Photo by Melody
Congratulations to all our photo contest participants! Check out the winning photos here. We will have the 2015 calendars available to order from Zazzle soon.

Article: The Hackberry Tree: Hackberry chaos

Communities > Forums > Article: The Hackberry Tree
bookmark
Forum: Article: The Hackberry TreeReplies: 73, Views: 316
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
lorilea
Justin, TX

March 24, 2009
12:26 PM

Post #6311977

Interesting story on the hackberry. Ever since I was old enough to hold a hachet I was in my mother's backyard digging the roots of these trees out of the ground. They are relentless, and even if you think you have killed it, if there is any root left, it will grow back. It is nice to know that they do have a benefit but I wonder if the cons on this tree out weigh the pros. They grow any where you don't want them to grow. And yes they attract insects alright. Don't let these trees grow by any structures. They attract termites,wood ants, and ticks. I rekon my grudge with the hackberry began with trying to get rid of them. Never tried the berries though.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 24, 2009
1:43 PM

Post #6312292

Hi Lorilea,
I'm sorry you have such trouble with the hackberry. Sometimes that happens with plants, depending on your environment and its location, and it can be really aggravating. I am not fond of its stains and relentless berry droppings either. But it was a challenge to me, trying to figure out its purpose in life.

I agree that not all plants are likable, but I always enjoy learning about their history.
Good luck with getting rid of yours, and thank you for writing.
Sharon
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 24, 2009
4:02 PM

Post #6312938

In my part of the world it is known as a "trash tree". Never totally understood why any of God's creations would be trash. However, it is one that is hard to deal with. First, it is very brittle and the entire top can break off in a high wind (that has happened twice to the tree next door to me). The roots stay near the top and nothing, nothing will grow under it.
The fruit maybe be beneficial to wildlife but it is a killer when one is trying to build a garden. The little trees come up EVERYWHERE...worse than any weed. I have seen them trimmed to perfection at the Dallas Arboretum and didn't even recognize it. Not the same in nature as it is truly gangly and unruly.

Ooooops! Guess I said too much.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 24, 2009
4:11 PM

Post #6312993

Hi Lou,
You can never say too much about something that causes grief. I think this is a controversial tree to say the least. In some areas it is invasive and aggravating, just like a lot of things. But it some it isn't.
I have learned a lot from what you said and that which was stated by others, and knowledge of all kinds is valuable, negativities included.
When we had a windstorm in September and an ice storm in January, I lost the tops out of all my trees, not a one is left. And the decorative pear trees of my neighbors are no more. We just do what we have to do in the areas in which we live.
I wish for you no more "trash trees"!
Thanks for reading the article, and feel free to comment at any time.
Sharon
leaflady
Hughesville, MO
(Zone 5a)

March 24, 2009
4:18 PM

Post #6313029

The hackberry is more or less a trash tree here too. But now that I know the many values of it I will be more careful about 'looking down my nose' at it and requesting that all of them be removed. Any tree that provides food for man, beast, & birds, has very useable wood, & is a friend of honey bees is not truely a trash tree. It rates up at the top of the list of good trees. We just didn't know its values.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 24, 2009
4:32 PM

Post #6313095

Hello Lee, and thank you.
It is a true challenge to find something good about some of the things that Nature hands us. It took me awhile to find something good about the hackberry tree, too.

I think that's true about a lot of things.

I hope you are having a nice spring day, but the high winds from the west are about to catch up to us. If it isn't one thing it seems to be another. But the winds are blowing the loose branches that were left by the recent ice storm out of the trees. Maybe that's something good.

Nice to hear from you again.
Sharon

Bettypauze

Bettypauze
Victoria Harbour, ON

March 24, 2009
8:10 PM

Post #6313987

Once again Shar, enjoyed your article..will have to research if we in Ontario have it? Looks so familiar...
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 24, 2009
8:19 PM

Post #6314018

Thanks Betty.
It is a nice tree for wildlife, but seems to be invasive for others. I am not sure it grows that far north, though.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 24, 2009
10:33 PM

Post #6314524

Must have pulled up over a hundred little "trees" today. From now until about June, that will be a daily chore. Only thing worse in the garden is bermuda grass. I'm sorry, Sharron.
This is to find something good about the hackberry. It does make heavy shade.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 24, 2009
10:41 PM

Post #6314559

Well, when you need shade, there you have it!
Sorry about your time consuming task today, Lou...I do the same thing with all the little maple saplings that take over every year. Sometimes it happens with my Rose of Sharon too, and my oak, sigh...maybe if they all grew out in the unused forest somewhere...

I hope your back isn't too painful tomorrow. ^_^
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 24, 2009
10:49 PM

Post #6314586

Back is doing wonderful! Yeah, you're right. I also pull up red oak on a continuing basis.
Last year was a good year for pecans and whooooweee did I have a lot of little pecan trees.
Should have figured out a market for the pecan trees by now.

Odd isn't it, how the things we think we would really like to have grow in the garden are hard to germinate.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 24, 2009
11:10 PM

Post #6314658

Yes, it is...
One year, many years ago, someone gave me a pot of creeping charlie. It was a gift, she said. Lovely in a pot, and I kept it in a pot. After about the third year, I noticed little creeping charlies all over my yard, so I took the pot out in the uninhabited country, and turned it upside down in a field of clover.

When I got the pot home, it got a couple of baths in bleach water.

I still find sprigs of creeping charlie in my yard.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2009
12:02 AM

Post #6314890

hahahaha! I love you...
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 25, 2009
12:17 AM

Post #6314957

Hey, Lou,
Would you like to have a sprig or two of creeping charlie??
To go with your hackberries?
I think I can find your address...
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2009
12:30 AM

Post #6315011

Oh, please no!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 25, 2009
12:32 AM

Post #6315026

Sorry, I couldn't resist!!
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2009
1:19 AM

Post #6315255

There's a possibility that we would be dangerous together! hahahaha!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 25, 2009
1:22 AM

Post #6315267

ya think?
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2009
1:29 AM

Post #6315298

I'm game, if you are...
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 25, 2009
1:35 AM

Post #6315325

I just came inside from collecting the little "helicopter" seeds that fell from the yellow maple, I have quite a box full. And then I checked on the creeping charlie, and it survived the winter very well. Now all this is very light weight, and will hardly make a dent in postage costs. It's dark now, but I am sure during my early morning stroll that I can find some more things that you really need to complete your landscaping.
Oh...I almost forgot the oak seedlings, complete with attached acorns. They're pretty lightweight too...

Actually, d mail some pictures, I'd love to see what you are talking about. Sounds as if you have a really nice garden area. I love Texas, my hubby was from there, and we spent many many summer vacations there, too. I don't know where your city is, but we were in the Galveston, Orange, Houston, Port Arthur area most of the time.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2009
1:44 AM

Post #6315361

I am 14 miles from Downtown Dallas (said with a Texian accent). A whole 13 miles from the hospital in which I was born. At my advanced age I've seen Dallas from the beginning.Dallas is still a "wanta be". Not many actual natives around but a lot of people from other parts of the country that have come here for the climate. CLIMATE?? From June till November it is never under 90 and often more than 100. Guess it must be better than ice and snow. We really need to get together soon.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 25, 2009
1:50 AM

Post #6315377

Yep, that might be something to think about.
Sounds like a plan for sure.
I spent one wretched night in the Dallas Ft. Worth airport once, wish I had known you then!
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2009
1:54 AM

Post #6315395

Well, you do now!!!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 25, 2009
2:05 AM

Post #6315445

Sure do, and I'll keep it in mind.

Thanks for all the fun chats today. I do appreciate all the different responses when I write about controversial plants. See what evolved? It is much more fun to know the thoughts of others than it is to sit complacent in my own environment.

I promise I will not send you any of my creeping charlie, helicopters, sprouting acorns, or squirrels. Not today, anyway.

Thank you, Lou, for all the fun.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 25, 2009
2:26 AM

Post #6315539

night, night
lorilea
Justin, TX

March 29, 2009
12:50 PM

Post #6334714

I think you did a good job finding it's purpose. I never knew about eating the berries. I guess they do feed the birds. Maybe if I had more they would leave my tomatos alone this year. lol.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

March 31, 2009
3:02 AM

Post #6343159

Like the article. Don't like the tree.
Have a perennial garden that supports masses of bees and also butterfies and lots of birds during migration. Neighbour has a garden of neglected trees with a small hackberry in a cramped shaded corner close to fence. Last summer was unusually wet and his hackberry seeded over much of our garden. I've now removed some of his tree which actually looks better.
Two houses down from us, there's another hackberry in a similar site. Sorry to report that it's a dark and crowded thicket that I believe I've already seen in several horror movies.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

March 31, 2009
3:31 AM

Post #6343294

Good to hear from you Sunny, you made me smile!!!

I really was trying to be very good and find something worthwhile about it, though. And today I heard from a guy who told me that it makes a wonderful bonsai.

Thanks for writing and for the chuckle!!
leaflady
Hughesville, MO
(Zone 5a)

March 31, 2009
12:55 PM

Post #6344357

Would the seedlings ship well? I might like to have a couple to plant in a fence row not too far from the yarden. But far enough to not have the mess all of you are talking about.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

March 31, 2009
2:01 PM

Post #6344627

Sorry leaflady,
I think I did them all in (pulled them all out)
At present I'm running on positive thought
- the tree might behave itself this year.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 31, 2009
3:10 PM

Post #6344961

IMHO that would be like sending someone poison ivy starts.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

March 31, 2009
5:01 PM

Post #6345392

Exactly
2577flowergirl
Cleveland, OK
(Zone 6b)

April 4, 2009
11:52 AM

Post #6362630

Another person's "trash tree" is my "treasure tree". When we bought our 5 acres in the country and moved in a new 32X80 mobile home my husband postioned it so that the back porch coming off the master bedroom was right in line with the huge hackberry tree about 20 foot to the south. It has to be 100 years old. It is huge, beautiful, gives off lots of shade, brings lots of birds and squirrels, etc. I have planted vinca minor underneath it which has covered the area now. There's a birdbath under it and it's great for hanging bird feeders. The berries aren't a problem as they help be feed the birds in the winter also. The trunk is probably at least 6-7 ft around. Being an avid flower gardener I had to thank you for such a great article on my treasure tree!! I've always loved it!!
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 4, 2009
3:07 PM

Post #6363215

Interesting flowergirl. You paint an attractive picture, but I wouldn't want that hackberry tree in the middle of one of my perennial beds; for that matter, anywhere near it.
I also believe in green gardens with lots of birds, butterflies and other insects. I do it, however, by using a large diversity of different perennials, including old varieties, and by never using pesticides or herbicides.
Five acres increases the available choices.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 4, 2009
3:14 PM

Post #6363256

I agree. Were I to give up my daily task of pulling the hundreds of hackberry seedlings I would soon have a forest you couldn't even walk through. My neighbor talks of cutting the tree down but doesn't make a move.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 4, 2009
5:20 PM

Post #6363674

I love when a subject of one of my articles becomes a point of discussion. It is interesting to note different reactions and feelings to a product of nature. BTW, I always try to find the reason for things, hackberry included. And if you notice, the only good reason that I found was that it was good for birds, butterflies and insects.

However, a gentleman on one of the other comment threads in this article provided some excellent information on the wood of the hackberry, how when dried it is a lovely hard wood and used for many wood projects. I didn't know that, but am glad to know it has another 'reason' for being.

Now...confession time, I don't have the hackberry growing here, it just grows in my memories. I do however have the most aggravating, gigantic, beautiful, ancient monstrosity of a cottonwood growing on the corner of my neighbor's lot. I swear it's roots live under my deck, its branches shade my deck and it often drives me crazy. Its little cottonish seedlings infiltrate my a/c unit every single spring and I have to get out there with a vacuum to clean them out. It is not fun. And when those seedlings fall, my yard is white.

I just look at it and try to find its reason for being. I found one or two. It shades my house from the sweltering sun as it sets in the west on those sweltering days of 100*+ and 100% humidity in July and August. That's one. It stood strong during our recent ice storm, when others around it fell to the ground, that's two, because without it, my house would not stay cool enough in the summer for me to even survive, and I have no plans for a new A/C system.

On the other hand, during the ice storm, it lost a limb that took with it about half of my 20+ year old redbud tree.

What a conundrum! It is a love/hate relationship I have with that tree. We survive together, the cottonwood and I. My deck is off the ground, and so far the cottonwood is not close to the foundation of my house, maybe it won't ever be. I do love the shade it provides, and I do love my neighbors, plus it is a gorgeous tree in its full glory during summer. I simply cannot live the rest of my life without it. So I live with it, and I vacuum my A/C unit when its seedlings strand themselves in it. (Great image, huh?)

And again, on the other hand...my half a redbud, is blooming, blooming, blooming, and life is good again. And so it goes...

I am so sorry, Lou, that you have to fight those hackberry seedlings, and flowergirl, your story makes me smile. Sunny, great for you to have all that land, and all those options.

Living with nature is filled with ups and downs, but without nature, we wouldn't be, would we? Goodness, what a conundrum.

I think our comment thread is a story in itself, and I am so appreciative to those of you who contribute to it.

I hope your weekend is beautiful. Happy spring!

Edited because I wrote flowergirl's name wrong, and also to tell Lorilei thanks, her opinion actually started this conversation!
Sharon

This message was edited Apr 4, 2009 3:58 PM

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

leaflady
Hughesville, MO
(Zone 5a)

April 4, 2009
7:30 PM

Post #6364112

Lou, the others paint such a wonderful picture of that tree I will have to find a seedling & move it close to the house so I can enjoy it. What I have been told is Hackberry has never gotten to any size worth talking about but I do remember some berries on it in the fall. Do they grow rapidly or are they slowpokes?

We have a cottonwood that is about 80' tall and losing limbs too. We also have a young one about 5 or 6 years old, maybe 10' tall that I tell the guys they are not to cut down because when the old one is gone I still want one.

We have an ancient catalpa tree that I never seen a seedling from. Do we need 2 to get seedlings? I'm thinking of collecting some seeds this coming fall to see if I can get them to germinate.

We have about 5 mulberry trees in the yarden that are welcome as well as a couple mimosa trees. Those and the black walnut sprouts are what keep us busy pulling, treating the stumps with killer, etc.

Yes, we all have trees we love & hate.

GOD bless each of you and your gardens.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 4, 2009
8:10 PM

Post #6364266

Sharran,
Thanks for the interesting comments; they'd do credit to kind and tolerant philosophy of Epicurus, whom I greatly admire.
In my case though, I don't really have all that land (though it sometimes sounds so). Most of it is my customers' land (the perennial gardens I have both installed and continue to maintain - large properties, not that many).
In my case, I just couldn't tolerate that hackberry tree. My customers wouldn't let me!
I do think that gardening is as much about destroying as it is about creating.
A key part of the creating is the promotion of healthy soil structures, healthy and balanced insect populations (not just butterflies) and support (in our area) for migrating birds.
A very inclusive thread, with lots of vigorous and entertaining discussion,
and all built around that hackberry tree. Not a bad tree after all!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 4, 2009
8:48 PM

Post #6364392

Sunny...
You speak from the heart, and I love that.

I just came in, camera in hand. Sometime ago, I trained 3 sprigs of wisteria around old clothesline poles. I now have healthy happy huge wisteria umbrellas every year. Most consider them invasives, but the bumble bees are happy today, the birds love that they are protected within the tangled branches, and very very soon now, the humming birds will be singing beneath its dainty leaves. Yes, I do have to dig and destroy the few runners it produces, but it is a small price to pay for its beauty and for its contribution to the bird/bee/insect population. It is commonly called a Kentucky Wisteria, as opposed to the Chinese wisteria.

So it is all in how we look at things.

I have spurge, euphorbia...also considered invasive, so I keep it enclosed in a rock rimmed garden. There is nothing to compare to its delicate beauty right now, and it is secluded so that its sap harms no one. It has an interesting history, but I like it for its yellow green color among my old purple iris...no other reason.

Yes, I do love this thread, and adore LouC for provoking the conversation. Who would have ever thought the hackberry would have given us such thought provoking entertainment.

BTW, I leave dates on my photos so that there is no doubt when plants bloom. Here is my beloved wisteria, and I happen to know that Lou has one in bloom as well right now.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 4, 2009
8:49 PM

Post #6364396

And my other invasive that I love...euphorbia:

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 4, 2009
8:51 PM

Post #6364401

And just for you all, to show you that I also love things that are not invasive or aggravating, here is my first tulip of the year.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 4, 2009
8:54 PM

Post #6364412

I hope your day is as full of sunshine as mine is!


And I hope this thread continues, thank you, Sunny.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 4, 2009
10:57 PM

Post #6364824

Ok. Now go to the "vines" forum and look at "Get Your Wisteria Fix". Then go to the Texas Forum and look at "Spring has Sprung". My wisteria with the cross vine intermingled makes life worth living. And this time the wisteria and Lady Banksia Rose bloomed at the same time and the aroma would put you out. Very soft and relaxing not like the pefume JOY. hahahaha. oooops. Hope I didn't offend anyone.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 4, 2009
10:59 PM

Post #6364831

You just wait, Lou...
I know the cost of Joy, think I'll check on the cost of shipping it to Texas...hmmmmm.
leaflady
Hughesville, MO
(Zone 5a)

April 5, 2009
5:03 AM

Post #6366127

Sharron, is there any chance that wisteria would be hardy in central MO? And if it is would you consider sending a rooted start for postage? Or trade for some hardy passion vine starts? The passion vine won't come up until nearly June tho.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 5, 2009
5:14 AM

Post #6366138

I think it would be hardy there. It wouldn't hurt to try, and sure I will send you a start, as soon as I get some runners.

Don't let me forget, though...and yes, I would love some passion vine.

I'd be happy to send it to you.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2009
3:10 PM

Post #6367184

Leaflady, that is a much better choice than the hackberry.
leaflady
Hughesville, MO
(Zone 5a)

April 6, 2009
2:05 AM

Post #6369853

Lou, Kyle & Holly are going to find a hackberry sprout on the farm & bring it up to the yarden for me. They say they are all over the farm. Kyle & I remembered Jack saying they aren't good fire wood, not putting off much heat.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 6, 2009
2:20 AM

Post #6369930

Son just got computer going again.
Only have snowdrops and some of the crocuses and there's going to be 6 inches of snow tomorrow, so sending picture from last summer.
Front of picture: Great blue lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica) just coming into bloom.
Know a very knowledgeable gardener who won't grow this because it's too invasive. Does seed a fair bit, especially in moist conditions (lawn sprinkler affects this garden). But not very hard to control and far too pretty to be invasive.
Really liked our wisteria but it didn't survive. Passion vine does well here (in greenhouses).

Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2009
2:29 AM

Post #6369974

What a beautiful garden, Sunny!
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 6, 2009
5:29 AM

Post #6370703

Looks like a picture in Southern Living magazine.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2009
5:32 AM

Post #6370709

I was thinking the same thing, Lou.
you sure are up late.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 6, 2009
5:38 AM

Post #6370725

Went to sleep around 8ish and now I am awake.aaaarrrgggghhh. Hate when I do that.
lorilea
Justin, TX

April 6, 2009
1:23 PM

Post #6371475

My pleasure Sharron, I enjoy conversing with all of you. Maybe we can keep it going. It is a wonderful thing when we can all share our opinions and experiences with each other.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 6, 2009
5:49 PM

Post #6372886

Only a couple of inches of snow so far; the wet, heavy (heart attack) stuff. Still no problem getting to the coffee shop.
Choosing the camera shot, but need to work at keeping all of a perennial garden looking good from May to October. Generally pretty successful, but a bit stressful. Advantage, doing these gardens gives me much larger areas to work with. More relaxing with my own garden and spent more time at that.
Sharran isn't exactly sleeping on the job herself! Health aside, tend to equate sleeping with wasting time.
Would like to tag along too.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2009
6:05 PM

Post #6372958

We have turned this into a lovely chat thread, and think when we reach somewhere over 100 posts, if we do, then one of us can start a new thread in one of the chat forums if we want. We'll keep calling it the Hackberry thread, and won't that be fun! And we can add a link here before we leave so we don't lose anyone.

Sunny, as I understand it, you care for the gardens of others, which in itself gives you ownership. What a wonderful thing to do! I am looking forward to more photos of gardens you tend. You are leaving your touch wherever you go.

We are also expecting a frost tonight, though our past 3 or so weeks were filled with 70* temps. I ran out over the weekend and this morning to take a few pix of things that might be blackened by tomorrow. Here is another picture of my wisteria 'tree', the blooms might be scattered over the walk way beneath its feet by morning.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2009
6:07 PM

Post #6372968

And maybe I posted this earlier, but here is my only blooming tulip of the moment, as it was on Saturday. Undoubtedly it will be gone by morning.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2009
6:10 PM

Post #6372981

We had a major ice storm in late Jan./early Feb...took me nearly 2 months to get it all cleaned up. I lost half of the redbud you see on the left, and some branches of the JM on the right. The green in the distant middle is in my neighbor's yard. It needs to be trimmed, because it has many broken branches, but it is his, not mine. The ice storm doesn't seem to have retarded the growth of either of my trees...I was so happy to see their colors.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2009
6:12 PM

Post #6372984

I also have euphorbia and hellebores blooming, they will not mind the frost. I have the euphorbia contained, so that it doesn't become invasive. I love the yellow/green blooms, and hate the sap. Lots of things come with a love/hate relationship.

As for sleep...yes, I can usually find something better to do.
lorilea
Justin, TX

April 6, 2009
7:11 PM

Post #6373272

Sunny and Sharron, those are such lovely pics. Hopefully I can borrow my neighbor's camera so I can take a picture of my Iris blooms. I attended the round up yesterday and I met alot of great people who gave me so many plants. I will have to wait till the freeze to put them in the garden but, I can't wait to see how they flourish. It will be fun if we can get our hackberry thread up and going. Lou, maybe it was all the exitement of the RU yesterday? Had a great time.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2009
7:26 PM

Post #6373337

Do we want to start up a new "Hackberry" thread in one of the regular forums, like Garden Talk or Parking Lot, wherever you prefer? I can do it anytime, or one of you can, and put the link here, and also put this link there.

Might be better than just on an article comment thread, though it is fun here.


LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2009
12:59 AM

Post #6374945

Oh my, what a day. MIL in the rehab/nursing home and driving me crazy! Our son lives in Tulsa and he was in the Metroplex for business and met us where she is. Lordy, Lordy, Lordy. Some people don't know when they are lucky. She is 91 and I am 67. Telling you for sure, she will outlive me. I know this not on topic of a tree, but she is going to put Mike and I in our graves!!!!!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2009
1:25 AM

Post #6375077

Not if we can help it, Lou...we'll pull you right back out again.

Where do you all want to go for a new thread? Parking Lot, or maybe Garden Talk?

We'll call it the Hackberry Tree and other stuff, but we can talk about whatever we want once we move the thread.

Let me know and it'll be done...
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2009
3:07 AM

Post #6375725

LouC,
Amazing the number of people in their 60s who have problems with elderly parents. My mother-in-law gave my ultraconscientious wife a pretty hard time over numbers of years. We always assumed she would outlive us. Her place has been taken by a sister-in-law (who has zero finer points), but my wife doesn't feel responsible for her. So now it's out of sight, out of mind.
Sunny
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2009
3:15 AM

Post #6375761

I find myself the lone tree standing in my family forest, so I can only hope I do not become a problem parent to my children when I am that age, or even now.

I know it is a tough row to hoe, dealing with parents for whom we feel responsible. I hope I don't outlive my usefulness in my lifetime.

Sunny, how many gardens do you tend? Or is tend the proper term for what you do?
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2009
4:45 AM

Post #6376067

Sharran,
If you're an only child, as our son, that can be tough. But kids should only do what's reasonable. They shouldn't try to do the impossible.
Have put in perennial gardens on around 15 properties. Have been maintaining and expanding four, plus our own, for about 10 years. Have had almost complete control over the gardens on the four properties, which has made doing a good job a lot easier. Tend to think of them all as my gardens (as my customers/friends are kind enough to verbalize). Always been a minor form of income, but having retired a year or so ago, I'm enjoying the gardening even more. I actually now have time to observe and think.
You sound at an age when you still have other responsibilites.
Sunny
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2009
4:54 AM

Post #6376095

No Sunny...my two children are grown and have jobs/lives of their own, and I am retired. My parents are no longer living. I have no other responsibilities now, but I am at an age that I also don't want to become a burden to either of my children. And my husband passed away just a couple of years ago. I do write, and I garden, and various other time consuming things, so I stay reasonably busy.

I guess time will tell.

Your gardening endeavors sound very satisfying. I hope you will continue to share pictures with us.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2009
5:23 AM

Post #6376157

Sharran,
Very sorry to hear about your husband.
Bad things sometimes happen to good people.
I like your positiveness.
Sunny
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2009
5:32 AM

Post #6376173

Thanks, Sunny...
We all have choices, you know, choices about how to deal with things. I live alone, so I would hate if even my cats avoided me. Don't want to ever become one of those grouchy little old ladies. The little and the old parts might fit me, but never grouchy.

LouC gave me an idea for another article this week, and if it is midnight in your area you can read it now. It won't be as controversial as the hackberry, but I love Lou's idea.

It fits me, I think, and maybe lots of people.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2009
3:41 PM

Post #6377526

You are such a love..no way will you ever, ever be a problem to anyone. My wise mother told me that when one gets old, older, whatever the overriding characteristics are become more pronounced, more condensed. As in those who are a pain are more so and those easy to love..more so. You are already set as one the best of all.

Christi
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2009
3:45 PM

Post #6377545

Sharran,
How do you get to the article?
Seen your long! list, but don't know which it is.
Sunny
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2009
3:54 PM

Post #6377579

Forgot to say, You pick the forum/thread and we will follow.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2009
4:00 PM

Post #6377603

Lou, you are a sweetheart.

Sunny, I have not written an article with the list included, only the article about honey. I didn't feel that my list was long enough, because it only includes those plants that I am familiar with here in zone 6b, almost 7a. Sorry that I didn't clarify that. I prefer leaving those kinds of articles to those who know more than I, and I only know what worked for me.

Everything I have read, though, tells me to go with the wildflowers that are native to your area when looking for bee food. That is my guideline for my own gardening. If I had enough space, I would have a field of clover. Of course I don't have the California lilacs here, but included it on my list anyway. Doubt that you would have it there either. My favorite is the monarda and aster, they seem to really pull the bees in. Also all the mints.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2009
4:38 PM

Post #6377756

I moved us to Garden Talk...
Please join us here:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/972504/

I don't want to go there all by myself...

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Article: The Hackberry Tree Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Hackberry friends Hemophobic 5 Mar 24, 2009 2:17 PM
nice phicks 7 Mar 26, 2009 11:56 PM
Hackberry Wood throneofyord 1 Mar 24, 2009 3:43 PM
Lovely! adinamiti 1 Mar 24, 2009 10:26 PM
Storm damage DianeEG 1 Apr 2, 2009 2:48 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America