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Sustainable Alternatives: Fish Farming

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phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

April 6, 2009
8:38 PM

Post #6373617

Any one here doing any here am starting am makeing wooden ponds with liners Paul
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

April 6, 2009
8:52 PM

Post #6373696

Sounds interesting Paul. Got any pictures?
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

April 6, 2009
9:35 PM

Post #6373874

Yes, definately interested here, too!
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

April 6, 2009
10:18 PM

Post #6374083

There are lots of fish farms here - catfish. Unfortunately I don't know much about them.
grownut
Clarkson, KY

April 6, 2009
11:31 PM

Post #6374449

I've only seen them after they're full and those were in ground. There was one man who owned a nursery and set up a series of small tanks that the fish somehow swam from tank to tank through shallow lined chutes, but as to any detail...
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

April 6, 2009
11:48 PM

Post #6374545

no pictures yet but ill take some as i go along i plan on raiseing some water plants along with the fish paul
twiggybuds
Moss Point, MS
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2009
12:02 AM

Post #6374636

Phicks are you planning to recirculate your water to feed plants and clean it? I've often thought that my water beds, vegetables/flowers could be great with fish water circulating through them. If nothing else, you could grow duckweed for compost. Your # of fish is going to depend on how clean you can keep your water. Aquaculture is getting hot because we've killed a lot of the natural fish populations. Talapia, striped bass, crawfish and prawns are all fresh water candidates.

You could call your extension office for literature or find it online. All the Gulf states are big on aquaculture.
twiggybuds
Moss Point, MS
(Zone 8b)

April 7, 2009
12:03 AM

Post #6374640

Oops! should have previewed.
grownut
Clarkson, KY

April 7, 2009
1:04 AM

Post #6374968

Paul -that's exactly what this man did. He had greenhouses and water plants. Did fairly shallow pools if I recall( I'm thinking the deepest was around 42''), and may even have had some of the transfer chutes on typical sawhorse type supports. Because he had incorporated a great number of differing levels, I'd say he probably didn't have huge trouble with pumping --there was a lot of fall in there - slow, but there.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

April 7, 2009
12:33 PM

Post #6376707

Yes, here also. There was a man who recycled his fishwater through a greenhouse to grow hydroponic plants fertilized with fish water. The local agent who told me about this said he eventually abandoned the project because of the resistance of the other fish farmers who just didn't like the idea. The man moved his operation to Tuscaloosa.
dmcdevitt
Schroon Lake, NY
(Zone 4a)

April 7, 2009
12:37 PM

Post #6376717

WE had a pond dug at the farm we're slowly working on. Wet spot in the hayfield, and I wanted the topsoil.

They found five or six springs, and had solid blue clay down to the bottom of the two deepest pools dug, which are 21' deep.

This was a very lucky outcome for my hunch, and not a cheap endeavor, but by the end of the summer the water had settled beautifully clear. We are hoping to stock trout.

We will be consulting fishery people this year...there is a pretty consistent breeze here so there may be enough aeration. We're also hoping to explore windmill options

This was last summer when the pond was about five months old

Thumbnail by dmcdevitt
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gloria125
Greensboro, AL

April 7, 2009
12:42 PM

Post #6376732

That is beautiful dmcdevitt:

At home in N. Michigan we had "cow ponds" 3 of them. One was big enough for a raft and we did a lot of sailing on it.
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

April 7, 2009
12:53 PM

Post #6376762

Wow! Beautiful pond!
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

April 7, 2009
1:10 PM

Post #6376818

nice i can see the clouds above in the pond i grew up in mass . id grow brown trout . or when you talk to the fishery people ask about one of the hybrid trouts they grow very fast paul
dmcdevitt
Schroon Lake, NY
(Zone 4a)

April 7, 2009
2:55 PM

Post #6377268

Paul, Brown is what's recommended. There are two brooks on the property, supposedly with native brookies, plus the beavers have made several large ponds at the end of the field, new since last year. We haven't tried for the brook trout, but wouldn't it be great to have a pond full of trout for protein?

I can't imagine being able to slaughter farm animals, although I'd like to have chickens for eggs and bug control. I guess I will have a retirement coop for the old ones, where they can sit in rocking chairs and have tea!

This message was edited Apr 7, 2009 11:10 AM
phicks
Lakeland, FL
(Zone 9b)

April 7, 2009
3:06 PM

Post #6377326

your pond looks to be a acre of a bit more you can stock 600 brown fingerling trout in it make sure you get the ny fish pond lic. its free paul
dmcdevitt
Schroon Lake, NY
(Zone 4a)

April 7, 2009
3:12 PM

Post #6377354

Fish farming to me sounds great. although my husband would be in charge of fish...He likes pond and aquarium stuff, so I will delegate that.

I wonder what the downsides are, and how hard it is to keep fish healthy and how you test them for toxins if you're planning to use them for food, or whether that's a concern.
msrobin
Caneyville, KY
(Zone 6b)

April 7, 2009
3:21 PM

Post #6377416

Last year when I was searching online, I found several resources for state guidelines and info. Don't recall what the links were, though.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

April 7, 2009
5:06 PM

Post #6377870

I was talking to a w oman who's husband died of cancer. To make sure that she would always have an income, he invested all his estate in fish ponds. She said she was so grateful that he had the forsight to do this. She said they do require round the clock care. The pH has to be monitored constantly. She s said on some occasions she has to make trips at night t o make adjustments. If you didn't care for them properly you could wind up with a pond full of dead fish.

So it is not exactly a "carefree" enterprise, but it can be very profitable - at least the catfish here are. But then there is a ready market for the catfish.
dmcdevitt
Schroon Lake, NY
(Zone 4a)

April 7, 2009
6:08 PM

Post #6378124

Gloria, I would think trout would find a good market, too, but I'm not looking for a business as much as being self sufficient. I would think you would want to avoid overcrowding, and I'm thinking if it's spring fed it would stay cooler and cleaner than it might otherwise. It's an interesting project at any rate.

I hope more people will post here if they're attempting it!


gloria125
Greensboro, AL

April 7, 2009
8:40 PM

Post #6378741

dmcdevitt: I agree. I think a pond is a very good thing. If its only for the frogs and grandchildren!

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