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Tomatoes: Tomato Cuttings

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rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 8, 2009
7:38 PM

Post #6238505

I added a pack of Burpee's Sweet 'Seedless' tomatoes packs to my order and received them yesterday, Weee I got 11 instead of 10.
Well the question..
Can I take a cutting off one of these tomatoes plants and , maybe keep it in the GH for next year ?
If so must the cutting be from the main stem or can it be one of the Leaf stems ?
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 8, 2009
10:32 PM

Post #6239341

Yes, you can get additional plants from a tomato plant. You cut off the suckers and stick them in a pot. They root very easily. I've done that several times, but I don't have a greenhouse so I don't know anything about overwintering them in there, but it should work I would think. Rooting suckers is also a good way to get a second batch of tomato plants going without starting from seed again.

Here's a good article on cutting and rooting suckers:
http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/trebor57.html

Some people cut all suckers from their plants. I've been told that suckers won't produce fruit on the plant, but they will.

Karen



rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2009
12:05 AM

Post #6239780

Thanks for the reply Karen, I have a leaf in a pot, from a plant I over wintered, but it is looking a little yellow.
I will try one of the suckers.
tarheel2az
Tonto Basin, AZ

March 9, 2009
1:54 AM

Post #6240227

rentman, we keep tomatoes in the GH over the winter every year and have fresh fruit year round. 'Cept this year when wilt wiped us out.

Frank
pdoyle23323
Chesapeake, VA
(Zone 7b)

March 11, 2009
5:18 PM

Post #6251962

So, when you pinch the sucker off, just stick it in potting soil? Can I put multiples in one pot? I guess you would have to do this immediately as they seem to wilt very quickly.
thx
dawn
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2009
6:18 PM

Post #6252204

Dawn I picked (cut) 3 yesterday put a little root hormone on them and into pot they went, I put one to a pot, I will let you know how they do.

This message was edited Mar 11, 2009 4:59 PM
pdoyle23323
Chesapeake, VA
(Zone 7b)

March 11, 2009
7:57 PM

Post #6252575

Thanks rentman.
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2009
9:04 PM

Post #6252843

The three on the left are from the 9th---two on the right planted today.
That's Spinach behind.
These are all suckers. The leaf cutting I planted a week ago is turning yellow.
They are from a cherry tom that I cut the top off last fall and kept in the GH.

Thumbnail by rentman
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pdoyle23323
Chesapeake, VA
(Zone 7b)

March 12, 2009
12:51 AM

Post #6253825

Well I'll be, I would have never known. I am going to try that then. Thanks rentman!
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 12, 2009
1:22 AM

Post #6253979

rentman,


Those are looking great! Yippee for you!

Dawn,

You can plant more than one to a pot if the pot is large enough. Last year I planted four of them in one 8" pot until they got roots, then I dumped the whole thing out gently, and separated them to put in the bed. However, rentman's setup in the six-pack trays would take less room. You want at least a couple of inches under the soil.

Karen

rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 15, 2009
4:58 PM

Post #6270722

I took this 'Leaf stem' Mar 8, put root hormone on it and put it in the pot, with mama.
It ain't do nothing, so the suckers, between the main stem and the leaf stem.

Thumbnail by rentman
Click the image for an enlarged view.

glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 15, 2009
5:17 PM

Post #6270811

rentman,

Yes, taking just a leaf cutting won't root as far as I know. You need the suckers.

They are the branches that form inside the "Y" between two branches or between a side branch and the main stem. Look at the photos in the link above, and then look at your own plant. Once you spot one of them, you'll know right off what to look for.

Once you get new plants going from the suckers on this plant, you can cut the suckers off your new plants and make more plants. At the end of the season you can carry some over winter like you did this year, and be ready to go as soon as the weather is warm.

This is a good way to grow determinate tomatoes all season. I did it last year, but didn't think of it soon enough. This year I will do it right away. I like the determine varieties because they produce enough tomatoes at a time to can for stewed tomatoes and tomato sauce for chili and spaghetti as well as eating fresh.

Karen

rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 15, 2009
6:05 PM

Post #6271023

Karen we are on the same page with that. I just took the long way around.
Now if I can just remember this in a couple of months. :-)
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 16, 2009
5:03 AM

Post #6273901

rentman,

Last year I planted a determinate variety in error. I thought it was indeterminate. However, I loved the taste of that variety, and my daughter, who won't eat a fresh tomato -- go figure, loved having a lot of them at a time to make chili sauce and spaghetti sauce for canning.

By the time I thought of starting the suckers, it was late in the season. I ended up with a couple of great plants with many green ones. All was not lost, though. My daughter canned the green tomatoes up as sweet relish for me -- 12 pints. The relish is wonderful.

This year, though, I am going to get the same variety going and then root the suckers as soon as I have some and keep on doing it so I have a big supply all summer for eating (me) and for canning (my daughter). Can't beat that.

The photo looks as if your suckers are doing well. Good luck on them.

Karen


cottonpicker
Audubon, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 16, 2009
10:12 AM

Post #6274200

glendalekid... What was the name of the variety you liked so well???
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 16, 2009
1:39 PM

Post #6274675

cottonpicker,

Celebrity -- but I seem to be a minority of one here on DG.

It was a great producer, and I loved the taste as did the people I gave some to. No disease problems, no BER, no bug problems.

Karen

cottonpicker
Audubon, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 16, 2009
1:52 PM

Post #6274731

hey, Karen... whatever works!!

Thank you for answering.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

March 16, 2009
4:05 PM

Post #6275346

I have grown Celebrity for years and love it-
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 16, 2009
4:52 PM

Post #6275610

I also will try Celebrity this year.
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 16, 2009
5:54 PM

Post #6275940

Jo,

Yea, there's two of us!! When I've mentioned Celebrity in other threads, I've gotten 100% negs on it.

I loved it. The taste was wonderful. To me it was just like the tomatoes from the Hunt's fields 40 years ago. I wish now that I knew what variety they grew. They were grown for taste and it did not matter if they survived the automatic pickers totally intact or if some of them got "poked" since they were going to be canned or turned into sauce anyway.

rentman,

It is a hybrid. I bought my plants last year at the local Farmers Co-op for about $3.69 a nine-pack. You can buy one pack and then just keep renewing them via cuttings. Since you have a GH you can even overwinter some and start again in the spring.

Karen

JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

March 16, 2009
6:15 PM

Post #6276028

One thing I really like about Celebrity is that there are very few seeds in them, and not a lot of the gelatin where seeds are. And the size and shape are very consistent.
twiggybuds
Moss Point, MS
(Zone 8b)

March 16, 2009
6:36 PM

Post #6276105

I grew Celebrity for years beginning back in 1986 I think. I chose it for its' advertised disease resistance. They were far better than those at the grocery and I mostly canned them. I always planted lots extra since I thought BER was a fact of life. They were dependable and make a good tasting sauce. The plants get ugly but keep going when it gets hot. They have an acidic taste that suits me but I get the impression that most folks here prefer "sweet" types.

That was before DG when I thought heirloom meant quilts or things I keep in the China cabinet. This year I'm trying a bunch of different determinate "canners". I'm also trying some of the "stars" of the tomato world to find out what all the fuss is about. Right now they're all equal...green, beautiful and full of potential.
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 17, 2009
5:31 PM

Post #6280780

twiggy,

Yea, now there's three of us!!

I thought the taste was very sweet compared to other varieties I've tried. In fact, on other threads when I said I liked them, most of the others said they didn't because they weren't acid enough, too sweet.

On nine plants last year I got BER on maybe three of the earliest tomatoes. I figure that's really close to none. On Big Boy the year before I had practically no fruit without BER. The hot weather did not bother Celebrity a bit here either. The plants did get much larger than I thought determinates would, so I ended up having to stake them. I got tomato worms and corn worms on the heirlooms last year, but not a one on Celebrity. The heirlooms last year did not like the hot weather, produced very little, and got BER as well.

For eating, canning, and giving away, I am sold on Celebrity.

Karen

twiggybuds
Moss Point, MS
(Zone 8b)

March 17, 2009
7:22 PM

Post #6281287

Karen I'm getting the impression that taste is very much dependent on soil and/or amendments. I added leaves, grass clippings, all the crop residue and the treasure from the chicken pen. I'm sure it had to have made some difference but my soil is almost pure sand, full of nematodes and so acidic that it will quickly turn green on the surface. I had to add lime and fert often to grow anything. If I used the soaker hose often enough to try to maintain steady moisture it leached the nutrients very rapidly. My answer was excessive fert and water, planting many extras and living with the BER.

I managed some good production of a wide range of vegs but I wouldn't want to garden like that now. I've realized that all that commercial fert was probably polluting my ground water and the nearby creek.

Now I garden in pots sitting in a plastic liner with 2" of water. It works like a combination raised bed/earth box. The constantly available water has cured the BER. I only need a little fert in small doses and what leaches out of the pots with the rain gets a second chance as the water is wicked back into the pots. Last year I grew Porter Improved and Rutgers Select with no disease problems. Someday I might try Celebrity again just to see what it can do under ideal conditions. This year my hybrids are all new to me, Sunmaster, Sunbeam and Heartland. I hope they produce at least as well as Celebrity because I want to fill all my jars. I'm also growing a bunch of paste types to try drying them.




JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

March 17, 2009
8:54 PM

Post #6281652

Now I am in trouble- I discovered that I didn't order Celebrity seeds this year, and I just called Totally Tomatoes to see if I could get 1 pack fairly soon- it would be $4.95 shipping, plus $2.95 for the seeds, then it would be slow in coming. Does anyone have a few extra seeds they could put in a 42 cent envelope to send me? Or I could send Paypal money- I don't think the Garden shops will have Celebrity plants- I don't remember seeing any last year-- (begging politely !! :-) ) Thanks- Jo
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 18, 2009
1:09 AM

Post #6282613

Jo,

Wish I could help you, but I buy the plants here, so I don't have any seeds for them. Last year they were at HD, Lowe's, and the Alabama Farmers Co-op. They were from Bonnie Plants which is owned by the Co-op.


twiggy,

I don't seem to have too many bug and disease problems here with the veggies. Thank goodness. I agree that with tomatoes the taste for the same variety does appear to vary from region to region. I thought maybe it was a difference in soil composition, but I don't know. So, I figure everyone has to find what he or she likes and stick with it.


Karen

JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

March 18, 2009
1:28 AM

Post #6282710

Bud, you have Dmail-
pennyrile
Evansville, IN
(Zone 6b)

March 18, 2009
3:43 AM

Post #6283344

Bonnie Plant Farms is owned by Alabama Farm Co-op?
cottonpicker
Audubon, PA
(Zone 6b)

March 18, 2009
11:10 AM

Post #6283927

YES... AFC owns Bonnie Plant Farms.
Bud
Batchelor, LA
(Zone 8b)

March 18, 2009
2:01 PM

Post #6284533

Jo
Your seed are on the way.
Good Luck!
Bud
sandy0225
Muncie, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2009
10:41 PM

Post #6383756

Have you ever tried celebrity bush? they have shorter plants, but from the ones I've planted get just as many tomatoes and they are actually bigger than the celebrity regular plants. FYI>>>>
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 9, 2009
3:36 AM

Post #6384951

I didn't know there were two types of Celebrity. The ones I planted last year got about two feet high and three feet wide. How would I know which type I have?

Karen


sandy0225
Muncie, IN
(Zone 5b)

April 10, 2009
12:22 PM

Post #6390538

Two feet high and three feet wide sounds like celebrity bush. The regular celebs are taller than that.
glendalekid
Tuscaloosa, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 10, 2009
1:57 PM

Post #6390837

I thought that size was typical of a determinate plant, but then I've not grown determinates before. So, I had the bush version. Good to know.

Karen



rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 23, 2009
11:36 PM

Post #6856974

An update on my Burpee's Sweet 'Seedless' tomatoes.
They are seedless, the taste is, good, at least much better than store bought.
My plants, (only got 6 producing), are growing well, they are med. size, 2 1/2"
The skin is tough, but all the tomatoes I grow are. :-) I'm looking for very thin skin one.
I have 3 cuttings, in pots, doing well and I will try and over winter them to see what happens. ???
Has anyone else grown these ?

Thumbnail by rentman
Click the image for an enlarged view.

jenhillphoto

jenhillphoto
Danbury, CT
(Zone 6a)

July 24, 2009
1:18 PM

Post #6858793

That's a nice looking tomato alright. How about adding it to the plant files rentman?
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 24, 2009
1:55 PM

Post #6858937

Hi Jen , I added it but now cannot find it it was added as Burpee's Sweet 'Seedless'
I'm doing something wrong, do you know if there are instruction on how to enter ?
Some days I'm just slow.

jenhillphoto

jenhillphoto
Danbury, CT
(Zone 6a)

July 24, 2009
7:43 PM

Post #6860360

It's there now rentman. It just takes some time for the pf admin to add it. I see it there now.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/180251/

Thanks,
Jen
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

July 24, 2009
8:51 PM

Post #6860591

Thanks Jen

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 25, 2009
11:57 AM

Post #6862773

By the way, there was a thread on tomato cuttings earlier this season and I used the information to make several more plants to give away to friends:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1004194/
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

August 8, 2009
10:56 PM

Post #6923957

I was making Salsa today, some of the tomatoes were the Burpee Seedless, this is a pic of one sliced in half.
They have no seeds but still have the white connector where they should form.
I like my Salsa very meaty with no white core or anything but Red Meat.
So what I'm getting at is I have to remove the white core where the seeds would normally form.
So the work to get a Salsa 'the way I like it' is just as much work as regular tomatoes.
I have a cutting that is 2' high and blooming which will be over wintered in the greenhouse but I will not buy more seed next year.

Thumbnail by rentman
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 11, 2009
1:51 AM

Post #6932618

Do you necessarily have to have a greenhouse to overwinter tomato cuttings? I'm gonna pick up a coupla my favorite heirloom seedlings in a coupla weeks to plant out the 2nd weekend in September. I suspect with our crazy summer weather, we're not going to have much of a winter either. In any case, I'd like to have some rooted cuttings standing in the wings for an earlier spring plantout.

Could I overwinter in a large plastic container with a screw top, as long as it sits in some moderate sunshine during the day? It could easily be moved to a warmer place at the threat of any cold snaps.

LMK. Thanks!
twiggybuds
Moss Point, MS
(Zone 8b)

August 11, 2009
2:33 AM

Post #6932861

By extrapolating my experience last year I think you could get by without a greenhouse but it would be some additional aggravation. I started my first seedlings in a sunny window in the house somewhere around New Years. When they had their first leaves they went out to the unheated greenhouse. I gave them a little food but was really trying more for age than size. Those first ones were 10-12" and went outside 03/03. Smaller ones went out right behind them and they all did well.

I think at the end of the season you could take cuttings and find a cardboard box to cover them with when frost was expected. I'd find a sheltered and sunny place for them and I think they'd make it if it doesn't freeze or frost actually touch them. If they got too big you could just take cuttings from your cuttings. I've done that this summer. If you could make some kind of frame covered in clear plastic and open on the south side, it would probably keep the wind from drying them so fast and be enough protection when your temps don't go lower than the high 30s. Probably save a lot of covering and uncovering too.
Jim41
Delhi, LA

August 15, 2009
6:15 AM

Post #6948475

I use to build an A frame and cover it with 6 mil visqueen and set it over my plants. Let the plastic extend down about six inchs and set a couple of bricks on it to hold it in place. A real warm day, just tilt it over. A real cold night leave some excess on the ends and just tuck it in.

I always liked the taste of Celebrity and raised nothing else for several years. Now the blight in our area kills them as fast as I set them out. Switched to all blight resistent tomatoes. I had four different varieties this year and you couldn't tell one from the other with the exception of Amelia. All were delicious. I think the flavor comes from what you plant them in.
pennyrile
Evansville, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 17, 2009
1:22 PM

Post #6956020

"I had four different varieties this year and you couldn't tell one from the other with the exception of Amelia. All were delicious. I think the flavor comes from what you plant them in." [Jim]

Which four varieties did you plant? What made Amelia stand out from the others?
Jim41
Delhi, LA

August 17, 2009
4:55 PM

Post #6956975

I planted 640, 589, 444 and Amelia. Amelia was the first tomatoes I planted about March 15. They were still bearing when the others quit. The tomatoes maintained a larger size in the top crop than the rest. None out produced them. The other three varities did ok and had a good taste but there was just better flavor to the Amelias. Of the four I liked the 640's the least and will not plant them next year. The 444s I have planted for several years. They were the first blight resistent tomatoe that came out. They make a great bottom and mid crop but forget a top crop.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 17, 2009
5:19 PM

Post #6957051

Jim41,
Please explain "bottom-, mid-, and top-crop." Thanks

Is this the same as "early-, mid -, and late-season?"
pennyrile
Evansville, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 17, 2009
9:35 PM

Post #6958015

Jim, so is the "blight" you're referring to TSWV ... Tomato Spot Wilt Virus?

If so, I didn't know 589 was resistant. But I heard it was bred for improved flavor.

Have you tried Mountain Glory, a flavor enhanced TSWV-resistant var.?

If you're talking about TSWV, that's some really nasty stuff.

Bill
Jim41
Delhi, LA

August 17, 2009
11:28 PM

Post #6958426

I expect we are talking about the same thing, Gymgirl. My language comes from years of raising cotton. Bottom crop is those first tomatoes that puts on, on the lower part of the stalk. The mid is the middle section of the tomatoe stalk where you put on the bulk of the tomatoe crop and the top is the late blooms on the top of the stalk that some times make a few late tomatoes. They are usually smaller than the others but oh so good because they are the last of the season.

I really don't know all the letters of the blight that wipes us out. I quit raising tomatoes for several years because of it. I planted over two hundred tomatoes one year trying to get some to live. The 444 was the first one that came out in our area that you don't have any trouble with and that is all I've raised for the past several years. Last year the young man I buy plants from told me of the others and this year I gave them a try. I really like the Amelia. I have never heard of Mountain Glory. If I can find some I'll try them. I am going to try a couple of tomatoes next year that aren't blight resistent. One is Russian Black and the other is Cherokee Chocolate. I don't know what success I'll have but I'm going to give them a shot.

I couldn't tell the 589 from the 444. Both were good but the Amelia out shined them in all ways. I didn't like the way the 640 produced it was the worst producer of the bunch for me. It tasted ok but not exceptional.
pennyrile
Evansville, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 18, 2009
2:00 AM

Post #6959057

Mountain Glory is basically Mountain Spring plus TSWV resistance and a flavor enhancing gene bred in. It's a big improvement over Mt. Spring, in my opinion.

Mt. Spring is pretty much a standard market tomato up here and through Kentucky and Tennessee and replaced Celebrity in that regard. Dr. Randy Gardner incorporated TSWV resistance and the flavor enhancement into the breeding lines because of the horrible TSWV plague in Southeastern U.S. and to make the Mt. Spring type available in a more resistant variety ... as I understand it.

I just thought you might want to try that one if you get a chance. Also, Bella Rosa is another TSWV resistant variety that sells out quickly every year for the past few years. I guess a lot of folks in the Southeast have found it favorable same as you have found Amelia to your liking.

Bill
Jim41
Delhi, LA

August 18, 2009
3:14 AM

Post #6959329

Thanks Bill for the information. I have never seen either of these locally. I give the guy who has the hot house in our area a buzz and see if he can locate the seed. In fact if you know a good seed company that handles these, I'll just order a packet of each and get him to start them for me. That is what I'm doing with the 2 black tomatoes I am going to try. I could start them myself but he does a lot better job of it than I do. It is worth the cost to me not to have to fool with it myself and also to have good hearty plants to transplant.
sandy0225
Muncie, IN
(Zone 5b)

September 13, 2009
11:50 PM

Post #7060536

You can get mountain spring seeds from HPS .
Jim41
Delhi, LA

September 14, 2009
2:52 AM

Post #7061346

Thanks sandy.
pennyrile
Evansville, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 14, 2009
4:42 PM

Post #7063137

You can get Mountain Glory seeds from Stokes. I think you can get Bella Rosa and Top Gun seeds from Twilleys. Top Gun is another TSWV-res. tomato I've grown that tasted pretty good for a determinate.
Jim41
Delhi, LA

September 14, 2009
9:14 PM

Post #7064088

How did you like Top Gun? I had a couple last year and they loaded up fast and heavy and then just sat there. They were the first two I planted and the last two that got ripe. The taste was pretty good. Didn't plant any this year but might give them another shot next year.
SigourneyBeaver
Pine Island, FL
(Zone 10a)

March 11, 2010
9:03 PM

Post #7622762

I'm confused about cuttings from determinate tomato plants. Elsewhere I've read that determinates' cuttings produce and croak at the same time as the parent plant, but that doesn't seem to be a universal truth. Since I'm in the land (well, island) of year-round gardening, I just cut and root my Paul Robeson, Porter's Dark Cherry and San Marzano Redorta 'maters constantly. I've not actually planted a tomato seed of any these in 4 years+...just cuttings from the long-gone mother plants. Thus, all of my experience is with indeterminate tomato cuttings.

I've got some Bradleys that I bought at a garden center, and they seem to be at least close-to-determinate and they're just now starting to bear fruit. Certainly neater than the others... Finally, if I root cuttings from these, should I really expect the perky little cuttings to go into the death spiral at the same time as the mother plant?



rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2010
10:19 PM

Post #7622959

Good question, Beaver, the only tomatoes I have grown are indeterminate.
Let us know.
twiggybuds
Moss Point, MS
(Zone 8b)

March 12, 2010
12:10 AM

Post #7623064

I rooted some determinates last year and I'd say they behave like new plants. I didn't get to trial them fully because I rooted them in late June just before it started raining everyday for months. Then it never cooled down enough for anything to set fruit until a month before frost. Those I rooted were overcome along the way with foliage disease and caterpillars because the rain washed off spray and dust.

They did grow and bloom just like a seedling would. So I have good reason to believe you could keep your Bradleys going.

I've read that everything has a finite lifespan and clones will behave as the original plant. It was about evergreens and cactus. I don't buy it. I believe that idea predates our knowledge of stem cells and whatever plants do to accomplish the same thing.
SigourneyBeaver
Pine Island, FL
(Zone 10a)

March 12, 2010
10:34 PM

Post #7625159

Thank you. When the Bradleys are full on, I'll start some fresh cuttings for fall planting and see what happens. I just can't believe the generations will all die on the same pre-ordained schedule.

Of course they may just drown. We had 8" of water here yesterday alone. Thank goodness for earthboxes, e-tainers, g-buckets and the like. Everything not in a planter was 6" underwater at night fall.
Jim41
Delhi, LA

March 13, 2010
7:21 AM

Post #7625716

The suckers you plant are just like a new plant and have there on life.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 13, 2010
7:27 AM

Post #7625728

My cloned tomato plants didn't do that much last year so the jury's still out on them. My friends to whom I gave them said that they weren't very productive, but I don't know whether it's because of something inherent in a cutting or the way they planted them.
Jim41
Delhi, LA

March 13, 2010
11:00 PM

Post #7627653

We always just pulled off a sucker and stuck it in the ground and kept it watered.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 14, 2010
7:06 AM

Post #7628006

I take the sucker off, pot it, and put the pot in a basin with about an inch of water. That keeps it moist and it usually takes right off.
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 18, 2010
11:53 AM

Post #7899774

Wow! I just discovered this "old" thread & I'm fascinated. Though I've never tried planting cuttings intentionally, I once tossed some spent tomato plants out into a field when I was gardening on an apartment balcony. The next spring they were growing! They didn't look super-healthy (not much water) & we were getting ready to move, so I just left them.

I know tomatoes will root anywhere along the stem & when I pot up nursery plants, I always put them very deep to make them stronger, but I've never actually tried rooting the suckers.

I'd love to try this and wonder if anyone who doesn't have a greenhouse has tried to keep cuttings from Summer over Winter till the next Spring?? Would it be possible to keep the plants under lights & as they got too large, to take more cuttings? I wonder if this would end up yielding weak or inferior plants.
Anyone tried it??
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 18, 2010
3:35 PM

Post #7900662

Note this pic...,nutsaboutnature, the two white balls (about the size of a marble) are tomatoes in the making. I over=wintered a tomato 'cutting' in my GH and we eat a number of tomatoes from the plant.
It started withering from my neglect, but I took a small cutting off it and stuck it in with some garlic.
Well here it is...doing it's best to do it's thing and I just have not planted it out.
In one way tomatoes are like weeds. They have lots of problems but they keep coming.
I don't think a cutting from a mother plant would weak or inferior plants.
And yes they can be hept inside under less than ideal light conditions and set out in the spring for a strong and productive plant.

Thumbnail by rentman
Click the image for an enlarged view.

nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 18, 2010
7:48 PM

Post #7901489

Thanks, rentman!!
I wasn't even sure if anyone was still watching this thread since the last post was back in March.

I think I'm going to try rooting some cuttings this summer & see if I can get any to survive over Winter with grow lights. I may also take a cutting or two from the main stem at the end of the season when I remove the plants. It would be a fun experiment to see whether the stem cuttings or suckers do better, or whether they both do about the same.

I'm saving this thread to refer back to for all the great info & ideas.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 21, 2010
10:50 AM

Post #7907729

Nuts!
Nix the grow lights. WINTER SOW them! Put them into one-gallon milk jugs outside when they'll get sunshine and rain. Come spring, you should have husky seedlings to transplant.

See the Winter Sowing forum!

Hugs!
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

June 21, 2010
11:17 AM

Post #7907813

How cold can winter sown things survive? Here in WA it gets pretty cold- I am thinking about trying it this year.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 21, 2010
1:03 PM

Post #7908133

OK, ya'll don't know I'm the unofficial "Winter Sowing Cheerleader?"

JoP,
Once you try it, you'll never go back to growing seeds inside again. TRUST ME!

I started a WHOLE thread with the links to all the discussions. I think it's called Winter sowing 101 or something. It's on the winter sowing forum.

The beauty and ease of the system is that the winter temps DO NOT MATTER AT ALL!
It really is sorta "set 'em and forget 'em," although you do have to check periodically if there's no rainfall/snow to make sure they're staying moist. Other than that, forget 'em!

There are pictures of rows of milk jugs COVERED IN SNOW! Come spring, we joked about people getting "jug eye" from peeping inside the jugs to see all the little green chia pet sprouts that are growing inside jugs that were once covered by SNOW!

THIS REALLY WORKS! I'll never start a tomato seed inside under lights again. It was just too easy!

Linda

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 21, 2010
1:05 PM

Post #7908140

Ok, since you insisted, here's the link!

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1072154/
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 22, 2010
7:45 AM

Post #7909982

O.K., Gymgirl.
You definitely have my attention!!

I saw your post just before going to bed last night so I was too bleary-eyed to check out any of your links. I intend to get into some of them today.

If I understand you correctly, you're saying I can Winter Sow (even seeds?) in my Zone 5a climate (Cold...BRRR & Snow...BRRR).

I've seen old Tomato plants I've tossed in Autumn actually start growing again the next Spring if they were in contact with soil that they could root into - but that's about the extent of it. They never looked particularly healthy, so I didn't bother to do anything with them.

The concept of Winter Sowing is extremely exciting so your "Cheers" have worked. I'll try to post again as I read more.

Thanks a bunch!!!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 22, 2010
8:06 AM

Post #7910037

Nuts,
Do keep me posted on your adventure with Winter Sowing should you choose to try it, particularly with your veggies.

As a matter of fact, most of the discussion on the "WS 2011 Change" thread is being held by Zone 5-ers, right now! So, you might wanna jump in on that one and see what they're up to for the coming season! Pronto!

Hugs!

Linda

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