our starter; the one we had was too tangy for our taste.

Did you rinse your curds after adding the vinegar? Sometimes that can help when one gets a leeetle carried away with the vinegar. =0)

Jay
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 14, 2009
12:36 AM

Post #6263231

No, never thought about rinsing them! Next time . . .
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 14, 2009
12:36 AM

Post #6263232

In the Little House books, they made vinegar from apple cores.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 14, 2009
1:09 PM

Post #6265020

I haven't read those books; one of these days. =0) Did they extract a juice from them first?

You can also make pectin from saved peels and cores. We've got bags and bags we've saved in the freezer from drying apples last fall, but we haven't gotten around to making the pectin yet. We're going to make jalapeno jelly with it. =0)

We got a couple of inches of snow in the last 24 hours! YEAH!!! I got the oats down in time. And right now the forecast is for a 60% chance of wetness next weekend. Sure hope so; the timing would be great for the oats. Hopefully I can get the second acre seeded and harrowed before the next round of wet. I'm just so tickled I was actually able to use Levi to harrow... it's our first step to really using the donks for serious farm work. He only tried to lay down once, and worked hard enough to break a sweat... that's a rare thing in a donkey. LOL Against their religion and all. =0)

I'm going to start my herbs today; some of the flowers I started are beginning to come up--stock and hollyhock. I'm especially excited about the hollyhock. It's called Peaches and Cream and it's a lovely apricot pink and white double. I want to put it in front of the bedroom window.

Blessings all,
Jay
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 15, 2009
4:22 PM

Post #6270586

If I ever get any apples, I'll start saving the peels & cores for pectin. Never heard of that, but then there is lots I haven't heard of. Is the process in Carla Emory's book? (I found one at a garage sale and love it.) I still don't know how to can, either, but I've made lots of jams & marmalade. If I ever get any vegetables, then I will learn how to can!

No sign of my Mason bees, I hope they are only sleeping, not dead, because the apricot trees & cherry bush are blooming now. No honeybees last year at all, but in previous years there were scads of them. Guess the hive blight or whatever got the honeybees. So I ordered the Mason bees and hope they will get their little bodies out there and get to work.

Lucky you, 2" of snow. All we got was lots of clouds, and a little rain. Bright & sunny today, need to get my little body out there and get to work. 8^)

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 15, 2009
6:33 PM

Post #6271134

Azgrammie isn't it a shame about the honey bee's :(
i have bee's hatching in our wood work her in our house and i find them on the windows. I let them out but i think they die ? :(
i have heard of them mason bee's .A apple orchard has them and uses them down the road from us. works well for him

CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 15, 2009
7:10 PM

Post #6271286

There is a big move in our community to have bee hives. There is a local bee society and they hold meetings and have demonstrations and information booths at local events.
Lots of people here grow fruit trees, especially apple trees, and many of them are beginning to get bee hives for their orchards.
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 15, 2009
10:38 PM

Post #6272197

I have read about the beehive blight (or whatever they called it) but of course don't remember what I read. 8^( I just know that 3 or 4 years ago I couldn't keep honeybees away from my hummingbird feeder, and that one day i heard a roar getting louder and louder and looked up, and witnessed a huge swarm of bees on their way to a new home. At the time, I hoped their new home would be far away, but "be careful what you wish for, you might get it." I also had to call a beekeeper to come out and remove a hive from beneath an antique trailer I planned to restore. Had to pay him but at least he gave me a quart of honey. 8^)

Last year all of my baby fruit trees bloomed and were beautiful, but no bees. So no fruit. I swore I wouldn't let this happen again and ordered some Mason bees, but they are either still sleeping or dead. My chickens got loose and nibbled at the paperwhite narcissus which just started to bloom (they said "ptoooey") so I took some of the flowers and tucked them next to the bee tubes. Wake up and smell the flowers, bees!

Who was it in one of the Dave's Garden forums who said "I want patience and I want it now!"
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 15, 2009
10:54 PM

Post #6272271

LOL... me too!!!
I love that... wake up and smell the flowers! So true for all of us, eh?
Besides the mason bees... and I will be following your experience avidly, as I have been thinking of them... I have been seeing where some orchards are using bumble bees. Never thought of them as much in the way of pollinating, but just another Duh! moment for me. =0)

I've had a few honey bees show up in the house, but I think they are just spring scout bees, checking to see if anything's up yet. I imagine they go back to the hive and tell everyone to just keep sleeping, or whatever it is that a bee does in winter.

We read about the pectin from apple peels in The Jam Lady's cookbook. That's a great book for anyone into jams, jellies, conserves, etc. No matter how new or old one is to jelly and jam, she has some great info and tempting recipes. We were finally able to get the perfect set to our chokecherry jelly thanks to her!

Have you made prickly pear jelly yet? That's just the tastiest stuff... I love the syrup over my pancakes, too.
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 15, 2009
11:04 PM

Post #6272316

chokecherry jelly?? That sounds soooo yummy!!! Are they a type of cherry??
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 15, 2009
11:16 PM

Post #6272366

Yes, they are. They are a tiny tart wild cherry that makes a great jelly, very popular around here. One doesn't really like to eat them straight off the bush, they have quite a pucker to them. But once you add the sugar for jelly... oh, it's heaven, pure heaven. =0)

Prickly pear jelly is made from cactus fruit and tastes like a cross between pears and bubble gum to me. You have to pick the fruit with tongs, then I like to roll the fruit around in a bed of hot coals to scorch the tiny spines off and bring up the sweetness. Or you could roast them a bit over the fire in like a vegetable bar-b-que basket or something. Each fruit is mostly seeds, but there's a rim of pulp around them and that's what you make the syrup and jelly from. It's been awhile since I've done it. Each year I think this year, but then the chokecherries come on and time gets away from us. Maybe THIS year! =0)
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 16, 2009
1:23 AM

Post #6273013

Boy, I thought I was creative using my extra green tomatoes in jam!! I want to try some of those "exotic" jellies and jams!!! :D
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 16, 2009
2:38 AM

Post #6273448

I'm sure you've got some interesting wild fruits in your area... can't wait to hear what! Maybe next fall we can do a jam and jelly swap?
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 16, 2009
10:30 AM

Post #6274222

Oh yes, that sounds great!!! I will hunt up some different fruit, so I dont look duh! hehehe I'm on it!
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 16, 2009
5:24 PM

Post #6275812

Having killed 4 or 5 blueberry bushes in the past several years, I finally got it through my head that I can't keep blueberries alive in my alkaline soil no matter how much acid I add, so I ordered a couple of berry bushes called Saskatoon berries (haven't arrived yet). Research convinces me that they are actually "serviceberries". Wonder what kind of jam they will make?

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 16, 2009
7:04 PM

Post #6276240

I m doing several butterfly and bee gardens next to my garden this year. I hope for the best .
Never heard of them berries. but i m new to berrys. Well growing them , eating them i m an expert. LOL
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 16, 2009
8:06 PM

Post #6276523

Tay, I think service berries are a native to somewhere on this continent. I think it is proounced "sarvis berry". I probably paid too much for them, if they grow wild, but they aren't growing around here. Yet. 8^)
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 16, 2009
8:14 PM

Post #6276550

Since I dont have time to can can I buy some local goodies and swap with you????? I really like home made items, but since it is spring, dont spend too much time in the house...
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 16, 2009
9:32 PM

Post #6276784

I dont grow my own unfortunately either. I buy them at the market. I do like to can. I make all my own salsa, pickles, relish, jams, and apple sauce...I enjoy it. I end up giving some to family as well. Those berries sound interesting. Let me know what they taste like. Sweet, tart? mmmm good.
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 16, 2009
9:35 PM

Post #6276802

Road Trip to Sewin's house... WOW salsa, is that hard?
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 16, 2009
9:42 PM

Post #6276832

No actually its really easy.
I blanch tomatoes and peel them, dice peppers, onions, vinegar, cilantro, and various other spices that I canít remember right now, cook it down a bit and ladle into hot canning jars. Process 15 or so minutes. Not hard at all. My DH luvs it though. So do his friends. :D
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 16, 2009
10:04 PM

Post #6276936

Well that cant be that hard, when you get a chance, can you D-mail the recipie so me and Billy can try it some time?

Is the vinegar for the canning process?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 16, 2009
10:22 PM

Post #6277020

Just catching up... computer was on the fritz several weeks. Jay, things are lookin' good!

Thanks for the kind words about my garlic articles. Like Jay, I uncovered mine early, but it was deliberate. I had put down straw last fall, and it was FULL of seed heads. I wanted it up, having learned the hard way how it germinates and chokes out my garlic. Anyway, I took a shot of my garlic before I re-mulched with leaves. The bed to the left is shallots.

sewincircle, you should plant garlic outside, in the fall. You are barely half a zone colder than I am here in the mountains. They need a time to establish roots before winter. They will green up a bit in the fall, and die down. That's okay. Mulch them well and wait. Uncover when the danger of hard freezes is past, they will stand a little frost. Hardneck garlics should do well for you.

Thumbnail by darius
Click the image for an enlarged view.

CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 17, 2009
12:00 AM

Post #6277533

Your garlic looks great! I was counting mine yesterday and I found 115 sprouts. I was worried that 5" of snow that covered them was going to do them all in but it doesn't seem to have bothered them at all. The little toes I planted were very, very small. Not as big as a pencil eraser so it will likely be a while before my plamnts are as big as yours.

Since I planted last fall, when will they be ready to pull?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
12:19 AM

Post #6277645

When half of the tops turn yellow and start to fall over...
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 17, 2009
12:36 AM

Post #6277757

Will it be in the fall? It seems like I remember reading somewhere that garlic takes a year to grow.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
12:42 AM

Post #6277784

It seems like mine were ready to harvest in August last year. I suppose it depends a lot on the total summer weather.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 17, 2009
12:46 AM

Post #6277816

Thanks. I imagine I will have to thin a lot of mine out. Any suggestions on doing that? Some of them are less than 2" apart. I'm sure I planted a couple thousand.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
12:51 AM

Post #6277851

LOL, like garlic, do ya? I'd pull one that is too close maybe in late May to see how they are growing. If they aren't bulbing much, it will be easy to pull them. What's the soil like?
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 17, 2009
12:52 AM

Post #6277854

Thanks darius. I will wait and try again in the fall. I was going to just give up, but now I think I am going to try again.
Miss Jester, I will type out my recipie and Dmail it to you. The vinegar is added to the tomatoes. Its all part of the recipie. Its really easy. Many people make salsa that you dont cook. I have always done it this way. ;)
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 17, 2009
12:56 AM

Post #6277874

It's a mix of top soil and composted horse manure and sawdust. Everything seems to love it.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
1:20 AM

Post #6278013

So nice and loose? Great! I hope mine do better this year with all the work on the bed. Last year some came close to rotting in this heavy clay, and all were small because they couldn't expand much against the clay.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
2:01 AM

Post #6278197

Learnin' lots about garlic, yeah! I just have a couple dozen, didn't want to get too carried away til I got some success. =0)

We started putting up the high tunnel today, driving the ground posts in. Went pretty well, except for one post that went in too far and now for the life of us we can't get it backed out... dug down around it and poured water in the hole. Will try with board bolted on and car jack to lever it up in the morning. Broke a bolt trying that tonight before water soak. Talk about CLAY!!! sheesh.

Dinner,,,
Jay

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
1:29 PM

Post #6279797

I think i need garlic
i just ordered sweet potatos
i got jet star about 12 plants . I think that will be enough LOLLLL
Cool a high tunnel ! must get pics up and show us .
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
1:40 PM

Post #6279834

Got up at the crack of dawn to lift that ground post. The water soak really helped; we were able to ease the post out just enough. =0) 24* out there this morning... the water in the hole hadn't completely soaked in and there was a thin crust of ice on it, so naturally I dropped the wrench into it while securing the bolt. Ugh. Take the glove off and fish around in the freezing water to find the wrench. Brrrr... but the rest of the plan went fine and the transit level is on its way back to the rental store.

Now the next twist. The arches are screwed together on the ground and that needs to be done on a flat surface. Er... ah... hmmm, not much flat around here. Too many gophers and doggie earth moving, grass hillocks and path ruts. Looks like today will be spent making a flat surface.

Jay

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
2:00 PM

Post #6279924

You can RENT a transit level? How wonderful! (not around here, though) I used to have one, when I was Builder, never figured I'd want to have one for a farmstead... sigh.

Sue, order garlic early-to-mid summer for fall shipment and planting. They run out of varieties fast.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
2:08 PM

Post #6279944

Yeah, we've got a great little construction rental place here. It only cost me $18 for a day. I can even rent a small tractor with brush hog if I get to that point. =0) Rented a trencher for running a new water line a couple of years ago... they're very nice there, very patient with explaining how to run all these machines.

If I remember right, Territorial sends out their fall catalogue (with all its garlic varieties) in April. Hard to think about fall planting when I'm just starting to put plants out here, but the descriptions of all the garlics bring me around...

LOL Jay

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2009
2:23 PM

Post #6279993

AZGrammie, here's a yoghurt recipe I used to use years ago that always gave really good results:

Spriteís Yoghurt

1 - 1 tsp gelatin in 1/4 cup warm water; add boiling water to 1 cup level, and 2 or 3 tbsps. honey. Set aside.

2 - Mix 3 cups of milk powder + 3 cups warm water, or 5 cups warm whole milk: cow, goat, etc.) + 1 14-oz. can evaporated milk.

Mix 1 + 2 together, adding 1 cup (or 2, for thinner yoghurt) warm water and 3 tbsps. yoghurt as starter (Dannon)

Put yoghurt in covered pan (stoneware or pottery works well) in preheated 300 degree oven, turning oven off immediately, and let stand 6 - 12 hours.

If still not set, heat oven so yoghurt gets warm again, add 3 more tbsps. yoghurt starter, and stir. Turn off oven and wait again.

*****

I used to make goat cheese, too, but we don't have goats anymore!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
3:01 PM

Post #6280175

Jay, go to my page (clicking on my name takes you there) and scroll down to the list of articles I have written. I list taste and storage qualities of a good many varieties, probably over a hundred (out of over 600 available) and sources for garlic to plant. There are articles on hardnecks (usually northern), softnecks (usually southern) and the "new" Creoles (which are NOT from louisiana!).

I only planted 5 varieties last fall: Siberian, Susanville, Red Toch, Keeper and Shantung Purple. If I plant too many varieties, I can't narrow down what does best in growing, taste and storage. It may take me 5 years to develop 2-3 I want to aggressively market.

Yes, it is very hard to think of fall planting when I haven't even started spring planting! I only mentioned ordering early as so many varieties get sold out fast, long before time to ship.
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2009
3:10 PM

Post #6280221

So you have to plant garlic in the fall for it to grow in the summer??? Oh darn... I love garlic and can eat it raw... Well something to think about next year.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
4:16 PM

Post #6280459

Sorry.
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 17, 2009
4:26 PM

Post #6280489

greenhouse_gal, thanks for the yoghurt recipe. Do you have a cheese press? So far the only cheeses I have made were really simple-minded, heat the milk or yoghurt (store-bought in my case, alas), add vinegar or lemon juice, strain. More or less. The plain milk cheese is pretty bland, I usually use milk just as it is starting to turn, don't want to use it for cheese if it is stll drinkable. (I live a long way from a grocery store.) I have culture to make mozarrelli but haven't tried it. I never seem to have enough time! They say you don't know what busy is until you retire, and they are so right.

Miss Jestr, you eat garlic raw? Wow, you must be single! LOL I planted 3 elephant garlic bulbs in the greenhouse last fall and they didn't do anything but didn't "melt" either, so I replanted them in my kitchen garden.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
4:29 PM

Post #6280506

Did you know that Elephant garlic isn't a garlic at all? It is a leek that bulbs. I tried to grow some 2 years ago but they rotted in the heavy clay.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2009
4:37 PM

Post #6280542

AZgrammie, I used to have small white plastic baskets that I would allow my cheese to firm up in. Then I'd put them on a ripening board. The flavor wasn't particularly good until I somehow developed the proper molds on that board, and after that the cheeses were excellent. However, this was way before I went to France and got to try the French goat cheeses, some of which I can buy now in the supermarket, so I have no idea how my old efforts would have compared to what's produced there.

We made a cheese press using a can, boards, some dowels, and a heavy weight of some sort. We also bought supplies from Hoegger's, and I'm amused to see that they're still advertising in country-style magazines. This was all when our kids were little and they're in their thirties now!

If garlic should only be planted in the fall, what about those spring-planting bulbs they sell in some of the catalogues? I've tried them without much success, though.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
5:15 PM

Post #6280713

MsJestr... you might double check with your local Master Gardener program or county extension agent... where you are might be very different, down in the lower altitudes of AZ. Fall planting may be for places with a freeze... when was the last time Kingman had a hard freeze?

I'll check out the articles, Darius. I really appreciate your experience. Thanks!
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2009
7:04 PM

Post #6281223

Yeppers AZ Grannie I am single... Cant find a cowboy to put up with me...LOL
I really love pickled garlic and I have a terra cotta pot taht I put in the micro wave with some butter and spices and cook then eat like candy...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
7:15 PM

Post #6281257

LOL, at least you can be sure of not having vampires after you!
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2009
7:19 PM

Post #6281274

Yeppers or worms...
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
7:21 PM

Post #6281280

You worry much about vampires, Darius? Maybe that's why you plant all that garlic, eh? You live in a neighborhood with handsome but dangerous vampires... they're always handsome, you know. =0)

Bleh, bleh, bleh...
Jay }:o|=

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
7:40 PM

Post #6281361

LOL!
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2009
7:52 PM

Post #6281410

Jayryunen,
We get down to 20 degrees for about a week or two in January, and still have below freezing nights here now. I was suprized we got a few days of really good snow, I had to leave work early just so I could get home..and one day I could not get to work.
I am in the High Desert around 6000 ft
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
8:43 PM

Post #6281616

I thought Kingman was lower... I mean, on the freeway it's right after Needles. =0) Still, I'd double check on the garlic season there. You might be able to get away with it.

Then again, maybe you should stop working so hard to chase off those devilishly handsome vamps... I mean, they are all the rage now, think how you'd be the envy of... er... well, every teenager who reads, anyway. LOL

"OH, you're dating a vampire? How dreamy. Is he as hot as they say? (squeal) Like everything you read just makes them sound soooo insatiable {shiver}"

Blech, blech, blech...
Jay
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2009
9:02 PM

Post #6281682

LOL Jayryunen, I need a man that can Ride, Rope and use a hammer, not one that is afraid of being out in the daylight... Oh and that can keep up with me and Billy.

It is on the road to needles, but coming from Needles, you are gradually climbing up. We are about 80 miles from Needles.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
9:13 PM

Post #6281723

Like I said, right after Needles... the only thing between you and there is that funny giant golfball house. And the turn-off for donkey-town. I thought the only hill was that ridge just outside of town... goes to show what driving will do to you. =0)

Well, except for the daylight bit, I don't see why you wouldn't want a vamp (you forgot to mention shoot). Do they have evening/nighttime SASS events? And just think of the competitive advantage a vamp would have in the rough stock events. What a nightlife you could have! LOL

Hmmm, with a hired vamp in overalls, I could get twice as much done around here. Overalls and a ballcap... yep, that's the vamp for me.
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 17, 2009
11:15 PM

Post #6282164

LOL

You guys are too funny.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2009
11:19 PM

Post #6282191

Come on, AZ, describe yer dream vamp... LOL You could keep yours in that freezer during the day...

This message was edited Mar 17, 2009 5:21 PM
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 17, 2009
11:51 PM

Post #6282334

LOL, my dream vamp? First of all, he must have teeth. Vampires do have teeth, right? A vampire who could get up off the couch and move around would be great. If he could fix my tractor tire, that would be an extra. And I would really like it if he could play a musical instrument and/or sing. He should like to go fishing and read. Both at the same time would be okay, that's what I do.

Yeah, and if he is really a HOT vampire, I could put him in the freezer and see if he could open it from the inside and get out. If not, I'd let him out, don't want him to cool off too much!

My neighborhood is called Antelope Valley. Know what you'd get if you put all the single guys in Antelope Valley into one room? A full set of teeth!

Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 18, 2009
12:06 AM

Post #6282380

Teeth are not necessary for drinking beer. And a downright handicap in a brawl. Put all the guys in our valley in one room... you've got the bar. LOL

Now, the most wonderful thing about vamps seems to be they are cultured... they read, they sing, and they can dance. Alcohol does not effect them, so no worries about DWI. I've never heard of one fishing, but hey, after the first 500 years of immortality, I bet they'd be willing to try anything to stave off the boredom (ennui seems to be particularly severe in the older vamps, who of course don't age, just get pedantic)

I'm sure there's a nice hunky city vamp out there just dying to retire to the country and try some wild blood... because of course we are only interested in the very moral vamps who suck the blood of rats and people we don't like. =0)
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 19, 2009
1:05 AM

Post #6287505

LOL, you know a lot more about vampires than I do, Jay. A hunky, singing, fishing, dancing, reading, beer drinking vampire -- that works for me! I even have packrats if "my" vampire lusts for blood!
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 19, 2009
3:42 PM

Post #6289792

I confess... I read a lot of mind-candy junk. I've even been known to slum around with a little chick lit. Then I read something last century, like George Eliot (love "Adam Bede") or Thackery, just to remember what compound sentences are like. Then a little something non-fiction... Small Farmer's Journal, Countryside, Four Season Gardening, then back to drivel. =0)

Basic junk food literary pyramid... the base is pop fiction, the tip is "literature". LOL

I've got "Dracula" on tape... what a hoot! A great read/listen for the halloween season! =0)
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 19, 2009
4:21 PM

Post #6289962

LOL AZGrannie, you do reside in Arizona... HOHOHOH
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2009
7:25 PM

Post #6295882

I got my goat cheese making kit a few days ago, and today I went to get a gallon of goat milk from a friend. Who happens to live waaaaay up in the mountains.

Getting the goat milk was interesting. Very rustic. Met my friend, R, at his house and he handed me the milking pail while he got the dog food for his dogs. Er... I wasn't really expecting this; he's always had it ready before. I'm wearing clogs... not the best in a barn yard. LOL But I delicately mince along behind (in general I am not a mincer, and I do have on my Cabela's camo pants with a beat-up flannel shirt, but clogs just lead to mincing in the manure) and we wade through the spring that has sprung up just outside the corral gate (mince, mince, hop) to be swarmed by 5 does all wanting to be first for the milking and GRAIN, which is in an inconveniently (is there any other kind) arranged milking pen. So my job is to only let one doe through at a time, wrestle the others back, not let the two kids out that have been isolated in the milking pen so their mom can bag up, and keep up my side of the conversation, all the while not getting goat manure in my CLOGS. Nooo problemo. LOL So R is milking and talking and I'm talking watching the goat hair fall in the milk and wondering if that's just how it is or if a little brushing might help that. Who knows? I haven't died yet from this milk.

So R gets the does milked in about 15 min (wow!), we turn all the babies in with all the moms, we manuveur our way through all the gates, not slipping in the spring that sprung, the manure slop that's a result (mince, mince, hop), feed the sheep (Lincoln and Churro), talk about the mountain lions and coyotes eating lambs, and go back to the house, except we don't go in, we just pour the milk through the filter into my jars on the tail gate of his truck while talking about how to keep the goats from girdling his fruit trees.

Like I said, very rustic. =0) Now the milk is chilling and I'm going to try to make chevre with it.

Jay
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 20, 2009
7:29 PM

Post #6295905

Ohhh Jay, I can just picture that little slice of heaven... Thanks for sharing.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2009
7:58 PM

Post #6296002

Too cute... maybe I should by some clogs?
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2009
8:38 PM

Post #6296133

Oh darlin' clogs are essential. To what, I'm not sure, but I wear mine all the time, except when it's muddy, then I wear those slip-on Muck shoes. I love that I can just slip them on and off as I am constantly in and out of the house and we have {{sigh}} dusty rose pink carpet that we TRY to keep half-way decent looking. LOL

But I do have to remind myslef they are not suitable, downright dangerous for working with the donkeys and climbing on ladders. If I die in a barnyard wreck, it will be because I forgot to change out of my clogs...

MsJstr... no, I haven't even beGUN to describe that little slice of heaven. =0) It's on a mountaintop, the whole place has gradually, probably over generations, been built out of scavenged boards or what was originally bought new has been recycled and reused so many times that it's hard to recognize its original function. This is no Mother Earth News kind of joint, more Countryside. =0) The manure and dropped hay has accumulated in the goat pens for so long, it's time to reset the fence... the goats can almost step over it. I was looking at the house, figuring it was one of those 'elaborated' old trailer houses, but I couldn't make out the original structure, it's just kept growing and growing and growing... a very organic style of architecture. LOL

Believe it or not, I love those kind of places. Because they are truly homes in the way that properties that are maintained for their market value never are. As fallen down and ramshackle as it is, it is R & C's home, their place, their life. They are good, kind, make-do kind of folks that are working hard to actually rejuvenate agriculture in the valley. C has been instrumental in getting a wool and rug weaving cooperative going, which just recently got accredited to evaluate alpaca fiber, and now they are moving into sustainable beef, lamb, and goat meat.

But it is VERY rough-hewn. =0)
MissJestr
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7a)

March 20, 2009
8:42 PM

Post #6296142

My Kind of place... Kind of like my place and the most importaint thing is it is homey... I love living like that...
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2009
8:47 PM

Post #6296158

Well, you can certainly see from my pics we are no shining example of neat and tidy...

Folks just don't appreciate the art required to obtain this kind of 'stead...
LOL

I got my lettuce and tatsoi seedlings planted in the coldframe today. The chard and beets I did a couple of days ago are looking good.
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 20, 2009
8:53 PM

Post #6296173

The ocean is tidy enough! hehehe
I have shoes that I use only for outside chores. I heard you should for biohazard precautions. :/ I would like to get some muck boots. I want green froggy ones.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2009
8:58 PM

Post #6296184

Do Crocs count? LOL, I'm never so dirty as when I forget to change my Crocs for boots in the garden. My daily attire is jeans, skinny tee, flannel overshirt and my old hiking boots.

I have an interview for a part-time job next Wednesday and I'm wondering if I can get away with my 'better' hiking boots or try and find a pair of shoes. (I have sandals but it's much too cold for them now.)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2009
9:00 PM

Post #6296191

That bio-hazard remark stopped me for a minute, then I remembered you've got chickens. =0) That's why, right?

I'm pretty sure I'm a bio-hazard disaster. Fortunately, right now I don't have chickens and as far as I know there's no lurking jackass flu waiting to leap the species barrier and make us all bray uncontrollably...

The ocean is very messy, what are you talking about? All that frothing and foaming and flotsam and jetsom. LOL
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2009
9:04 PM

Post #6296203

We must have the same fashion consultant, Darius. =0) And crocs are clogs as far as I'm concerned.

Oh yeah, which shoes, which beat up shoes? LOL I've got a going to town pair for when we go to dinner or meet with city folks... clogs. LOL

I have a great pair of hiking boots, but I only wear them when I know I'll be outside for awhile, because they drag in sooo much stuff.

Forgot to say... good luck with the interview!

This message was edited Mar 20, 2009 3:05 PM
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 20, 2009
9:11 PM

Post #6296220

Yup, thats what I meant. Chicken biohazards. Jackass flu? I have had that before. Not cool. I have crocs for gardening. Luv them. And I dont know why you couldnt wear dress work boots for the interview. Or pick up a pair of shoes. hehehe Good luck with it!! Well, at least the ocean HAS tides! LOL
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2009
9:44 PM

Post #6296339

Yeah, well, we have wind. That'll clean up anything not tied down. LOL
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 21, 2009
6:58 PM

Post #6300062

Read Jay's post about mincing & hopping and mucking about in clogs, all so he could make chevre cheese . . . and realized how inelegant the cheese I am making today out of slightly soured milk is going to be in comparison. But I do have chickens, and if I don't like the way it turns out, the chickens will love it anyway. 8^)
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 21, 2009
8:19 PM

Post #6300294

The Mason bees are alive & well, have tunneled their way out of 2 of the 3 tubes I bought. I think there were only supposed to be a few in each tube. Anyway, several little black bees and several little golden bees are buzzing frantically around the Manchurian & Moorpark apricot trees, Nanking cherry bush, and Japanese plum. There also seem to be a very few honeybees, hallalujah. So maybe this year, fruit? Of course it is supposed to snow on Sunday, I will cover them with blankets and see if that helps.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 21, 2009
10:40 PM

Post #6300778

Hooray! So glad to hear about the bees surviving; that's encouraging as I was thinking of getting some one of these days.

You may be envious of my chevre, but I don't know how to make cheese out of soured milk... so do tell! I'm all ears!

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 21, 2009
11:50 PM

Post #6301119

that is great you get raw milk from a goat friend. Jealous ! :)
well what a wonderful place you have .
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 22, 2009
12:03 AM

Post #6301172

Jay
Have you thought of getting a milk goat of your own? You could bring her to your friend's billy to breed and eat the kidd or sell it?

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 22, 2009
12:38 AM

Post #6301314

Right, and have to be there twice a day rain or shine to milk it! Been there, done that. I loved the goat's milk but we never could find anyone to take over chores occasionally to let us have a bit of a life off the farm! Probably that's more possible in some areas, but this one isn't sufficiently ag-oriented.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 22, 2009
12:58 AM

Post #6301396

Tell me about it! We have 11 horses, 10 chickens, 2 dogs, 2 hamsters, a cat, a rabbit, a duck, a turtle and a salamander. We don't leave home often. But we do have people we can dole the animals out to a couple times a year.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2009
1:19 AM

Post #6301467

We think about it, but it's a lot cheaper to get the milk from my friends--no buck fees, no feed bills, no housing maintainance, no vet bills. I get goat meat from them too. I'm working on my garden so earnestly so there's more exchange happening... fresh veggies at the stores here are a joke!

I know what folks are talking about... it's hard to get away for any extended period of time. =0( What we do now is take turns... I go away for a week, SO goes away to something. Last year we did manage to get away for 10 days to go to the Small Farmer's Gathering and Auction up in Oregon. Which by the by is coming up (April 17-19), if anyone's interested. We've got a dear friend who does housesitting and we trade massages for her taking care of the place when we go. But besides being in demand for staying at folk's places, she works two jobs... a full time at the local prison (she's a social worker) and a part time cleaning.

We got the baseboards on the high tunnel done this evening! Wooo--hoo, we kicked it today!

Jay
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 22, 2009
1:22 AM

Post #6301478

Are you a massage therapist?
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2009
1:32 AM

Post #6301519

My partner is. =0) Definitely has its benefits. LOL Except that we both tend to overdo it at the same time (like today) and it just seems plain mean to ask for a massage when she's just as tuckered as I... though she'll offer, I always turn her down.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 22, 2009
2:04 AM

Post #6301658

A built in massage therapist. Wow! I couldn't be as selfless as you, I'm afraid.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2009
2:18 AM

Post #6301702

Lier, lier, pants on fire!
You take good care of DH, and if he were dragging in all tuckered and wore out, you wouldn't have the heart to ask more. You are sooooo busted. =0)
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 22, 2009
2:26 AM

Post #6301729

You're right. I do spoil the big lug. LOL
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 22, 2009
12:18 PM

Post #6302743

LMBO, just getting caught up on the homestead. You all have been very busy. I was raised on goats milk. I dont drink it anymore. SWEET! I do love the cheese. I would love to give it a try but it is in a long line of...I would love to try thats. So I still buy it.
I would love a massage therapist at this point. I put my back out again and sit here all swollen and hurting. May need to take something soon. I cant sleep very long before it just pushes me out of bed. :/
Pics of High Tunnel would be great. Have a good day all!!
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2009
1:01 PM

Post #6302858

Ooo, sorry to hear about the back. Mine went out a few years ago and I happened to stumble on a great book of exercises to strengthen it and haven't had any problems since. I'll see if I can find the title for you.

Check out the high tunnel thread and you'll see more pics than you can stand! LOL I don't kow that we'll get much further today, we're supposed to have high winds again. =0( And I feel a bit like a truck ran over me.

Today we'll probably just make sourdough bread, set the house to order, and finally up-pot some of those hundreds of tomatoes. Sheesh. I didn't mean to plant hundreds, really I didn't, but everyone's doing so well I haven't the heart to pinch any off. LOL
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 22, 2009
1:37 PM

Post #6302957

Thanks Jay! That would be great. I had to have emergency surgery on the back about 6 years ago. (couldnt walk anymore) I guess thats not a good sign. hehehe So I get epi injections every three to four months. I am way over due. :/ I would love to do something so I dont need the injections anymore. I will check out that thread. (high tunnel) Thanks. I know what you mean about the plants. I ended up with way more than I needed as well. Even after dropping a try. oops! I plan to grow them anyway and selling the rest to the garden center my DH works for to resell. ;) Might as well make a little with them. LOL Have a great day!!!
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 22, 2009
2:16 PM

Post #6303067

It's great you have an outlet for your extra plants. If my veggies do as well as I hope, I am going to set a table yp in my front yard and sell some. Didn't think about selling the plants.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2009
3:52 PM

Post #6303378

Ouch! My back trouble was nothing compared to that. I just couldn't stand up after trimming a hoof on my donkey... with one more foot to go. And sleet blowing down my neck. I sure had to be careful bending over for a month or so.

The book is titled "Backache: What Exercises Work" and it's by Dava Sobel and Arthur C. Klein. It has both stretching and strengthening exercises, very low impact and very good. My partner has recommended it to a lot of her massage clients and it's helped several of them, even after surgery. Hope it helps you!

AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 22, 2009
4:36 PM

Post #6303530

Gee, another book to add to my growing list of books I need! I spent most of 14 hours in the car Friday, going down to Phoenix (and Chandler, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson, Heber -- what did I skip?) Came back with two new dwarf citrus trees (yeah, for up here, for the greenhouse I haven't built yet, ha ha), and a colossal backache. And I had my nifty little car seat with me, too -- this is a gadget that looks way too small, but is guaranteed to correct the way you sit and eliminate back ache. When I first got it it did seem to help a great deal but I got out of the habit of using it, and backache has returned. I've had a pinched nerve problem off and on for about as long as I can remember -- and Jay, your suggestion of exercise is really the way to go, because when I get myself off my er, okole, and go hiking, the pain goes away.

Meanwhile, the sour milk cheese I make is sort of a stop on the way to the chickens, I just hate to waste food I paid for without giving it a try. I give them the whey which they love. The cheese turns out pretty sour but after a few days in the fridge it is okay for a spread on crackers when I am desperate for something to snack on. Then what's left goes to the chickens!
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 22, 2009
6:09 PM

Post #6303970

Thanks Jay. My doctor says core strength is important so I will pick that up!!!
Chicken cheese??? LOL I love redwine cheese. mmmm great, hungry again. hehehe

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2009
6:21 PM

Post #6304026

there is a high tunnel thread ? where ?
i m so craving cheese right now mmmm
can't wait for our farmers market . A lady has it there. yumo
we finaly finished our GH whew. Got some last little odds and ends to do and i m in business.
I used to live in chandler and Avondale :)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2009
6:29 PM

Post #6304068

Well, it's more a watch me put up my high tunnel thread... lol
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/963785/

And high tunnel stuff shows up from time to time over on the greenhouse forum, too.

Lets see your GH! I'm jealous...

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2009
11:52 PM

Post #6305397

oh Jayryunen there is nothing to be jealous of LOLLL but i m flattered :)
its just a humble little 20' cattle panel hoop house :) nothing fancy .
but i am still having trouble with it . I just can't get the plastic to fit on the end. Hmmm the tape isn't working and then i ran out of tape LOLLL uhg.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2009
12:02 AM

Post #6305446

At least I'd have a place to put all my thriving tomato plants... I was admiring them just a couple of days ago, and then it hit me... I've no place to put them yet! OMG! Got to get my tunnel up pronto...


Now if I lived near you...
LOL

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2009
12:06 AM

Post #6305472

we could be wild and crazy ,with tomato bliss in our eyes :)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2009
12:12 AM

Post #6305492

OoooOOOoooo, tomato bliss. That sound loverly. =0)
Has that been legalized yet?
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 23, 2009
12:50 AM

Post #6305662

Tomato bliss? Is there a recipie? ;)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2009
1:02 AM

Post #6305714

Other than eating supermarket tomatoes and then being exposed to a real, ripe, warm from the vine honest tomato?

Maybe some basil...

=0)

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2009
4:29 PM

Post #6308180

you got it jay !
that is excactly it .
add to it real goat cheese or mozzerella with olive oil drizzle or a pesto
aaahhhhh( salivating )
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2009
7:11 PM

Post #6308899

Oh my, oh my... we may be getting just waaaaay too sensuous for a family forum here...
Must go work on tomato patch, dreaming of lovely, lushous, drippingly juicy plump tomatoes with fresh chevre and basil just clipped from the herb patch...

Drat!! It's crazy windy out there, small dogs and cats flying by. Ugh.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 23, 2009
7:53 PM

Post #6309073

With all the wind, how do you keep any soil in your garden? Was the wind a deciding factor for the high tunnel?
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2009
8:47 PM

Post #6309310

Well, clay doesn't blow much... LOL. Seriously, we are starting to see some dirt drifts on the road into town. When we have as little moisture as we've had, any bare soil starts to move.

The wind was definitely part of the reason. Things growing under row covers do so much better because the wind isn't constantly sucking moisture from their leaves and the soil. Hail is another reason; where we are, in the foothills of the mountains, we are as likely to get hail as rain in the summer and you know what that can do to a gardener's day...

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2009
11:15 PM

Post #6309909

ouch hail
we were in AZ for several years and had the sand storms , them are not fun to get caught in driving !
LOL on the tomatos and being sensous LOL (giggling and blushing )
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 23, 2009
11:23 PM

Post #6309946

Peel me a tomahto...
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 24, 2009
2:27 AM

Post #6310807

Peel me like a grape an lemme get outta here.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 24, 2009
2:30 AM

Post #6310822

{snort} =0D

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 24, 2009
12:47 PM

Post #6312058

blushing Tee hee
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 24, 2009
1:22 PM

Post #6312213

It's going to be a busy day today, chores and then off over the mountains to deliver some goat milk to a friend of mine who has pancreatic cancer. Doing some chores over there. Then back home to bake ground goat meatballs for another friend undergoing radiation treatment and beginning to feel very low energy. Trying to keep her strength up. The nice thing about these meatballs is you can heat one up at a time in a little sauce and have it on a bit of pasta... a smallish meal for someone who's appetite may be dropping off.

It's not supposed to be so windy today, that'll be nice for the driving. =0)
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 24, 2009
5:44 PM

Post #6313413

What a wonderful way to spend your time Jay. Helping others. :)
Have a wonderfully busy day and be Blessed.
I am at school being grumpy. :{ Now I feel a bunch better after checking in with you all. It always makes me cheery to read about your days.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 25, 2009
11:38 AM

Post #6316472

It seems like all we hear about anymore is people who are fighting battles with cancer. A good friend of ours passed away yesterday after a long battle with cancer that started in his prostate and ended up in his brain and a few other places as well. He was a good man. He pastored a church until his health got to bad. I know he is pain free and enjoying his rewards now but the earth will be a sadder place without him.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2009
3:37 PM

Post #6317388

Well, I think mostly it's 'cause we're all getting older, not running with the 20 somethings anymore. We're getting to the age (50+) where the degenerative diseases start to take their toll, rather than mishap and misfortune.

A hundred years ago the average lifespan was much shorter than it is now, and many, many children died in infancy, women died in childbirth, and men died in wagon wrecks. Heart disease was rampant because of poor childhood nutrition. Tuberculosis, cholera, dysentary, sepsis, VD... and folks also died from cancer.

Life is a delicate precarious proposition and I think in our vigor we forget that the causes of life are few and the causes of death manifold. It's so easy to forget as we rush from one project to the next, as we try to meet deadlines, make paychecks, obtain wealth, reputation and ease, create our vision of our life, that it's fleeting and tenuous. We often take life as a given, when really it's a gift.

I hope everyone will take the time to appreciate their life and the life around them today. Just as it is, nothing added, it's a wonder.

Blessings,
Jay

CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 25, 2009
9:12 PM

Post #6319034

Too often we don't take time to enjoy our blessings. One of the things I like best about living here is the slower pace of life. It's a nice change from how we have lived for years.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2009
9:58 PM

Post #6319258

my Dh aunt just died two days ago of cancer. Took her fast . But she wasn't one who went to dr's. So she could have had it undetected for years. But in Dec she was diagnosed and March she died. :(
i always try and " be in the moment " i think people forget how to do that ? . IMHO :)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2009
2:58 PM

Post #6322237

I've found that working with large livestock tends to help with that. Nothing like spacing out to cause general mayhem to ensure. =0)

We've got a storm front moving in, with 3-6" of snow predicted, depending on who you listen to. It's certainly clouded up since we got up. Here's crossing our fingers and toes. =0) I'm thinking, if we do get snow, of going out and turning it under in my pea patch, as Susan from Roswell said they used to do 'in the old days'. Of course, I'll be using a turning fork rather than a plow. LOL

I'm making another batch of chevre this morning. The first batch went fast! =od We have to fire the wood stove up and heat the house up to around 70* to get it warm enough for the culture to work within a day... much warmer than we usually keep the house.

What's everybody else up to these days?
Jay
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 26, 2009
3:33 PM

Post #6322416

I actually got all my dishes washed at one time. That is quite a happening here in my little world. LOL I have clothes washing now. It has been raining for 2 days so nothing much going on outside. DH is going to a funeral this afternoon. Guess I'll just keep trying to catch up on the house work. It is 60 degrees here today. I need to pot up my blueberry sprouts. Got the broccoli potted up. Still waiting for the red and yellow wonder strawberries to sprout. Might get to read a bit if I'm lucky.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 26, 2009
8:52 PM

Post #6323640

Jay,
Did you get your hoped for snow and get it plowed under?
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2009
8:54 PM

Post #6323647

No, so far just {{sigh}} sunny and windy. still. forever.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 26, 2009
8:55 PM

Post #6323651

Sorry. I know you guys could use the moisture.
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 26, 2009
10:14 PM

Post #6323978

It is 3 oclock, I'm watching the sky, a little anxiously. My kids (dear son = DS?), DDIL (dear daughterinlaw), two pretty teenaged granddaughters, and the HD fullback boyfriend of one of them) are on their way back from a ski trip to Breckenridge CO. Heard on the radio that flights at Denver airport have been cancelled. They called me at noon from Farmington NM, said all was okay, they had big fun, and it was snowing so they were driving slow. The sky here is unbelievable right now, never seen anything like it -- from straight East to straight West of me, there's a humongous PINK cloud on its way and almost here. We are in for something Big and Bad.
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 26, 2009
10:47 PM

Post #6324140


3:45. Logged off and shut down the 'puter, not knowing what to expect from the pink cloud. turned out to be SNOW, but the regular white kind, although the cloud we are now in is still pink. This is a major snowstorm, blowing horizontally. The kids should be at Holbrook by now, an easy hour drive to their house in Heber. Meanwhile, I have no desire to bundle up and go outside and throw blankets over my plum, cherry, and apricot trees/bushes. Brrrr. They will just have to get along!
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2009
10:55 PM

Post #6324170

Hope springs eternal... maybe it'll make it all the way here! It's been snowish on the mountain much of the day but nada here so far.

Should I bring in firewood or would that jinx it... oh, dither, dither. =0)

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2009
11:11 PM

Post #6324263

Hey did someone here give me a link on a yahoo mini greenhouse on a raised bed ?
i can't find the link anywhere :(
i was looking at pvc pipe and only found 1/2 inch and Dh says it won't bend the way i think it will over the beds with out a fitter. ?
hmmm mystery ?
thanks for any help
sue
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2009
11:26 PM

Post #6324311

How wide are your beds?

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2009
11:34 PM

Post #6324340

maybe 3' ? hope to plant two rows of plants in the bed
i thought i book marked the link but i guess i didn't ? uhg age is creeping up and doing not nice things to my head "ack"
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2009
11:46 PM

Post #6324395

I'm sorry, I can't help you with the link. =0(

You shouldn't have any problem bending 1/2" PVC over that... how long are the pieces of PVC?

The article I'm looking at in Countryside is using 8'-10' 1/2" PVC buried at least a foot on a 4' wide bed. On a 3' wide bed, they probably won't need to be 10', but once you cut one you can't go back, so try it first and decide.

The article cautions that taller than 3' will catch the wind more.

How tall are the plants you are planning on planting?

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 26, 2009
11:58 PM

Post #6324428

well i m so embarresed LOL
i showed my Dh your pic above ... welll he said to me " that isn't pvc honey that is poly pipe " woops my bad :( LOL
sheesh i m such a girl !!
i did scout Utube and found some neat things but no the one i was looking for .
Thanks Jayryunen :) i better get in that RIF program LOL Reading is Fundamental !
i was going to do the mini greenhouse on the beds for lettuce and beets just to get them started in April oh and carrots and radishes.
Nothing to tall
yeah we do have nasty winds but nothing like yours . i did live in Wyoming for a spring and yikes that was windy !
thanks again
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2009
12:10 AM

Post #6324489

Yes, my bed has poly pipe (scrounged), but PVC might work as well... the only thing is the 3' width, rather than 4'. =0) The instructions I have are for 4' wide beds. I went out to try, but my PVC is 3/4 and that's too heavy. I'd just take one of the lengths you have and, laying it flat, see if you can bend an arch on the ground (like a C) that is the width of your bed. Make sure the pipe is warm... plastic bends better when it's warm, so a sunny day is best. =0) You won't have to make it too tall for those crops, either. If Mr. Smug is willing to help, you can figure out how long each piece needs to be without much hassle.

Some folks bury the PVC and some folks (like me) hammer 18" lengths of rebar 1' into the ground and slip the PVC over it. If you're going to bury it, remember to add that amount to your length... 2' if you're going to bury each end 1'.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2009
12:27 AM

Post #6324550

Ok good to know
I think we will try the poly pipe.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2009
1:25 PM

Post #6326458

WOOOOOO--HOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!

Snow, glorious snow!!!! YEEEE--HAAAAAW We got about 6" last night and we might get more today. Lawdie, it's loverly out there. =0) 16* and snow.

It's a snow day {singing} we get to make snow angels {skipping} la-la-la-la =0)

The chevre turned out great again, so I froze half and we'll be noshing on it for some time... got some wonderful herb blends for trying in it. Saw some strawberries being sold by the roadside, so I'll plot what to do with a case of them. We've got plenty of jam, so not that. =0) And just catching up on reading.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 27, 2009
1:36 PM

Post #6326497

Thank the Lord for your moisture. Will you be plowing today?

How many times can you make cheese with the kit you bought?

My Mom mashes strawberries and puts them in the freezer without adding anything to them. That way she can use them for different things. You could slice and dry them for adding to cereal, trail mix and such. I only have a small dehydrator but I love having one.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2009
2:17 PM

Post #6326709

I think snow turning will happen tomorrow, when the sun comes out. It's still below freezing out there. We'll see... after this moves through, it's supposed to be WINDY for a week... now the plowing under really makes sense, because so often the wind just takes away whatever moisture we get.

We have a dehydrator, too, (and we love ours as well) and figured we'd dry some, freeze some, and make some new dishes with some. =0) I've been looking in my old Joy of Cooking at the original gelatine desserts that get whipped cream (instead of fake whipped topping) folded in and licking my lips... =od , wondering if I can find fresh rhubarb...

The kit will make 5 batches of chevre, and there's also another kind of culture, Fresh, that can be cultured in sterile milk and frozen in ice cube trays for many, many batches. I haven't tried that one yet; I've got to call them and find out if the way they recommend for sterilizing the milk will work at my altitude.
AZgrammie
North of Heber, AZ
(Zone 6b)

March 27, 2009
3:32 PM

Post #6327134

I'm surprised we got the snow before you did, Jay, I figured the same Pink Wall of snow that hit here would be getting to your place about the same time, coming from Colorado. Denver airport was closed, and I-40 was closed both directions from Flagstaff. My kids got in just as the storm hit here -- said they brought it with them! Today it is bright and clear and sunny. Snow is all melted away. It was about 20 here during the night and will be 17 tonight. So far greenhouse is doing fine, was down to about 38 when I went out at 6:30. My little citrus trees are okay, so are the geraniums and tomato plants. I'm afraid to look at the outside fruit trees.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2009
3:45 PM

Post #6327205

AZ, great to hear your GH plants are fine! I've been thinking about trying a dwarf peach in mine when it gets to its permanent location. It's a rare year frost doesn't get the outdoor peaches around here. =0) And I do so love a juicy, ripe peach.

I think the weather usually comes down from the NW kind of diagonally, so that you and Denver got it first doesn't really surprise me. It's still lightly snowing here. =0) Thanks for not hogging it all. LOL I'll try and get some pics to post...
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2009
4:40 PM

Post #6327467

Here you go... proof that we can get snow! Here's me and my goofy dog River measuring... officially 6". =0)

Thumbnail by Jayryunen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 27, 2009
11:09 PM

Post #6328927

My dehydrator is small and round. I bought it years ago at a Big Lots store for $14. It takes quite a while to work and it doesn't dry evenly. I just go through the trays every few hours and take out what's done, condense down what's left and take the trays out as they empty. Whenever we are planning a road trip I dry up some fruit and make my own trail mix for the drive. I do the same thing for trail riding. Last year I dried some tomatoes. They taste good to snack on.

That was a good snow. I hope the wind doesn't blow it all away before you can get it turned under. Your dog is really pretty. I love those dark brindle pits. My DB had a huge pit bull named Dude who was that dark brindle and white.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2009
11:42 PM

Post #6329022

We've got an excalibur dehydrator and we're glad we spent the dough on it. We're both kind of absent-minded, so babysitting a dehydrator would just have been a no-go. We've used it for summer squash, bell peppers, jalapenos, apples, green beans, celery and sweet corn. We did do one batch of tomatoes, but decided it took too much energy... we had to run it 2 days to get them as dry as we wanted... and don't do that anymore. We're not big on dried tomatoes anyway. We'll probably do a load of strawberries next. =0)

We got the snow turned under in the pea patch, so we'll see how that goes. It'll certainly get the moisture down deeper.

Pits can be such big, goomie dogs and mine's probably half lab on top of that, so she's incredibly silly sometimes. She'd been snowplowing with her nose right before that picture, just running around the yard with her nose in the snow. =0) I saw her in with the donkeys one day, nibbling around the coronary band of one while it ate hay. The yummy crusties from stepping in the pee hole... blech. But they both seemed to be fine with it. LOL Animals... wierder than we know. And no, we don't allow face licking in our house! LOL
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 28, 2009
12:02 AM

Post #6329090

Yow, ain't it the truth! I know where dem tongues have been. GUHROSE!!!!!!

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2009
1:07 AM

Post #6329331

LOL i think the dog loves to eat snow . :) cute
wow snow ! really ? congrats . Here in OH we are praying for no snow LOL . Glad you got some to help wit moisture. Sounds like you need it.
i love watching the Dog Whisperer . He has a pit named Daddy and its such a love of a dog ! i wan't to smooch him through my tv ! LOL
He does wonders with pits who have been used for fighting and makes them pussy cats !
rain here on our farm.
kids are still sick
I got an excallibur and am looking forward to using it this year. I was so busy canning last year i forgot to use it ? LOL sheesh
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2009
1:08 AM

Post #6329334

I don't know how folks get so romantical about the 'secret life' of dogs... eating manure, rolling in dead things, rejoicing in being skunked... I love my dogs, but I ain't kissin' 'em on the lips!

LOL
Jay
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2009
1:10 AM

Post #6329342

We use ours for making yogurt, too. =0)

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2009
1:28 AM

Post #6329431

Im not a fan of drooling that is my big " EEEWWWW " even when my kids drooled as babys i just grossed out LOL
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2009
1:32 AM

Post #6329455

Excuuuuuuuse me! My dogs don't drool!
They slobber.
So there.
LOL

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2009
1:42 AM

Post #6329498

LOL :)
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 28, 2009
2:09 AM

Post #6329629

My BC has long hair and when he leaves the water bowl he has a very wet chin and he ALWAYS wants to put it on me! GRRRR But I love the old guy. We've been through a lot together and he has always been there for me. What's a little water between friends? LOL

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2009
12:43 PM

Post #6330754

I think the one thing that is my most grossest is when they bring you a slobber, drool ,soaked tennis ball and drop it in your lap ! "UGH' that is my grosser than gross IMHO :) I used to wear a glove when i played ball with our dog LOl i m such a sissy.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2009
2:17 PM

Post #6331027

I had a lab/retriever cross that loved to run up to me after swimming and shake the water out all over me. He did this quite deliberately, as I had trained him to shake his body on command and for a while I could get him to shake off where he got out of the water, away from me. But then he discovered how much fun it was to get me all wet and listen to me squeal.. it clearly gave him great delight. And only me... he'd run by others to get to me. Brat-child. LOL

He was a bit of a joker. =0) The truly best dog in my life (I've had several), until this one, another cut-up and extremely intelligent. Now much help, but she keeps me laughing with her antics. =0)

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2009
5:51 PM

Post #6331867

always good to have a funny dog around. :)
we have no animals at the moment , not even a fish :( just trying to get things paid off and then a pup later.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2009
6:18 PM

Post #6331955

Yeah, taking good care of animals does take money and time. I've certainly had times in my life when I didn't have animals because of the money. It's tough, but I think you've got your priorities straight for sure. =0)

And besides, there're always the wild ones. I love to watch all the birds and wild animals around my place, especially the coyotes, without having to worry about the safety of my livestock.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2009
2:19 AM

Post #6333643

I have lots of animals and most don't pay their way but we really enjoy them. They cost time and money and you have to be willing to make all the adjustments they require or you shouldn't have them. I can't ever see us being without animals.
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 29, 2009
12:50 PM

Post #6334711

Okay, backing up to the dehydrator for foods. Is that what you use to make beef jerky? And wow I did not know so many foods taste good dehydrated. Do you just eat them that way or do you put them in stuff as an ingreidiant?? I do LUV trail mix. mmm mmm good!
Yes, I have come to realize that my chickens and other animals are time consuming and costly but it is something that I am willing to do at the time. Anyone who waits and plans is smart. So many rush in on a whim and end up in deep doo doo. Well, the animals usually. Taynors, you are smart.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2009
1:19 PM

Post #6334808

You are wise and you have self control, 2 things that all too often don't come in the same package. LOL

I just dried a few veggies for the first time last year so I don't know a lot about it but I want to do more this year. I will be studying up on the subject while my plants are growing.
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 29, 2009
1:35 PM

Post #6334875

Sounds good. I may give it a shot. I do LOVE beef jerky. My whole family would scarf it down on day one though. LOL I also like dried fruit. It will be interesting to learn I think. I may give it a whirl. :D

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2009
2:02 PM

Post #6334985

"Taynors you are smart " can i quote you on that to my DH LOL sewincircle :) yeah my dh is the one with the self control on the animals , i m not that responsible LOL :)
i enjoy caring for animals so much, it never seems like work. I used to work in pet stores back in CA . I would take the sick ones and keep them well... steal them more like it. When i saw the owner place them in the back left to die ,,, i would take them and tell him it died and i threw it away LOL most times they only needed a little love an tlc . :) i know im bad.
dehydrators are great !!!! you will love it
when you can do your own tomatos ! and bananas yumo i had one many years ago. I have the new excalibur and having't used it yet but will this year
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 29, 2009
5:28 PM

Post #6335794

Is that what you need to make jerky? Thats what I would do a lot of. hehehe
Yes, quote me!!! Even if its an impossed smart moment. We all need those who keep us balanced. LOL

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2009
11:29 PM

Post #6337369

My first dehydrator was an old electric one i got from that guy on tv like 15 years ago . Ronco something ? . I did lots of Jerky ! yumo
the excalibur has more trays and its square . My first one was a round tower.
Oh and the excalibur has a fan ?
I got my smart moment on record LOL i got proof. ! :)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2009
11:36 PM

Post #6337412

Hey sewin...
You can use either a dehydrator or your oven to make jerky. I've not done it, but I've read about it and a friend of mine has told me she used to make jerky all the time in her oven.

I'll bet if you do some web research, you'll find some good instructions and marinades. Try Backwoods Home mag, they're handy with stuff like that. Heck, you'll probably find out how to make jerky on willow sticks over a bed of coals... the REAL old fashioned way. LOL
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 29, 2009
11:58 PM

Post #6337525

WOW! I will do some searching!! My family thinks jerky is a food group. hehehe I would love to stun them with homemade jerky. Other than me on a bad day. :0 as long as I dont have to walk on the hot coals I will be fine. LOL Thanks!!! I am on it. I would like to try your dried tomatoes too among other things.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:02 AM

Post #6337543

Then if you want to go to the other extreme, check out Cabela's for deli slicers, marinades, commercial dehydrators, smokers, vacuum sealers... maximum tech jerky. Oh, and sausage making, too. =0)

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:02 AM

Post #6337546

Jayryunen how is the garlic coming along ? in your beds. :) i should do garlic this fall ?

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:03 AM

Post #6337556

jay your an enabler !!! your gonna get em trouble if they go to that site LOLLLL
you mean jerky isn't a food group ? huh ?
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
12:04 AM

Post #6337561

Is your snow gone? I really did not know Newmexico got snow.
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
12:05 AM

Post #6337564

I know Taynors...the teachers say NO! Go figure. Something about the pyramid.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:13 AM

Post #6337601

Hey Taynors, I resemble that remark! LOL
The garlic (I almost typed jerky) is doing well; it even did just fine in the 6" of snow we got, which is already gone. OF COURSE YOU SHOULD PLANT GARLIC! That's a major food group you silly. =0)

Oooh yes, where I am we get snow. There are even some good ski resorts in NM. Here's our March snow storm from 2005.

Thumbnail by Jayryunen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:16 AM

Post #6337625

I hope you'll post your findings and pictures of how you do it, sewin. I think that'd be very interesting.

That whole food pyramid thing is from the FDA, which we all know is under the control of the evangelical militant fundamentalist health freaks. You know the ones... they don't live any longer, it just SEEMS like it.

LOL
Jay

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:17 AM

Post #6337626

Sew i think we need to make our own food pyramid ! what the heck does governement know any how ? LOL
Jay you poor thang ! is the dog helping ? or just supervising ?
great news on the garlic surviving the snow !
hmmm ok garlic it is
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
12:21 AM

Post #6337646

WOW!!! WHo knew!! That is a bunch of snow. You must be near mountains! Good greif. My DS lived in white sands for about a year. She never mentioned snow.
I am all about rewriting the pyramid! And why a pyramid??? Why not a rhombus or an octagon. Lets break all the rules. Jerky AND garlic ar on top though. Sound good???
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:26 AM

Post #6337677

That's my partner running the shovel and her dog is waiting impatiently for her to get to the official pee spot. She's a very particular dog... LOL The dogs put off going outside for as long as possible...

We got 3' of snow in 36 hours. It was remarkable for March. The old timers say it used to snow like that in the winter up here. Now we usually get 2 or 3 one foot snows during the winter--along with several small snows-- with a nice sunny gap in between so it mostly melts off. But this year that foot turned into 6" and 2 snows with one small snow. So our March storm was very much needed and it's already all gone.

OK, so far we've got chevre, jerky, garlic in the pyramid...
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:29 AM

Post #6337689

Well, snow doesn't fall very often in White Sands, but up above White Sands is Blanca Peak, which gets quite a bit of snow, and there's a ski resort in Ruidoso... maybe she's keeping it secret?
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
12:31 AM

Post #6337706

That is indeed a lot of snow. I thought the dog looked eger to go!!!
Where should cheese curds go???
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
12:33 AM

Post #6337712

Is it like "What happens in Whitesands stays in Whitesands"? LOL
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:34 AM

Post #6337721

Well, I prefer them in my mouth... let's see, a little of the garlic would be nice mixed in. Hmmm... bread. Bread of the non-supermarket variety should be part of the decagon...
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
12:37 AM

Post #6337732

Decagon!! Genius!!! I agree. Bread of the non super market variety- in!
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:41 AM

Post #6337762

Tomatoes...
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
12:42 AM

Post #6337769

Of the dried variety or salsa?

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:43 AM

Post #6337770

Im weaning my family off the Wonder Bread slowly. I grew up with homemade bread and i just can't stomache the grocery store stuff yuckooooo . I know i married a man who eats the stuff so i can't complain to much. LOL
Jerky
chevere
cheese curds
garlic
red wine (homemade)
homemade bread
olives ?
then what else ?
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:54 AM

Post #6337839

Any and all tomatoes... including salsa, ketchup, pizza sauce and juice.

chevre and cheese curds might be considered the same... chevre being a sort of cheese curd. I think the bread doesn't necessarily have to be homemade, just not sponge bread. We have some wonderful artisan bread makers these days and sometimes it's nice to have some of that. =0)

Red wine... can we expand that to include all home-brewed spirits... beer, liqueurs, wines... there's a local winery that makes an absolutely divine peach wine and an apple wine to die for, all from local fruit.

Chocolate...
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
12:55 AM

Post #6337841

I am thinking we need a catagorie for salsa and olives (black or green)?
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
12:56 AM

Post #6337847

Consider it expanded and YES CHOCOLATE
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
12:57 AM

Post #6337853

Condiments?
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
12:58 AM

Post #6337859

Well, we have salsa, ketchup, what about mustard, and relish. I make a mean sweet pickle relish! Oh ya and corn relish.
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
1:25 AM

Post #6337985

Where would jams and jellies go?
sewincircle
Elbridge, NY
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2009
1:36 AM

Post #6338057

hmmm...good question. Would they be condiments?

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
5:35 PM

Post #6340735

LOL
yes maybe we should color catagorize this pyramid LOL red, yellow and green. :)
yeah i think we can add all brewed liquids
this year i want to make my own juice with a pressure steamer can't recall the name of it but there is a thread somwhere on DG
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
6:06 PM

Post #6340840

Let me know how that goes... I've been curious about them. =0)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
6:24 PM

Post #6340906

The steamer you are talking about is a Mehu Liisa. JustMeLisa (a long-time member here) uses one and loves it. I'm sure there are others...
http://www.kitchenfantasy.com/shopping_cart/juicesteamer.html
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 30, 2009
6:43 PM

Post #6340992

Darius,
What is the difference between apple juice and apple cider. Not hard cider. Is there any difference?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 30, 2009
7:22 PM

Post #6341142

I suppose the biggest difference is pasteurization. Real cider is just fresh apple juice (and sometimes cherry juice) not pasteurized, and in fact can ferment to make "hard cider" which is alcoholic. However, the difference at home is non-existent EXCEPT when you can the juice, thus pasteurizing.

I would think a steam juicer would naturally pasteurize the juice. Cider is usually pressed from raw apples.

My step-mother's father used to throw old apples in a barrel (wood) and add water about the time it gets cold. The apples would ferment and freeze, then he'd scoop the hard cider out that floated to the top.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 31, 2009
1:50 AM

Post #6342855

I guess that is why cider always seems so light and crisp compared to apple juice. Is there a difference in getting the taste via pressing as opposed to "juicing" as in a grinding juicer? Would it change the juice from the clear, crisp cider consistency to the off the shelf heavy juice?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2009
1:55 AM

Post #6342884

I've never made cider, but I read they typically they use early apples which have a crisper and more tart taste. I imagine pressing gives a more clear liquid that any kind of grinding, but I don't know for certain.
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 31, 2009
1:58 AM

Post #6342901

I would think Jonagold would make tasty cider. Granny Smith used to be my favorite until DH bought a bag of Jonagolds last year. They are delicious. Crisp and tart with a touch of sweetness.

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2009
12:49 PM

Post #6344327

BIG THANK YOU darius ! and a big ((())))
I didn't add the extra i in Liisa i guess that is why nothing on google showed up for me ?
We have an apple orchard a mile down the road from us. he does honey , cider and lots of apples ! of all kinds i think he has over 10 varietys .
he has an old press for his cider. It goes fast in the fall. He has a wonderful early apple i just love ! can't recall the name at the moment
but it will come to me.
just a FYI on cider . Easy does it . Can give a gastro intestinal difficulties If you catch my drift :)
Cajun i think the reason for the heavy juice is due to sugar content. I know the juice i get from the orchard here and the ones at the health food store are much nicer . Like you say a much crisper flavor and textrue
later
sue
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2009
2:02 PM

Post #6344632

Some folks say that the word cider traditionally means hard cider... I guess things are changing so that now there's soft cider (unpastueurized juice) and hard cider. And then there's that stuff in the store... sort of like the sponge bread of the cider world. LOL
I've read the best ciders are blended from several varieties of apples. There's a wonderful festival in Massachussets that I'd just love to go to. They have cider tastings, orchard tours, workshops... two days of cider indulgence. I think it sounds like such grand fun...

http://www.ciderday.org/about.html
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2009
2:12 PM

Post #6344674

I can't believe it's already the end of the month, there's still so much to get done before planting on Tax Day. Not to mention taxes... =0( Yesterday was absolutely awful outside, all day the wind just rubbed and bumped against the house, bitter cold from the north. Brrrrrr. I finished repotting everything and I have officially run out of room on my rack... I'll have to go into town today and buy more lights to hang from the bottom and put flats on the floor. Once again I planted waaaay too much and I haven't the heart to pick out only the few I need and let the other ones die. So it looks like a trip to the flea market for my next month.

The lettuce and other greens in the cold frame are looking good. We should be able to start thinning for salads soon. The garlic is coming along slowly, the daffodils got taken out by the snow and cold... again. =0( The pansies are flowering... who knew a pansy is tougher than a daffodil?

Have a good one today...
Jay

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2009
9:38 PM

Post #6346556

Jay what is a good way to start salad greens. I put some seeds in a cell tray pack ? hmmm usualy i do them in small round containers then transplant in garden . I was experimenting again.
still need manure for my beds
still need a door for the GH
still need to move the trailer
still need to find chard seeds . Funny i thought the local Wally would have some ? or lowes ? nothing ?
pansys tougher than a daff ? huh who 'd of thunk on that one LOL
yukky weather today
cold and windy
might rain tomorrow :(
have a great night
sue
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2009
9:54 PM

Post #6346616

I start my seeds in a cell pack tray and it works fine. At night I've been covering the greens with some light weight row cover inside the cold frame and then put a quilt over the cold frame. We've gotten down to 8* and no damage. =0)

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2009
9:56 PM

Post #6346627

sweeeeeet :)
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2009
10:02 PM

Post #6346672

You want the rest of my chard seeds? They're old, but they're still sprouting. I'll mail 'em to you if you want them... Fordhook Giant and Rhubarb. D-mail me if you want them. =0)

I've had trouble getting a chard seedling I'm happy with; mine get all leggy when I start them indoors. Have you had any better luck?

taynors

taynors
Urbana, OH
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2009
10:11 PM

Post #6346717

No mine are leggy too
I think mine did better when i did them in the GH .
the greens i m doing are chinese varietys and a european salad mix , and a Red Rossa its a loose leaf ?
i have never done chard so this is my first time .
i will dmail you :) thank you
I had good luck with my salad varietys before , then the following year in a new garden i dug didn't go so well very biter !!! even the rabbits didn't like it LOL
so i hope i get it right this time ?
how far are the lights from your seedlings ? i still think mine are to far away ? they could be 2 " closer but i don't have anymore wood to prop them up with LOL i do redneck style LOL
my outlet in the basement is on the blink so i dragged them upstairs and they are in my bedroom LOLLLL

i
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2009
10:48 PM

Post #6346881

I scrounged some blue insulation board from a construction site to get mine close to the lights... 1". So I don't think that's the problem. Oh well, they were leggy last year and I just planted them deep and they did fine. I guess it's a chard thing. LOL
Jayryunen
Sapello, NM
(Zone 5b)

April 1, 2009
2:10 PM

Post #6349291

Here's April's thread...

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/969887/

Join us there!
=0) Jay

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Homesteading Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Share your homesteading experiences and dreams. PeggieK 246 Jul 4, 2012 8:18 PM
Ways to "Live off the land", share your ideas PeggieK 149 Mar 25, 2010 10:10 AM
Looking for possible partners in a homestead darius 71 Mar 24, 2012 3:49 PM
Explain makshi 49 Aug 6, 2008 2:36 PM
Ducks vs. Chickens nivlac 85 Apr 23, 2013 6:45 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America