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Garden Talk: The Hackberry Tree and other stuff...

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Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2009
4:37 PM

Post #6377749

We started here:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/966760/

as a comment thread attached to an article. It grew and grew like Topsy. I am moving it to Garden Talk so that others can join us.

The subject is plants that cause some of us grief, blood, sweat, and tears, and others of us very little to no problem. Some plants are like that.

Do you have a plant that drives you crazy, one you cannot seem to get rid of? Join us with that one, or just join us for fun.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2009
7:50 PM

Post #6378511

A plant that drives me crazy, but that I don't (now) want to get rid of, is japanese windflower. I love the comment, for the cultivar 'Honorine Jobert', from Sterhill in Atlanta, "can be slowly invasive".
Maintain two very large clumps of apparently Anenome hupehensis. The clumps increase in size, only relatively slowly, by underground runners. The problem is that the runners are quite deep and have a habit of coming up inside ornamental shrubs.
At the same time, japanese windflower is among the most noticeable and showy perennials in the fall garden. I may have heard more praise for them, from non-gardeners viewing the garden, than for any other plant.
Think I'd say: "somewhat invasive, but well worth the work".
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2009
9:02 PM

Post #6378836

Ahhhhh, but they are so beautiful, Sunny, as you well know. One time I considered planting them in containers but the runners found their way down through the tiny holes in the bottoms. Now I keep the few I do have in pots, and they are not nearly as beautiful because they have no room to spread.

I wonder, if we know something is even moderately invasive, why do we keep it?
For the beauty or for the challenge?

Same happens with my American wisteria every year, but I wanted them in tree form, and now I have 2 of them. They are so lovely, I simply take their runners every summer, and wind them around the trunk. It works. The trunk gets wider and the top gets fuller.

Lots of work for two weeks of lush lavender umbrellas.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2009
9:25 PM

Post #6378917

You have a spectacular wisteria display there Sharran. Love the color.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2009
9:44 PM

Post #6379028

The picture might have to do for another year too, if we get the freeze that is predicted for tonight. They both are in full bloom again!

Thank you.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 8, 2009
7:03 PM

Post #6382891

Freeze!
Being a northerner, thought everybody somewhat south of us had tropical climates. Just kidding, but didn't realize you have these types of problems too.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 8, 2009
7:12 PM

Post #6382917

No freeze...bad prediction, thank goodness!
Lots of sunshine and 70+ degrees today. I have been weeding, weeding, weeding, and my wisteria is gorgeous.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2009
7:32 PM

Post #6382978

I second that emotion Sharran. Its just fantastic. We are going to eliminate a weeping cherry tree.
Long story but the graft bolted and the tree has two weeping branches and twenty that are just plain old cherry.
Mybe DD will go for a wysteria like yours.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 8, 2009
7:39 PM

Post #6383003

Maybe so, GE, and sorry about your weeping cherry that no longer weeps. And you might like wisteria, some do and some don't, and it does take some work keeping up with its runners. It sure would be pretty on that long driveway(?) I think I have seen of yours...maybe across from your new bed?

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2009
8:05 PM

Post #6383089

Dont tempt me.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 8, 2009
8:10 PM

Post #6383104

Along about July, I will have rooted runners...

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 9, 2009
9:39 AM

Post #6385489

now
now
no enabeling.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 9, 2009
2:04 PM

Post #6386133

Noticed 'How to kill wy(i)isteria' on the invasive plants forum. Don't believe it is invasive here. As said we lost ours. Disappointed. Don't know why it died.
Really agree with Sharran's philosophy above. If you have a beautiful plant
that requires a bit more work, it's worth it. Don't like the sound of the Roundup attack in last entry on Invasives Forum.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 9, 2009
2:11 PM

Post #6386162

I love, love, love my wisteria. The beauty of the recent blooms was enough but the aroma was intoxicating. Now the blooms are gone and it is covered in leaves that present dense shade over the deck way into November. Cannot imagine putting on Roundup...on anything.

Thumbnail by LouC
Click the image for an enlarged view.

leaflady
Hughesville, MO
(Zone 5a)

April 9, 2009
2:38 PM

Post #6386257

I followed you. Not much time to post as we are remodeling house & have a close by deadline. See you more in mid May.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 9, 2009
3:48 PM

Post #6386548

Love the iris LouC, we don't see them until June.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 9, 2009
5:11 PM

Post #6387139

Great iris, Lou...
Mine will be blooming in another couple of weeks, but not yet. Right now it is wisteria and tulips.
And no Roundup for me either. Too many repercussions.

See you, Leaflady...enjoy your remodeling.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 9, 2009
5:39 PM

Post #6387265

hahahah! That was supposed to wisteria. Oh well.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 17, 2009
10:11 PM

Post #6425383

Just went to Niagara-on-the-Lake for a couple of days. Saw this house up for sale with Chionodoxa (blue) all over the place. This was just part of the property. Chionodoxa also ran out to the curb. Is this invasive? Is it just personal taste?


Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
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Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 17, 2009
10:17 PM

Post #6425413

Hi Sunny, the only thing I know for sure is that they naturalize very easily, so maybe if not controlled, they would be invasive. They seem to colonize fairly quickly. I haven't heard or read that they are invasive, and don't have any here at the moment, so can't tell you more than this. Maybe others will be able to.

We are up to 77 today. Just hoping it doesn't get too warm too fast as it sometimes is known to do.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 18, 2009
12:46 AM

Post #6425995

Hi Sharon,
Will move in five or ten years. If I don't plant all the things I say I won't, in new garden, there won't be anything in it!
I know too high a temperature here will shorten bloom time of the daffodils.
Is that sort of thing the problem with your potential temperatures?
Sunny
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2009
12:53 AM

Post #6426033

Too late for daffs here now, they have already bloomed and gone, but my tulips are blooming, and they don't like heat very much. I have been watching one that is 2 weeks old now, and it is still beautiful, but if it gets much warmer, it and the others will soon be gone. Doesn't seem to bother the iris, which is next, or the daylilies that will follow, but it wreaks havoc on bleeding hearts and columbine, too. Everything in its own time, of course, but sometimes the heat shortens the time.

I doubt that any garden of yours would be bare for very long. You wouldn't let it be!

Enjoy your weekend.



SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 18, 2009
2:28 AM

Post #6426387

Very interesting. Using the plants you mention.
Had warm weather for a week. Crocus, species tulips and Chionodoxa 'Giant Pink' at end of front garden! It's alive!
Good weekend yourself.

Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
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Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2009
2:44 AM

Post #6426436

Beautiful! Don't see any muscari. And our crocus is long gone, but was pretty for awhile about six weeks ago. Nice that yours all bloom at similar times.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 18, 2009
3:30 AM

Post #6426557

Tends to go: snowdrops, species crocus, hybrid crocus, species tulips, --- ,
but this is an early spring for us. Sunny spots first. Like muscari. Stays in clumps. Have a fair bit of it, but it flowers somewhat later.
Like yellow crocus, in part, because you can see it from a distance. Yellow mammoth crocus is an ochre yellow. Gertrude Jekyll apparently said that a perennial bed should have a bit of lemon? yellow to highlight other colors. Would go farther and say yellow is a very cheerful color, especially to greet you in spring.
Have a problem with hybrid crocus bulbs. Have planted them in groups of a single color, but working the soil through the growing season tends to mix the colors up. Mice (voles), picking them off, also doesn't help. Now need to either plant new single color groups each fall or use mixed color groups.
Was reading on-line what a meticulous gardener Monet was. Renoir was apparently much more casual and believed you shouldn't over-weed a garden! Think I'm a Monet rather than a Renoir gardener. But it's fun.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2009
3:40 AM

Post #6426588

Parameters, you think?

Monet's gardens were wonderful, very inspiring. I have tried to find his blue iris, and think I have come close, but somehow fall far short of his overall look. I am currently fighting an influx of dandelions right now. I don't think Monet included them in his gardens or his paintings.

Thumbnail by Sharran
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Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2009
3:42 AM

Post #6426596

And then for accent, there's always Ms. Jekyll's yellow...

Last year for both, of course, since mine have yet to bloom this season, but soon!

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 18, 2009
4:25 AM

Post #6426690

Not one for parameters, except in stats.
Thanks for the iris images. Beautiful. Love german irises. My very knowledgeable and experienced perennial gardening friend here complains the blooms don't last long enough. Still, I think they put on a wonderful show. Have just started using rebloomers (as below).
Actually, one reason went to Niagara-on-the-Lake was to identify an iris I purchased there last April. Was supposed to be 'Again and Again', but turned out to be a slightly irridescent fragrant violetty blue iris. They agreed that it was 'Feedback'. Love it. After communicating with the grower and the retailer it seems that the confusion was in rhyzomes purchased by the grower.
I must admit Gertrude Jekyll drives me up the wall for hating magenta in the garden. We have nice falls here and blocks of magenta new england aster (Alma Pötschke) are quite spectacular.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2009
5:04 AM

Post #6426792

Lots of magenta these days. I have an unnamed daylily that is about as magenta as it can get. If it gets any magenta-er it will explode, I think. And with all the magenta comes a deep bright orange throat. It was a gift, so I love it anyway.

Now if only I can find a photo...Ms. Gertrude would truly have a conniption fit.

This is not a great photo, but you get the idea.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2009
5:05 AM

Post #6426795

Actually that photo does not do the color justice, so you'll have to use your imagination. Sunglasses come to mind.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 18, 2009
3:39 PM

Post #6428000

Looks and sounds great.
magenta-orange - very interesting color combination.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 18, 2009
4:12 PM

Post #6428090

A very 'LOUD' color combo!
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 19, 2009
3:58 AM

Post #6430624

Started gardening today!
Own garden - mostly edging.
First two perennial plants started flowering: a lungbane (Pulmonaria rubra) and a primrose (Primula polyantha), both in sunnier spots. Am seeing leaves beginnings on columbines and Jacob's ladders. Just beginning to see white in some of expanding magnolia buds (star magnolia).
Sorry to hear about the dandelions. How are you handling them? A friend demonstrated a mechanical device on a long handle that seemed to work.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 19, 2009
4:09 AM

Post #6430650

If you promise to not laugh, this is my dandelion tool: I taped a very dull, very long butcher knife on to the end of a broom handle. Also glued it before I taped it. When I see a dandelion, I push the knife into the ground at an angle around the perimeter of the dandelion. The entire dandelion lifts right out. I just shake the dirt loose and toss the dandelion in a black trash bag. If it hasn't flowered, I'll toss it on the compost heap, but not very often, because I don't want it to spread a single seed. This works for me, but it is a neverending battle that I won't win, I know. I have not seen anything else that works any better, so until then, I'll keep my butcher knifed broom handle.

I just noticed today that my first columbine is blooming. I'll get a photo tomorrow, it was a little rainy today. I am glad you are getting some perennial blooms up your way.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 19, 2009
4:44 AM

Post #6430723

Necessity is the mother of invention. Excellent device, but doesn't sound like you'll be patenting it. Probably not a good idea to take it with you when you go to the bank. When I see the friend next weekend will ask about their contraption, though yours sounds more efficient.
Have some osteoarthritus myself, so getting back up from kneeling isn't always automatic. Find the leverage from a long-handed trowel comes in handy in getting up. Like the idea of the long handle. Find a spade a very comfortable tool to use.
Was digging out (blue) chionodoxa and puschkinia myself. I know. Don't think there will ever be a clear winner, at least while I'm still gardening.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 19, 2009
4:52 AM

Post #6430766

OK, I don't know puschkinia. On a mission to look it up.

Funny about taking my device to the bank, I will have to remember that. And yes, I have trouble getting to my feet, too, seems more and more each passing year, so whatever works.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 20, 2009
3:29 AM

Post #6435146

Second day of gardening. Not got out our own garden yet. Lovely weather,
not too hot or cold.
Told wife about your dandelion knife-stick. She said be careful (e.g. hitting a stone). Took the liberty of assuring her you are. Also, your description does include the words 'very dull'!
Funny about Puschkinia libanotica and Chionodoxa forbesii (C. lucilae: maybe the same plant). Comments on Dave's seem quite positive. Guess it all depends on the intended use. They really had spread in our back and front gardens, including into the lawn and just beginning, onto a neighbour's lawn.
The problem is that they spread by seed and they produce a lot of it. Added a note on Dave's: they seem to go from seed to flowering small bulb in two years. They're not always that easy to remove. I wonder if one should call a plant invasive if it spreads from your garden to your neighbour's, uninvited. Probably most people don't notice and don't care.
Heard at a lecture that lenten rose is replacing trillium in some American woods south of us. Confirmed this with lecturer. Think lenten rose has such a high profile among some gardeners that they'd rather not know.
Need to take computer in, probably tomorrow. Believe should get it back within a few days. Think could get it done faster, if it was not a Mac.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 20, 2009
3:37 AM

Post #6435199

I have a Mac, too, luckily it is new and I have had no problems with it.

It is interesting what is invasive in some areas, or rather what some consider invasive. I tend to consider them more aggravating than invasive.

Interesting about Lenten rose. I didn't know that, but I hate to think the trillium would ever be replaced. I love Lenten rose, too, though...and would be happy to have both. It is a little hot here for the wild trillium, which is my preference. It does grow in the area 'Land Between the Lakes'...I live about 6 or 7 miles from that acreage so I can see them in the wild quite often. (Something for you to google!) I do have Lenten rose in my garden.

Thank your wife for me...I am very careful. It is so dull, the only thing it will cut is dirt, I think. i have been using it for years!
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 20, 2009
4:51 AM

Post #6435439

Very interesting to see your area, the history (technology - the lakes - and civil war) and the wildlife and scenery. Had read that both Lincoln and Jefferson Davis were born in Kentucky. Park and historical interpretation are quite good here now, but we were always amazed when visiting, to see how advanced they were in the States.
Trilliums don't transplant well (Sorry: not suggesting you're off to dig them up). Apparently woodland plants tend to be very site specific. Better, for us, to try by getting trilliums raised horticulturally from seed.
We live in an area (southern Ontario and continuing East) which was once almost all woodland, but was disturbed by native farmers and then, of course, by immigrant loggers, farmers, etc. That means that almost all the plants which are native here, are adapted to go through their life cycles before the forest canopy closes over. Consequently native plants tend to be spring bloomers. Think shade plants, in general, tend to be spring bloomers, maybe for the same reason. Am a sunshine gardener because the big herbaceous flowers of summer and fall need sun.
(second edit: spelling!)
This message was edited Apr 20, 2009 1:07 AM

This message was edited Apr 20, 2009 1:25 AM
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 20, 2009
6:25 AM

Post #6435614

Sunny...when you have time, I'd like you to read one of my articles. You might like it:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/973/

I grew up in the mountains of Southeast Kentucky, part of the Appalachians, so the vernacular will be a little different to you. I think you will enjoy it.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 21, 2009
1:34 AM

Post #6439876

Hi Sharon,
Have the computer until Wednesday.
Read your trillium article - beautifully written and very interesting content.
Wife (taught high school English for 31 years) said how literary it is.
Taught high school Science myself (Chemistry teacher) for last 19 years of work. Before that taught Physical (specialty) and Socio-cultural Anthropology at a post secondary level.
We have several trillium woods around us and these are carpeted with white trilliums in early May. There are far fewer purple trilliums. Also, my wife's family cottage (Lake-of-Bays) used to have lots of white trilliums. Think my late mother-in-law may have been correct in blaming the deer for the large reduction in their numbers. It fits with what you say about the vulnerability of trilliums.
Sunny (also known as Charlie)
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 21, 2009
1:40 AM

Post #6439918

Meant to add: Humanities - Sounds like you may have taught English yourself.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2009
1:49 AM

Post #6439976

Thank you, Sunny (you are already Sunny to me, I will have to get used to Charlie). I am glad you enjoyed the article. Trillium is one of my favorite spring flowers.

We have a nice grouping of teachers here, I taught English and French early on, but spent most of my years teaching Humanities, and many areas of Art History and Studio Art. A total of 37 years was a long time to be teaching in public schools, but I would do it again if I could. I learned a lot about people. I loved teaching.

Interesting that we enjoyed teaching, and now we enjoy learning, particularly about nature. Most of my articles are based on experiences with wild flowers that grew in the mountains where I grew up. I live all the way across the state from those mountains now, but my fondest memories came from them. There is a vast difference in southeast Kentucky and my area here in western Kentucky. Going from east to west, we leave the mountains for the hills, and the hills for the flatland here. Many things that grew for me there, do not grow very easily here. But still I try.

Glad you still have your computer, and thank you to your wife. Seems the three of us have much in common.


Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2009
1:51 AM

Post #6439986

I was writing when you posted, so we crossed...yes, many similarities and parallels.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 21, 2009
3:37 AM

Post #6440523

I very much agree with you Sharon about enjoying learning. I'm very pro-teenager, but I'm also happy to now operate in another and more relaxing context. Your own movement and experience across Kentucky make for some very interesting contrasts.
I emigrated from London, England, in my mid twenties. Was an old and very urban environment then, though went to family cottages in some historical and scenic locations. Southern Ontario is so remarkably new by comparison.
I could have done with some of your Art History recently as am helping with some writing on gardens. After reading on-line, now know something about Italianate (new word for me) landscape painters, the Impressionists and a very tiny bit about abstract and cubist art (latter thanks to remarkable Brazilian landscape designer, Roberto Burle Marx). Very different from the Chemistry of Combustion or Atomic Theory!
Charlie
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2009
3:52 AM

Post #6440566

Very different, but art tells us about humanity, often more than the written word, as in the particular instance of pre history and the cave dwellers, the ancient Egyptians, and in your case, Stone Henge. Some we don't like, but we can still learn from.

You mentioned 'family cottages in some historical and scenic locations'...any photos?
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 21, 2009
4:19 AM

Post #6440653

For sure.
Stone Henge is certainly an enigma. Were some burials there which I heard have turned out to be intrusive. Think the gist is that Anglo-Saxons had used it to bury criminals, from their time, on un-hallowed ground.
Didn't use cameras much when young, but tomorrow will check for pictures of the Lake-of-Bays which is quite pretty.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2009
4:24 AM

Post #6440680

Somewhere I read that the Anglo Saxons considered it pagan territory, and used it accordingly. Don't remember where I read it, but now that you mentioned it I remember.

As much as anything, I love the longevity of the architecture in Europe. Ours is nothing comparatively speaking. Even your cottages are structurally sound, have been for centuries. Of course we have no centuries to speak of, but still...they get old, we tear them down. That has always bothered me.

Looking forward to pictures.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 21, 2009
4:53 AM

Post #6440779

We were reading along the same lines.
Guess it's all relative.
Thirty/forty years ago, spent some time in Washington D.C. and Northern Virginia. We were amazed at the long and fascinating history of the United States, compared to Canada.
Also: When just arrived in D.C. and walked out from hotel. Saw a Howard Johnson. Looked across the road. Saw a rather unusual building for D.C. Was it? Wasn't it? Yes. It was the Watergate complex. We were visiting history in the making!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2009
5:04 AM

Post #6440818

When you are in DC, history is always in the making!! Not always great history, but history at any rate.

It would be good if you could visit again sometime.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 21, 2009
3:45 PM

Post #6442298

Know what you are saying.
For sure.
Going to try for a couple of cottage pictures.
Lake-of-Bays - Hemlocks

Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
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SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 21, 2009
3:50 PM

Post #6442326

Early fall sunset.


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SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 21, 2009
3:58 PM

Post #6442370

Silly.
Most of my wife's family.
Wife has sunglasses on head.
Me taking picture.

Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
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Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2009
4:10 PM

Post #6442434

Just keep them coming, Sunny. I am loving all of them. Great trees and rocks at the cottage, and beautiful sunset. I live very near Kentucky and Barkley Lakes, and have some lovely sunset shots, too. There is nothing more beautiful than the sun setting over water, and there is no way to duplicate those colors.

Not silly, just a very happy family photo. Your wife is lovely, and so is her family. Something to treasure for sure. I think my hair/head has a permanent crease from sunglasses or reading glasses perched on top.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2009
4:24 AM

Post #6445766

Hi Sharon,
Going to try for oldest bed in our front garden now and last summer.


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Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2009
4:26 AM

Post #6445774

Hi Sunny,
Wondered where you were. Nice bed. Crocus and tulips, I see, what else? And what is in the beds nearer your house? And the tree?
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2009
4:28 AM

Post #6445775

Last summer.


SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2009
4:29 AM

Post #6445781

Didn't work.
Will try again.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2009
4:32 AM

Post #6445791

Sorry Sharon.
Will try one more time.

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Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2009
4:36 AM

Post #6445809

Ah beautiful! Love the coneflowers. What's in the back, nearer the street? Not dianthus, is it? And look at the lone little daylily. Very lovely. Any surprises for fall?

It is so pretty it is well worth waiting for.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2009
4:40 AM

Post #6445828

Wanted to show the difference three months makes to that bed.
Beds nearer the house were planted last year after stonework was done.
The white is actually Chionodoxa 'Giant Pink', which it seems does not seed much (or at all). I've been told otherwise. I'm not that great a photographer, but it never seems to take a good picture.
Couple of days of gardening - and feeling quite stiff (notably knees) - not in shape yet (well as good as I can get into shape!).
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2009
4:46 AM

Post #6445852

I always forget at the beginning of gardening season how much the first week of gardening hurts. Takes me the better part of a month to even get callouses built up. And I creak when I try to move.

Three months makes a tremendous difference. I found my columbines blooming today, and irises are full of buds. I will soon have all purple blooms, when the rhododendron pops open. But soon the columbine will begin their pink blooms. Such is the genetics of the columbine family I think. Started with one plant, one color, now I have many plants, many colors. Also have some in a red shade, but just getting them started, new seed variety.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2009
4:57 AM

Post #6445884

I can see: Rudbeckia 'Goldsturm' closest: the culver's root 'Fascination' (to left back) is just about finished: High on other side is purple loosestrife 'Morden Pink' (still going strong): the blue is balloon flower: the Helenium sp (in front of culver's root) is just coming out: and that bed contains quite a lot of New England aster 'Alma Pötschke' (not out yet). As you say, there's purple coneflower at the front ('Magnum' - very reliable - I also like the recurved flower petals - can see more of the flower from the side).
How's things going yourself?
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2009
5:05 AM

Post #6445907

How does culver's root do for you? I have some trouble with it here, but didn't in the mountains. Hotter here, I think. Where I grew up is more like your area. Loosestrife is what I couldn't identify. My balloon flowers bloom late and long, I have white and purple, as they age, the bloom becomes bluer. I have no asters, not sure why, just have never had them.

Things are going very well. Trying to get a book compiled and to a publisher for consideration. Two publishers actually are interested. Keeps me at the computer and I am beginning to wonder if my eyes will last as long as I need them to. When my husband was living he kept me more grounded, without him I lose track of time, and write for too many consecutive hours. I need a more disciplined routine.

Thanks for asking. What about you?
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2009
5:12 AM

Post #6445920

I am crazy about daylilies, and here is a portion of my largest daylily bed last summer.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2009
5:16 AM

Post #6445938

In past, have not had time to raise plants from seed. Do have and use columbines though. Lovely plants. Can see a number just coming up now. I like the sound of your larger number of columbines.
Love rhodendrons, but our area has alkaline soil. We would have to grow them in acidified raised beds.
Had another indication today how much easier annual gardening is than perennial gardening. Was at accountant's (he grows annuals). He says for his annual gardening he starts the season by rotortilling the beds. Probably had to dig them by hand in the first place, but rotortilling would just spead the weeds around in a perennial garden. You can't just clean out a perennial bed at the end of the growing season.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2009
5:32 AM

Post #6445970

But I like the constancy of perennials. They are comfortable to me. They are more work, and I have one bed that I am fighting right now. I mixed annuals in with perennials last year. Dumb. So now I am going from row to row, cleaning out alternate rows. Driving myself crazy, and thinking i'll just add more perennials by thinning from other beds. I used to be a little more structured, but having retired added that element of adventure, I think.

I have a friend who only plants perennials. Lovely gardens, but when they are gone, they are gone. I like my foliage.

I think I am in a rut, and would like to change, but am not willing to give up any of my perennial gardens.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2009
5:34 AM

Post #6445973

Same plant, just a little further down the garden...

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2009
5:46 AM

Post #6446002

I like all garden plants, but culver's root is one of my very favorite ones. It does very well here (very hardy). The bees love it. I find balloon flowers also very hardy (once established): also drought tolerant. The white and blue-purple seem hardier than the pink. Am also a huge lover of asters (frikart's - very long flowering: calico - lovely shape late in the season - New England (both magenta and purple) and others. We have long and comfortable falls here and can benefit from late summer and fall plants.
Love your daylilies. You may have seen one or two on the front of that bed in the picture. Only planted them two years ago and bed is crowded. Like the double orange 'Mary Brown' but its not very vigorous in my circumstances.
Your book sounds very interesting. Am committed to some time editing myself, as said.
Suspect I may be more undisciplined than you.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2009
5:57 AM

Post #6446032

Most of my gardening is all perennial, but it takes certain requirements (e.g. very deep beds with large numbers of plants in them and a careful avoidance of bad runners and seeders). Do use annuals in small areas (tuberous begonias, zinnias, etc), but avoid seeders like cleome.
Love the columbines.
Adventure is great, just not with seeders and runners!
Better hit the sack. Will check the thread before I take computer in.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2009
5:59 AM

Post #6446036

Culver's root was at one time used as a medicinal plant, and as such has some interesting stories. I love the history of plants, their uses many years ago. I wish I could grow it here. Now you have perked my interest in asters. I am not sure why I don't have them. Dianthus is another that I have let fall by the wayside.

I suspect your is a good place for hostas, do you grow them?
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2009
6:00 AM

Post #6446038

I'll look forward to your computer's return. Have a good week.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2009
1:56 PM

Post #6446908

Thanks Sharon,
You too. It will be like keeping my mouth shut!
Closer picture of my favorite culver's root. Shows the fasciation (elongation of the growing tip - flattening of tip of flower spike that routinely occurs in 'Fascination').
Keep up the good work!
Speak to you soon.

Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 26, 2009
9:31 AM

Post #6464337

culvers root is really interestingSunntborders
I'm going to check it out.
Just lurking today.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2009
4:15 AM

Post #6473282

Hi ge1836,
I love the plant (the bees love it too). It's a sunshine plant.
I do normally deadhead the central spikes (bloom first) to tidy the plant up,
but hadn't in picture to show the fasciation. Think it's only the central spikes that may show this peculiarity (and only in the cultivar, 'Fascination'). The species culver's root is also excellent, as is the cultivar 'Lavendelturm' ('Lavender Tower'). Looking for other cultivars!
Sunny
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2009
4:26 AM

Post #6473292

Hi Sharon,
Back in circulation. Couldn't remember which thread we were talking on!
Must be getting old.
Pretty humid (and hot) today. I really must work on being an early starter.
Starting gardening at 11 oclock and working through the heat of the day really isn't the best strategy. Going to be cooler and raining tomorrow.
Sunny


Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 28, 2009
4:32 AM

Post #6473306

Hi Sunny,
Nice to have you back among the conversant!
It has happened here, too...the heat suddenly appeared, and my hours of garden work were shortened considerably. It has been in the mid 80's for more than 5 days now. I have no complaints, but not sure what happened to the 70's. The spring bulbs are no longer, and my bearded iris, rhododendron and roses have bloomed seemingly overnight.
Fun to see, though.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2009
4:52 AM

Post #6473343

very pretty, Sharon.

LouC
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2009
4:53 AM

Post #6473346

Still got bulbs!
Below: our front garden today.
You are way ahead of us.
Today, the anenomes (ranunuloides and robisoniana have just started blooming). Love irises, but way too early. Only shrub roses and Explorer Series Roses are fully hardy here.
Love your picture of rhodendron (?), but as said, we have alkaline soil.
Had latter emphasized in my school, where a number of shrubs were donated for the flower beds I put in. One donor insisted I take rhododendrons, though garden didn't contain raised acidified beds. They only lasted about two years.
Pity because such pretty flowers.


Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 28, 2009
4:56 AM

Post #6473354

Hello Lou,
I am so glad to see you here.

I have lots of purples blooming, funny how that happened, but this will be the week of purples in the front yard, i think. Columbine, iris, the rhodo, variegated vinca, just lots of purple.
But in the back gardens, I have roses...

For you, LouC..

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2009
4:58 AM

Post #6473361

Thank you, beautiful red. Can't sleep.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 28, 2009
5:00 AM

Post #6473368

Sunny, that bed has really taken off...it was very sparse the last time I saw it. Looking good up there.

Our rhododendron does well here, but this one is about 40 years old, and is very nearly succumbing to old age, I think. I doubt it will last much longer. It has been very showy for all these years, though, and I hate to lose it.


SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2009
5:20 AM

Post #6473412

In my case, it's 'got to sleep',
even when there's much more interesting things to do!
Never liked sleeping.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 28, 2009
5:27 AM

Post #6473422

Agree with you on that one, Sunny.
But it's on my must do list, too, even though there are other things that I much prefer.
You all have a good day tomorrow.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 28, 2009
8:45 AM

Post #6473559

That reminds me to edge some of the borders.Nice house Sunny
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2009
12:35 PM

Post #6473990

Hi ge1836,
Took several years of class from a local horticultural-environmentalist expert.
He said edge down about a foot with a spade and it needs to do be done once a year. We have heavy clay. Only go down about half that myself and need to do it twice a year. Tend to continually build up my perennial beds by working in (weedless) composed matter in spring and fall. Whatever the case, edging really makes a garden look better and, of course, it keeps the lawn out of the flower beds and it seems to help keep weeds out of the lawn.
You probably know: houses really tend to suck your money up (this wrong, that wrong), but I love the gardens (rather spend the money on them, though don't think you get it back when you sell the house!). Off to garden.
Sunny

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 28, 2009
1:14 PM

Post #6474177

I live with my kids they take care of whats wrong with the house, so I can obcess about the gardens
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2009
4:08 PM

Post #6474897

Back. Pouring with rain.
You're a useful person to have around.
Shouldn't be too perfectionist about the garden. I am!
Off to price shrimp manure.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 28, 2009
4:11 PM

Post #6474913

shrimp manure?
My cats would love it.
They already think the mulched beds are just big litter boxes.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2009
10:14 PM

Post #6476648

You put it that way ge1836, my wife would love it too! I'm not absolutely sure what it is, as yet, but I suspect it might be mainly seaweed plus soil. Got to check. Found last year that the huge advantage of it is that it contains no weed seeds.
Despite the cats, think mulching is the way to go. Don't use it myself because like to see the surface of the soil, while I still can (till end May?). Plant perennials pretty close and typically divide in a few years. Don't have to tell you the advantages of mulching.
Our obese cat likes to go out and eat my plants (irritates me) and then go in and be sick on the carpets (irritates my wife).

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 29, 2009
8:59 AM

Post #6478496

Oddly enough I also have an obese cat that never goes out side unless its 60* or above.
Seedless mulch and compost, now there's a great Idea.
GF of mine who farms organicaly gave me hundreds of pounds of her compost. I used it on DL's last fall. Now I can find where the plants are because of the stacys weeds that came with it.
We mulch here because the soil is clay and has no nutritive value.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 29, 2009
2:16 PM

Post #6479313

Hi ge,
Good to hear from you.
Will get back to you later in day.
Sunny
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 29, 2009
2:29 PM

Post #6479369

Running behind today...and the day hasn't started yet. Lots of iris blooming now, but only one of each of the color groups. That's strange.

Here is a painting I did of my last year's calla lily. JoAnn, thought you might like to see it. Did it too quickly because it was to be a gift, so put it off till the day before the birthday, nothing like being a procrastinator. I don't paint much during gardening season, is that true for you too, JoAnn?

This was such a simple thing to do, particularly in acrylics, but fast, unlike your watercolors.

Sunny...hope your day is good, too.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2009
2:30 PM

Post #6479378

Not fair for one person to have so many talents. I love the painting. I can't even draw stick people.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 29, 2009
3:09 PM

Post #6479512

Nice Sharran the mood is there.
I dont paint duering the garden season and I do not paint pleinaire(out doors)

This message was edited Apr 29, 2009 11:10 AM
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 29, 2009
7:07 PM

Post #6480537

Hi ge, Sharon and LouC.
Nice painting Sharon! Clever artist as LouC says.
Would like to try painting myself sometimes. LouC should try abstract art.
Ge (going to capitalize first letter - hope that's OK) - Won't go GE because that's 'genetically engineered'. Know exactly what you're saying about weeds in compost. Bet we all do. We have heavy clay and also add lots of organic matter. Have gardened on sandy soil. Much easier, but I have more confidence in clay than sand. One of the really tricky things about clay is that it is easy to slip on when wet.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 30, 2009
9:01 AM

Post #6483022

I hear you.
I am not young and nimble and shoved the spade into the ground ,lost my balance and fell backward. First time on the ground in 30 years. Now that thats over I'm not affraid of it anymore.
I carry a bucket of compost and potting soil and manure (any organic matter) mixed together, dig the hole adding the clay to the bucket and mix it,then fill in the hole around the plant.My other house was sand. I preferr clay, easier to dig after a rain.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2009
2:28 PM

Post #6483711

Got to be careful Ge - I'm not exactly a spring chicken.
Working on garden today which has weathered limestone rocks in it - very pretty - but very slippery, when wet. As we know, got to take care on clay too. It is a bit wet, but that is also good for the perennials I'm having to dig up and replant. Bed is really overrun with spring and latter bulb plants that spread by seed (especially puschkinia (small white plants with light blue lines in flower) and large alliums (decorative onions)).
Have regular arthritis - mainly knees - don't let it bother me too much - but I
think it might affect my sense of balance. Watch it yourself too.
Sunny

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 30, 2009
2:34 PM

Post #6483742

Without hijacking the thread I can tell you the arthritic knees do affect your balance. Feet too. I'm riddled with it but refuse to just lay down and take it. Motrin,Motrin,Motrin chant as I go.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 30, 2009
2:47 PM

Post #6483792

And then there are those of us who rely on nerve root injections in our backs just so our legs will walk. But oh well, anything, as long as we can dig a hole and plant a flower. And the injections only take one day away from gardening (yesterday), and now I am good for the rest of the summer!!

This is my day to get out there and tackle those weeds that grew up yesterday while I recouped from the injections.

Finally my old yellow and white irises are blooming, I was beginning to think they had faded into oblivion. I also have some heirloom tomato plants that need to be put in the ground, and a few beans, it might be a dirty muddy day because I can see clouds forming. I definitely wanted sunshine today.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 30, 2009
3:35 PM

Post #6484008

Looks like we are in for another over-cast day. Saw on the tv news that on the other side of Dallas (we are south) about 50 miles from here that they had between 10-14 inches of rain yesterday. Just three weeks ago today is when we had the wildfires and it cleared some astronomical number of acres (120,000 acres or more). They are getting the floods now and while it sounds like a good thing, it is wreaking more havoc. I feel so sorry for everyone who is standing in the wake of nature with no place to hide.

Christi
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 30, 2009
4:02 PM

Post #6484127

It is snowing in Baker Oregon this morning.
I told my friend there: Merry Christmas.

Looks like rain here today, but my weeds are higher than my knees at a couple of spots, so I am going to have to get out there between raindrops. We do need rain, so I won't complain yet.

Morning Christi, I hope this day is good for you and the rest of our crew. I will be spending my day on my knees dodging raindrops, because I am determined to get these beds weeded. Let's hope I can crawl back into the house once I finish.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 30, 2009
4:43 PM

Post #6484254

UMMMMMph Sharran. Good luck
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2009
6:02 PM

Post #6484534

Christi - good to know arthritic knees and balance problems are related. Now I know it's not my brain.
Sharon - wish you only had arthritis - scratch - wish you wouldn't have that either.
LouC - You must be the fittest of all.
Sharon - weeds - I find a coffee (and donut) at the beginning and a beer at the end does help. Really trying to cut out the donut, but not today.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 30, 2009
6:06 PM

Post #6484548

Groooaaannnnnnn...
Just a little break. Worried about my holly tree. Some years ago it came up on its own, and is a lovely pyramid now, about 20 feet tall. When we had the horrific ice storm at the end of January, it was bowed over frozen against my trellis. Well, when it thawed some 10 days later, the holly sprung right back up, and I thought it was OK, but now it is shedding leaves like crazy, but on some branches I see new growth. Not sure how to deal with it, but think I will give it time and a trim. Maybe that will help.

Break over, I am dragging, but knees work fine.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 30, 2009
6:14 PM

Post #6484576

Maybe we should start a" creeky gardener forum".
Give some of these youngsters a glimps into their future.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 30, 2009
7:15 PM

Post #6484876

Sounds like an idea to me.
Thankfully a little shower came along, gave me an excuse for another break!
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 30, 2009
7:19 PM

Post #6484896

While I somewhat resented the title of "Senior Citizen" for awhile, it doesn't sound so bad now that I have entered the "elderly" range.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

April 30, 2009
7:20 PM

Post #6484901

I have what I call "geezer moments"
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 30, 2009
7:22 PM

Post #6484911

Still croaking like I have whooping cough but the sun is out for a moment and a walk in my garden is always good for the soul.

Later.

Christi
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2009
11:47 PM

Post #6485987

Funny thing about gardening - you're not usually interested in it when your young and quite fit. Then when it gets to be a bit of a physical challenge, you decide you love it.
Still, in all seriousness, it's great exercise for joints, etc.
'Senior citizen' is OK when you get discounts on things!
(Sorry - think I confused Christi and Ge above - must be a senior creeky geezer).

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

April 30, 2009
11:53 PM

Post #6486014

Chuckle...

Must be. I remember being offended when I was first offered the senior special at a breakfast place a few years ago. Discount was nice, though.

I dunno, those years we were young we were busy doing other things, I think. I have always gardened, but not to the extent that I do now. Now it is an obsession, and I am not happy unless I am outside. Even though it goes hand in hand with creaky bones and aches and pains. Worth it, I think. I surely am not going to get my exercise working out to a video!

It's raining.
And no, I am not nearly finished.
And rain tomorrow.
Rats. But oh my, I have a ton of iris and roses blooming.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 1, 2009
1:23 AM

Post #6486392

Think gardening is good for the mind - very mentally relaxing.
Love to work in among the bees.
Noticing as many bumblebees, in our back garden, as honey bees. Read something like there normally being 20? times more honey bees than bumblebees. Maybe it's because the weather keeps getting a bit cool.

Love irises Sharon, though as said too early for them here. Lovely picture.
My professional horticulturalist friend complains that irises don't bloom for long enough. I don't agree, though the more of them you have, the better the showing. I don't think irises like competition from other perennials; they like space. They seem to do fine at the front of the beds. (Sun on tops of rhizomes etc.)

Have used Canadian Explorer Series and other roses (fully winter-hardy here) in mixed perennial beds. They do very well, but the problem is they tend to rip your arms when you are working in a bed.

We have rain tonight, which is very convenient, because I just dug over and replanted a perennial bed.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 1, 2009
2:05 AM

Post #6486697

Rain here still tonight, sometimes heavy. The iris will be drooping and the roses too. I might have to go out tomorrow and make little crutches for them. I surely have enough small branches all over the yard to do that.

Roses do rip into you, don't they? I have New Dawn, a white climber, and it is not getting enough sunshine where it is. I am going to cut it back and try to move it. I am sure I will be shredded before getting it done because its thorns are absolutely ruthless. Maybe if I wear a heavy longsleeved denim shirt, and those oven mitts that come up to the elbows, perhaps overalls...boots...I might get it moved. You think?

Even then, it'll probably win the battle.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 1, 2009
2:33 AM

Post #6486841

Yes!
Your'e also obviously a lot more cunning and devious than the rose.
Usually wear long pants and longsleaved shirt myself when garden.
One thing I have trouble with, is wearing gloves. Certainly with a rose.
But there are lots of times when I can do much better without gloves
e.g. planting small bulbs, pulling up grass in a flower bed, even planting
flowers.
Prop up a large number of plants myself, usually with bamboo stakes and twine. Small branches may look better with something like an iris.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 1, 2009
3:07 AM

Post #6486990

I have bamboo growing, and saved the bare branches from last year. They of course have forks, so that's what I will use.

I hate gloves, too, but try to wear them most of the time.

Here's Sophie's Rose...somehow I have ended up with about 3 of them, and they are all in bloom, pretty blooms, and not too prickly. Very full foliage.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 1, 2009
10:06 AM

Post #6487616

All the rose talk makes me jealous. DD is the rose expert in this house. She doesnt garden as much as I do so I wish she would add a few more roses to the ones we already have. We have about 4 NOID's from the former owner.
Jo Ann
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 1, 2009
10:14 AM

Post #6487630

Aunt Bett would be so proud of you. She probably was even when you were a little tyke.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 1, 2009
2:13 PM

Post #6488309

Lou, you have read too many of my stories...
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 1, 2009
3:10 PM

Post #6488609

Computer problems again.
Going back for service.
Will be back when fixed.
Sunny
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 1, 2009
3:13 PM

Post #6488626

Good grief Sunny...
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2009
1:23 AM

Post #6491127

Got it back - but for how long?
Don't know what problem is. May be one of attachment devices. Got to find out which it could be. Not very computer literate. Am a lot more confident with learning than doing.
Lovely rose. Gardening with gloves on, can be like writing with gloves on. Still, writing is easier on your hands.
Worked on own garden today - mostly digging out chionodoxa and puschkinia, deadheading giant pink chionodoxa (to prevent seeding) and some perennial division. Had a corydalis beginning to seed over the place - pretty sure was Corydalis solida (small with purplish flowers). Dug it out because is it difficult to control: grows from a corm or bulb, so if you pull it out you leave the corm behind. Love Corydalis lutea (golden corydalis) - fleshy root and can just hoe it away if you need to. Has a phenomenally long bloom time and grows well in a fair amount of shade.
Tried to get a picture of the Anenome robinsoniana - light lavender color, very pretty - but it just comes out as off-white (same with quite attractive Chionodoxa Giant Pink).
Getting daffodils blooming now - so long after Sharon's.
Trilliums in garden are in bud. Will certainly get picture of local trillium woods when in bloom.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2009
1:38 AM

Post #6491211

I love trilliums, they are your national flower there, I think. I remember learning that when I wrote an article on them.

Well I have tons of columbine blooming. It will bloom off and on all summer, I think because it is in dappled sunlight. I can't seem to grow it in other places though. I like its foliage as well as it's comical bloom. There was some lovely wild columbine in Alaska, red to red/orange. Huge things, of course everything in Alaska was huge, even the dandelions looked like chrysanthemums. And the Himalayan poppies, oh my, how beautiful. I doubt they would even bother to peep up out of the ground here, but I'd sure like to try.

I am computer illiterate, Sunny, but think you and i might be 2 of the few Mac users aboard. Can't remember if JoAnn has a mac or not. I can use it, but don't know a thing about fixing it if it ever decides to quit on me.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2009
2:44 AM

Post #6491535

A Mac is at the top of my wish list. My PC is over 6 years old and I am to understand that is when the button pushes that kills it. Preprogrammed obsolence. I have upgraded everything possible and it is beginning to little quirks here and there. Guess I can't say I haven't been warned. Did a short walk in the garden and the hackberry seedlings are everywhere since we have had rain. Too bad there isn't a market for them. I could get a new Mac almost overnight. Still too much congestion to stay long enough to do anything about them. Guess I will soon have a forest.

Just took all of these meds that aren't helping so guess I will turn in and hope I sleep.

One day at a time.

Christi
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2009
4:09 AM

Post #6491812

Glad Christi mentioned the hackberry. After all, we are 'The Hackberry Tree and Other Stuff'. Back to our roots.
Interesting how few people are using Macs - think I'd seen, for the population at large, about 10%.
If we have to get another computer, my son will be pushing for a Mac again.
He seems to be getting support from Christi and Sharon hasn't said a word against Macs.
Love the sound of the Alaskan plants Sharon. Sounds like you went there.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2009
4:16 AM

Post #6491827

I absolutely love my Mac, Sunny...love it. I can't even use my old PC anymore. I would not have anything else.

I did go to Alaska for about 10 days last June. I had been asked to create a memorial garden for a long time DG member who lost her life to a brain tumor last May. So I went to Alaska, and built a memory garden using all her favorite plants and garden decor. I'll tell you I was scared to death because I didn't know a thing about Alaskan native plants or the environment. It was amazing, though, and I loved every minute there. It was in Seward which is located on the Kenai Peninsula, and the soil is absolutely rich. Black gold. The Salmon River runs right behind where I was, and everytime it floods, it just enriches the soil that much more.

Beautiful country, lovely people. A trip of a lifetime, and believe me I learned a lot! I still can't believe this little country gal from KY went all the way to Alaska and planted a garden, though. And my friend there, the sister of the lady who died, tells me that even the Himalayan poppies are coming right back up already, and the snow just melted this week, I think. I can't wait to see if all the other plants return. I hope I did something right.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2009
4:51 AM

Post #6491886

The memorial garden - What a nice thing to do - that was the something right.
Lot of people wouldn't take the time or effort or have the imagination.
Alaska sounds very interesting. Snow there just melted this week!
My friend at Merlin's Hollow (garden) here, always grows Himalayan (blue) poppies. Says easy to start here, but problem is hot spells in summer.
Presumably Alaska is that much colder.
Another vote for Macs.
Better hit the sack - You know Sharon - have to admit - your 'must do list' (sleeping) does make sense.
Charlie (Seems equivalent to Sharon and Christi)
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2009
5:00 AM

Post #6491902

Good night, Charlie.
Think I might have to hang it up for the night, too.

Hope your tomorrow is good.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2009
11:19 AM

Post #6492235

I don't have a Mac because they are twice or more as expensive as other PC's. Probably the reason for the smaller percentage of owners.

Christi
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2009
2:42 PM

Post #6492797

I think things like computers are even more here. Bet your right Christi, about cost.
Off to breakfast - the highlight of the week! Bit too nippy to sit outside today.
Haven't had the traditional English breakfast for years - the high fat content one - but love scrambled eggs and homefries and coffee. Would like a few baked beans too - but I've never seen baked beans served in a restaurant in Canada - or in U.S. either. Maybe it's also too old fashioned in England now. After gardening, think going out for breakfast at Jonathan's on Saturday morning is my favorite activity. This isn't entirely age-related - admit I did like such food since youth.
Charlie
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2009
2:49 PM

Post #6492827

I haven't had breakfast out in years, Charlie, and that sounds like such a fun treat. There are a lot of 'high grease' breakfast places close by, I guess my favorite might be the Cracker Barrel chain. I like their cooked apples and biscuits. Silly because I could make my own, but never do anymore.

So you have a great breakfast, I have some DG friends coming for the day from northern Illinois. It is raining, and I am afraid we won't be wading through the garden. We will have to remain inside and look at quilts instead. But it will be fun.

You all have a good day, I need to decide what to create for lunch.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 2, 2009
4:17 PM

Post #6493228

Cracker Barrel chain - sound like a place worth knowing.
Got to admit one can make a much healthier breakfast at home - usually do.
Sharon sounds like a busy day.
Me - off gardening. Lots of weeds and invasives to deal with, still lots will get away.
Good day to all, too.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2009
12:56 PM

Post #6496418

Hi all,
Christi - heard about thunderstorms in Dallas
- think you said you were south of Dallas
- hope all well
Charlie
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 3, 2009
1:18 PM

Post #6496504

Yes, Charlie, I am 14 miles from downtown Dallas straight south on I35. Dallas weather service covers from Abilene to Texarkana, west to east, and Waco to the Red River, south to north. That is a huge area and one can be having snow while the other end is in the 60's. We had 1 1/2 inches rain and lots of high winds and lightening but no damage.
North of here was a whole 'nuther story. Probably 50 miles from me or less it rained 10-14 inches and wind sheer did lots of damage. If Dallas proper is used as a center of a spoke that is not far at all. Some of those people were in the wildfire area (120,000 acres) 3 weeks ago and now it is all mud and the creeks are overflowing. This is our tornado season and we were under warnings all day yesterday. I have been directly through 3 tornadoes and it is not fun. The hair on your body literally stands up from the electric tension in the air.

Christi
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2009
2:29 PM

Post #6496745

Christi,
- great to hear no damage
- very interesting description: When I taught high school, there was a unit on
'Extreme Weather'. You would have been a fantastic guest speaker. We read
about such variable weather, but you really need to hear from somebody in
the region.
- there is a very very occasional tornado north of us. In all my teaching of
weather and electricity, I never heard about the electrical charge on humans
in tornados. Makes sense. Am sure 'no fun' is putting it lightly.
Charlie
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 3, 2009
3:16 PM

Post #6496941

I am no scientist...far from it. This is only a personal observation and after three experiences you get to recognize it. We were under tornado watch all day yesterday and all the ingredients were there. Thanks for the undeserved compliment. The animals sense it first. Our community used to be rural and the barnyard animals prance around, the dogs and cats are antsy. Bird disappear. By then it is on top of you. The view of damage on the ground is much, much worse than what a tv camera can pick up. I guess all natural disasters are like that.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 3, 2009
5:13 PM

Post #6497466

We have similar weather patterns here, too, Christi, and during tornado season, the hair on my cats, both inside cats, stands straight up. One is yellow with longish hair, looks exactly like a miniature lion. He is my weather predictor. I haven't looked at myself in the mirror, but maybe mine does that too.

Right now we have had about 4 days of rain, and my back garden is much like a bog. Just 4 days ago I was watering my plants. Though it won't flood here at my house, the area is in a flood warning zone at the moment, and some roads near the river are already under water. We also have high winds still, but nothing to compare to you. About all they did for me was to shake loose those limbs that were still hanging by a thread of bark from the January/February ice storm.

That particular storm, 10 days without electricity...a once in a lifetime storm, by the way, ...will have changed my pattern of sunlight. It tore the limbs from my trees and left them bare naked except for trunks. I wonder if my shade loving plants will fry this summer. There is some shade, because some branches were left on the maples, but the oaks are bare with patches of leaves growing from the trunks. And lots, if not all, lost their tops. Still it is very pretty with all the green of the moment, but come July, my gardens might well be toast.

Like all things, I guess we'll see.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2009
12:10 AM

Post #6499221

Our last tornado (May 9,1994) that actually hit us destroyed 700 homes in our town by skipping around. Two doors down from me the roof was taken off. We lost 5 mature trees all the way to the roots. Couldn't open the front door because the sycamore that stood near the street was laying on it...some 50 feet tall. Sure 'nuff changed things around here. It jumped the freeway and followed the creek into the next community and took the entire business area off the map. Shame because it was a stop on the stagecoach route and was over 100+ years old. Nothing lasts forever on this planet.

I hope your trees recover. We cut down three mature trees last year because they were dying. My Japanese Bloodgood Maple is beautiful right now but in a week or so it will be cooked. Supposed to be an understory tree. I just may buy a picnic canopy to protect it until the pecan that is growing like a weed gets big enough to protect it. Now that's another tree that drives me crazy. This was an off-year for pecans so we haven't had too many seedlings but boy last year was a doozy.

Anyone want some red oak, pecan, or hackberry seedlings. Have ooodles and gobs.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
12:24 AM

Post #6499278

Christi,
Tell me about the red oak? What is different?
I guess I could look it up, now couldn't I... But I am feeling my age. I went to the grocery, and the parking lot was flooded with water. It was only drizzly, just a light rain. Of course I wore my gardening crocs, and jeans that are too long, as all jeans are for me. They dragged in the water, but it wasn't too bad, I thought. By the time I got the groceries put away, grabbed a bite to eat, changed clothes and shoes, I am sitting here shivering. I simply cannot get warm.
But I am going to look up the red oak, and maybe pecan...though I am sure in my wildest dreams the pecan won't grow for me.

Off to research...
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2009
12:43 AM

Post #6499351

There are multiple varieties of Red Oak and I sorry to say I don't know one from another.
It is native for us as well as the pecan so there is little to do. My neighbor has the original pecan. Mine is from seedlings that I decided to protect because I needed a tree there.
The native tastes the best but it is no bigger than a thumbnail. The paper shell pecan is a graft on the native. Really big pecans. She has one of those but the squirrels are faster than we are.

I do know that one of the neighbors has a red oak that doesn't drop it's leaves until spring and we all hate it. We all clean up the leaves and dutifully put them in the compost (takes two years to break down red oak leaves) and just as you get your spring beds going...this other tree drops its leaves and makes a big mess. Have to clean them up because the pill bugs, snails and slugs hide in them.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
12:53 AM

Post #6499413

OK, Lou, you can keep your massive amounts of seedlings. I have a similar problem with maple seedlings, the little 'helicopter' seeds that root themselves in my flower pots, flower beds, roof, gutters, and the wheel covers of my car if it ever sat still long enough. By the way, would you like a maple tree seedling or two?
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2009
12:56 AM

Post #6499427

Amazing - and we about snow and ice.
It is extremely interesting to hear the descriptions of the two of you.
So different from our weather.
Sharon's cats must be quite a sight (especially the yellow lion). I could get that effect with a van de Graff generator, but of course the cats wouldn't follow the safety instructions.
Guess the pesky seedlings aren't so bad in the overall scheme of things.
Was also thinking - gardens, when read Christi's 'nothing lasts for ever on this planet'.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
1:07 AM

Post #6499491

Charlie,
Here is the lion when he was a bit miffed that I was painting his favorite room and had all the furniture and everything else all awry. I had taken a break, and returned to again climb the ladder. 'Not again,' he said...

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2009
1:17 AM

Post #6499548

He's gorgeous - what a picture! - we're cat people too.
Have some experience with maples too.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
2:01 AM

Post #6499743

This cat is uncanny. I have read about cats like that, but this one is simply beyond words. And he talks, grumbles and mumbles, but he is only 2 years old. I swear he knows my thoughts. And he anticipates them. His feelings also show on his face. My other cat, Daisy, is very calm, very quiet, and accommodating. Jazz, however, lets the world know how he feels. If I happen to be in a room where he isn't, he starts calling, wailing, until I answer and tell him where I am. He is also much like a guard cat. When a strange car appears in the driveway, like a flash he is at the window, and if he doesn't recognize the car, he yells. If I tell him it's OK, then he will go about his business, but if I don't know who it is either, he stands beside my legs, until I answer the door, then waits to see what I do. And he will not go outside.

Well, I am sure you didn't ask to know about the personality of a miniature lion, but even so, there you have it. He also knows how to turn the radio on, and does so if I stay on the phone for longer than he wants.

Daisy on the other hand, ignores both of us. She is a perfectly symmetrical tuxedo cat, and very beautiful. They are both rescues, and rarely are out of my sight. Silly cats.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2009
4:19 AM

Post #6500512

Sharon - thanks for the low down on Jazz and Daisy - and the picture of Daisy. Daisy is cute and Jazz is good looking and must be a real character.
We actually had two cats too, both from same cat hostel. They were as different as chalk and cheese. One died a year or two ago and was quite elderly. Pebbles was a tiny cat with a big heart; she absolutely loved her family and was very talkative. Our cats were in-door cats, but could go outside into our back garden.Pebbles was very territorial and if ever she found another cat, a speedy intervention was required to prevent a major dust-up. She actually also chased off squirrels and birds. Nevertheless, the most common word people used to description her was 'sweet'.
Buddy her obese brother (not biological), still living with us, has always been devoted to food. He always manages to knock food out of his plate and sometimes also manages to wipe it up the wall. His main focus in the garden has been to eat my plants and then come in and bring them up on the carpet. If he sees a cat in the garden, he runs in in panic. On the other hand, he is well known at the vets', where I think he's tried to kill everybody.
At this point in time, his diabetic food has been wonderful and not only has he trimmed down a lot, he's in such great shape that he does not need insulin shots. He can now clean himself and actually now likes being brushed. Though he has got a lot more friendly, his first love will always be food.








Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
4:32 AM

Post #6500551

Charlie, that is too funny. Buddy is well known to the vets, Jazz is quite well known there, too. I guess cats like people have their own personalities. And I like their independence, though Jazz has to be within sight of me.

We are supposed to have sunshine tomorrow, i really hope so, it has been since last Wednesday, I think, since I have even glimpsed the sun.

Did you get much done in your garden today?
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2009
5:13 AM

Post #6500640

Went to a couple of garden centers and spent an hour or two on our garden. One frustrating thing was having to look for a gardening knife I'd lost - found at bottom of fifth bag of plant debris I went through.
Find I almost always lose hand tools in the same way; have plant material in my hand as well as the tool and throw both in the bag. Think I'm going to start reducing the number of tools I take to a place, to make it easier to keep track of them. Had already checked at a customer's for that knife. Have always been particularly careful about tools around children.
Hope you get your sunshine tomorrow Sharon. What you're experiencing sounds like England - very green - but often overcast.
Carol loved the cat pictures too.
Was laughing with Carol about you saying you had not decided what to have for lunch with the DG guests. Way to go. Carol would be thinking about
(worrying about) the menu (plus the whole house from top to bottom) five days before.
Had better attend to sleep (let you get some sleep too). Wish it was time to get up and we could start tomorrow now.
Charlie
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
5:25 AM

Post #6500660

Yes, I do find sleep a waste of time.

But sleep well, since it seems I do better when I do, maybe you will too.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2009
2:47 PM

Post #6502020

Hi Sharon, Christi, Ge,
Conscience makes me correct above - Carol only worries about the downstairs, when we have lunch/diner guests. She is very meticulous
and can set a pretty nice table. Her mother was the 'hostess with the mostest', but Carol also had a career - glad she's retired - bit less largely self-imposed stress on her - she really enjoys retirement - me too.
Wish we could mention (maybe even joke about) politics on occasions. Come from a very political background and Carol is very knowledgeable about current politics. On the other hand, talking about limiting stress, it's probably a good idea they've banned political comments from threads. And anyway, gardening has dynamite topics like purple loosestrife and other invasives.
Charlie
Have a good day All.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2009
3:12 PM

Post #6502191

Good morning. Sun is showing for first time in almost 3 weeks. Probably the most difficult 3 weeks of my life. The garden has become a jungle and you can't wade through the house. I really need the sanctity of the garden and the house is never done anyway.

Going to go out and stay out today.

Christi
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
4:05 PM

Post #6502486

Hi All...
Yes, Charlie, retirement is good, but sometimes boring.

Sunshine is peeping through...a good thing since I was threatening to find a big yellow ball and hang it from a tree limb. But some little wrens just took over my bluebird nest and I am so distressed. They did it last year too, they build false nests, then leave, but they also destroy whatever is in their wake. I always have about 3 hatches of bluebirds a year, but that isn't going to happen because the wrens get up earlier than I do, and I simply cannot sleep under or over the bluebird house. They even have the nerve to peck into the bluebird eggs and drop them onto the ground. Mean little things. I fought them off yesterday with a broom, but still, the blue birds have gone away. They will be back, but the cycle will repeat itself no doubt.

I have never ever killed a bird, but those little guys are on my last nerve. Of course I couldn't hurt it, but I could give it a good talking to. Trouble is, they talk right back.

I hope you have a good day in your garden, Christi, gardens are good for the soul, which is why I need to get outside, too.

Charlie, it is a good thing we can't talk politics. I would have been banned from the site a long time ago. We did get a bit vocal about the hackberry and that was fun, and I like loostrife, too, so maybe we can exercise our opinions about flowers and get the soap box thing out of our systems that way.

You all have a good day.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2009
4:45 PM

Post #6502662

I was going to build nesting boxes until I read about the wrens. Forgot where but I read of different things to use for sheild to keep the wrens out. They will even kill a nestling and push it onto the ground.

Had to come in for a drink of cold water. About 40+ years ago we planted two Mimosa trees in the back. They were all the rage then and everybody had them. They grew fast and gave our toddlers someplace to play. Well, they died in about 15 years and we decided no more. That is...until we had two new beds prepared this winter. Now with all the rain there must be a hundred thousand seedlings that have rejuvenated. One more to add to the list of GO AWAY. They also did a sloppy job of the beds and now bermuda grass and St. Augustine grass is coming up in the bed. aaaarrrrrgggghhhh!!!!

Free for the taking:
hackberry
pecan
oaks
mimosa

And a weed that comes back every year that looks like a false poinsettia. Oh, and did I mention four o'clocks. I love them but not everywhere. No way to contain them.

This is the kind of thing that sometimes makes me think of gardening as "work".
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
4:50 PM

Post #6502684

Ahhhhhh, Lou...I love mimosas and 4 o'clocks. I don't want a mimosa, however, because I grew up with one and it drove me crazy because I had to unclog everything it clogged.

4 0'clocks, though, yes...love them.

I am watching this wretched wren carrying sticks up to the bluebird box. Since it has gone this far, I can't save a thing by fighting anymore. I am so upset, those little bluebirds have worked so hard, and I hate to go look and see the destruction. I will see i I can find what to use to deter the wrens. It's early and the bluebirds could return.

This was during better days...

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2009
4:56 PM

Post #6502711

I will try to catch some seeds from the four o'clock for you this fall. They are everywhere.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
5:00 PM

Post #6502726

Rats, the wrens are native and are protected under the Migratory Bird law. Makes me so so angry. And I don't have enough land to move the box far enough away to protect the bluebirds.

And the rains are back. I am going to sit here and pout.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 4, 2009
6:05 PM

Post #6503029

Another spreader is "Love in a Mist"
I'll never plant it again.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 4, 2009
6:11 PM

Post #6503066

Here's what I found. for chickadees
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/Publications/Birdscope/Winter2009/chickadee_tube.html
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
6:46 PM

Post #6503247

I found pretty much the same thing, the wrens attack the bluebird house because it is located too close to my own house. The wrens would not venture far away, so the bb house should be moved, I think. I am afraid I don't have enough land to move it much further, though.

I would rather not have it than watch the wrens destroy the nest. They are so annoying, and make me so angry.

There is a park just a small one a couple of blocks away from my house. I have been thinking about asking the city if I could place a bluebird house there. There are no buildings, but lots of trees with spaces in between. They might have a fighting chance if located away from homes.

Thanks JoAnn.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 4, 2009
8:34 PM

Post #6503706

Wrens here have been menacing the chickadees. I have seen the wrens go into the chic house and pull out their sweet moss and cathair nest. The chicks come back and rebuild.I saw the chicks chaase the wren away yesterday. Have you ever saved dryer lint for birds at nesting time?
We do,Its a riot.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
8:44 PM

Post #6503766

Oh, yes, I have dryer lint hanging from the tree in a net bag that had oranges in it. Done that for years. They fight over it.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2009
11:10 PM

Post #6504385

That's a really good idea. Just now watching three wrens. They are such cute little birds until you find out they are pirates.Explains why their numbers are going up and the other birds are going down.

Raining again.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
11:12 PM

Post #6504392

Raining here too. Again. I picked these iris up off the ground, couldn't bear to leave them there. came from my grandmothers' gardens.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2009
11:19 PM

Post #6504414

So pretty and special. Before it started raining...again...I intended to take pictures of the hybrids I got from Mitch. They are truly breathtaking.

May have stayed out too long today. First time in the 4 weeks I have the crud and now I am coughing my head off again.

It has rained too much and soon there will be none at all.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2009
11:34 PM

Post #6504464

I am anxious to see those blooms, Lou, but not anxious for you to start that cough... again.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 5, 2009
12:12 AM

Post #6504636

The wrens sound very unpleasant. Nature isn't always very kind.
Could do with some rain here. Am pulling apart much of a perennial garden and replanting it. Having to use a hose to water as I do a section.
Love the iris, Sharon.
Look after yourself, Christi.
Keep adding things to my 'will never grow again list', JoAnn. As I've been complaining, have dug up at least, hundreds of puschkinia and chionodoxa (blue) bulb-plants over last week - in three gardens. Am having to pull apart perennials in one garden, in part, to get these bulbs out. Funny thing is I planted the puschkinia and chionodoxa after I heard about them at a lecture. I should really be sueing the speaker.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 5, 2009
9:41 AM

Post #6506166

What a job!!!
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 5, 2009
2:10 PM

Post #6506869

But we're tough! (I think)
Off to fight the good fight.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 5, 2009
9:01 PM

Post #6508812

Ha!!! I just won the battle with the house wrens.

I watched them this morning while I was weeding nearby. My presence did not a thing to deter them, even when I stood and moved around the garden. They were happily stuffing the bluebird house with sticks, long ones, building a false nest since all they were using were those sticks. So...I walked myself over to the bluebird house, and all the time those annoying little creatures were calling me names. I could hear them, just over my right shoulder on the branch behind me.

I took the nails out of the bluebird house, and removed the front cover, made in such a way so that the old nests can be cleaned out after the babies leave. Inside, towering over the original nest were stacks of sticks...multiple sticks. I could see ants in the bottom too, possibly because the eggs had been destroyed. I didn't clean it out yet, I just left the cover off, displaying their handiwork for the world to see.

They jabbered, yelled and screamed little bird curses, but then they went away, and I wish, never to return. I am going to leave the cover off for awhile, letting the wretched ants escape, and hoping it leaves a message to the silly wrens to move on. Then I'll clean it out and move it as far away from the house as I can get. I hate to do that, but I hate the wretched wrens even more.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 5, 2009
10:08 PM

Post #6509111

What we do in the name of justice.
You go girl!
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 5, 2009
10:33 PM

Post #6509226

I certainly second JoAnn's sentiments.
Well done Sharon. Mouthy little psychos aren't they?
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 5, 2009
10:35 PM

Post #6509240

Every 2 seconds, they mouth. I timed them. Shrieking just behind my ear. And those little throat muscles just bellowing. I wanted to smack their little faces, but restrained myself.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 5, 2009
10:51 PM

Post #6509317

Remarkable and commendable restraint.
Actually weeds aren't so bad, because (1) they don't mouth off and (2) you can do them in.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 5, 2009
11:16 PM

Post #6509464

Chuckle, Charlie. I am glad you said that. I haven't laughed today till now!
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 6, 2009
2:24 AM

Post #6510461

Good to laugh, Sharon.
Local horticultural society has their annual plant sale this weekend.
Sure you know - it can be a good place to get certain perennials (phlox, globe thistle, primulas, etc.). Tend to get the kind of plant that has proven useful over time. Don't tend to get invasives, though it helps to be able to recognize invasives if necessary. Only really buy named cultivars now, but always interesting to go.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 6, 2009
3:03 AM

Post #6510680

I wish we had something like that around here, but there are no organizations locally that have much interest in plants. I think sometimes about trying to start a plant group/club or something, because there are lots of lovely gardens around, but I think I might be alone in my efforts.

Take your camera with you, Charlie, so we can enjoy it with you.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 6, 2009
3:50 AM

Post #6510873

I will Sharon.
After that will go to Merlin's Hollow and help my friends sell the plants that payed for the materials for their 3/4 acre garden. The garden has four open days in year (this will be the first one) and has a herbaceous perennial garden, an alpine garden, small pond system, fragrant garden and knot garden. The plants sold are either from the garden or raised from seed by David. The seed comes from international botanizing expeditions which people can pay into to sponsor. He grows plants from northern areas with climates like ours, e.g. Siberia, the Baltic, parts of U.S. and parts of Japan, Korea and China. David is a horticulturalist, landscape architect (retired) and environmentalist and a very interesting person. As you would suspect, a lot of what I know about gardening, I've learned from him. Will see how my camera does there.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 6, 2009
3:59 AM

Post #6510902

Oh wow! Wish I could see that too.
I hope you enjoy every bit of it.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 6, 2009
4:38 AM

Post #6511008

Thanks Sharon,
Let you get some sleep,
Charlie
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 6, 2009
4:58 AM

Post #6511087

Enjoy your tomorrow, Charlie...I am looking forward to hearing all about it.
And remember, I don't waste much time sleeping, so not a problem.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 6, 2009
4:52 PM

Post #6512779

Computer - not so good - having trouble again. Have been disconnecting attachment devices, to try to locate the source of the problem - next thing will be the modem and internet access (will do this week - probably Friday). Had to reboot the thing about four times this morning. Last step will be to take the computer, mouse and power cable in to store together. At least am learning more about computers. Should have problem fixed within a week of next Monday. Store thinks there is nothing wrong with the hardware.
Sale day is Saturday - will know by then whether can use card reader.
Hope all having good weather. In our case could do with some rain - some
areas of gardens beginning to look a bit dry - seems early to need to water.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 8, 2009
4:00 PM

Post #6521880

You all remember the Ice Storm of the Century, right...just a few short months ago. Well...no ice this time, but boy did we have a storm. My already naked trees shed a few more limbs. And I will be playing pick up sticks... again.

And we are under a tornado watch for the remainder of the day. Good grief. It is like this all over the yard, front, back, sides. I am so tired of cleaning my yard. And I thought my house was going to blow away. Sad.

I had moved my house plants outside. They were all over the deck. It has taken me all morning to pick up, clean up, and re pot. Only one small (3') ficus was damaged, though...the other bigger ones were just traumatized a little.

But the irises are on the ground. Again.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 8, 2009
5:11 PM

Post #6522196

What a downer Sharran I am so sorry about the Irises.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 8, 2009
7:35 PM

Post #6522743

Certainly second JoAnn's sentiments about iris.
Glad only minimal damage to house plants.
See you have a brick divider between the lawn and the flower bed. Probably saves edging? Is the yellow the euphorbias?
What is in the bed in front of the yellow?
What's the little tree in the bed?
Sorry for all the questions Sharon, but interested to see what you're growing.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 8, 2009
7:45 PM

Post #6522767

Meant to ask JoAnn,
What's your cat's name?
Know Sharon has Jazz and Daisy.
We have Buddy - we also call Buddy other things when he eats my plants and is then sick on the carpet!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 8, 2009
8:00 PM

Post #6522812

Well, just picked up some major limbs, still storms predicted, but tried to get what was down away from plants. And winds are still blowing.

Don't apologize for asking gardening questions, Charlie, glad to talk about my gardens. The bed you see, edged in brick and stone contains iris, the dread euphorbia, and in front daylilies. It is sort of my nursery in front. When I root cuttings or try new things, I put them there because it is just off my back deck. It needs to be weeded again since the rains seem never to stop.

The small tree is the magnolia I started a few years ago from seed. When we had the ice storm it was knocked down by a bigger limb, and froze to the ice. When I finally got the big limb off it, it popped right back up and now has new growth on it. It is very resilient.

At the top left you can see the edge of another bed, which contains iris, daylilies, and roses. It is a pretty large bed, but can't tell you the exact size. It keeps expanding.

You might not appreciate the assymetry of my flower beds, they just seem to evolve, and sometimes they don't stop.

Here is a photo of the magnolia when it was frozen to the ground, I think. I can't see it very well to know. Could be the wrong one. This was about a week after the storm.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 8, 2009
8:02 PM

Post #6522820

If you look to the left of the lattice and the bluebird house, you'll see the magnolia with the limb over it. Stayed that way till I got help with the limb.

Here it is now with new growth.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 8, 2009
9:51 PM

Post #6523221

Thanks Sharon
Thought those might be the euphorbias.
And those are daylilies - never used to use them, until the lily beetle hit the
oriental lilies - have really got to like daylilies, which I started using in earnest last year.- can't wait to see how they've survived our winter.
Don't have much experience with magnolias - awefully pretty; the only one that is truly hardy in our zone are star magnolia, but others do well in the right spot. Have a 'Dr Merrill' in our garden. Thought could see that leathery sort of leaf that magnolias have - very pretty, even when not in flower.
I'm not one for symmetrical lines - but I suppose planting in 3s, 5s, etc. is about that.
Seasonal contrast very interesting.
Bit frustrating re our card reader - not on: will get some pictures on soon- we now have lots of lungbanes, primulas, anenomes, some barenworts, etc. in flower. Virginia blue bells just coming into bloom. It really strikes me how small (low to the ground) the plants of May are, compared to those of July.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 8, 2009
10:32 PM

Post #6523359

I love bluebells. Barenworts, I am not sure I know. Will have to do a search on that. Maybe I just don't know it's name.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 8, 2009
11:38 PM

Post #6523604

Sharon - I mis-spelled it - barrenwort - 2 'r'. - Epimedium

Think what bumblebees are visiting is red barrenwort, which is in flower. -Epimedium rubrum (x). Have several different hybrids - are partial shade and groundcover plants - is clump-forming (just perfect!) - in this one, the leaves turn red in colder weather.
We also have English bluebells - but they flower much later (I think June).
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2009
1:09 AM

Post #6524025

you just have to send pictures, Charlie.

Had to rescue my blue iris off the driveway...makes me so angry.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2009
1:10 AM

Post #6524036

But the roses made it fine through the storms...

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2009
1:22 AM

Post #6524107

Is this it, Charlie? Or close to it?
Beautiful little plant.

I found this picture in Plant Files.

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 9, 2009
3:32 AM

Post #6524715

That's it Sharon. Just went outside with a flash light to check. I love it when one can be certain. I also keep all plant labels - usually have pictures (have for perhaps ten years) and have them filed. Still can't always be sure when have very similar forms of a species or hybrid. Think 'heritage' is a very useful term when you have an older, tried and true cultivar (e.g. of iris or phlox), but don't know the names. Have been keeping little maps, over last
several years: occasionally also plant cultivars in alphabetical order.
Have just been checking a cowslip type primula, on line and outside with flash light. Just realized can take a bit to Merlin's Hollow tomorrow.
You really have beautiful irises - what a great range of colors - also lovely rose. Just noted today we have a yellow dwarf iris in bloom.
Been having to identify computer problems by not using attachment devices, but will use card reader (pictures) tomorrow.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2009
3:39 AM

Post #6524743

I hope you have a good time tomorrow.

I have an upcoming article some time later on cowslips, it is a bit funny, because the name conjures an unusual image. As a child, I heard it as cow's lips.

I call all my iris 'heirloom', mostly because they are old and were given to me by older folks who are no longer here. I could try to find their names, but that is hard to do when so many look alike and yet when you check their 'birth' date, you find you have had it longer that it has been around.
The sky blue one, for example. It is my newest one, and the only one I have a name for, but during the ice storm, I lost most of my markers, so now I only remember it is something like "Kentucky Girl".

Storms again tonight. I am so tired of storms...aaarrrrgggghhhh. Electrical, too.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 9, 2009
4:23 AM

Post #6524848

Have quite a few 'heirloom' irises myself - in circumstances you refer to.
Have a pretty medium sized yellow and brown iris from Carol's grandmother's cottage, near Timmins, On (way up north). She and her husband were Americans who settled up there (husband the chemist for the Hollinger Gold Mine). Pretty wild country, but they loved the cottage on the lake).
Spent ages trying to identify one iris (as I think I said) - got to admit, it's not worth it.
Look forward to your article; know cowslips have a long history (e.g. Shakespeare) and were important in folklore and folk medicine). Reasonable, for a child to make sense of the word.
Sorry about storms - hope all well.
Will be in touch tomorrow.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2009
6:14 AM

Post #6525053

Here's a yellowish/brown, an old old one. Similar??

Electrical storm, no rain just tons of lightning and thunder. Had my cats scurrying for cover. They have not come back from their hiding places yet either.

It's been a while since I wrote the article on cowslips, but think I probably included it's legend and lore, usually my pattern, if I have a pattern.

So now that I have finished with the thunder storm..think I can sleep in the quiet. It was so loud earlier, and there were sirens (our city uses them as a warning for storms, even at midnight!) that I knew there would be no sleep in that noise.

You all have a good tomorrow!

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2009
8:24 AM

Post #6525137

Hi Charley
I have two Tabby cats(brothers) Ben and Jerry.
I live w/ my DD and SIL and they have a Gray Tiger Angel.
Sharran the wreckage of the TBI's is really sad,glad you could get some cut flowers from the blast.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2009
9:10 AM

Post #6525158

This is Jerry he follows me where ever I go.Wish he could handle a spade.
What good is a cat anyway LOL

Thumbnail by ge1836
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2009
1:40 PM

Post #6525588

Ahhhhh, JoAnne, my sleepless friend. Cats are good for the soul, you know. Lovely landscape you have there behind Jerry.

You must like ice cream!
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 9, 2009
4:31 PM

Post #6526246

Love picture of Jerry, JoAnn - looks like our Buddy, but more trim.
Interesting iris, Sharon - lots of buds.
Glad thunderstorms over - is pouring with rain here - have to see how the open house goes. - cats - maybe 'good for the soul' - but in the case of Buddy, not always good for your sanity. Just picked up a gift that should have stayed in the cat box and he's trying to get more food. But he's faithful, in his way, if not as faithful as Jerry.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2009
4:35 PM

Post #6526262

Chuckle...Buddy's gift.

Jazz has decided the lure of the vase of iris is just too tempting. Disregarding the threat of punishment for being on the table...

I'll have to get a photo before he realizes I am on to him again...

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2009
5:29 PM

Post #6526504

I always tell people who ask the cats names "Ben and Jerry" a household favorite.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2009
5:36 PM

Post #6526523

Oh...look at this...

My iris go to person, PollyK, tells me it is iris tectorum. I have had this one for years and it never bloomed till now. It is very small and I thought when I saw it that it was one of the beardeds just fallen over from the rains. But isn't it pretty!!! I didn't even know it was there, and what a surprise.

For some time I had iris on a side of my house that got lots of sun, but then as trees grew, they were in too much shade. So about 4 years or so ago, I moved them. Every one bloomed, but this one never had. Over the years, my iris have been given to me, so I have no idea where this one came from.

It is also known as Japanese roof iris, because they used to plant it on their thatched roofs.
Interesting history, and I also found that it is highly toxic. It has one more bud, then no more.
I love surprises.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2009
5:38 PM

Post #6526525

Oops, hit send too soon...

Thumbnail by Sharran
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2009
2:08 AM

Post #6528054

Sharon, Have one, that was bought as white, but is blue - very pretty - didn't know about poisonous - Lucky that Buddy has never shown any gustatory interest in irises.
Poured with rain today at Merlin's Hollow - David said they've had nothing like it in the 20 or so years that they have had opened houses. - will get a few pictures of his garden tomorrow.
Have some pictures of spring flowers that have bloomed within the last week in our garden.
Japanese wood poppy.

Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2009
2:11 AM

Post #6528070

Anenome ranunculoides (yellow) and A. apennina (actually lilac)


Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2009
2:13 AM

Post #6528078

dwarf iris


Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2009
2:14 AM

Post #6528086

spring pea

Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2009
2:16 AM

Post #6528097

Lovely show, Charlie...what is the variegated plant to the right of the spring pea?

Great iris, and lovely other blooms, too...Never saw the Japanese wood poppy before.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2009
2:17 AM

Post #6528101

primula (polyantha type)


Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2009
2:24 AM

Post #6528129

Nice primula, too...
You have lots of things blooming, all very very springish.

Off topic, but wonder if anybody needs a new thread? This one might be lengthy for dial uppers, but I don't have dial up so I don't know.

Speak up if anybody wants a new one.
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2009
2:28 AM

Post #6528136

lungbane (Pulmonaria 'Excalibur') Sharon
primula (cowslip type- prob)

Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2009
2:33 AM

Post #6528154

Yes - absolutely Sharon.
Primula (denticulate type)
Blue flower - another lungbane (blue lungwort)

Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2009
2:37 AM

Post #6528173

Finally, currently the tallest perennial plants in the garden - Virginia bluebells



Thumbnail by SunnyBorders
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2009
2:42 AM

Post #6528186

Sharon - The plants you have been mentioning probably say June to us here.
When would you have had these spring plants in bloom?
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2009
2:48 AM

Post #6528225

I am trying to remember, but think our daffs were finished in late March, then tulips in mid April, along with wisteria and rhododendron. So I would say probably yours would be finished at least a month ago.

I usually leave dates on my photos for that very reason.

I will have daylilies blooming very soon, Charlie, and they'll bloom for a long time. They have a few buds now. I also have hollyhocks with lots of buds. So maybe we are about a month or more ahead of you.

Are you saying you need a new thread?
SunnyBorders
Aurora, ON
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2009
2:57 AM

Post #6528261

Looks like you garden for more time in the year than we do - as might expected.
Yes - was going to suggest we need to move to a new thread - not sure what 'dial upper' refers to - but we're having to (scroll?) down a fair way.
Time is 11 p.m. here. What is it where you are?
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2009
2:58 AM

Post #6528268

It's 10 here, so yes, I'll make a new thread.
Hang on and I'll have a link to it here.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2009
3:02 AM

Post #6528275

OK, here we go...
Let's move over to a new slate:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/986578/

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


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